Student news

  • Oxford student Holly Cobb

    Student Stories: Reflections as a young carer

    The journey to Oxford 

  • Professor Irene Tracey

    Hilary term message to Oxford Students from the Vice-Chancellor

    Welcome back to the start of Hilary term! I hope you are settling back into the rhythm of student life now that we’re heading into Week 2. Despite the cold weather, Oxford is looking spectacular with the winter frost and sun, so do enjoy our beautiful parks for some fresh air. I’m new to the job as your Vice-Chancellor, and so here I want to give you a feel for what you can expect from me.  I’m also keen to meet with students (you can find out more at the end of this message about how I plan to do that). 

    My Oxford journey

  • Professor Tim Soutphommasane

    Meet Oxford's new Chief Diversity Officer

    Can you tell us a little bit about your experience to date?

    I’m a political theorist and human rights advocate by background. My research has been concerned with questions of patriotism and multiculturalism. I’ve been especially interested in how national identities evolve to include diversity generated by immigration. More recently I’ve been doing work on anti-racism, and on the impact of COVID on freedoms and political culture.

  • Five students sat together talking - National Student Survey

    10 reasons to complete the National Student Survey

    1. It’s your chance to give your views

    The NSS is a national listening exercise – and all final year undergraduate students across the UK are strongly encouraged to take part. It’s important for you, for future students, for universities, and for the broader higher education landscape of the UK. Give your views, and be part of something big.

    2. It helps us improve what we do for students
    The NSS survey – plus the Student Barometer for all students – give us the opportunity to listen and respond, and to do things better.

  • Oxford’s digital transformation

    A major transformation of the University's processes, culture and technology is underway.

    The Digital Transformation programme will enable Oxford to be digitally fit for the future, making it easier for everyone to study and work here.

  • Professor Irene Tracey

    A message from Professor Irene Tracey, Oxford's new Vice–Chancellor

    Professor Tracey shared this video message with students and staff on 5 January 2023:

  • Exterior of the Clarendon Institute on Walton Street.

    Student stories: Discovering the School of Rare Jewish Languages

    In 2020 I made the jump and left my job at the BBC to read for a DPhil in modern Iranian Jewish history at Oxford. A major pull for me in returning to Oxford’s Oriental Institute for the doctorate was being surrounded by people working on everything from Biblical Hebrew to Classical Mongolian and Armenian under one roof. As an undergraduate I had spent time studying Persian and Urdu and living abroad in Istanbul and Jerusalem. I was looking forward to recapturing some of that variety once I was back at university.

  • TomTokovyi

    Student Stories: Studying as a Clarendon Scholar from Ukraine

    As a typical Ukrainian child, I spent most of my free time playing outdoors and socialising – football was a huge passion of mine. I grew up specialising in learning foreign languages in Bila Tserkva and at the age of 15, I was one of three students from Ukraine to win a full academic scholarship to study A-levels in the UK. Realising I was not going to become the next Andriy Shevchenko in football or the next Steve Kaufmann in foreign languages, I decided to study sciences (Biology, Chemistry, Maths, and Further Maths) at school. 

  • From left to right: Dr Xand van Tulleken, Freshta Karim, Sharmarke Dubow, Erick Moreno Superlano and Natasha Kaplinsky

    Celebrating Oxford's Students of Sanctuary

    Creating a pathway to Oxford

    The world can be an inhospitable place for the millions of people who find themselves displaced or endangered by conflict, persecution, climate change or the violation of their human rights. Only 1% of those affected by displacement go on into higher education.

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