Examinations and Boards

  • Thursday 28 October 2010
  • No. 4932
  • Vol 141

Changes to Regulations

1. Continuing Education Board

Postgraduate Diploma in Paediatric Infectious Diseases

With immediate effect

In Examination Regulations 2010, p. 1006

Delete from p. 1040 line 44 to p. 1042 line 5 and insert:

'1. The course will consist of lectures, written assignments and online Interactive case studies in the field of paediatric infectious disease. The course may be taken on a part-time basis over a period which shall normally be of two years’ duration but shall not exceed three years’ duration.

2. Every candidate must normally:

(a)    Attend a residential course held annually in Oxford entitled “Infection and Immunity in Children”.

(b)   Attend a second residential course held annually in Oxford entitled “Infection and Immunity in Children” (with a different course syllabus each year).

(c)    Attend the residential PENTA-ESPID (Tr@inforPedHIV) training course in paediatric HIV medicine.

(d)   Complete Online PENTA-ESPID (Tr@inforPedHIV)module in paediatric HIV medicine.

(e)    Actively participate in seven ESPID Online Case Rounds.

(f)    Actively participate in one four week PENTA-ESPID(Tr@inforPedHIV) Online Case Discussion in paediatric HIV medicine.

(g)   Actively participate in six online multiple choice sessions.

3. Every candidate shall be required to satisfy the examiners in the following:

(a)    Active participation, to the satisfaction of the Course Director, in all parts of the course.

(b)   A written assignment consisting of either:

 i.      An audit of clinical practice in paediatric infectious disease of no more than 4000 words.

Or

 ii.      A case study and literature review of no more than 4000 words.

And

iii.      A short oral presentation.

(c)    A written assignment consisting of either:

i.      A dissertation in an area of special interest of no more than 8000 words.

Or

  ii.      A project report describing a research study in the field of paediatric infectious diseases undertaken by the candidate of no more than 8000 words written in the style of a scientific paper with abstract, introduction/background, methods, results and conclusion.

(d)   An examination consisting of multiple choice questions in paediatric infectious diseases covering the topics outlined in the schedule for training in paediatric infectious disease summarised below.

The assignments under 3(b) and 3(c) shall be forwarded to the examiners c/o Registry, Department of Continuing Education, 1 Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JA, for consideration by such date as the examiners shall determine and of which they shall notify candidates. The assessed work will, in normal circumstances, be submitted through an electronic submission system.

4. Candidates may be required to attend a viva voce examination at the end of the course of studies at the discretion of the examiners.

5. The examiners may award a distinction to candidates for the Postgraduate Diploma.

6. A candidate who fails to satisfy the examiners in the assignments under 3(b) and 3(c) or the examination under 3(d) above may normally be permitted to resubmit work in respect of the part or parts of the examination which they have failed on not more than one occasion which shall normally be within one year of the original failure.'

Changes to Regulations

2. Humanities Divisional Board

Honour Moderations in Classical Archaeology and Ancient History

With immediate effect

In Examination Regulations, 2010, p. 73, delete ll. 44–46 and substitute:

'The prescribed plays are Acharnians and Lysistrata. Compulsory passages for comment will be set from these. Candidates will also be expected to be familiar with Frogs.'.

Note: The syllabus prescribed in Examination Regulations, 2010, p. 73, was included in error, and will apply for the first time in the academic year 2011/12. The syllabus remains unchanged from the prescription in Examination Regulations, 2009.

Changes to Regulations

3. Medical Sciences Board

(a) Preliminary Examination in Biomedical Sciences

With effect from 1 October 2011 (for first examination in 2012)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2010, p. 58, after l. 8 insert:

'Biomedical Sciences 
Medical Sciences Division'

2 Ibid, p. 62, after l. 5 insert:

'Biomedical Sciences 3rd'

3 Ibid., p. 105, after l. 19 insert:  

 ‘Special Regulations for the Preliminary Examination in Biomedical Sciences

 A

1. The subjects of the Preliminary Examination in Biomedical Sciences shall be:

(1) Systems

(2) Cells, Molecules and Genes

(3) Mathematics and Statistics

2. The syllabus, number of papers, and their format shall be as prescribed by regulation by the Medical Sciences Board.

3. A candidate shall be deemed to have passed the examination if he or she has satisfied the Moderators in all three subjects.

4. Candidates must offer all three subjects at one examination, provided that a candidate who has failed in one, two or all three subjects may offer that number of subjects again on one further occasion.

5. The Moderators may award a Distinction to candidates of special merit who have satisfied them in all three subjects at a single examination.

B

One written paper will be set in each subject. The duration of the written papers will be three hours for subjects 1 and 2, and two hours for subject 3.

All candidates shall be assessed as to their practical ability in coursework under the following provisions:

(a) The Course Director, or a deputy, shall make available to the Moderators, at the end of the fifth week of the term in which the examinations are held, evidence showing the extent and the standard to which each candidate has completed the prescribed coursework.

(b) Coursework cannot normally be retaken. Candidates whose attendance or performance is deemed unsatisfactory may be required by the Moderators to submit to further examination. Failure to satisfy the Moderators in the coursework associated with an examination paper will normally constitute failure of that examination paper.

Schedule

1. Systems

a. Body: cardiovascular; respiratory; renal and gastrointestinal systems

b. Brain: introduction to neuroscience; neuroanatomy overview; sensory; motor; neural development; learning and memory; sleep, dreams, and consciousness

c. Behaviour: memory; language; awareness and attention; decision-making and rationality; disorders; social; genetics of diseases

2. Cells, Molecules and Genes

a. Cells: cell division and cell cycle; inter- and intra-cellular signalling; excitable tissues; membrane transport; general principles of pharmacology

b. Molecules: DNA/RNA structure; protein structure; lipids and membrane structure; energy metabolism

c. Genes: fundamentals of genes; molecular biology techniques

3. Mathematics and Statistics'

(b) Preliminary Examination in Physiological Sciences 

With effect from 1 October 2011

1 In Examination Regulations, 2010, p. 59, delete l. 31.

2 Ibid., p. 62, delete l. 30.

3 Ibid, p. 152, delete from l. 17 to p. 153, l. 11.

(c) Preliminary Examination in Psychology and Philosophy

With effect from 1 October 2011 (for first examination in 2012)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2010, p. 59, after l. 31 insert:

'Psychology and Philosophy Medical Sciences Division and Faculty of Philosophy'

2 Ibid., p. 62, after l. 30 insert:

'Psychology and Philosophy 2nd'

3 Ibid., p. 153, after l. 11 insert:

‘Special Regulations for the Preliminary Examination in Psychology and Philosophy

A

1. The subjects of the examination shall be:

(1) Neurophysiology

(2) Introduction to Philosophy

(3) Introduction to Probability Theory and Statistics

(4) Introduction to Psychology

2. A candidate shall be allowed to offer themself for examination in one, two, or three subjects.

3. A candidate shall be deemed to have passed the examination if he or she shall have satisfied the Moderators in three subjects.

4. In the case of candidates who have satisfied the Moderators in three subjects in a single examination the Moderators may award a Distinction to those of special merit.

B

(1) Neurophysiology

Excitable Tissues. Membrane potential, ion pumps. Action potential, refractory period. Receptor potentials. Neuromuscular transmission. Synaptic mechanisms.

Chemical Transmitters. Storage and release of transmitter. Removal and synthesis of transmitter. Selected drugs acting on the nervous system.

Efferent Mechanisms. Muscle contraction. Muscle receptors. Spinal reflexes. Higher motor centres. Autonomic nervous system.

Afferent Mechanisms. Hearing. Vision. Somaesthetic system, including pain.

One three-hour paper will be set.

(2) Introduction to Philosophy

As specified for the Preliminary Examination for Philosophy, Politics, and Economics.

(3) Introduction to Probability Theory and Statistics

This examination is intended to test the candidate's understanding of the elements of probability theory and of the principles of statistics as applied to the design and analysis of surveys and experiments and to the interpretation of the results of such investigations. The topics below are more fully detailed in Definitions and Formulae with Statistical Tables for Elementary Statistics and Quantitative Methods Courses, which is prepared by the Department of Statistics. Copies of this will be available at the examination.

Descriptive statistics and statistical presentation using graphs and simple measures of central tendency and dispersion. Frequency distributions. Samples and populations. The addition and multiplication laws of probability; conditional probability and Bayes' Rule. The binomial, Poisson and normal distributions: their properties and uses and the relationships between them. Statistical inference using sampling distributions, standard errors and confidence limits. Common uses of z, t, chi-square and F tests and nonparametric tests including tests of hypothesis for the mean, median or proportion of a single population or for the difference between two or more populations, goodness-of-fit tests and tests of difference between two population distributions.

Parametric one-way Analysis of variance. Kruskal-Wallis non-Parametric analysis of variance.

The analysis of 2-way contingency tables using chi-square tests. Linear regression and correlation.

A comprehensive list of formulae together with statistical tables will be available at the examination.

One three-hour paper will be set.

(4) Introduction to Psychology

Methods and topics in: development; individual differences; social behaviour; animal behaviour; the neural basis of behaviour; perception; learning; memory; language; cognition; skills; abnormal behaviour.

One three-hour paper will be set.

For papers (3) and (4) only, examiners will permit the use of any hand-held pocket calculator subject to the conditions set out under the heading 'Use of calculators in examinations' in the Regulations for the Conduct of University Examinations.'

(d) Preliminary Examination in Psychology, Philosophy and Physiology 

 With effect from October 2011

 1 In Examination Regulations, 2010, p. 59, delete l. 32–33.

2 Ibid., p. 62, delete l. 31–32.

3 Ibid, p. 153, delete from l. 12 to p. 154, l. 41. 

(e) Honour School of Cell and Systems Biology

With effect from 1 October 2012 (for first Part I examination in 2013, and first Part II examination in 2014)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2010, p. 64, after l. 6, insert:

'Cell and Systems Biology Medical Sciences Division'

2 Ibid., p. 171, after l. 50, insert on a new page:

'SPECIAL REGULATIONS FOR THE HONOUR SCHOOL OF CELL AND SYSTEMS BIOLOGY

A

1. The subject of the Honour School of Cell and Systems Biology shall be all aspects of the scientific study of the development and functioning of living organisms with particular but not exclusive reference to mammals.

2. No candidate shall be admitted to examination in this school unless he or she has either passed or been exempted from the First Public Examination.

3. The examination in this school shall be under the supervision of the Medical Sciences Board, which shall make regulations concerning it.

4. The examination in Cell and Systems Biology shall consist of two parts: Part I and Part II.

5. No candidate shall be admitted to the Part II examination in this school unless he or she has passed the Part I examination in this school.

6. The examination for Part I will take place during Week 0 or 1 in Trinity Term of the candidate's second year. The examination for Part II will take place during Trinity Term of the candidate's third year.

7. In addition to the form of examination prescribed below, candidates may be examined viva voce in either part of the examination.

8. Candidates for Part II may offer themselves for examination in one or more of the Supplementary Subjects. The Supplementary Subjects available in any year will be notified to students annually during Trinity Term. Account shall be taken of a candidate’s results in any such subject in the candidate's overall classification in the Honour School of Cell and Systems Biology. Candidates awarded a pass in a Supplementary Subject examination may not retake the same Supplementary Subject examination.

 B

PART I

1. Candidates will attend lectures and practicals in subjects totalling five full options from a list published in the University Gazette by Week 8 in Trinity Term in the year preceding the examination. The handbook for the course will specify which options are recommended to proceed to particular options in Part II.

2. Options offered from the Honour School of Experimental Psychology Part I will be examined by Papers I–IV as specified for that examination. Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the appropriate components of the papers relating to their chosen option or options.

3. All other options will be examined by one-hour papers requiring short answers. Shorter papers will be set on half options. Candidates will be required to offer papers in each option or half option that they have chosen.

4. Candidates will be required to undertake practical work as specified in the course handbook which will constitute part of the examination. The Course Director, or a deputy, shall make available to the Examiners, at the end of Week 9 of Hilary Term in which the examinations are held, evidence showing the extent and the standard to which each candidate has completed the prescribed practical work. Practical work cannot normally be retaken. Candidates whose attendance or performance is deemed unsatisfactory may be required by the Examiners to submit to further examination. Failure to satisfy the Examiners in the practical work associated with an examination paper will normally constitute failure of that examination paper.

PART II

1. Each candidate must offer timed written examination papers and a project report based on a research project.

2. The options of the school shall be:

A Neuroscience

B Molecular Medicine

C Myocardial, vascular and respiratory biology

D Infection and Immunity

E Signalling in health and disease

as specified for the Honour School of Medical Sciences.

3. Each candidate must offer 4 written papers: Paper 1 for two chosen options, Paper 2, and Paper 3 as specified for the Honour School of Medical Sciences, except that Paper 1 for the second chosen option will require candidates to answer 2 questions in 2 hours.

4. The Research Project

The research project will normally be carried out in the Trinity Term of the candidate's second year and the Michaelmas Term of the candidate's third year.

(i) Form, subject and approval of the project

The project shall consist of original experiments done by the candidate alone or in collaboration with others (where such collaboration is, for instance, needed to produce results in the time available).

A list of potential supervisors and their research interests shall be published no later than the end of Week 6 of Hilary Term in the academic year preceding the examination.  Candidates should normally discuss their intended project with the potential supervisor and their tutor before submitting a project outline to the course administrator no later than noon, Friday of Week 0 of Trinity Term of the academic year preceding the examination. Decision on the application shall be made by the Course Director, or a deputy, and communicated to candidates by Friday of Week 1 of the same term.

(ii) Submission of the Project Report

The length and format of the Project Report based on the project shall be according to guidelines published by the Medical Sciences Board in Week 6 of Hilary Term of the academic year preceding the year of examination. Material in a candidate's Project Report must not be duplicated in any answer given in a written examination paper. Project Reports previously submitted for the Honour School of Cell and Systems Biology may be resubmitted.  No Project Report will be accepted if it has already been submitted, wholly or substantially, for another Honour School or degree of this University, or for a degree of any other institution.

Project Reports (three copies) must be sent to the Chairman of Examiners, Honour School of Cell and Systems Biology, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, not later than noon on the Friday of Week 1 of Hilary Term in the academic year in which the candidate intends to take the examination. The copies shall be accompanied (in a separate sealed envelope) by a certificate signed by each candidate indicating that the research project is the candidate’s own work and that the supervisor has commented on no more than the first draft of the Project Report.  In the case of laboratory-based work that has been produced in collaboration, the certificate shall indicate the extent of the candidate’s own contribution.

In exceptional cases, where through unforeseen circumstances a laboratory-based project produces no useable results (i.e. not even negative or ambiguous results), the candidate may apply through his or her college to the Course Director, or a deputy, for permission to submit a concise review of the scientific context and the aims of the work that was attempted in place of the normal Project Report. Such an application must be accompanied by supporting evidence from the supervisor of the project. The concise review to be submitted in such circumstances should be comparable in length to the Report of a successful laboratory-based project and will be presented orally to the examiners and be examined viva voce in the usual way for a research project. The examiners will be advised that substantive results could not be produced.

In all cases, the examiners shall obtain and consider a written report from each supervisor indicating the extent of the input made by the candidate to the outcome of the project and also any unforeseen difficulties associated with the project (e.g. unexpected technical issues or problems in the availability of materials, equipment, or literature or other published data).

(iii) Oral Assessment of project-based written work

In addition, each candidate shall make a brief oral presentation of their project to a group of two examiners (or examiners and assessors appointed to ensure an adequate representation of expertise), after which, the candidate shall be examined viva voce on the project.  The form of the presentation to the examiners shall be specified in guidelines published by the Medical Sciences Board.

5. The weighting of marks for the five exercises required of each candidate shall be 25 per cent for the Project Report based on the research project, 15 per cent for Papers 1, 2 and 3, except that Paper 1 for the second chosen option will carry 10 per cent of the marks.  Marks carried forward from the Part I examination will account for the remaining 20 per cent for the candidate’s overall result for the Honour School of Cell and Systems Biology.'

(f) Honour School of Neuroscience

With effect from 1 October 2012 (for first Part I examination in 2013, and first Part II examination in 2014)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2010, p. 65, after l. 33, insert:  

'Neuroscience Medical Sciences Division'

2 Ibid., p. 380, after l. 14 insert on a new page:

'SPECIAL REGULATIONS FOR THE HONOUR SCHOOL OF NEUROSCIENCE

A

1. The subject of the Honour School of Neuroscience shall be all aspects of the scientific study of the nervous system.

2. No candidate shall be admitted to examination in this school unless he or she has either passed or been exempted from the First Public Examination.

3. The examination in this school shall be under the supervision of the Medical Sciences Board, which shall make regulations concerning it.

4. The examination in Neuroscience shall consist of two parts: Part I and Part II.

5. No candidate shall be admitted to the Part II examination in this school unless he or she has passed the Part I examination in this school.

6. The examination for Part I will take place during Week 0 or 1 in Trinity Term of the candidate's second year. The examination for Part II will take place during Trinity Term of the candidate's third year.

7. In addition to the form of examination prescribed below, candidates may be examined viva voce in either part of the examination.

8. Candidates for Part II may offer themselves for examination in one or more of the Supplementary Subjects. The Supplementary Subjects available in any year will be notified to students annually during Trinity Term. Account shall be taken of a candidate's results in any such subject in the candidate's overall classification in the Honour School of Cell and Systems Biology. Candidates awarded a pass in a Supplementary Subject examination may not retake the same Supplementary Subject examination.

 B

PART I

1. Candidates will attend lectures and practicals in subjects totalling five full options from a list published in the University Gazette by Week 8 in Trinity Term in the year preceding the examination. The handbook for the course will specify which options are recommended to proceed to particular options in Part II.

 2. Options offered from the Honour School of Experimental Psychology Part I will be examined by Papers I–IV as specified for that examination. Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the appropriate components of the papers relating to their chosen option or options.

3. All other options will be examined by one-hour papers requiring short answers. Shorter papers will be set on half options. Candidates will be required to offer papers in each option or half option that they have chosen.

4. Candidates will be required to undertake practical work as specified in the course handbook which will constitute part of the examination. The Course Director, or a deputy, shall make available to the Examiners, at the end of Week 9 of Hilary Term in which the examinations are held, evidence showing the extent and the standard to which each candidate has completed the prescribed practical work. Practical work cannot normally be retaken. Candidates whose attendance or performance is deemed unsatisfactory may be required by the Examiners to submit to further examination. Failure to satisfy the Examiners in the practical work associated with an examination paper will normally constitute failure of that examination paper.

PART II

1. Each candidate must offer timed written examination papers and a project report based on a research project.

2. Each candidate must offer 4 written papers: Paper 1A, Neuroscience, and Paper 2 as specified for the Honour School of Medical Sciences; two advanced options as specified for the Honour School of Experimental Psychology Part II.

3. The Research Project

The research project will normally be carried out in the Trinity Term of the candidate’s second year and the Michaelmas Term of the candidate’s third year.

(i) Form, subject and approval of the project

The project shall consist of original experiments done by the candidate alone or in collaboration with others (where such collaboration is, for instance, needed to produce results in the time available).

A list of potential supervisors and their research interests shall be published no later than the end of Week 6 of Hilary Term in the academic year preceding the examination.  Candidates should normally discuss their intended project with the potential supervisor and their tutor before submitting a project outline to the course administrator no later than noon, Friday of Week 0 of Trinity Term of the academic year preceding the examination. Decision on the application shall be made by the Course Director, or a deputy, and communicated to candidates by Friday of Week 1 of the same term.

(ii) Submission of the Project Report

The length and format of the Project Report based on the project shall be according to guidelines published by the Medical Sciences Board in Week 6 of Hilary Term of the academic year preceding the year of examination. Material in a candidate's Project Report must not be duplicated in any answer given in a written examination paper. Project Reports previously submitted for the Honour School of Cell and Systems Biology may be resubmitted.  No Project Report will be accepted if it has already been submitted, wholly or substantially, for another Honour School or degree of this University, or for a degree of any other institution.

Project Reports (three copies) must be sent to the Chairman of Examiners, Honour School of Cell and Systems Biology, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, not later than noon on the Friday of Week 1 of Hilary Term in the academic year in which the candidate intends to take the examination. The copies shall be accompanied (in a separate sealed envelope) by a certificate signed by each candidate indicating that the research project is the candidate’s own work and that the supervisor has commented on no more than the first draft of the Project Report.  In the case of laboratory-based work that has been produced in collaboration, the certificate shall indicate the extent of the candidate’s own contribution.

In exceptional cases, where through unforeseen circumstances a laboratory-based project produces no useable results (i.e. not even negative or ambiguous results), the candidate may apply through his or her college to the Course Director, or a deputy, for permission to submit a concise review of the scientific context and the aims of the work that was attempted in place of the normal Project Report. Such an application must be accompanied by supporting evidence from the supervisor of the project. The concise review to be submitted in such circumstances should be comparable in length to the Report of a successful laboratory-based project and will be presented orally to the examiners and be examined viva voce in the usual way for a research project. The examiners will be advised that substantive results could not be produced.

In all cases, the examiners shall obtain and consider a written report from each supervisor indicating the extent of the input made by the candidate to the outcome of the project and also any unforeseen difficulties associated with the project (e.g. unexpected technical issues or problems in the availability of materials, equipment, or literature or other published data).

(iii) Oral Assessment of project-based written work

In addition, each candidate shall make a brief oral presentation of their project to a group of two examiners (or examiners and assessors appointed to ensure an adequate representation of expertise), after which, the candidate shall be examined viva voce on the project.  The form of the presentation to the examiners shall be specified in guidelines published by the Medical Sciences Board.

4. The weighting of marks for the five exercises required of each candidate shall be 25 per cent for the Project Report based on the research project and 55 per cent in total for the four written papers.  Marks carried forward from the Part I examination will account for the remaining 20 per cent for the candidate’s overall result for the Honour School of Neuroscience.’

(g) Honour School of Experimental Psychology

With immediate effect

In Examination Regulations, 2010, p. 249, ll. 43–48, delete:

'The Head of Department, or deputy, shall inform the examiners by the end of the noughth week of the Trinity Term in which the Part I examination is to be held (a) as to which candidates have failed to satisfy the requirement to undertake practical work, and (b) as to which candidates have failed to satisfy the requirement to submit portfolios.'

and substitute:

'The Head of Department or deputy shall inform the examiners by the end of Week 0 of the Trinity Term in which the Part I examination is to be held as to which candidates have (a) failed to satisfy the requirement to undertake practical work or (b) failed to submit a portfolio.'

(h) Special Regulations For Philosophy In All Honour Schools Including Philosophy

With effect from 1 October 2012 (for first Part I examination in 2013, and first Part II examination in 2014)

In Examination Regulations, 2010, p. 408, after l. 16, insert new section:

'Psychology and Philosophy 

Candidates may take at most five subjects in Philosophy. All candidates must take eight subjects in total. Candidates may only take subjects in Psychology if they offer Psychology Parts I and II.

Candidates who take one subject in Philosophy may take any subject, except 121, in conformity with the General Regulations. Candidates who take two subjects in Philosophy must take at least one of 101, 102, 104, or 125. Those offering three or more Philosophy subjects must choose at least two from the above list. Their further subjects taken in Philosophy must be chosen in conformity with the General Regulations.’

(i) Honour School of Physiological Sciences

 With effect from 1 October 2014

 1 In Examination Regulations, 2010, p. 66, delete l. 6.

 2 Ibid., delete from pp. 440 to 443.

(j) Honour School of Psychology and Philosophy

With effect from 1 October 2012 (for first Part I examination in 2013, and first Part II examination in 2014)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2010, p. 66, after l. 6, insert:

'Psychology and Philosophy 
Medical Sciences Division and Faculty of Philosophy'

2 Ibid., p. 443, after l. 41 insert on a new page:

‘SPECIAL REGULATIONS FOR THE HONOUR SCHOOL OF PSYCHOLOGY AND PHILOSOPHY

A

1. All candidates shall be examined in Psychology and Philosophy.

2. No candidate shall be admitted to the examination in this school unless

(a) he or she has either passed or been exempted from the First Public Examination; and

(b) he or she has satisfied the Moderators for the Preliminary Examination in Psychology and Philosophy in the subject Introduction to Probability Theory and Statistics or has passed the Qualifying Examination in Statistics for this school.

The Head of the Department of Experimental Psychology may dispense a candidate from the Qualifying Examination in Statistics in cases where it is clear that the candidate has reached an adequate standard in Statistics by virtue of previous study and qualification.

3. The examination shall consist of two parts. Part I shall consist of papers in Psychology. Part II shall consist of papers in Psychology and Philosophy.

4. No candidate shall be admitted for the Part II examination in this school unless he or she has passed the Part I examination.

5. The Examination Board shall comprise such of the Public Examiners in the Honour School of Experimental Psychology as may be required, and such examiners in Philosophy as are nominated by a committee of which the two elected members shall be appointed by the Board of the Faculty of Philosophy.

6. The examinations in this school shall be under the joint supervision of the Medical Sciences Board and the Philosophy Faculty Board which shall make regulations concerning them subject always to the preceding clauses of this sub-section.

B

Candidates must take five papers for Part I and six papers for Part II. The five papers for Psychology Part I shall count as two papers for the Final Honour School.

The examination for Psychology Part I shall be taken during Weeks 0 and 1 of Trinity Term of the candidate's second year. The examination for Psychology Part II and for Philosophy shall be held during Trinity Term of the candidate's third year. The dates of submission for assessed work are those prescribed in sections 2–3 below.

The subjects in Psychology shall be those specified in 2. Psychology below; and in Philosophy those listed in the Special Regulations for Philosophy in all Honour Schools including Philosophy.

Candidates may offer either a research project or a library dissertation in Psychology, or a thesis in Philosophy.

There are further restrictions on the choice of subjects and requirements to be satisfied which are set out below.

The highest honours can be obtained by excellence in either branch of the School, provided that the candidate has taken sufficient subjects in the branch and that adequate knowledge is shown in the other branch of examination.

Every candidate shall give notice to the Academic Registrar and Secretary of Faculties of all papers being offered not later than Friday in Week 8 of Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examination.

2. PSYCHOLOGY

PART I

1. The five written papers as specified for Part I of the Honour School of Experimental Psychology will be set:

Paper I Biological Bases of Behaviour

Component parts: (i) Cognitive Neuroscience, (ii) Behavioural Neuroscience.

Paper II Human Experimental Psychology 1

Component parts: (i) Perception, (ii) Memory, Attention, and Information Processing.

Paper III Human Experimental Psychology 2

Component parts: (1) Language and Cognition, (ii) Developmental Psychology.

Paper IV Social Psychology, and Individual Differences and Psychological Disorders.

Component parts: (i) Social Psychology, (ii) Individual Differences and Psychological Disorders.

Paper V Experimental Design and Statistics

Candidates will be required to answer essays and short answer questions in four of the eight components of Papers I–IV. All candidates are required to offer Paper V.

Candidates who wish to be deemed eligible for Graduate Basis of Registration (GBR) for the British Psychological Society (BPS) must ensure that the components they select provide coverage of all five of the areas defined in the GBR curriculum. In order to achieve this, candidates must offer one component from each of four areas, chosen from the five areas prescribed below:

1. Cognitive Neuroscience or Behavioural Neuroscience from Paper I;

2. Perception; or Memory, Attention and Information Processing; or Language and Cognition from Papers II and III;

3. Developmental Psychology from Paper III;

4. Social Psychology from Paper IV;

5. Individual Differences and Psychological Disorders from paper IV.

In addition, candidates must sit additional short answer questions covering one component from the remaining fifth area.

The other requirements for BPS Graduate Membership are set out in Part II below.

Qualifying Examination in Statistics

Any candidate who has not satisfied the Moderators for the Preliminary Examination for Psychology and Philosophy in the subject Introduction to Probability Theory and Statistics must pass a Qualifying Examination in Statistics before being admitted for examination in the Honour School. The Head of the Department of Experimental Psychology shall have the capacity to dispense a candidate from the examination in cases where it is clear that an individual has reached an adequate standard by virtue of previous study and qualification.

The syllabus and paper set for the examination shall be that for the subject Introduction to Probability Theory and Statistics in the Preliminary Examination in Psychology and Philosophy.

For all papers in Psychology and for the Qualifying Examination in Statistics, the examiners will permit the use of any hand-held pocket calculator subject to the conditions set out under the heading ‘Use of calculators in examinations' in the Regulations for the Conduct of University Examinations.

Practical work

Candidates will be required to undertake practical work, as specified by the Head of the Department of Experimental Psychology, and this will constitute a part of the examination. In exceptional circumstances the Proctors may dispense a candidate from the specified requirements on the recommendation of the Head of Department or deputy.

Candidates shall submit to the Chairman of Examiners, Honour School of Psychology and Philosophy, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, not later than Week 10 in Hilary Term preceding the term in which the Part I examination is to be held, portfolios containing reports of their practical work completed during their course of study for Part I. These portfolios shall be available to the examiners as a part of the examination. Each portfolio shall be accompanied by a certificate signed by the candidate indicating that the portfolio submitted is the candidate's own work. This certificate must be submitted separately in a sealed envelope addressed to the Chairman of Examiners. Where the work submitted has been produced in collaboration, the candidates shall indicate the extent of their own contributions. Reports of practical work previously submitted for the Honour School of Psychology and Philosophy may be resubmitted but reports will not be accepted if they have already been submitted, wholly or substantially, for another Honour School or degree of this University, or for a degree of any other institution. The Head of Department or deputy shall inform the examiners by the end of Week 0 of the Trinity Term in which the Part I examination is to be held as to which candidates have (a) failed to satisfy the requirement to undertake practical work or (b) failed to submit a portfolio. Candidates in category (a) will be deemed to have failed Paper V. Candidates in category (b) will be deemed to have failed the entire Part I examination. The Head of Department or deputy shall also make available records showing the extent to which candidates have adequately pursued a course of practical work. The examiners shall take this evidence into consideration along with evidence of unsatisfactory or distinguished performance in each portfolio of practical work.

A candidate who fails the Part I examination may retake the examination once only, in the Long Vacation of the same academic year as the original examination. The highest mark that can be awarded to a candidate retaking the examination is a Pass.

PART II

Candidates must offer six papers for Part II. At least one and at most three of the papers must be in Psychology, the others to be chosen from those available in Philosophy below. Candidates taking three papers in Psychology may offer a Research Project or a Library Dissertation in place of one of the three Psychology papers. Candidates may substitute one paper from the list below in place of one of the Psychology Advanced Options:

Animal Behaviour

General Linguistics

Phonetics and phonology.

In order to be deemed eligible for Graduate Membership of the BPS, candidates must take at least two subjects in Part II Psychology.

Written papers, research project, and Library Dissertation:

Each candidate will be examined in either one, two or three areas of Psychology by means of one, two or three written papers, each of three hours or two written papers, each of three hours, and either a research project or a Library Dissertation. The written papers will be selected from the list of at least 12 options approved by the Medical Sciences Division and published at the Department of Experimental Psychology. A list of options will be posted in the Department of Experimental Psychology not later than noon on Friday of Week 5 of Hilary Term in the year preceding that in which the examination is taken.

Research Project

As specified for the Honour School of Experimental Psychology.

Library Dissertation

As specified for the Honour School of Experimental Psychology.

Candidates will be required to undertake practical work, as specified by the Head of the Department of Experimental Psychology, and this will constitute a part of the examination. In exceptional circumstances the Proctors may dispense a candidate from the specified requirements on the recommendation of the Head of Department or deputy. Candidates shall submit to the Chairman of Examiners, Honour School of Psychology and Philosophy, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, not later than Week 10 in the Hilary Term preceding the term in which the Part II examination is to be held, portfolios containing reports of their practical work. These portfolios shall be available to the examiners as part of the examination. Each portfolio shall be accompanied by a certificate signed by the candidate indicating that the portfolio submitted is the candidate's own work. This certificate must be submitted separately in a sealed envelope addressed to the Chairman of Examiners. Where the work submitted has been produced in collaboration, the candidates shall indicate the extent of their own contributions. Reports of practical work previously submitted for the Honour School of Psychology and Philosophy may be resubmitted but reports will not be accepted if they have already been submitted, wholly or substantially, for another Honour School or degree of this University, or for a degree of any other institution. The Head of Department or deputy shall inform the examiners by the end of Week 0 of the Trinity Term in which the Part II examination is to be held as to which candidates have failed to satisfy the requirement to undertake practical work. Failure to satisfy the requirement to undertake practical work will result in the candidate’s final degree classification being lowered by one class. Candidates who fail to submit a portfolio will be deemed to have failed the entire Part II examination. The Head of Department or deputy shall also make available records showing the extent to which candidates have adequately pursued a course of practical work. The examiners shall take this evidence into consideration along with evidence of unsatisfactory or distinguished performance in each portfolio of practical work.

3. PHILOSOPHY

Candidates must satisfy both the General Regulations, and those relating specifically to Psychology and Philosophy in the Special Regulations for Philosophy in all Honour Schools including Philosophy.'

(k) Honour School of Psychology, Philosophy, and Physiology

 With effect from 1 October 2014

 1 In Examination Regulations, 2010, p. 66, delete ll. 7–8.

2 Ibid., delete pp. 444–449.

(l) Regulations on Financial Matters

(i) With effect from 1 October 2011

1 In Examination Regulations, 2010, p. 1112, after l. 34, insert 'Cell and Systems Biology'.

2 Ibid., p. 1113, after l. 3, insert 'Neuroscience'.

3 Ibid, after l. 5, insert 'Psychology and Philosophy'.

(ii) With effect from 1 October 2014

1 In Examination Regulations, 2010, p. 1113, delete ll. 5–6.