Department for Transport | University of Oxford

Department for Transport

Related case studies

Material engineering with real ‘impact’

Material engineering with real ‘impact’

Understanding what happens when objects are damaged is helping University of Oxford engineers develop new, exotic materials, systems, and structures.

From flies to fetal viability

From flies to fetal viability

Research by zoologists at the University of Oxford into how hoverflies achieve their exquisite control has led, rather unexpectedly, to a means of improving IVF techniques.

Electric motor

Electric motors fit for racing cars

Think of electric vehicles and you probably picture sluggish hybrid cars -- but University of Oxford engineers are developing electric motors that power the world’s fastest sports cars.

coastal flooding and cliff erosion

Calculating the risks of coastal flooding and cliff erosion

Scientists at the University of Oxford are developing yet further a computer model that will forecast the environmental risks to Britain’s coastline for decades ahead. This will be of immense value to local authority planning departments.

Pioneering research takes to the skies

Pioneering research takes to the skies

Lighter, faster, more environmentally friendly jet engines are being created by University researchers and Rolls-Royce engineers.

Creating chemical sensors to catch drug-drivers

Creating chemical sensors to catch drug-drivers

The University of Oxford’s chemistry department leads the way in electrochemical sensors that can be used to detect the presence of drugs in saliva samples – or even measure how hot chillies are.

Efficient fuel cells powered by enzymes

Efficient fuel cells powered by enzymes

Alternative energy sources don’t yet pack the desired punch – but researchers in Oxford are changing that by developing fuel cells inspired by nature.

Mobile Robotics Group

Creating cars that drive themselves

An engineering project at University of Oxford offers the possibility of autonomous personal transport, which could save people time, reduce emissions and make roads safer.

Urban hotspots

Getting critical

Oxford’s Environmental Change Institute analyses the risks to the nation’s infrastructure.

Bethecar Moor

The value of a green and pleasant land

Oxford research work helps to highlight the value of the natural world.

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