MSc in Modern South Asian Studies | University of Oxford
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MSc in Modern South Asian Studies

About the course

The MSc in Modern South Asian Studies is a new 12-month, taught master's course, offered jointly by the Faculty of Oriental Studies and the Oxford School of Global and Area Studies (OSGA). You will study this important region, with its rich history and its complex present-day societies, from a number of disciplinary and analytical perspectives, culminating in a 12,000-word thesis.

The MSc in Modern South Asian Studies is an exciting degree bringing together Oxford’s wealth of expertise on South Asia in a single programme. Students gain access to teaching and expert supervision across departments in the Social Sciences and Humanities Divisions.  They receive rigorous training in one of three tailored modules in research methods, and subject to timetabling, may have the opportunity to build in Hindi, Urdu, Old Hindi, Persian, Gujarati, Bengali, Marathi or other language training. Students may pursue any combination of interests, including history, literature, language, religion, economy and interstate relations.

The MSc in Modern South Asian Studies comprises five components: the core course, a module in research methods, two option papers and the thesis. All students attend the core course, introducing modern South Asia across the disciplines. Delivered by faculty members with a range of specialisations, the course explores both individual states within the region and the connections and comparisons between them.

You will receive training in research methods through one of the following specially tailored programmes:

  • research methods for area studies, both qualitative and quantitative
  • qualitative and historical methods
  • qualitative methods: literature and language

You will also choose two option papers. For a full list of option papers, please see the course pages on the department website. Please note that the options will change from time to time, and not all will be run every year.

Students with at least an intermediate or colloquial knowledge of any South Asian language also have the opportunity to take less intensive language training either continuing at an advanced level or beginning a new language. Students interested in taking Persian, either at advanced or beginner level, are asked to flag this in their personal statement.

During the course of the year, you will select a topic for your 12,000 word thesis and receive expert supervision.

The MSc is jointly taught by staff within the Social Science and Humanities Divisions, who will also assess your application. The application process is administered by the Oxford School of Global and Area Studies.

Students on the course will experience a variety of teaching modes, including lectures, seminars, classes, student presentations, and small group teaching. Supervision for the thesis will be offered as a series of individual meetings between you and your thesis supervisor.

You will be required to gather relevant materials for your thesis during the course, usually by working in libraries and archives in the UK but potentially also via fieldwork. 

Assessment is through a combination of coursework, assessed essays, written examinations and the thesis.  

Graduate destinations

The department aims to equip its graduates with a range of valuable skills which will enable them to compete successfully within a number of different careers - in the civil service and policy-making bodies in Britain, Europe and further afield, in non-governmental organisations concerned with development, in the charitable sector, in journalism, public and private sector research and consultancy, law and academia. The MSc is a valuable preparation for students wishing to go on to doctoral research.

Other courses in this area

Changes to the course

The University will seek to deliver this course in accordance with the description set out in this course page. However, there may be situations in which it is desirable or necessary for the University to make changes in course provision, either before or after registration. For further information, please see our page on changes to courses.

Entry requirements for entry in 2019-20

Within equal opportunities principles and legislation, applications will be assessed in the light of an applicant’s ability to meet the following entry requirements:

1. Academic ability

Proven and potential academic excellence

Applicants are normally expected to be predicted or have achieved a first-class or strong (ie top third) upper second-class undergraduate degree with honours (or equivalent international qualifications), as a minimum, in any discipline.

However, entrance is very competitive and most successful applicants have a first-class degree or the equivalent.

For applicants with a degree from the USA, the minimum GPA sought is 3.7 out of 4.0.

The admissions board will consider the entire application and any qualifications beyond the minimum bachelor's degree will be taken into account. These may include a master's degree or professional qualifications.

If you hold non-UK qualifications and wish to check how your qualifications match these requirements, you can contact the National Recognition Information Centre for the United Kingdom (UK NARIC).

No Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or GMAT scores are sought.

Other appropriate indicators will include:

Supporting documents

You will be required to supply supporting documents with your application, including references and an official transcript. See 'How to apply' for instructions on the documents you will need and how these will be assessed.

Performance at interview(s)

Interviews are not normally held as part of the admissions process. 

Publications

Publications are not required but should be listed in your CV/résumé if this may help indicate the quality of the application. These may be academic works, journalism, blogs or other such writings.

Other qualifications, evidence of excellence and relevant experience

Evidence of prior interest in South Asia, including research or working experience in one or more countries of the region, is an advantage.

2. English language requirement

Applicants whose first language is not English are usually required to provide evidence of proficiency in English at the higher level required by the University.

3. Availability of supervision, teaching, facilities and places

The following factors will govern whether candidates can be offered places:

  • The ability of the Faculty of Oriental Studies and the Oxford School of Global and Area Studies (OSGA) to provide the appropriate supervision, research opportunities, teaching and facilities for your chosen area of work. 
  • Minimum and maximum limits to the numbers of students who may be admitted to Oxford's research and taught programmes.

The provision of supervision, where required, is subject to the following points:

  • The allocation of graduate supervision is the responsibility of the Faculty of Oriental Studies and the Oxford School of Global and Area Studies (OSGA) and it is not always possible to accommodate the preferences of incoming graduate students to work with a particular member of staff. 
  • Under exceptional circumstances a supervisor may be found outside the Faculty of Oriental Studies and the Oxford School of Global and Area Studies (OSGA).

All students are assigned a general supervisor at the start of term, who is usually a member of the core teaching staff on the MSc in Modern South Asian Studies. The role of the general supervisor is to guide you through your course of study and assist you with written assessments. If your research interests fall outside the expertise of your general supervisor, they will assist you in identifying appropriate expertise within the university, and help you approach suitable scholars for supervision.

Depending on the range of your research interests, therefore, it is possible for you to have more than one supervisor - a general supervisor who oversees your general academic progress, and a different supervisor for your thesis. Your supervisor(s) will discuss your progress, give you feedback on drafts (no more than one full draft per assessment) and answer any questions before you submit work to Examination Schools.

Where possible your academic supervisor will not change for the duration of your course. However, it may be necessary to assign a new academic supervisor during the course of study or before registration for reasons which might include sabbatical leave, maternity leave or change in employment.

4. Disability, health conditions and specific learning difficulties

Students are selected for admission without regard to gender, marital or civil partnership status, disability, race, nationality, ethnic origin, religion or belief, sexual orientation, age or social background.

Decisions on admission are based solely on the individual academic merits of each candidate and the application of the entry requirements appropriate to the course.

Further information on how these matters are supported during the admissions process is available in our guidance for applicants with disabilities.

5. Assessors

All recommendations to admit a student involve the judgment of at least two members of academic staff with relevant experience and expertise, and additionally must be approved by the Director of Graduate Studies or Admissions Committee (or equivalent departmental persons or bodies).

Admissions panels or committees will always include at least one member of academic staff who has undertaken appropriate training.

6. Other information

Whether you have yet secured funding is not taken into consideration in the decision to make an initial offer of a place, but please note that the initial offer of a place will not be confirmed until you have completed a Financial Declaration.

If you wish to transfer from the MSc to the MPhil in Modern South Asian Studies then you must apply to do so by noon on Monday of Week 4 of Hilary term. You will need the support of your supervisors, and must satisfy the Teaching Committee that you have good reasons for wishing to change and well thought out plans for the second year of the MPhil including the thesis.

In the case of students who require specific help to adjust to an academic programme or to a new range of skills, the supervisor will work with them to ensure that they have additional support.

Resources

Since the MSc is taught jointly by staff within the Social Sciences and Humanities Divisions, students will be part of a larger community of teachers, researchers and students with interests in South Asia.  There are some 60 academics in Humanities and Social Sciences with South Asia research interests in Oxford.

For parts of the research methods course, you will be taught alongside those studying for other MSc courses offered by the Oxford School of Global and Area Studies (OSGA), as well as students taking the MPhil in Modern South Asian Studies and doctoral students, opening up further possibilities for interdisciplinary learning and exchange.

For students who already have a grounding in a South Asian language, there are opportunities to proceed to an advanced level and to develop reading skills to attain a research proficiency.

You will have access to the libraries, study spaces, common rooms and IT facilities of the Oxford School of Global and Area Studies, and of the Faculty of Oriental Studies, as well as to the social and networking events organised by these two university centres.

The Bodleian Libraries offer unparalleled library and archive facilities for South Asia, including one of the richest collections of official archival materials on South Asia in the UK. The main reference collection is accessed via the Charles Wendell David Reading Room at the Weston Library. Other important open shelf collections can be found in the Upper Camera, the Oriental Institute Library and the Social Science Library. Students may access other Bodleian Libraries sites as necessary. 

Oxford also offers a wealth of resources for the study of South Asian art and material culture. The Ashmolean Museum contains collections encompassing art from the Islamic world, the Indian subcontinent and South-East Asia. The Pitt Rivers Museum holds important collections of ethnographic material from India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Tibet, Nepal and Sri Lanka. The Museum of the History of Science houses an unrivalled collection of historic scientific instruments, including astrolabes and other instruments, with Persian, Arabic or Sanskrit inscriptions, manufactured by artisans in India.

Oxford IT Services supports university members in their study and library use, helping students to get the most from their courses in state-of-the-art IT learning rooms. Some of the MSc module convenors will also make use of the University's online sharing platform, known as Canvas, where selected course readings are made available.

In addition to the faculties and departments who share in teaching for the MSc, Oxford contains outstanding collegiate centres for study and research in relation to South Asia and its many regions, at Wolfson College, Somerville College and St Antony’s College. Research seminars at these collegiate centres are open to all students.

Funding

There are over 1,000 full graduate scholarships available across the University, and these cover your course fees and provide a grant for living costs. If you apply by the relevant January deadline and fulfil the eligibility criteria you will be automatically considered. Over two thirds of Oxford scholarships require nothing more than the standard course application. Use the Fees, funding and scholarship search to find out which scholarships you are eligible for and if they require an additional application, full details of which are provided.

Further information about scholarships and funding opportunities available through this academic department and for this course (if applicable) can be found on the department's website. These may include Grand Union DTP ESRC studentships and the Ertegun Scholarship Programme. In order to be considered for these awards you will need to complete the scholarships section of the course application form and submit additional supporting material. The studentships’ webpage and the Ertegun Scholarships Programme website provide more details about the application process for each, as well as any eligibility criteria that may apply.

Costs

Annual fees for entry in 2019-20

Fee status

Annual Course fees

Home/EU (including Islands)£16,415
Overseas£23,950

The fees shown above are the annual course fees for this course, for entry in the stated academic year.

Course fees cover your teaching as well as other academic services and facilities provided to support your studies. Unless specified in the additional information section below, course fees do not cover your accommodation, residential costs or other living costs. They also don’t cover any additional costs and charges that are outlined in the additional information below. You may have seen separate figures in the past for tuition fees and college fees. We have now combined these into a single figure.

Course fees are payable each year, for the duration of your fee liability (your fee liability is the length of time for which you are required to pay course fees). For courses lasting longer than one year, please be aware that fees will usually increase annually. For details, please see our guidance on likely increases to fees and charges.

For more information about course fees and fee liability, please see the Fees section of this website. EU applicants should refer to our dedicated webpage for details of the implications of the UK’s plans to leave the European Union.

Additional information

There are no compulsory elements of this course that entail additional costs beyond fees and living costs. However, please note that, depending on your choice of research topic and the research required to complete it, you may incur additional expenses, such as travel expenses, research expenses, and field trips. You will need to meet these additional costs, although you may be able to apply for small grants from your department and/or college to help you cover some of these expenses. Standard travel insurance can be provided by the University. However, students may be required to pay any additional insurance premiums associated with travel to areas with an increased level of risk, and should factor this into their planning for fieldwork.

Living costs

In addition to your course fees, you will need to ensure that you have adequate funds to support your living costs for the duration of your course.

For the 2019-20 academic year, the range of likely living costs for full-time study is between c. £1,058 and £1,643 for each month spent in Oxford. Full information, including a breakdown of likely living costs in Oxford for items such as food, accommodation and study costs, is available on our living costs page. When planning your finances for any future years of study in Oxford beyond 2019-20, you should allow for an estimated increase in living expenses of 3% each year.

How to apply

You are not expected to contact academic members of the department before or after applying but may do so for various reasons such as advice on refining the application, to discuss research topics, or for recommended reading to prepare for the course. 

The set of documents you should send with your application to this course comprises the following:

Official transcript(s)

Your transcripts should give detailed information of the individual grades received in your university-level qualifications to date. You should only upload official documents issued by your institution and any transcript not in English should be accompanied by a certified translation.

More information about the transcript requirement is available in the Application Guide.

CV/résumé

A CV/résumé is compulsory for all applications. Most applicants choose to submit a document of one to two pages highlighting their academic achievements and any relevant professional experience.

Statement of purpose/personal statement:
Around 500 words

The statement of purpose should be written in English and indicate your motivation for applying to the MSc. It could include some of the following:

  • what motivated your interest in India or South Asia
  • why you want to apply for the MSc
  • what particular aspects of the course interest you
  • how the course will help you in your future career
  • whether you hope to study further (perhaps progressing to a PhD/DPhil)
  • if you have a topic of interest to research for the extended thesis.  

The department is not just looking for those of excellent academic potential but also those who will make a significant contribution to the small group teaching and learning experience in Oxford.

This will be assessed for:

  • your reasons for applying
  • your relevant academic experience
  • evidence of motivation for and understanding of the proposed area of study
  • how your MSc will help you in your future career.

Written work:
Two essays of 2,000 words each

Essays (usually academic) or other writing samples, written in English, are required. These should be examples of your best written work and need not be related to South Asia. Academic work is preferred to other forms of writing such as journalism, business reports or reportage, but you should include what you have available.   

Extracts of the requisite length from longer work are also permissible as long as the context is made clear.  The word count does not need to include any bibliography or brief footnotes.

This will be assessed for your understanding of a research question, the ability to construct and defend an argument, the use of evidence where relevant, powers of analysis and expression, and capacity to produce a scholarly text.

References/letters of recommendation:
Three overall, generally academic

Whilst you must register three referees, the department may start the assessment of your application if two of the three references are submitted by the course deadline and your application is otherwise complete. Please note that you may still be required to ensure your third referee supplies a reference for consideration.

Three academic references are encouraged, though if necessary you may use one professional reference of the three references required overall provided that it is relevant to the course.

Your references will support your intellectual ability, academic achievement, and motivation. 

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