University researchers awarded for their work in public and community engagement | University of Oxford

University researchers awarded for their work in public and community engagement

28 June 2017

A researcher reconstructing lost historical sites, a project transforming lion killers into lion conservationists, activities to help people living with dementia and a department giving schoolchildren a chance to touch a piece of the moon have all been named winners at this year’s Vice-Chancellor’s Public Engagement with Research Awards. These projects, along with ten others, were recognised at the Vice-Chancellor’s Public Engagement with Research Awards on 28 June, at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History.

Dr Claire Sexton, of the Department of Psychiatry, won an Early Career Research Award for engaging communities with her research on ageing in the brain. Since 2015 she has delivered Dementia Friends information sessions and public talks about her research. She is also Founding Chair of Dementia Friendly Chipping Norton. The group aims to bring together people living with dementia, caregivers, community organisations and researchers to increase awareness of dementia locally and improve inclusion and quality of life.

The Department of Earth Sciences was recognised in the Building Capacity category, for their work with Oxford primary school groups. Schoolchildren joined researchers in investigating samples of real lunar material brought to earth by the Apollo missions in the 1970s, which are rarely seen and held, even by researchers of lunar science.

Awarded projects engaged those much further afield too. A project led by Dr Amy Dickman from the Department of Zoology worked with communities in Tanzania to transform lion killers into lion conservationists – a major need in an area which holds the world’s second largest lion population, but had previously suffered high rates of lion killing.

The Vice-Chancellor’s prize was also announced at the ceremony - this year’s winner was Dr Alexy Karenowska, Department of Physics, for her work on the documentation, preservation, and restoration of at-risk cultural heritage sites across the world. Dr Karenowska led a team to create a 13 tonne replica of the Triumphal Arch from Syria's Palmyra site, destroyed in 2015. She managed the installation of the structure on Trafalgar Square in London and has overseen the installation of the same arch in New York, Dubai and Florence.

Professor Louise Richardson, Vice-Chancellor says: “I have been deeply impressed by the quality of the public engagement with research projects submitted for this year’s awards. The breadth and diversity of the activities taking place show how seriously the University takes its commitment to public engagement. It is inspiring to see the positive impact these activities have both on research and on the individuals and communities that have been involved, from warriors in Tanzania and young adults in Brazil, to local communities affected by dementia.”

Professor Alison Woollard, the University’s Academic Champion for Public Engagement with Research says: “Public engagement enriches both research and society and the University is committed to enabling our researchers to inspire, consult and collaborate with the public. I’m delighted that we are able to recognise and highlight the fantastic work our researchers are doing and hope these awards encourage more colleagues across the University to carry out their own public engagement with research.”

A full list of project winners can be found at (from 29 June 2017): http://www.ox.ac.uk/research/public-engagement/engaged-research/engagement-awards

Photographs
Of the projects and award winners available on request; photographs of the prize-giving ceremony also available from 29/ 30 June

Notes for editors

The Vice-Chancellor's Public Engagement with Research Awards recognise and reward those at the University of Oxford who undertake high-quality engagement activities and have contributed to building capacity in this area. There are three categories of award – Early Career Researcher, Building Capacity and Projects. Entrants can be at any level in their career and activities of any scale are welcome.

Winning entries receive recognition for their achievements at the Vice-Chancellor's Public Engagement with Research Awards Ceremony that takes place on 28 June 2017.The Vice-Chancellor’s Prize is also be announced at the ceremony and the winner receives a prize of £1,500.

Contact

Dr Lesley Paterson, Senior Facilitator & Coordinator, Public Engagement with Research, Research Services, University of Oxford. lesley.paterson@admin.ox.ac.uk; 01865 616571.