Department of Health | University of Oxford

Department of Health

Related case studies

Impact case studies

Two cancer therapies are better than one

Combining two unrelated treatment technologies might sound strange – but it provides a crucial step towards more effective targeted cancer therapies.

Cooling babies to save lives

Cooling babies to save lives

Birth asphyxia is a major cause of death and of acquired brain damage in newborn infants. By demonstrating the success of a new cooling treatment, researchers at the University of Oxford have helped bring the new treatment into regular clinical practice.

Super-materials made by silkworms

Super-materials made by silkworms

Researchers at the University of Oxford are looking to the natural world to create a new breed of exotic materials – and the applications seem limitless.

Creating chemical sensors to catch drug-drivers

Creating chemical sensors to catch drug-drivers

The University of Oxford’s chemistry department leads the way in electrochemical sensors that can be used to detect the presence of drugs in saliva samples – or even measure how hot chillies are.

NHS hospital

Improving hospitals’ ‘early warning’ systems

The University of Oxford is at the forefront of a pioneering project to improve outcomes for at-risk patients in NHS hospitals.

Computers at the heart of the matter

Computers at the heart of the matter

Sophisticated computer models of the heart, developed by computer scientists at the University of Oxford, are helping to predict which new drugs are free from cardiac-related side effects.

Restoring Sight With Gene Therapy

Restoring Sight With Gene Therapy

Researchers from Oxford’s Nuffield Laboratory of Ophthalmology are helping restore eyesight in patients with genetic vision defects.

Government building

Influencing HIV/AIDS policy in India through mathematical modelling

Mathematical research at the University of Oxford has played a significant role in shaping the Indian Government’s response to the growing HIV/AIDS crisis.

dyslexia

Helping to dispel the misery of dyslexia

Research by Professor John Stein at the University of Oxford has shown that the simple solution of using yellow or blue filters can significantly improve many dyslexic children’s reading.

Speech analysis

Improving treatment of speech disorders

An Oxford University researcher has developed a telephone-based system to help clinicians diagnose and treat patients with diseases that affect their voice.

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