Bone density screening | University of Oxford

Bone density screening

The Iffley Road Sports Centre will host a day of bone density screening with Tracey Hunt, MSc Exercise and Nutrition Science, BSc (HONS), on Tuesday 29 January 

Tracey will assess your bone density and fracture risk using a machine called a ‘Quantative Ultrasound Scanner’ or ‘QUS’. The test measures the bone density in your heel, and is very useful for assessing your risk of fracturing (breaking) your legs, arms, hips and wrists – common fracture sites for sufferers of osteoporosis. The machine is safe, painless, and has no side effects. You put your foot in a machine that grips your heel, and ultrasound waves pass through it. Each heel stays in the machine for about two minutes.

Although the test itself is not diagnostic, individuals with low scores are given a copy of their results to give to their GP. The test serves as a useful ‘filter’ to help a GP decide whether or not the individual needs further investigation, meaning that it usually speeds up, or improves, the individual’s chances of access to a more detailed diagnostic test. 

After the test has been completed, your results will be explained to you, and you’ll have the opportunity to ask any questions. You will also receive an information pack with evidence-based nutrition, exercise and lifestyle advice to enable you to safeguard yourself against osteoporosis, greatly enhancing your chances of having strong and healthy bones for life. 

The test is available for £30. Payments can be made at the end of the appointment by either cash or cheque.

If you would like to book a test please email Tracey: tracey@bonematters.org

The appointment will take approximately 15 minutes and results and advice are given immediately. For more information on the test and the benefits visit Tracey’s website at www.bonematters.org 

If you would like to speak to Tracey she can be contacted on 07825 556740.

Osteoporosis literally means ‘porous bones’. It occurs when the rate of bone renewal does not match the rate of breakdown, eventually resulting in weak, brittle bones