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Oxford University Gazette, 26 November 2009: Examinations and Boards

Changes in Regulations

With the approval, where appropriate, of the Education Committee of Council, and, where appropriate, of the Humanities Board, the following changes in regulations made by divisional boards and the English Board will come into effect on 11 December.

1 Medical Sciences Board

Honour School of Psychology, Philosophy, and Physiology

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 443, l. 44, delete 'Medical Sciences' and substitute 'Physiological Sciences'.


2 Social Sciences Board

(a) M.Phil in Archaeology

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011 (Qualifying Test) and in 2012 (final examination))

1 In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 479, ll. 32–33, after 'examinations in' insert 'Archaeology,'.

1 Ibid., 2009, p. 480, after l. 28 insert:

'Archaeology—Social Sciences'.

2 Ibid., p. 485, l. 1, after 'M.Phil in' insert 'Archaeology and in'.

3 Ibid., p. 488, after l. 24 insert:

'Archaeology

(See also the general notice at the commencement of these regulations)

Within the Division of Social Sciences, the course shall be administered by the Committee for the School of Archaeology. The regulations made are as follows:

1. Candidates for admission must apply to the Committee for the School of Archaeology. They will be required to produce evidence of their appropriate qualifications for the proposed course including their suitable proficiency in relevant ancient or modern languages.

2. Candidates must follow for six terms a course of instruction in Archaeology. During their first year, candidates must attend the core course component seminars.

3. The registration of candidates will lapse from the Register of M.Phil students on the last day of the Trinity Full Term in the academic year after that in which their name is first entered in it, unless the committee decides otherwise.

4. All candidates are required:

(a) to satisfy the examiners in a Qualifying Examination identical with that for the degree of Master of Studies in Archaeology and governed by regulations 5–9 for that degree, in the Trinity Full Term of the academic year in which their name is first entered on the Register of M.Phil students except that under regulation 5 (b) of that degree a 10,000 word dissertation may not normally be offered in place of one of the subject options and must be examined by two pre-set essays or by a three-hour written paper. In the case of failure in one part of the qualifying examination, the candidate will have the same rights of resubmission as for the Master of Studies and, if successful, will be granted permission to supplicate for the degree of Master of Studies but will not be permitted to proceed to the second year of the M.Phil Candidates whose work in the Qualifying Examination is judged by the examiners to be of the standard required for the degree of M.St in Archaeology, but not of the standard required to proceed to the second year of the M.Phil in Archaeology, will be granted permission to supplicate for the degree of Master of Studies in Archaeology;

(b) to deliver to the Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, not later than noon on the Friday of the sixth week of Trinity Full Term in the academic year after that in which their name is first entered on the Register for M.Phil Students, a thesis of not more than 25,000 words (excluding bibliography and any descriptive catalogue or other factual matter, but including notes and appendices) on the subject approved in accordance with regulations 7 and 10 below;

(c) to present themselves for written examination in accordance with regulation 5 below in the Trinity Full Term of the academic year after that in which their name is first entered on the Register for M.Phil Students;

(d) to present themselves for an oral examination as required by the examiners.

5. The written examination shall comprise one subject chosen from schedules A–D for the Master of Studies in Archaeology. [Candidates who offered a subject from Schedule C or D in the qualifying examination may not normally offer another subject from the same schedule.] The subject may be examined, at the candidate's choice, either by two pre-set essays of 5,000 words each, or by a written paper.

6. The choice of subjects for thesis and examination must be approved by the candidate's supervisor and by the committee, having regard to the candidate's previous experience and to the availability of teaching. The subject for the thesis will normally be related to the subject chosen under regulation 5 above.

7. Candidates will be expected to show sufficient general knowledge of Ancient History and Geography for a proper understanding of their subjects.

8. The subject for examination and the chosen method of examination must be submitted for approval by the committee in time for its meeting in eighth week of the Trinity Full Term of the academic year in which the candidate's name is first entered on the Register for M.Phil students. Notice of the subject must be given to the Registrar no later than Friday of the eighth week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examination.

9. Candidates intending to offer pairs of pre-set essays in place of the written examination (as specified in 5 above) will select essay topics from a list offered by their supervisors. The proposed essay titles, countersigned by the supervisor, must be submitted for approval to the Chairman of Examiners by noon on Friday of the seventh week of the Hilary Full Term preceding the examinations. Candidates must submit two copies of their essays by not later than noon on Friday of the sixth week of Trinity Full Term, to the Examination Schools. Essays must be typed or printed.

10. The proposed thesis title must be submitted for approval by the committee in time for its meeting in the eighth week of the Trinity Full Term of the year in which the candidate's name is first entered on the Register for M.Phil Students.

11. Candidates will normally be expected to undertake a programme of relevant practical work (e.g. excavation, travel, or museum study), to be approved by their supervisors beforehand.

12. Candidates are advised that adequate reading knowledge of an appropriate language or languages (other than English) may be necessary to reach the standard required by the examiners.

13. Candidates will be required to deposit one copy of the thesis with the Examination Schools. Successful candidates will be required to deposit one copy of the thesis in the Ashmolean Library or the Balfour Library, as directed by the examiners. Such candidates will be required to complete a form stating whether they give permission for their thesis to be consulted.

14. Candidates whose work in the Final Examination is judged by the Examiners not to be of the standard required for the degree of M.Phil in Archaeology but whose work in the Qualifying Examination nevertheless reached the standard required for the degree of M.St in Archaeology, may be offered the option of resitting the M.Phil Examination under the General Regulations § 2, cl. 4, or of being granted permission to supplicate for the degree of Master of Studies in Archaeology.

15. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.'


(b) M.Phil in European Archaeology

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011—Qualifying Test, and in 2012—final examination)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 480, ll. 3–4, delete 'European Archaeology,'.

2 Ibid., delete l. 40.

3 Ibid., p. 485, ll. 1–2, delete 'and in European Archaeology'.

4 Ibid., delete from p. 512, l. 1 to p. 513, l. 45.


(c) M.Phil in Landscape Archaeology

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011—Qualifying Test, and in 2012—final examination)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 480, ll. 3–4, delete 'Landscape Archaeology,'.

2 Ibid., p. 481, delete l. 10.

3 Ibid., p. 485, ll. 2–3, delete 'and in Landscape Archaeology'.

4 Ibid., delete from p. 533, l. 1 to p. 534, l. 42.


(d) M.Phil in Migration Studies

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for examination in 2011—Qualifying Test, and in 2012—final examination)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 481, delete l. 19.

2 Ibid., delete from p. 544, l. 26 to p. 547, l. 24.

3 Ibid., p. 1076, delete ll. 16–33.


(e) M.Phil in World Archaeology

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011—Qualifying Test, and in 2012—final examination)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 480, l. 17, delete 'World Archaeology,'.

2 Ibid., p. 481, delete l. 35.

3 Ibid., p. 485, l. 3, delete 'and in World Archaeology'.

4 Ibid., delete from p. 594, l. 10 to p. 595, l. 52.


(f) M.Sc in Forced Migration

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2008, p. 674, delete ll. 6–7.

2 Ibid., p. 675, after l. 6 insert:

        `Refugee and Forced 
            Migration Studies              Social Sciences'.

3 Ibid., delete from p. 717, l. 35, to p. 719, l. 3.

4 Ibid., p. 757, after l. 39 insert:

'Refugee and Forced Migration Studies

1. Candidates will be expected to attend such lectures and seminars as their supervisor/course director shall recommend.

2. Candidates will, when they enter for their examination, be required to produce a certificate from their society that they are following a course of study in the field which they have pursued in Oxford for at least three terms.

3. Candidates must present themselves for an oral examination if requested by the examiners.

4. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination. Every candidate will be required to satisfy the examiners in three papers and two essay papers as follows:

Paper I: International Legal and Normative Framework

International legal and normative framework in relation to refugees and displaced persons. International and domestic application of individual and group rights to displaced persons and refugees. Activities and involvement of the relevant international organs, governments, and intergovernmental and non-governmental organisations relevant to forced migration. Concepts of intervention and their justifications. Evolution of humanitarian responses to forced migration. Organisational culture of assistance. Ethical issues raised by efforts to assist, control, prevent, and deter movements of forced migrants.

Paper II: Causes and Consequences of Forced Migration

Theories of the causes of forced migration and humanitarian crises. Historical dimensions and social dynamics of forced migration. Social and cultural constructions of place and space. Impact of forced migration on gender relations and age structures. Coercion and conflict. Implications of forced migrants for conceptualising the modern state and the international order. Security and stability of states. Environmental and development-induced displacement. Poverty and vulnerability. Impact of forced migrants on host populations and governments. Agency, coping mechanisms and survival strategies of affected populations. Nationalism, ethnicity and group identity. Consequences of resettlement programmes for livelihood and economic autonomy. Repatriation and local-level social reconstruction.

Paper III: Thematic and Regional Electives

Students will be required to take two electives from a range offered. Not all electives will be available in any one year. A list of the electives available in any particular year will be confirmed and published by the Course Director by Monday of Week Six of Michaelmas Full Term.

Multidisciplinary Thesis

Each student will be required to write a thesis of not less than 10,000 and not more than 15,000 words on a topic relevant to forced migration. The purpose of this thesis is to ensure that the students have engaged in a multidisciplinary analysis of a single issue in forced migration to gain an awareness of the complex interrelations in the field.

The topic of the thesis will require approval by the chairman of examiners. This thesis must be the work of the candidate alone and aid from others must be limited to prior discussion as to the subject and advice on presentation. The thesis must be presented in proper scholarly form, in two copies typed, in double-spacing on one side only of quarto or A4 paper, each copy bound or held firmly in a stiff cover, and must be delivered to the Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, no later than Friday noon of Week Six in Trinity Term.

Research Methods Group Essay

Each student must display an understanding of research methods relevant to forced migration. This will be in the form of a group essay of approximately, but no more than 5,000 words, based on directed field research conducted during a four-week period in Hilary Term. The essay will present findings and engage with topics which include: epistemology of social science; social science paradigms; ethics and values; quantitative, qualitative, and participatory methods of date collection; the presentation of statistical information; research design; sampling theory; hypothesis testing; questionnaire design; participant observation; participatory learning and action; and evaluative research.

The essay must be presented in a proper scholarly form and delivered to the Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, no later than Friday noon in Week Eight of Hilary Term.

A candidate who fails the examination will be permitted to retake it on one further occasion only, not later than one year after the initial attempt. A candidate who has reached a satisfactory standard on any of the three components of the examination: (i) the thesis; (ii) the two written papers; (iii) the research methods group essay, will not be required to retake that part of the examination. Candidates may also be required to attend an oral examination, which may be on one or more of the candidate's written examinations, thesis or group essay. Any candidate who fails a group assignment may be considered for a pass on the basis of an oral examination.'


(g) M.Sc in Migration Studies

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 674, after l. 36 insert:

        `Migration Studies             Social Sciences'.

2 Ibid., p. 744, after l. 33 insert:

'Migration Studies

1. The Social Sciences Board shall elect for the supervision of the course a Standing Committee, which shall consist of the Directors of the Centre on Migration, Policy and Society (COMPAS) and of the International Migration Institute (IMI) ex officio, the course director, and two other members of the teaching staff drawn from Oxford Department of International Development and the School of Anthropology, which shall have the power to arrange lectures and other instruction. The course director shall be responsible to that committee.

2. Candidates must follow a course of instruction in Migration Studies for at least three terms and will, when entering for the examinations, be required to produce a certificate from their supervisor to this effect. Candidates will be expected to attend such lectures and seminars as their supervisor/course director shall recommend.

3. The final examination shall be taken in Trinity Term of the academic year in which the candidate's name is first entered on the Register of M.Sc Students or, with the approval of the Board, in a subsequent year.

4. Each candidate will be required to satisfy the examiners in five papers in accordance with I, II, III, IV and V below.

I International Migration in the Social Sciences: An Interdisciplinary Introduction

5. This paper will be examined by means of a three-hour written examination to be taken during Trinity Term. Candidates will be expected to display understanding of key concepts and analysis in the economics, politics, sociology and anthropology of migration. The paper will cover theories and approaches in migration studies; basic concepts in migration studies; types of human migration and mobility; the history and development of migration studies.

II Key Themes in International Migration

6. Assessment of this paper will take place in the form of one written essay of a maximum of 5,000 words (excluding notes and bibliography) on a topic taught in the year. Candidates shall submit their essay to the Examination Schools no later than 12 noon on Tuesday of the second week of the Trinity Term of the course, accompanied by a statement that the essay is the candidates own work except where otherwise indicated. This essay will be expected to display an understanding of the major debates in contemporary migration, including theoretical and practical questions and issues that currently drive research in the field of migration studies. Topics to be covered will vary from year to year, depending on changes in the focus of migration studies.

III Elective paper

7. Candidates' understanding of the two options they choose will be assessed through two sets of questions in an options paper. A list of papers approved for this purpose by the Standing Committee will be available from the course director by Monday of Week Nought of Michaelmas Full Term. Students are free to elect any one of these papers in consultation with their supervisor. The examiners may, at their discretion, either require candidates to sit the standard examination paper for this elective paper, or else set a paper specifically for students on the M.Sc in Migration Studies.

IV Methods in Social Research

8. Each student must display an understanding of research methods relevant to migration studies. This understanding will be assessed in the form of the satisfactory completion of a course of practical work in (i) participant observation, in-depth interviewing, archival research, and qualitative data analysis; (ii) basic principles of statistical inference, and statistical models for the analysis of quantitative social science data; (iii) methods of data collection, including questionnaire design, interviewing and coding; and (iv) basic principles of economic modelling, microeconomics and labour economics.

9. Assessment of this paper shall take the form of four pieces of coursework, written during Hilary Term. Candidates shall submit a portfolio consisting of copies of all coursework to the Examination Schools no later than 12 noon on Tuesday of the fifth week of the Trinity Term of the course, accompanied by a statement that the coursework is the candidate's own work except where otherwise indicated.

V Dissertation

10. Each candidate shall be required to submit a dissertation of not more than 15,000 words (excluding references and appendices) on a subject approved by the supervisor. The candidate shall send to the Standing Committee, with the written approval of his or her supervisor, the proposed title of the dissertation for consideration by the Standing Committee, by noon on the Tuesday of the first week of Hilary Term in the academic year in which his or her name was entered on the Register of M.Sc students.

11. The dissertation (three copies) must be typewritten and delivered to the Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, not later than noon on Friday of sixth week of Trinity Term in the year in which the examination is taken. It must be marked for the attention of the Chairman of Examiners, M.Sc in Migration Studies, c/o Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford. The word count shall be stated on the outside front cover of the dissertation. The examiners shall retain a copy of the dissertation of each candidate who passes the examination for deposit in the Social Sciences Library.

12. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.

13. If it is the opinion of the examiners that the work done by a candidate is not of sufficient merit to qualify for the Degree of M.Sc, the candidate shall be given the option of re-sitting the M.Sc examination on one further occasion only, normally not later than one year after the first attempt.'


(h) M.St in Archaeology

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 597, after l. 23 insert:

    `Archaeology                            Social Sciences'.

2 Ibid., p. 605, after l. 21 insert:

'Archaeology

1. Within the Division of Social Sciences, the course shall be administered by the Committee for the School of Archaeology. The regulations made are as follows:

2. Candidates for admission must apply to the Committee for the School of Archaeology. They will be required to produce evidence of their appropriate qualifications for the proposed course, which may include their suitable proficiency in relevant ancient or modern languages.

3. Candidates must follow for three terms a course of instruction in Archaeology and must attend the core course component seminars.

4. The registration of candidates will lapse on the last day of the Trinity Full Term in the academic year of their admission, unless it shall have been extended by the committee.

5. The written examination shall comprise three subjects:

(a) one subject selected from Schedules A below to be examined by written paper;

(b) two further subjects selected from Schedules A–D. [Not more than one subject of the three selected may normally be taken from either one of Schedule C or D.] Each of these subjects may be examined at the candidate's choice either by two pre-set essays (each of 5,000 words) or by written paper.

In lieu of one of the subjects in (b) above, M.St (but not normally M.Phil) candidates may offer, with the permission of the committee, a dissertation of not more than 10,000 words (excluding bibliography and descriptive catalogue or similar factual matter, but including notes and appendices).

The topic of the dissertation should be connected with one of the subjects chosen by the candidate under 4(a) and (b) above and must be approved by the candidate's supervisor. If the candidate has elected to be examined by pre-set essays in another part of the examination, the topic of the dissertation must be clearly distinct from the pre-set essay titles. The dissertation must be the work of the candidate alone, and aid from others must be limited to prior discussion of the subject, bibliographic advice, help with access to study material and advice on presentation. The dissertation must be a new piece of work, substantially different from any dissertation previously submitted by the candidate for a degree of this or another university. When the dissertation is submitted, it must be accompanied by a statement, signed by the candidate, confirming that these conditions have been met. The proposed title of the dissertation, countersigned by the supervisor, must be submitted for approval by the committee by noon on the Monday of the seventh week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examination. Two copies typed or printed (the second may be a photocopy) in double spacing on one side only of A4 paper and bound simply or filed securely, must be delivered in a parcel bearing the words 'Dissertation for the M.St in Archaeology' to the Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, not later than noon on the Friday of the sixth week of Trinity Full Term. Candidates will be required to deposit one copy of the dissertation with the Examination Schools.

Schedule A: Main Subjects

Ancient Indian Ocean Corridors and Connections

Archaeological method and theory

Archaeology of Colonialism

Archaeology of Southern African hunter-gatherers

Chinese Archaeology

Environmental Archaeology

Formation of the Islamic World

Landscape Archaeology

Neolithic and Bronze Age Europe

Palaeolithic and Mesolithic Europe

Palaeolithic Archaeology

Regional studies in Australian and Pacific prehistory

Transformation of the Celtic World 500 BC–AD 100

Visual Cultures of the Ancient World

Western Europe in the Early Middle Ages: AD 400–900


Schedule B: Options

Archaeology and Geographical Information Systems

Archaeology of Early Anglo-Saxon England

Archaeology of Late Anglo-Saxon England

Coinage and Society in Anglo-Saxon England

Farming and States in Sub- Saharan Africa

Hunter-gatherers in world perspective

Practical Archaeobotany

Themes in Archaeological Science


Schedule C: Archaeological Science

Any subject offered in the M.St in Archaeological Science.


Schedule D: Classical Archaeology

Any subject offered in the M.St in Classical Archaeology.

Candidates may apply for other subjects to be approved by the committee, which shall define their scope and inform both the candidate and the examiners of this definition in writing. Not all course options may be available in any given year.

6. Candidates will be expected to show a general knowledge of Ancient History and Geography, so far as they are concerned with their subjects.

7. Candidates must present themselves for an oral examination as required by the examiners.

8. The subjects to be offered by the candidates and their chosen method of examination, duly approved by their supervisors, must be submitted for approval to the committee in time for its meeting in eighth week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examination. Notice of options to be offered by candidates must be given to the Registrar not later than Friday of the eighth week of that same term.

9. Candidates intending to offer pairs of pre-set essays in place of one or two written examinations (as specified in 4 above) will select essay topics from a list offered by their supervisor. The proposed essay titles, countersigned by the supervisor, must be submitted for approval to the Chairman of Examiners by noon on Friday of the seventh week of the Hilary Full Term preceding the examinations. Candidates must submit two copies of their essays by not later than noon on Friday of the sixth week of Trinity Full Term to the Examination Schools. Essays must be typed or printed.

10. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination. 11. In the case of failure in just one part of the examination, the candidate will be permitted to retake that part of the examination on one further occasion, not later than one year after the initial attempt. Written papers would be retaken the following year.'


(i) M.St in Classical Archaeology

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 610, delete ll. 9–11, and substitute:

'Any subject offered in the M.St in Archaeology, Byzantine Studies, Greek and/or Latin Languages and Literature, Greek and Roman History, History of Art, Women's Studies.'


(j) M.St in European Archaeology

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 597, delete l. 34.

2 Ibid., delete from p. 614, l. 28 to p. 616, l. 16.


(k) M.St in Landscape Archaeology

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 598, delete l. 21.

2 Ibid., delete from p. 634, l. 11 to p. 636, l. 4.


(l) M.St in World Archaeology

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 598, delete l. 46.

2 Ibid., delete from p. 665, l. 6 to p. 666, l. 40.


3 Board of the Faculty of English Language and Literature

Moderations in English Language and Literature

With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 100, ll. 3–4, delete ', with the exception of paper I, which will be of two and a half hours' duration'.

2 In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 123, ll. 41–2, delete ', with the exception of Paper 3, which will be of two and a half hours' duration'.

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