Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs | University of Oxford

Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs

Related case studies

Niger wetlands

How changes to inland waters impact regional climates

Oxford scientists have developed a computer model showing how different amounts of surface water can effect changes in regional climate.

Strategies to reduce animal disease in Africa

Strategies to reduce animal disease in Africa

Four years’ research among South African smallholders has resulted in an argument for attention to local practices in the treatment of livestock diseases.

Balancing conservation

Balancing conservation and commerce in the world’s forests

Research into forest ecology at the University of Oxford is helping to reconcile the competing pressures of biodiversity and economic development.

Urban hotspots

Getting critical

Oxford’s Environmental Change Institute analyses the risks to the nation’s infrastructure.

Bethecar Moor

The value of a green and pleasant land

Oxford research work helps to highlight the value of the natural world.

Dülük Baba Tepesi

Smartphones become Smart Stones

Research at Oxford is demonstrating how ordinary smartphones can be turned into cheap, simple devices to monitor climate and environment.

Turning orange into grapefruit

Turning orange into grapefruit

Research in the Department of Chemistry into the action of natural enzymes is finding a commercial application in the global flavours and fragrances market.

Managing the risk of surface water flooding

Managing the risk of surface water flooding

Research by the University of Oxford, in conjunction with the London School of Economics, is playing a key role in combating one of Britain’s most persistent natural hazards.

Tom Hart

To the Zooniverse and beyond

Harnessing the time and skills of millions of volunteers worldwide is proving to be an extremely powerful way of driving research in fields as diverse as history, zoology, physics and even the response to humanitarian disasters.

Tick on a leaf

Putting ticks on the map

As the climate changes, diseases carried by insects and ticks are spreading northwards. Mapping techniques from the Department of Zoology provide detailed information for health authorities, economists and the general public about changing disease risks.

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