National Study Investigates Long-term Health Impacts of COVID-19 | University of Oxford

National Study Investigates Long-term Health Impacts of COVID-19

7 July 2020

A major UK research study - PHOSP-COVID, will investigate the long-term health impacts of COVID-19 on hospitalised patients.

Awarded £8.4 million jointly by UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), the PHOSP-COVID study is one of a number of COVID-19 studies that have been given urgent public health research status by the Department of Health and Social Care. Led by the NIHR Leicester Biomedical Research Centre (BRC) but with sub-leads from Oxford, the study will draw on expertise from a consortium of leading researchers and clinicians from across the UK to assess the impact of COVID-19 on patient health and their recovery.

The Oxford teams have leading roles in multi-organ imaging, mental health and lung disease. The study involves an important collaboration between the two Trusts (Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust), the two NIHR Biomedical Research Centres (Oxford BRC and Oxford Health BRC), and the University of Oxford. More than 50 doctors and researchers will work together in Oxford to provide for the clinical care and research into the post COVID-19 sequelae and contribute to the better health of the nation, applying world-class science.

Professor John Geddes, Director of the NIHR Oxford Health BRC, and lead for the mental health component of the study, said, “We know that mental health and neurological problems are quite common after viral infections and so it is very important that these are being assessed alongside other health outcomes. We will then be able to develop and test new ways of preventing and treating these problems to make sure that people recover as quickly as possible. We are very grateful for a generous gift from the Duke of Westminster which has enabled us to start the research very quickly.”

Professor Keith Channon, Deputy Head of Medical Sciences Division (Research) and Director of Oxford Academic Health Partners, said, “Oxford’s cardiovascular imaging experts will help to lead the PHOSP-COVID work to understand the consequences of COVID-19 for heart and circulatory diseases. These workstreams have also been designated as national flagship projects by the British Heart Foundation, so we are delighted to contribute scientific leadership to this important consortium.”

Professor Helen McShane, Director of the NIHR Oxford BRC, said, “I am delighted that the two Oxford Biomedical Research Centres are working hand in hand on this important study, to investigate the multi-organ and mental health sequelae of infection with COVID-19, utilising our expertise in multi-modal imaging. We look forward to working with colleagues in Leicester, London and around the country on this very timely study.”

Professor Meghana Pandit, Chief Medical Officer at Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, said, “The results of this research will be crucial for our understanding of the longer term effects of COVID-19. I am really pleased that our patients will be able to benefit from this research which is made possible by the close working of the NHS and the University of Oxford through the BRC.”

Professor Ling-Pei Ho, Chair, NIHR Respiratory Translational Research Collaboration, said, “This is a fantastic opportunity to work together across the country to integrate clinical care and scientific research; and also with the extensive expertise in the Oxford BRC. Oxford will apply its world-class science to a huge clinical need and translate this to greater mechanistic understanding of disease.”

Health and Social Care Secretary Matt Hancock said, “As we continue our fight against this global pandemic, we are learning more and more about the impact the disease can have not only on immediate health, but longer-term physical and mental health too.

“This world-leading study is another fantastic contribution from the UK's world-leading life sciences and research sector. It will also help to ensure future treatment can be tailored as much as possible to the person.”

Around 10,000 patients are expected to take part, making it the largest comprehensive study in the world to understand and improve the health of survivors after hospitalisation from COVID-19.

Symptoms of COVID-19 have varied among those who have tested positive: some have displayed no symptoms, while others have developed severe pneumonia and sadly even lost their lives. For those who were hospitalised and have since been discharged it is not yet clear what the medical, psychological and rehabilitation needs for this group of patients will be to enable them to make as full a recovery as possible.

Patients on the study will be assessed using techniques such as advanced imaging, data collection and analysis of blood and lung samples, creating a comprehensive picture of the impact COVID-19 has had on longer-term health outcomes across the UK.

The PHOSP-COVID team will then develop trials of new strategies for clinical care including personalised treatments for groups of patients based on the particular disease characteristics they show as a result of having COVID-19 to improve their long-term health.

This study is widely supported across the NIHR infrastructure, including the Translational Research Collaborations for respiratory, mental health, cardiovascular, dementia, and diet, exercise and nutrition, and many of the NIHR Biomedical Research Centres, which are set up to translate lab-based scientific breakthroughs into potential new treatments, diagnostics and medical technologies.

For further information, please contact: Genevieve Juillet, Media Relations Manager (Research and Innovation), University of Oxford, gen.juillet@admin.ox.ac.uk, phone 01865 280534

Notes to editors:

To follow the study as it develops, visit www.phosp.org

The University Department of Psychiatry’s mission is to conduct world-class research, teach psychiatry to medical students, develop future researchers in a graduate programme, teach doctors in training, promote excellence in clinical practice, and develop and provide innovative clinical services. It supports research in four key areas: neurobiology, psychological treatments, developmental psychiatry and social psychiatry. The Department is committed to the translation of scientific discovery into benefits for patients. www.psych.ox.ac.uk

Funding for the University of Oxford’s coronavirus research is crucial to the development of a vaccine and the subsequent delivery of effective drugs to combat this new virus. Unprecedented speed, scope and ambition is required. Please make a gift. Any gift made will help contribute to the fight against coronavirus. 

The NIHR Oxford Health Biomedical Research Centre is a partnership between the Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust and the University of Oxford. We aim to bring the best science to the complex problems of mental health and dementia. www.oxfordhealthbrc.nihr.ac.uk

The NIHR Oxford Biomedical Research Centre is funded by the National Institute for Health Research, and is a partnership between the Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and the University of Oxford. The NIHR provides the NHS with the support and infrastructure it needs to conduct first-class research funded by the Government and its partners alongside high-quality patient care, education and training. Its aim is to support outstanding individuals (both leaders and collaborators), working in world class facilities (both NHS and university), and Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (OUH) is one of the largest acute teaching trusts in the UK, with a national and international reputation for the excellence of its services and its role in patient care, teaching and research.

The Trust supports world-leading research programmes in cardiovascular diseases, musculoskeletal disorders, neurological disorders such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s through its designation as one of the UK’s five comprehensive biomedical centres. It works in close partnership with the University of Oxford and is a leading centre for cancer, neurosciences, diabetes, genetics and many other fields. Research themes of particular strength are: cancer, cardiovascular science, diabetes, endocrinology & metabolism, infection and immunology, musculoskeletal science, neuroscience and reproduction and development.

This brings together academic research expertise with clinical teams to translate medical science into better healthcare treatments. Our patients benefit from world-class discovery and innovation supported by the NIHR Oxford Biomedical Research Centre, a partnership between the Trust and the University of Oxford, funded by the National Institute for Health Research.

The Trust employs over 12,000 staff and consists of four hospitals: the Churchill Hospital, John Radcliffe Hospital and Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre in Oxford and the Horton General Hospital in Banbury. On 1 October 2015 the Trust was awarded Foundation status and became Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. www.ouh.nhs.uk