2015/16 Humanitas Visiting Professors announced | University of Oxford
Adam and Eve
Professor Stephen Greenblatt will speak on the theme of ‘The Rise and Fall of Adam and Eve’

2015/16 Humanitas Visiting Professors announced

Matt Pickles

Tom Stoppard, Simon Schama, Stephen Greenblatt, the Assad Brothers and Christian Thielmann have been announced as Humanitas Visiting Professors at Oxford University over the next academic year.

This month, Professor Stephen Greenblatt will give two public lectures in Oxford as Humanitas Visiting Professor of Museums, Galleries and Libraries.

In Hilary Term next year Christian Thiemann will be Visiting Professor for Opera Studies and Tom Stoppard will be Visiting Professor for Drama Studies. In Trinity Term the Assad Brothers will share the Visiting Professorships for Classical Music and Simon Schama will lecture as Visiting Professor for Historiography.

Professor Greenblatt will speak on the theme of 'The Rise and Fall of Adam and Eve' in the Weston Library's Blackwell Hall on 19 October and the South School of the Examination Schools on 20 October.

He will also lead a graduate seminar in the lecture theatre of the Weston Library on 21 October.

Stephen Greenblatt is Cogan University Professor of the Humanities at Harvard University. He is the author of twelve books, including The Swerve: How the World Became Modern and Will in the World: How Shakespeare Became Shakespeare.

His honours include the 2012 Pulitzer Prize and the 2011 National Book Award for The Swerve, the William Shakespeare Award for Classical Theatre, and two Guggenheim Fellowships.

Professor Greenblatt's visit has been organised by TORCH | The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities, the English Faculty, and the Bodleian Library.

Humanitas is a series of Visiting Professorships at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge intended to bring leading practitioners and scholars to both universities to address major themes in the arts, social sciences and humanities.

Created by Lord Weidenfeld, the programme is managed and funded by the Weidenfeld-Hoffmann Trust with the support of a series of benefactors and administered by TORCH | The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities.