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Oxford and the EU: student Q&As

Page updated 1 September 2021

Implications of the UK's exit from the European Union

The University of Oxford is, and intends to remain, a thriving, cosmopolitan community of scholars and students united in our commitment to education and research. The departure from the EU will not change this; our staff and students from all across the world are as warmly welcome as ever. We have made extensive preparations to mitigate the impact of the UK’s exit from the EU on our students, staff and day-to-day operations.

Trade and cooperation agreement

The United Kingdom and the European Union have concluded a Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) following the UK’s departure from the EU and end of the transition period. The TCA, agreed on 24 December 2020, came into force on 1 January 2021. The Agreement establishes a framework for the future UK-EU relationship and provides for new arrangements on trade, transport and the regulation of goods and services, among others. It confirms that UK institutions will be eligible to participate in the EU’s Horizon Europe, Euratom Research and Training, and Copernicus programmes.

Course fees

As a result of the UK’s decision to leave the EU, most students from the EU who start a programme of study from 2021/22 onwards will pay fees at the ‘Overseas’ rate. Students from the EU, EEA and Switzerland who have been granted settled or pre-settled status under the EU Settlement Scheme may be eligible to pay fees at the Home rate if they meet the residence requirements. Please visit our fee status pages for prospective Undergraduate or Graduate students for more information about this. You may also wish to refer to the detailed guidance published by the UK Council for International Students in May 2021.

Erasmus+ and the Turing Scheme

Following the outcome of the negotiations with the EU, the UK has decided not to participate in the Erasmus+ Scheme (2021-2027). The UK government has launched the Turing Scheme as a replacement programme for study and work abroad in 2021/22. The University is pleased to have secured Turing Scheme funding towards living costs for specific student opportunities in the 2021/22 academic year, spanning a range of departments, with enhanced funding available for students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

The University aims to ensure that its students can continue to enjoy academic placements abroad, taking advantage of the strong international links Oxford already has with leading academic institutions across the globe. 

The latest advice on the UK's departure from the EU can be found on the tabs on this page. This information is correct at the time of writing on the basis of current UK Government and EU policy. It will be updated as new advice is issued.

For all current students

What will happen to my healthcare rights?

For UK students studying in EU/EEA
(NB: EU students should refer to the ‘For current EU students’ section)

The UK has introduced a new UK Global Health Insurance Card (GHIC) which will provide access to state healthcare in Europe at a reduced cost or for free. If you have rights under the Withdrawal Agreement you can also apply for EHIC as explained on the UK Government website

If you have an existing EHIC it will remain valid until it expires. You are advised to take the following steps:

  • Ensure that you have a valid up to date European Health Insurance Card (EHIC); 
  • If your EHIC has expired, you should apply for a new GHIC if you are a UK student or apply for a new EHIC card if you are an EU student; AND
  • Ensure your insurance includes adequate healthcare cover for any period studying/working away from your home country

You are advised not to rely only on EHIC or GHIC rights at any point, as this is not an alternative to travel insurance. Further information is available on the Government website.  

You should ensure that you stay up-to-date with the information on this page and healthcare information available via the UK Government website. You will need to consult this Government webpage for each individual EU country you may be residing in.

I am a postgraduate working with a research team funded by an ongoing Horizon 2020 grant. What will happen to this funding?

All Horizon 2020 grants will continue to receive funding from the European Commission until the project end date.

Where can I find more information on the Government’s position?

The UK Government has a dedicated transition period hub with further information about the UK’s exit from the EU.  

 

For current EU students

Will my immigration status change?

If you were living in the UK before 31 December 2020, you should have applied under the EU Settlement Scheme if you wished to stay beyond 30 June 2021. The Government has said they may accept late applications if you can provide a valid reason why you did not apply before the deadline. If you are granted pre-settled or settled status under the scheme you will not need a student visa.

If you have not been granted a settled or pre-settled status, you will need to obtain a Student visa before you can come to the UK. This will require a visa application fee of £348 and to pay the immigration health surcharge of £470 times the number of years of your course, all paid in advance. See the student visa webpages for further information.

What course fees will I be charged? 

Fee status regulations changed in 2021 as a result of the UK’s exit from the EU. Your fee status will have been assessed in line with the current regulations at the time of your application, and confirmed to you as part of the admissions process. Once your fee status has been set, this will usually remain the same for the duration of your course.

Fees will only increase during your course in accordance with the information on changes to fees and charges set out in the applicable version of the University’s terms and conditions (see Your contract with the University page).

You can find specific course fees via our  Fees, Funding and Scholarships search and general information on fees on our Course Fees pages.

What will happen to my healthcare rights?

If you are a citizen of an EEA/EU country or Switzerland and were living in the UK before 31 December 2020, you can continue to use the NHS. If you wish to remain residing in the UK and to maintain your entitlement to free NHS healthcare after 30 June 2021, you would have needed to apply to the EU Settlement Scheme before that date. The Government has said they may accept late applications if you can provide a valid reason why you did not apply before the deadline. More information about healthcare is available on the UK Government website.

If you arrive in the UK after 1 January 2021, your student visa application will include an immigration health surcharge to allow you to access the NHS.

Under the Common Travel Area, Irish citizens living in the UK will continue to access healthcare in the UK on the same terms as a UK resident.

You are advised not to rely only on EHIC or GHIC rights at any point, as this is not an alternative to travel insurance.  

You should ensure that you stay up-to-date with the information on this page and healthcare information available via the Government's Foreign travel advice page. You will need to consult this Government webpage for each individual EU country you may be residing in.

I am on either a six year, or accelerated graduate-entry medical course. How will my fee status be affected?

Fee status regulations changed in 2021 as a result of the UK’s exit from the EU. Your fee status will have been assessed in line with the current regulations at the time of your application, and confirmed to you as part of the admissions process. Once your fee status has been set, this will usually remain the same for the duration of your course. Further information for students on the six-year medicine course in 2020/21 or earlier:

-         Under current Government regulations, if you transfer to another medical school for your clinical study, we expect you will continue to be charged fees relevant to your existing fee status

-         If you are registered on a different Oxford programme between the pre-clinical and clinical sections of your course, your fee status for the intercalated course will be assessed based on the situation, and the Government regulations, at the time. When you return for the clinical stage of the medical course, you will resume with your original fee rates

For more information about fees, see the Changes to Fees and Charges pages of the Fees and Funding website and consult the applicable version of the University’s terms and conditions (see Your contract with the University pages).

Can I apply for student loan support?

Eligible undergraduate and postgraduate EU students who  are continuing on an eligible course in the 2021/22 academic year, will be able to apply for student loan support for the duration of their course provided that they meet the residency requirements.

EU, other EEA, and Swiss Nationals who commenced their course in the 2021/22 academic year will only be eligible for undergraduate or postgraduate student loan support from the UK Government if they have UK citizens’ rights (i.e. if they have pre-settled or settled status, or if they are an Irish citizen covered by the Common Travel Area arrangement).

The support you can access from the government will depend on your residency status.

For further information please refer to the Student Finance eligibility criteria and the UK government’s Education Hub FAQs page.

Will my UKRI research council funding be affected?

If you are a current recipient of UKRI research council funding please refer to your funding offer letter for the full terms and conditions of your award, which will be made based on your eligibility and fee status at the time of application for the funding.

 More information on UKRI funding is available on the Research Councils tab on the Oxford funding webpage.

Where can I find further information and advice on studying in the UK following the UK's departure from the European Union?

Please refer to the UKCISA website for up to date information and advice on studying in the UK.

For current undergraduates with a compulsory year abroad

I am on a compulsory year abroad or due to undertake a year abroad during 2021/22. What action do I need to take?

Following the outcome of the UK’s negotiations with the EU, the UK has opted not to participate in the new Erasmus+ Scheme (2021-2027). The UK government has launched the Turing Scheme as a replacement programme for study and work abroad. 

The University is pleased to have secured Turing Scheme funding towards living costs for specific student opportunities in the 2021/22 academic year, spanning a range of departments, with enhanced funding available for students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

The University is in contact with students taking part in international activities eligible for Erasmus+ funding or Turing Scheme funding in 2021/22, to confirm further details about their entitlement.

You should continue with your year abroad arrangements, noting the following:

  • If you are currently undertaking, or are due to undertake activity in the EU supported by the Erasmus+ or Turing scheme (an Assistantship, a study exchange, or work placement(s))(where this is possible in view of the various Covid-19 related restrictions), your funding arrangements will continue as planned.
  • If you are in receipt of UK Government support (i.e. via Student Finance agencies) or Oxford funding, this is unaffected by the UK’s departure from the EU.
  • You should check the UK Government’s travel advice website and the relevant country's embassy website, for specific entry requirements for the country you are visiting
  • We also recommend that you check the links available via this page on the UK Government website for the latest information on year abroad arrangements which may be impacted by the Coronavirus pandemic. You should ensure that you revisit this information as close to any dates of travel as possible. This includes when you travel between EU countries and, or when travelling between the EU and the UK. 
  • You will be contacted by your faculty directly to confirm any change in requirements, and if additional information is made available that is likely to impact on your year abroad arrangements.
  • As advised by your faculty, you are expected to have obtained insurance for your Year Abroad and should make sure that the insurance you have in place includes adequate healthcare cover for any period studying/working away from the UK. UK citizens should make sure that they have a valid European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) or apply for a new UK Global Health Insurance Card (GHIC) before travelling. You are advised not to rely only on EHIC or GHIC rights at any point, as this is not an alternative to travel insurance.
  • You should also ensure that you have completed a risk assessment for your Year Abroad with particular focus on potential COVID-19 related disruption, and returned this to the faculty for their validation. Please stay up-to-date with the information on this page and healthcare information available via the UK government's ‘Foreign travel advice’ and ‘Healthcare for UK nationals visiting the EU’ web pages. You will need to consult this information for each individual EU country you may be residing in.

Will I now need a visa or permit to study or work in the EU?

For travel to most European countries you will need at least 6 months of validity left on your UK passport. You may also need a visa to work or study in your chosen destination and it is essential that you check, in advance, the local entry requirements that will apply when travelling to your intended placement or returning to a continuing placement. Please visit the UK government's ‘Foreign travel advice’ webpage, click on your host country, and review the information under “Entry Requirements”. In most cases this will direct you to the website of the relevant national embassy for specific guidance on the visa application process. 

Please bear in mind that having fulfilled the visa requirements for travel to your host country, once you arrive, there may be associated validation or residence permit requirements that must be fulfilled within a fixed time period in order for you to remain legally in the country.

Will I be able to access healthcare in my host country? Is my EHIC card sufficient?

You need to obtain insurance for your year abroad and should make sure that the insurance you have in place includes adequate healthcare cover for any period studying/working away from the UK. UK citizens should also make sure that they have a valid European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) or apply for a new UK Global Health Insurance Card (GHIC) before travelling. You are advised not to rely only on EHIC or GHIC rights at any point, as this is not an alternative to travel insurance. Further information is available on the Government website

You should also ensure that you have completed a risk assessment for your Year Abroad with particular focus on potential COVID-19 related disruption, and returned this to the faculty for their validation.

Please stay up-to-date with the information on this page and the healthcare information available via the UK government's ‘Foreign travel advice’ and ‘Healthcare for UK nationals visiting the EU’ web pages. You will need to consult this information for each individual EU country you may be residing in.

The University is closely monitoring the advice from the UK Government and other parties about the UK’s departure from the EU. Your faculty will ensure you are informed of any further developments about any impact on year abroad arrangements as information is released.   

I will be on a compulsory year abroad in 2022/23. What should I do?

You should make plans for your year abroad as usual while staying up to date with guidance provided by your faculty and any further guidance published by the University as it becomes available, noting the following:

Following the outcome of the UK’s negotiations with the EU, the UK has opted not to participate in the new Erasmus+ Scheme (2021-2027). The UK government has launched the Turing Scheme as a replacement programme for study and work abroad.

Turing Scheme funding has been secured for the 2021/22 academic year. The University plans to bid for further funding at the next available opportunity in order to support future academic years, and will update its Turing scheme webpage as information becomes available.

The University aims to ensure that its students can continue to enjoy academic placements abroad, benefiting from our longstanding partnerships with European institutions.

The University is closely monitoring the advice from the UK Government and other parties about the UK’s departure from the EU. Your faculty will ensure you are informed of any further developments about any impact on year abroad arrangements as information is released.

Prospective students - starting in the academic year 2022/23

The University is committed to welcoming and supporting EU students in the long term.

Further information for prospective students will be added to this section on a rolling basis as additional information is released by the UK Government. 

What course fees will I be charged in the academic year 2022/23?

EU students starting a course in 2022/23 will normally be charged the ‘Overseas’ fee rate. Students from the EU, EEA and Switzerland who have been granted settled or pre-settled status under the EU Settlement Scheme may be eligible to pay fees at the Home rate if they meet the residence requirements. Irish nationals living in the UK or Ireland will be charged fees at the ‘Home’ rate for the duration of their course, subject to residence requirements. Please visit our fee status pages for prospective Undergraduate or Graduate students for more information about this. You may also wish to refer to the detailed guidance published by the UK Council for International Students in May 2021. 

More information will be published on this page as it is confirmed by the Government.  

Course fees information for the academic year 2022/23 is available via our Fees, Funding and Scholarships Search for undergraduate and graduate students and on course pages.

The course fees are outlined in your Course Information Sheet and offer letter (if applicable), and governed by the applicable version of the University’s terms and conditions. Information on changes to fees and charges in subsequent years for students who start in 2022/23 is available on our website and will also be available in the applicable version of the University’s terms and conditions.

Will I be able to apply for student loan support?

For courses starting on or after 1 August 2021, the UK government has confirmed that EU, other EEA, and Swiss Nationals will only be eligible for student finance from the UK Government if they have UK citizens’ rights (i.e. if they have pre-settled or settled status, or if they are an Irish citizen covered by the Common Travel Area arrangement).

Student Finance England will ask such students to provide evidence of their eligibility in order to be awarded undergraduate or postgraduate student loan support.

The support you can access from the government will depend on your residency status.

For further information please refer to the Student Finance eligibility criteria and the UK government’s Education Hub FAQs page.

Will University bursary provision for undergraduates be affected?

As most EU students are no longer eligible for Home fee status or student finance from the UK Government, they are no longer eligible to be assessed for bursary support from Oxford.

Republic of Ireland (ROI) nationals living in the UK or Ireland, and other students from the EU, EEA and Switzerland who have been granted settled or pre-settled status under the EU Settlement Scheme may qualify for Home fee status and student finance from the UK government, and therefore they may also be eligible for an Oxford Bursary, if they meet the residence requirements.

Will Oxford University scholarship funding provision be affected?

The changes announced by the UK Government will have an impact on the eligibility criteria for some University scholarship funding. However, the University has a wide range of graduate scholarships, covering all fees statuses, nationalities and courses, for example, the Clarendon Fund for which all full-time and part-time DPhil and Master’s offer holders are eligible to be considered. A small number of undergraduate scholarships are available. More information on funding is available on the undergraduate scholarships page and on the graduate applicant funding pages.

Will UKRI Research Council funding be affected?

UKRI has confirmed that research councils will be able to award postgraduate studentships to both home and international students, now including EU, from 2021/22 onwards. Awards will include fees (up to that research council’s UK rate) and living stipend. There is a cap of 30% on non-UK awards.

 More information is available on the Research Councils tab on the Oxford funding webpage.

Will I be able to participate in the Erasmus+ programme?

The UK government has confirmed that the UK will no longer participate in the Erasmus+ Scheme. The UK has introduced the Turing Scheme, and the University is pleased to have secured Turing Scheme funding towards living costs for specific student opportunities in the 2021/22 academic year. The University aims to ensure that its students can continue to enjoy academic placements abroad, taking advantage of the strong international links Oxford already has with leading academic institutions across the globe. The University plans to bid for further funding at the next available opportunity in order to support future academic years, and will update this page as information becomes available. 

Will I need a student visa?

If you do not have settled or pre-settled status under the EU Settlement Scheme you will need a student visa.  A new Student Route was launched on 5 October 2020 for EU, EEA and Swiss students starting from 1 January 2021 onwards and further details are on the student visa webpages. This will require a visa application fee of £348 and to pay the immigration health surcharge of £470 times the number of years of your course, all paid in advance. 

Where can I find more information on applying for graduate study from the EU?

We are as committed as ever to welcoming the brightest students from all over the world for graduate study at Oxford and around two-thirds of Oxford's graduate students come from outside the UK. If you are interested in graduate study for a start in the 2022-23 academic year, check the Graduate Admissions website. The website includes detailed information on courses, fees, scholarships, and much more. Our international pages include guidance and advice including more detail about international qualifications, English language requirements and visas and immigration.

For UK national students starting in the academic year 2022/23 who have been living in the EEA, Switzerland or Gibraltar and will return to England to study

UK nationals who have been living in the EEA, Switzerland or Gibraltar and are returning to England to study

UK nationals living in the EEA, Switzerland or Gibraltar from December 2020 until the first day of their course and for the three years before the first day of their course will also be charged Home fees. Children of UK nationals will also be eligible on the same terms, even if they are not themselves UK nationals, as long as both they and their parent meet the above criteria.

More information on this can be found on the Graduate fee status page and the Undergraduate fee status page

Where can I find further information and advice on studying in the UK following the UK's departure from the European Union?

Please refer to the UKCISA website for up to date information and advice on studying in the UK.

The University understands that there are other questions to which many students, applicants and offer holders seek answers, such as access to the NHS and post-study right to work. The University will update this page as UK and EU negotiations advance.