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Oxford University Gazette, 27 May 2010: Examinations and Boards

Board of the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages

Special Subjects in the Honour School of Modern Languages and the related Joint Honour Schools 2011

The Board of the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages gives notice, under the provisions of the regulations in Examination Regulations, that the following Special Subjects will be available for examination in Trinity Term 2011 (this replaces any previously published lists). Certain subjects are marked with a language identifier. The bold numbers are those used by the Examination Schools to identify papers. The method of assessment for each special subject is also shown: a key to the letters is given at the end of this list.

Depending on the availability of teaching resources, not all Special Subjects will be available to all candidates in every year.

Note: Special Subjects for 2012 will be published one year before the examination.

2195 European cinema. An introduction to some of the major movements and landmarks in the evolution of European cinema. In the work submitted for assessment, candidates will be expected to show evidence of having worked on film study and analysis.
Method of assessment: C (1)

2011 [1] Modern literary theory. Candidates will be expected to be familiar with major theories in this field since 1918.
Method of assessment: C (1)

2030 (L) Syntax.
Method of assessment: A

2009 (L) Semantics.
Method of assessment: A

2031 (L) Phonetics and Phonology.
Method of assessment: A*

2032 (L) Sociolinguistics.
Method of assessment: A

2033 (L) Translation Theory.
Method of assessment: A

2001 (L) Psycholinguistics.
Method of assessment: A

2198 (L) Linguistic Project. In the work submitted for assessment, candidates should document a piece of original research into some aspect of a particular dialect, language, or variety.
Method of assessment: B (1)

2199 (L) Language Change and Historical Linguistics.
Method of assessment: A

2012 (I, L, P, S) Romance philology and linguistics. Candidates will be expected to show a detailed knowledge of the methods of comparative Romance linguistics and to illustrate their answers with examples from more than one Romance language. Texts for linguistic commentary in 'Vulgar Latin' (G. Rohlfs, Sermo vulgaris latinus, Tübingen, 1969: II, VII, XIII, XX, XXIX, XXXIV) and unseen passages from 'lesser known' Romance varieties (Sardinian, Romanian, Romansch and others) will also be set each year.
Method of assessment: A

2036 (G) Old Norse. Candidates will be expected to have made a special study of F. Ranke and D. Hofmann, Altnordisches Elementarbuch (Sammlung Göschen No. 1115), pp. 80–135. Candidates will also be expected to have read the Völsungasaga and related material from the Poetic Edda. Written work must show knowledge of the texts in the original language. [PM]
Method of assessment: B (2)

2037 (G, L) Old High German, with either Gothic or Old Saxon or Old English or Old Frisian. Prescribed texts: Gothic, Gospel according to St Mark, chapters 1–9; Old Saxon, Heliand, ll. 4025–5038; Old English, Beowulf, ll; 1–1049. Old Frisian, texts I–IX, XII–XIV, XVI, XVII from Rolf Bremmer's Introduction to Old Frisian and The Seventeen Statutes and The Twenty Four Landlaws (Buma 1961, pp.93–107). [PM]
Method of assessment: B (2)

2041 (G) Walther von der Vogelweide and the Origins of the German Love Lyric. [PM]
Method of assessment: B (2)

2042 (G) Gottfried's Tristan and Medieval German Court Society. [PM]
Method of assessment: B (2)

2071 (G) Mechthild von Magdeburg and women's writing in German 1150–1300. [PM]
Method of assessment: B (2)

2045 (G) Eighteenth-century German aesthetics from Baumgarten to Schiller.
Method of assessment: B (1)

2072 (G) Weimar Classicism 1794–1805.
Method of assessment: B (2)

2047 (G) The Bildungsroman.
Method of assessment: B (2)

2049 (G) Nietzsche and his impact.
Method of assessment: B (2)

2050 (G) The poetry of Hugo von Hofmannsthal, Stefan George, and Rainer Maria Rilke. Candidates will be examined on the poetry of two of these authors and will be expected to have read the works listed in any two of the sections below.

(a) Hofmannsthal: all the lyric poems in Hugo von Hofmannsthal, Gedichte. Dramen I (1891–1898), ed. Bernd Schoeller with Rudof Hirsch (volume 1 of the Gesammelte Werke in 10 Einzelbänden) (Frankfurt am Main: Fischer, 1979 or later reprints).

(b) George: Hymnen, Pilgerfahrten, Algabal; Das Jahr der Seele; Der Teppich des Lebens und die Lieder von Traum und Tod mit einem Vorspiel; the sections 'Zeitgedichte', 'Gestalten', 'Gezeiten', and 'Maximin' from Der siebente Ring; Das neue Reich omitting the section 'Sprüche'.

(c) Rilke: Das Stunden-Buch; Neue Gedichte (both parts); Requiem für eine Freundin; Requiem für Wolf Graf von Kalckreuth; Die Sonette an Orpheus; Duineser Elegien.
Method of assessment: B (2)

2073 (G) Modernist prose fiction 1898–1933.
Method of assessment: B (2)

2079 (G) Expressionism in German literature and the visual arts.
Method of assessment: B (1)

2056 (G) German poetry from 1945. Candidates will be expected to have a general knowledge of the field, and a detailed knowledge of works written by some of the key figures.
Method of assessment: B (2)

2070 (G) Narrative Identities in the German Novel since 1945. Participants will be expected to demonstrate a general knowledge of the field and to have read a range of German-language novels from the post-1945 era. Each portfolio shall consist of two essays, only one of which may be on a single text.
Method of assessment: B (2)

2080 (G) Literature in the GDR.
Method of assessment: B (2)

2081 (G) Advanced Translation: Theory and Practice. The course will be taught in Hilary Term of the final year. The maximum number of participants in the seminar will be eight, on a first-come-first-served basis. Students should apply by e-mail to katrin.kohl@jesus.ox.ac.uk and charlie.louth@queens.ox.ac.uk. Applications will be accepted from Monday, first week in the Trinity Term of the student's second year until the course is full, and at the latest on Monday, first week in the Michaelmas Term of the student's final year.
Method of assessment: B (2)

2196 (G) Contemporary German Literature. Candidates will be expected to have a general knowledge of writing in German from the last decade and to have read a range of texts from the same period. Each portfolio will consist of two essays, only one of which may be on a single text.
Method of assessment: B (2)

2006 (G) Drama and theatre since 1960. Candidates will study some of the principal dramatic texts and writings on the theatre by a selection of the following: Peter Weiss, Peter Handke, Thomas Bernhard, Heiner Müller, Elfriede Jelinek, and others. There will also be opportunities to write about the practice and politics of the theatre.
Method of assessment: B (2)

2005 (G) Cinema in Cultural Context: German Film 1930–70.
Method of assessment: B (1)

2083 (I) Italian Lyric Poetry of the Thirteenth Century. This paper explores the birth and the evolution of Italian poetry from the Scuola Siciliana to the Tuscan poets, Dante and the Stilnovisti as well as the poeti giocosi. Particular attention is given to the specificity and the complexity of the poetic language through which this literary tradition constantly renews itself. Topics include the relationship between courtly and religious versions of love and desire, poetry and philosophy, politics and exile.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2084 (I) Dante's minor works. This paper explores Dante's intellectual and literary journey in his works other than the Divine Comedy. Topics include Dante's meditation on desire and courtly love, his linguistic, poetic and political theories, as well as the relationship between poetry and philosophy, literature and exile. Students can choose among Fiore, Rime, Vita nova, Convivio, De vulgari eloquentia, Epistles, and Monarchia.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2091 (I) Italian Culture during the Fascist period. To what extent was Italian culture shaped by Mussolini's dictatorship during the inter-war years? In order to address this issue, you can choose to deepen your knowledge of one particular field or attempt an analysis of a range of cultural media (literary, cinematic, journalistic, etc). You can study specific movements—such as Futurism, the novecentisti, the strapesani, etc.—or specific themes such as censorship, propaganda, state-sponsored initiatives and, last but certainly not the least, anti-Fascist culture.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2085 (I, L) 'Questione della lingua'. Candidates will be expected to have read: Dante, De vulgari eloquentia; Bembo, Prose della volgar lingua; Manzoni, Scritti sulla lingua.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2086 (I) Women writers of the Italian Renaissance. A change in the cultural climate at the end of the fifteenth century combined with the rise of the printing industry, which required an ever increasing number of readers, meant that women's education was no longer viewed with scorn but, for the first time in Europe, actively encouraged. This is the reason why the Italian Renaissance saw an unprecedented flourishing of women writers. Veronica Gambara, Vittoria Colonna, Tullia d'Aragona, Chiara Matraini, Gaspara Stampa, Isabella di Morra, Veronica Franco and Moderata Fonte are just a few of the better known writers and poets active during the period 1500–1600, but there are many others still waiting to be rediscovered. All can be studied individually, comparatively, or thematically, including the questione della donna which, in trying to define women's role in society, gave rise to a much debated and often fiercely controversial topic in Renaissance Italy.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2088 (I) The works of Carlo Emilio Gadda. Gadda is one of the most fascinating and complex Italian writers of the twentieth century, whose oeuvre spans a wide variety of styles (from the macaronic to the lyrical) and genres (from the novel to the elzeviro, including poems, private diaries, technical articles, philosophical reflections, radiophonic pieces, fables, critical essays and psycho-political pamphlets). This course will aim at providing the conceptual basis for the critical interpretation of Gadda's literary production, and in particular of his two major novels (La cognizione del dolore and Quer pasticciaccio brutto de via Merulana); some of his other works will also be studied.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2092 (I) Narratives of national identity in postwar Italy. This option allows you to study the interaction between fictional production (mainly literary and/or cinematic) and the construction of models of national identity. This was a particularly sensitive issue in the early postwar years when Italians had to rebuild a sense of nationhood after the collapse of Fascism and the humiliation of the Second World War. Moreover, themes such as the regional fragmentation of the peninsula—cultural as well as economic—have accompanied the work of Italian artists throughout the postwar years and are much alive today.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2096 (I) Sicilian literature 1945 to the present day. This paper allows you to study the extraordinary contribution to Italian fiction made by Sicilian writers from the Second World War to the present day. The novels range widely in content and style: from two comic works written in the 1940s and 1950s (V. Brancati, Il bell'Antonio (1949) and Paolo il caldo (1955)), to the important best-seller Tomasi di Lampedusa's Il gattopardo (1958), key works about society by Sciascia (Il giorno della civetta (1961), A ciascuno il suo (1966) and L'affaire Moro (1978)), and more recent fictions by Bufalino (Diceria dell'untore (1981), and Le menzogne della notte (1988)).
Method of assessment: B (3)

2097 (I) Italian women writers 1945 to the present day. Writing by women is studied against the historical context of the changing role of women in the political sphere, in society and within literary genres. Students are asked to consider issues connected with gender and creativity, developments in perceptions and expectations of writing by women, as well as the merits of the texts themselves as literature. Any writers of suitable merit can be studied and independent contemporary choices are encouraged, but a core selection would include Anna Banti, Natalia Ginzburg, Elsa Morante, Francesca Sanvitale, Paola Capriolo and Francesca Duranti.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2098 (I) Italian poetry from 1956 to the present day. Montale's collection La bufera e altro (1956) is universally considered as a crucial watershed for Italian poetry of the Novecento. In this book, the sense of an ending—of the poetry that the generation of Montale and Ungaretti wrote, its language, its formal innovations, as well as its concerns, and its sense of its role within Italian cultural and political history—combines with a strong impetus towards the future, addressing the historical present, and the role of the poet within it, in a profoundly renewed and problematic fashion. La Bufera paves the way for the work of all the major protagonists of the second half of the century, from Andrea Zanzotto to Vittorio Sereni, Giorgio Caproni and Amelia Rosselli. The option will give students the opportunity to read (as well as La bufera itself) some of the major collections that have shaped the poetic imaginary of the secondo novecento: Zanzotto's La beltà, Sereni's Strumenti umani, Caproni's Il seme del piangere, and Rosselli's Variazioni belliche.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2103 (S) Spanish drama before Lope de Vega. Candidates will be expected to be familiar with the works of: Juan del Encina, Lucas Fernández, Lope de Rueda, Juan de la Cueva, Bartolomé de Torres Naharro, Diego Sánchez de Badajoz, Juan de Timoneda, Miguel Venegas, Miguel de Cervantes, and the Spanish works of Gil Vicente. Candidates will be expected to have read the Portuguese and bilingual texts of Gil Vicente, but passages for comment, which will not be compulsory, will not be set from these. [PM]
Method of assessment: A

2105 (S) The discovery and conquest of Mexico and the Antilles. Candidates will be expected to have read: Cristóbal Colón, Textos y documentos completos (ed. Consuelo Varela), Nuevas cartas (ed. Juan Gil, Madrid: Alianza Universidad, 1984); Hernán Cortés, Cartas de relación de la conquista de Méjico (ed. A. Delgado Gómez, Castalia, Madrid), Letters two and three, pp. 159–453; Bernal Díaz del Castillo, Historia de la Conquista de la Nueva España (Porrúa, Mexico, 1960), vol. i, pp. 174–501 and vol. ii, pp. 1–60; Bartolomé de las Casas, Brevísima relación de la destrucción de las Indias (Madrid: Cátedra, 1991); Toribio de Motolinia, Historia de los Indios de la Nueva España (Porrúa, Mexico, 1969), pp. 77–109; Bernardino de Sahagún, Historia general de la Nueva España (Porrúa, Mexico, 1956), Libros 3, 7, and 8.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2106 (S) Spanish devotional and mystical writing 1577–88. Candidates will be expected to have read: Santa Teresa de Jesús, Moradas del castillo interior; Fray Luis de Granada, Introducción del símbolo de la fe (ed. José María Balcells, Madrid, Cátedra, 1989), pp. 125–231; Fray Luis de León, Rey de Dios, Esposo, and Jesús, from De los nombres de Cristo; San Juan de la Cruz, Llama de amor viva (candidates will also be expected to have read the poem), Malón de Chaide, La conversión de la Magdalena (three vols., ed. Félix García, Clásicos Castellanos, Madrid, 1958), III, 83–178, 190–219. [PM]
Method of assessment: B (3)

2108 (S) Modern Catalan literature. Candidates will be expected to have a general knowledge of the field and a detailed knowledge of at least three authors. Details of the authors and works prescribed for detailed knowledge will be available in the Modern Languages Faculty Office, 41 Wellington Square, at the beginning of the Michaelmas Full Term of the academic year of the examination.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2111 (S) Modern Galician literature. Candidates will be expected to have a general knowledge of the field and a detailed knowledge of at least three authors. Details of the authors and works prescribed for detailed knowledge will be available in the Modern Languages Faculty Office, 41 Wellington Square, at the beginning of the Michaelmas Full Term of the academic year of the examination.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2007 (S) Women Writers in Modern Spain. The course focuses on women's writing from the 1940s to the present. Candidates should have a knowledge of the historical and social contexts and show a detailed knowledge of the work of at least three individual authors which can also be studied comparatively or thematically. Belonging to a literary tradition which was once granted an inferior cultural and political status, these writers interrogate the values and perspectives of the dominant canon shedding new light on the cultural and social history of modern Spain. While the course is intended to underscore issues related to gender, other approaches can also be considered.

2008 (S) The Literature and Culture of al-Andalus.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2003 (S) Literature, historiography and society in Late Medieval Spain. This Special Subject will allow students with an interest in the literature, culture and history of the Spanish Middle Ages to explore a large number of issues related to how literary and historiographical texts represent, discuss or challenge the social order in Late Medieval Spain. Candidates will examine with special attention the social aspects of Cancionero poetry, prose, treatises and different varieties of historiographical discourse.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2112 (S, L) Modern Catalan. Candidates will be required to show knowledge of the descriptive analysis of the contemporary language, and will have the opportunity of discussing the historical development of the language where this illuminates present-day usage. Candidates will study the structure of Catalan as spoken and written at the present day (phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics); an overview of the external history of the language and the regional varieties, the current sociolinguistic situation, standardisation and language policy.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2113 (S, L) Modern Galician. Candidates will be required to show knowledge of the descriptive analysis of the contemporary language, and will have the opportunity of discussing the historical development of the language where this illuminates present-day usage. Candidates will study the structure of Galician as spoken and written at the present day (phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics); an overview of the external history of the language and the regional varieties, the current sociolinguistic situation, standardisation and language policy.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2102 (S) Proto-Feminism and Feminism in Modern Spain. This paper maps out the process of women's social, cultural and political emancipation in Spain through the study of writers such as E. Pardo Bazán, Concepción Arenal, Carmen de Burgos, Rosa Chacel, María Zambrano, C Martín Gaite and Esher Tusquets, among others. Their works have contributed to the development of feminism either by addressing questions of women's social and political rights or by vindicating female sexuality, modes of thinking and ways of writing. Belonging to a literary tradition which was once granted an inferior cultural and political status, these writers interrogate the values and perspectives of the dominant canon shedding new light on the cultural and social history of modern Spain. Candidates will be expected to have a general knowledge of the main feminist theoretical debates and a detailed knowledge of at least three authors.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2100 (S, L) Bilingualism: Spanish and English. Candidates will study Spanish and English in contrast; Spanish and English in a bilingual context. Being able to express an idea in two different verbal systems may produce outputs that are not yielded by monolinguals. This provides a window for the understanding of the nature of language. This paper addresses questions like: how is bilingual behaviour emerging from the brain? How does a child express it as opposed to an adult? What social or individual factors induce code-switching? We will focus on current studies investigating the complexity of a bilingual experience.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2114 (S, P) Latin American fiction from 1940. Candidates may limit themselves to either Spanish American or Brazilian fiction. Candidates will be expected to be familiar with the broad evolution of this fiction over the period since 1940. They wil also be expected to undertake a specialised study of at least three of the following authors: Jorge Amado, Jorge Luis Borges, Alejo Carpentier, Julio Cortázar, Fernando del Paso, Carlos Fuentes, Gabriel García Márquez, Joao Guimaraes Rosa, Clarice Lispector, Mario Vargas Llosa.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2130 (S, P) The Galician–Portuguese Cancioneiros. [PM]
Method of assessment: B (3)

2131 (P) The Literature of Portuguese Expansion in Asia. [PM]
Method of assessment: B (3)

2129 (P) Portuguese Drama in the Sixteenth Century. [PM]
Method of assessment: B (3)

2134 (P) Twentieth-century Lusophone Women Writers.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2135 (P) The literature of Portuguese-speaking Africa.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2136 (P) Contemporary Brazilian Fiction.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2139 (P) Brazilian Cinema
Method of assessment: B (3)

2137 (R, L) [2] Old Church Slavonic in relation to Common Slavonic and Russian. [PM]
Method of assessment: A

2138 (R, L) Comparative Slavonic Philology. [PM]
Method of assessment: A

2150, 2151, 2153, 2154, 2155, 2156, 2157, 2158 (R, L) The structure and history of Bulgarian/Macedonian. The structure and history of Czech. The structure and history of Polish. The structure and history of Serbian/Croatian. The structure and history of Slovak. The structure and history of Slovene. The structure and history of Sorbian The structure and history of Ukrainian.
[PM]
Method of assessment: A

2160 (R) Russian Literature (1953 to the present day).
Method of assessment: A

2163 (R) Russian Drama of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
Method of assessment: A

2170 (R) Russian women's writing.
Method of assessment: B (1)

2176 (Gr) The School of the Ionian Islands 1797–1912, with special reference to the works of Solomos, Kalvos, Laskaratos, Matesis, Valaoritis, and Mavilis.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2177 (Gr) The New Athenian School of Poetry 1880–1912, with special reference to the works of Palamas, Drosinis, Gryparis, Krystallis, Malakasis, and Hadzopoulos.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2178 (Gr) The Greek novel 1918–40, with special reference to the works of K. Theotokis, G. Theotokas, Karagatsis, Myrivilis, Venezis, K. Politis, and G. N. Abbot.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2179 (Gr) Greek Women Writers.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2180 (Gr) Modern Greek Film.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2181 (Gr) Readings of Popular Culture in twentieth-century Greece.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2184 [3] Medieval Welsh tales and romances.
Method of assessment: A

2185 [3] The poets of the Welsh princes.
Method of assessment: A\ p 2186 [3] The poetry of Dafydd ap Gwilym.
Method of assessment: A

2187 The Ulster Cycle of tales.
Method of assessment: A

2188 The classical Irish bardic tradition.
Method of assessment: A

2189 (L) The structure and history of the Welsh language.
Method of assessment: A

2190 (L) The structure and history of the Irish language.
Method of assessment: A

2074 Medieval Hebrew prose and poetry. Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the historical background and literary production of Jews in medieval Spain, Provence and Italy. They will be expected to undertake a specialised study of at least two of the following topics:

Isaac ibn Sahula, Meshal Haqadmoni, ed. and English translation Raphael Loewe, Osford 2004.

Megillat Ahimaaz, ed. and English translation M. Saltzman, New York, 1924.

Judah ibn Tibbon, Ethical Will, ed. I. Abrahams, Philadelphia 1948, vol. 1, pp. 54–99.

The Gazelle, medieval Hebrew poems on God, Israel and the soul, ed. R. Scheindlin, Philadelphia, 1991.

Wine, women, & death: medieval Hebrew poems on the good life, Raymond P. Scheindlin, Philadelphia, 1986.
Method of assessment: A

2075 Early twentieth-century Hebrew literature. Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the work of Central and East European Hebrew writers (some of whom settled in Palestine in the early decades of this century) and in particular of their literary development in the environment of Austrian, Russian, and Polish literature, and their influence in shaping contemporary Hebrew literature. Candidates will be expected to have read stories by Y.H. Brenner, M. Berdyczewski and S.J. Agnon; David Vogel's novel, Hayei nisu'im; a selection of poetry by H. N. Bialik, Saul Tschernichovsky and Leah Goldberg. Texts will be selected from the following works: Y.H. Brenner, Kovetz sippurim (Sifrei) Mofet); Y. Lichtenbaum (ed), Sofreinu (Ahiasaf); T. Carmi (ed), The Penguin Book of Hebrew Verse; S.J. Agnon, Sefer hama'asim.
Method of assessment: A

2078 Modern Yiddish Literature.

Sholem Aleichem: Gants Tevye der milkhiker (Vilna: B. Kletskin, 1925 or any other full Yiddish edition);

Sh. A-ski (Shloyme-Zanvl Rappoport): Der dibek (in Di yidishe drame fun tsvantsikstn yorhundert (New York, 1977) vol. ii);

Dovid Bergelson: Opgang, ed. Joseph Sherman (New York: Modern Language Association, 1999);

Selections from the poetry of Dovid Hofshteyn, Peretz Markish, Leyb Kviko and Moyshe Kulbak in A shpigl oyf a shteyn (TelAviv: Petez-farlag, 1964);

Isaac Bashevis Singer, selected stories from Der shpigl un andere dertseylungen (Jerusalem: Magnes Press, 1979).
Method of assessment: B (4)

2077 (L) Yiddish Linguistics
Method of assessment: A

2191 (R) Postwar Polish Literature.
Method of assessment: A

Any other subject approved by the Modern Languages Board. Application must be made in writing, and with the support of the candidate's tutor, to the Chairman of the Modern Languages Board, Modern Languages Faculty Office, 41 Wellington Square, not later than the Wednesday of the second week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examination.


Key to abbreviation letters

Language identifiers

L Linguistics

F: French

G: German

I: Italian

S: Spanish

P: Portuguese

R: Russian and Slavonic

Gr: Greek


Method of assessment

A: Three-hour unseen written paper. (* The examination for the Subject 'Phonetics and Phonology' will additionally involve a half-hour practical phonetic transcription exercise)

B: An essay or portfolio of essays (the number in parentheses shows the number of essays required), aggregating to about 6,000 words and not exceeding 8,000 words, except that for 2198 Linguistics Project, the essay shall be about 8,000 words and not exceed 10,000 words. Completed essays should be delivered by noon on the Friday of the ninth week of Hilary Term next before the examination.

C: An essay or portfolio of essays (the number in parentheses shows the number of essays required), aggregating to about 6,000 words and not exceeding 8,000 words, written as answers to an examination paper to be collected from the Examination Schools, and signed for by candidates, on the Friday of the fifth week of Hilary Term next before the examination. Completed essay(s) should be submitted by hand to the Examination Schools by noon on the Friday of the ninth week of Hilary Term in the year of the examination, together with a statement certifying that the essays are the candidate's own work and that they have not already been submitted, either wholly or substantially, for a degree in this university or elsewhere.

Note: Paper XII subjects which have been designated as Pre-modern are marked [PM] after the paper description.


Notes on mutual exclusions and other restrictions

[1] No candidate in the Honour School of English and Modern Languages may offer both the Special Subject 'Modern literary theory' and the Special Topic 'The History and Theory of Criticism' from the Honour School of English Language and Literature.

[2] No candidate in the Honour School of Modern Languages or in a joint Honour School involving Modern Languages may offer both the Special Subject 'Old Church Slavonic in relation to Common Slavonic and Russian' and option (1) ('The Old Church Slavonic language') in the Linguistic Studies paper II in Russian (Russian paper V from the Honour School of Modern Languages).

[3] No candidate in the Honour School of English and Modern Languages may offer the papers 'Medieval Welsh Language and Literature I or II' from the Honour School of English Language and Literature with any of the Special Subjects 'Medieval Welsh tales and romances', 'The poets of the Welsh princes' and 'The poetry of Dafydd ap Gwilym'.

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Appointments

Medical Sciences Division

Appointments

Clinical Reader

Obstetrics and Gynaecology

AHMED ASHOUR AHMED, MB B.CH M.SC MD Ain Shams, Cairo, PH.D Camb, MRCOG, Fellow of St Hugh's College From 1 July 2010.


University Lecturer

Biochemistry, Structural Cell Biology

MATTHEW KENNETH HIGGINS, MA PH.D Camb, Fellow of Somerville College. From 1 October 2010.

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Changes in Regulations

With the approval, where appropriate, of the Education Committee of Council, the following changes in regulations made by the Social Sciences Board and the Continuing Education Board will come into effect on 11 June.

1 Social Sciences Board

(a) M.Phil in Development Studies

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 502, l. 18 after 'childhood' insert 'and youth'.

2 Ibid., l. 19, after 'child-' insert 'and youth-'.

3 Ibid., ll. 21–22, delete 'a political-economy perspective' and substitute 'political-economy and socio-cultural perspectives'.

4 Ibid., ll. 22–23, delete 'and the reproduction of childhood poverty'.

5 Ibid. l. 24, after 'class' delete ',caste, ethnicity and rural:urban residence' and substitute 'etc. and to their engagement with armed political violence and processes of globalisation'.

6 Ibid., l. 27, delete 'work/labour' and substitute 'work'.

7 Ibid., l. 28, after 'transition,' insert 'migration'.

(b) M.Phil in Medical Anthropology

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 540, l. 46 delete 'fourth' and substitute 'fifth'.


2 Continuing Education Board

M.St in Literature and Arts

To take effect 1 October 2011

1 In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 598, after l. 23 insert:

        `Literature and Arts           Continuing Education'.

2 Ibid., p. 639, after l. 20 insert:

'Literature and Arts

1. Every candidate must follow for at least six terms (and a maximum of eight terms) a part-time course of instruction in interdisciplinary study in the Humanities (Literature, History and History of Art).

2. The course will consist of lectures, seminars, on-line courses and individual tutorials.

3. The examination will consist of the following parts:

(a) Four essays, each of between 4,000 and 5,000 words in length

(b) A report on the candidate's engagement with the on-line courses. Candidates must engage with the course to the satisfaction of the Course Director.

(c) A dissertation on a topic selected by the candidate in consultation with the Course Director and his or her supervisor and approved by the examiners. The dissertation should be between 10,000 and 11,000 words in length, and will need to demonstrate knowledge and awareness of more than one subject discipline.

Candidates may be required to attend a viva voce examination if the Examiners require further information in order to make a judgement on an individual candidate.

The dissertation (under 3 (c)) must be submitted not later than noon on the third Friday in September of the final year of the course to the Chairman of Examiners for the Degree of MLA, c/o Registry, 1 Wellington Square, Oxford. All other elements of assessed work shall be forwarded to the examiners, c/o Registry, 1 Wellington Square, Oxford for consideration by such dates as the examiners shall determine and shall notify the candidates and tutors at the start of each academic year.

All assessed work (3 (a)–(c)) must be accompanied by a statement that it is the candidate's own work.

4. To pass the MLA examination, candidates must achieve a mark of at least 60 for each assignment and the dissertation. Candidates must also have completed the two distance-learning core courses to the satisfaction of the Course Director. Candidates may be awarded a Distinction.

5. A candidate who fails to satisfy the examiners in 3 may be permitted to resubmit work in respect of part or parts of the examination which they have failed for examination on one further occasion. In the case of 3 (a), candidates should resubmit work within one year, but normally not later than three months after the initial attempt. In the case of 3 (c), candidates should resubmit work not later than twelve months after the initial attempt.

The schedule of assessment for any one year will be circulated to candidates and supervisors by the second week of Michaelmas Term.'

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