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1. Viva notices are not published in the online Gazette -- please refer to the printed Gazette.
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Oxford University Gazette, 25 June 2010: Examinations and Boards

Medical Sciences Board

Elections 10 June

On Thursday, 10 June, the following were duly elected to the Medical Sciences Board to hold office until MT 2014.

Four persons from among the members of the Faculty of Clinical Medicine elected jointly by the members of the Faculty of Biochemistry, the Faculty of Clinical Medicine, the Faculty of Physiological Sciences and the Faculty of Psychological Studies

1. PROFESSOR P.J. RATCLIFFE, MB B.CH MD Camb, MA Oxf, Fellow of Magdalen College, Faculty of Clinical Medicine

2. PROFESSOR K.M. CHANNON, B.SC MB CH.B MD Manch, MA Oxf, Faculty of Clinical Medicine

3. C.P. CONLON, MA Oxf, MD Lond, Fellow of Oriel College, Faculty of Clinical Medicine

4. PROFESSOR H.C. WATKINS, MA Oxf, MD PH.D Lond, Fellow of Exeter College, Faculty of Clinical Medicine

[The votes recorded were: for Professor Channon, 119; for Dr Conlon, 118; for Professor Hamdy, 93; for Professor Kennard, 69; for Professor La Thangue, 29; for Professor Ratcliffe, 144; for Professor Stein, 50; for Dr Sullivan, 53; for Professor Watkins, 117]


Four persons from among the members of the Faculty of Biochemistry, the Faculty of Physiological Sciences and the Faculty of Psychological Studies, of whom there shall be no more than one from each of the Department of Biochemistry, the Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, the Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, the Department of Pharmacology and the Department of Experimental Psychology, elected jointly by the members of the Faculty of Biochemistry, the Faculty of Clinical Medicine, the Faculty of Physiological Sciences and the Faculty of Psychological Studies

1. PROFESSOR DAME KAY E. DAVIES, MA D.PHIL Oxf, Fellow of Hertford College, Faculty of Biochemistry, Faculty of Physiological Sciences, Faculty of Clinical Medicine

2. PROFESSOR J.N.P. RAWLINS, MA D.PHIL Oxf, Fellow of Wolfson College, Faculty of Psychological Studies

3. PROFESSOR A.G. GALIONE, MA PH.D Camb, MA Oxf, Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall, Faculty of Physiological Sciences

4. PROFESSOR H. WALDMANN, MB CH.B PH.D SC.D (HON) Camb, MA D.PHIL Oxf, Fellow of Lincoln College, Faculty of Physiological Sciences

[The votes recorded were: for Professor Davies, 165; for Professor Galione, 110; for Professor Miesenboeck, 58; for Professor Rawlins, 117; for Professor Waldmann, 100; for Dr Wormald, 97]

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Appointments and Reappointments

Social Sciences Division

Appointments

UNIVERSITY LECTURERS

J. FENSKE, BA Belf, MA M.PHIL Yale, Fellow of St Antony's College. In Economic History. From 1 September 2010 until 31 August 2015.

R. FIRTH, B.ED Lanc, M.ED Birm, PH.D Nott Trent, Fellow of St Anne's College. In Education (Geography). From 1 September 2010 until 31 August 2015.


Reappointments

UNIVERSITY LECTURERS

PROFESSOR L.A. PAYNE, BA MA New York, M.PHIL PH.D Yale, Fellow of St Antony's College. In Sociology (Latin American Societies). From 1 January 2011 until the retiring age.

J. PILA, BA LL.B PH.D Melbourne, Fellow of St Catherine's College. In Intellectual Property Law. From 1 July 2010 until the retiring age.

UNIVERSITY LECTURER (CUF)

PROFESSOR J. EDELMAN, BCL Western Australia, D.PHIL Oxf, Fellow of Keble College. In Law. From 1 September 2010 until the retiring age.

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M.Sc in Neuroscience 2010–2011

The following deadlines will apply in 2010–11.

Qualifying examination: Wednesday, 8 December 2010

Poster presentation of Dissertation 1: Thursday, 14 April 2011

Submission of Dissertation 1: Wednesday, 20 April 2011

Oral presentation of Dissertation 2: Thursday, 4 August 2011, and Friday, 5 August 2011

Submission of Dissertation 2: Friday, 19 August 2011

Viva voce examinations: Tuesday, 13 September 2011, Wednesday, 14 September 2011, and Thursday, 15 September 2011

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Changes in Regulations

With the approval, where appropriate, of the Education Committee of Council, and, where applicable, of the Humanities Board, the following changes in regulations made by divisional boards, faculty boards, and the Continuing Education Board will come into effect on 10 July.

1 Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences Board

(a) Honour School of Computer Science

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in Part A in 2011)

In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 205, after l. 8, insert: 'Each subject shall be examined by means of a written examination with the exception of Object Oriented Programming, which shall be examined by means of a mini project or a written examination, the details of which are set out in the Course Handbook.'

(b) Honour School of Mathematics and Computer Science

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in Part A in 2011)

In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 329, l. 21, after 'the Course Handbook.' insert 'The manner of examining the subjects in Schedule A (MC) shall be the same as that prescribed for the same subject in the Honour School of Computer Science.'

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2 Social Sciences Board

(a) Special regulations of Divisional and Faculty Boards concerning research degrees: Department of Politics and International Relations

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

In Examination Regulations, 2009, delete from p. 903, l. 40 to p. 904, l. 30 and substitute:

'(See also the general notice at the commencement of these regulations. The current edition of the relevant 'Notes of Guidance for Graduate Students and Supervisors' contains an elaborated version of these regulations)

Candidates with Probationer Research Student status, unless or until they have entered upon another status, or have been otherwise dispensed from some or all of the following requirements by the relevant Graduate Studies Committee, are required to undertake the work set out below during the first year.

1. A first-year student shall:

(i) satisfactorily complete a course of lectures, seminars, and classes, as determined in the relevant 'Notes of Guidance for Graduate Students and Supervisors' and supplemented by his or her supervisor;

(ii) satisfactorily complete a course of research methods training, as determined in the relevant 'Notes of Guidance for Graduate Students and Supervisors' and supplemented by his or her supervisor and/or by the relevant Director of Research Training.

2. Applications for transfer from Probationer Research Student status to D.Phil. or M.Litt. status must be submitted in accordance with the requirements in the relevant 'Notes of Guidance. Applicants in their sixth and final term of Probationer Status must submit their completed application not later than 5 p. m. on the Friday of Fifth Week of that term. In addition to satisfying the above requirements (i) and (ii), the transfer of status application must include two copies of an outline of the proposed research topic and two copies of the written work—all as specified in the relevant 'Notes of Guidance for Graduate Students and Supervisors'. The relevant Graduate Studies Committee will appoint two assessors, one of whom will normally be a member of the committee, except in cases where neither of the two most appropriate assessors is a member of that committee. The committee will then decide whether to approve the transfer. In the case of applications to transfer to D.Phil. status where the committee does not so approve, it may authorise an extension of time in order to allow the candidate to resubmit at a later date (but before the end of the sixth term after admission to Probationer Research Student status), or alternatively approve a transfer to M.Litt. status.

3. Candidates whose applications for transfer of status are not successful may, with the approval of the relevant Graduate Studies Committee, submit revised proposals within their first six terms of Probationer Research Student status.

4. Though not in itself sufficient qualification for students wishing to advance to M. Litt. or D.Phil. status, the successful completion of the M.Sc. in Politics Research or the M.Sc. in Political Theory Research may serve in place of 1. (i) and (ii) above, and material submitted as part of the requirements for the M.Sc. may also be used in the transfer application. Probationer Research Students who have already completed the M.Sc. in Politics Research or the M.Sc. in Political Theory Research should normally apply for transfer of status by the end of the Trinity Full Term of their first year of study as a Probationer Research Student.'

(b) M.Phil in Politics (Comparative Government, Political Theory, European Politics and Society)

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 571, delete ll. 28–29 and substitute:

'(See also the general notice at the commencement of these regulations. The current edition of the Notes of Guidance for Graduate Students and Supervisors in Politics contains an elaborated version of these regulations)

The regulations made by the Politics Graduate Studies Committee are as follows:'.

2 Ibid., ll. 33–35, after 'Committee.' delete The qualifying test... degrees in Politics.'

3 Ibid., delete ll. 42–43 and substitute:

'Candidates who fail the written examination part of the Qualifying Test will normally be allowed to retake it before the beginning of the next academic year.'

4 Ibid., p. 572, delete ll. 3–44, and substitute:

'Compulsory papers:

(a) Research Methods

(i) Research Methods in Political Science is a compulsory paper for candidates in Comparative Government and in European Politics and Society. Candidates will satisfactorily complete a course of lectures, classes and practical work in: Introduction to the Advanced Study of Politics and International Relations, Statistical Methods in the Social Sciences, Applied Statistics for Political Scientists, Philosophy of the Social Sciences, and Research Design in Comparative Political Science. Each candidate must also complete one long-course option (either Formal Analysis or Intermediate Social Statistics) or two short-course options in Hilary and/or Trinity Term. Students are required to produce a Research Design Essay of between 4,000 and 6,000 words on research design as it bears on some aspect of politics, to be submitted to the Examination Schools by noon on the Friday of Sixth Week of Trinity Term. It must be accompanied by a statement that it is the candidate's own work except where otherwise indicated and that it has not previously been submitted as part of another degree programme. The essay will normally be related to the subject of the student's proposed M.Phil. thesis. The Director of Graduate Studies in Politics shall draw the attention of the examiners to the names of any candidates who have failed to complete their research methods training to a satisfactory level of quality, and the examiners may require candidates to retake the course or a specified part thereof.

(ii) Research Methods in Political Theory is a compulsory paper for candidates in Political Theory. Candidates will satisfactorily complete the lectures, classes and practical work in Introduction to the Advanced Study of Politics and International Relations, Ethics, Philosophy of the Social Sciences and Text and Interpretation. Each candidate must also complete one long-course option or two short-course options in Hilary and/or Trinity Term. Students are required to produce a Research Design Essay of between 4,000 and 6,000 words on research design as it bears on some aspect of political theory, to be submitted to the Examination Schools by noon on the Friday of Sixth Week of Trinity Term. It must be accompanied by a statement that it is the candidate's own work except where otherwise indicated and that it has not previously been submitted for assessment as part of another degree programme. The essay will normally be related to the subject of the student's proposed M.Phil. thesis. The Director of Graduate Studies in Politics shall draw the attention of the examiners to the names of any candidates who have failed to complete their research methods training to a satisfactory level of quality, and the examiners may require candidates to retake the course or a specified part thereof.'

5 Ibid., l. 50, after 'the beginning' delete 'of the first week'.

6 Ibid., p. 573, delete ll. 16–42 and substitute:

'No candidate shall enter the final examination unless he or she has already passed the Qualifying Test. In the final examination every candidate must offer:

(1) A thesis* of not more than 30,000 words, excluding bibliography, two copies to be delivered to the Examination Schools by noon on the Monday of First Week of Trinity Term. The thesis must be accompanied by a statement that it is the candidate's own work except where otherwise indicated and that it has not previously been submitted for assessment as part of another degree programme. After the examination process is complete, each successful candidate must deposit one hardbound copy of their thesis in the Bodleian Library.

(2) Two subject papers.

Candidates sitting for the M.Phil. (Comparative Government) may select two papers from the following list: (e)–(t), (af)–(ad).

Candidates sitting for the M.Phil. (Political Theory) may select two papers from the following list: (s)–(aa).

Candidates sitting for the M.Phil. (European Politics and Society) may select two papers from the list: (e)–(ad).

Candidates may, with the special permission of the Politics Graduate Studies Committee, offer subjects outside this list. Applications must be made by the last Friday of the Trinity Term preceding that in which the examination is to be taken, and must be supported by the student's supervisor. Supervisors should ensure that applications are submitted as early as possible so that if approval is not given, the candidate has sufficient time to choose an alternative. Teaching in some options may not be available each year.'

7 Ibid., p. 575, l. 12, delete 'Democratisation' and substitute 'Democratization'.

8 Ibid., ll. 13, 17, and 20, delete 'democratisation' and substitute 'democratization'.

9 Ibid., l. 26 delete 'then' and substitute 'than'.

10 Ibid., delete ll. 30–33 and substitute:

'(u) The Political and Ethical Thought of Plato and Aristotle

Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the major writings on ethics and politics in the works of both Plato and Aristotle. Questions may also be asked on the ethical and political thought of the Pre-Socratics.'

11 Ibid., p. 576, l. 6, delete '—as specified by the bibliography issued by the Sub-faculty of Politics.'

12 Ibid., delete ll. 17–47, and substitute:

'(ab) European International History since 1945

The origins of the Cold War in Europe; institution-formation (including Council of Europe, NATO, European Communities, CSCE); Europe in East-West relations; Germany, France, and Britain (impact of war, decolonisation; intra-European relations and relations with the superpowers; values, priorities, and historical memory); the emergence and character of European Community/Union external policies; the causes and consequences of the end of the Cold War in Europe.

(ac) Comparative Political Economy

Candidates will be introduced to some of the major topics related to the comparative political economy of industrialised democracies and will be encouraged to question whether the political relationships among individuals, institutions and the economy are different in different countries. Topics will include the relationship between social coalitions and politics; the nature of corporatism; the existing diversity among advanced market economies; the influence of unions and wage bargaining institutions; the reasons why some countries have comprehensive welfare states and whether the welfare state is declining; the impact of government partisanship and electoral factors on economic policy; the political causes and effects of inequality; the political and economic importance of globalisation; and the relationship between democracy and economic growth.

(ad) Comparative European Parliaments

Candidates will explore generic and comparative themes in European legislative politics, at both national and EU level, using a range of analytical perspectives. Candidates are expected to be familiar with legislative politics in at least two European states and the EU level as well as to show awareness of the basic literature in the comparative study of legislatures.

Candidates must present themselves for viva voce examination when requested by the examiners.'

(c) M.Sc in Political Theory Research

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

In Examination Regulations, 2009, delete from p. 751, l. 38 to p. 752, l. 21 and substitute:

'(See also the general notice at the commencement of these regulations. The current edition of the Notes of Guidance for Graduate Students and Supervisors in Politics contains an elaborated version of these regulations)

A candidate for the M.Sc. in Political Theory Research shall follow for twelve months a course of instruction in Political Theory Research. Each candidate must pass the M.Sc. Examination at the end of Trinity Term in the two compulsory papers. Each student must also submit a thesis during the Long Vacation. The two compulsory papers are Theory of Politics and Research Methods in Political Theory.

Compulsory papers:

(a) Theory of Politics

Compulsory paper taken from the M.Phil. in Politics (Political Theory)

A critical examination of political concepts and theories, including social concepts and theories with political relevance.

(b) Research Methods in Political Theory

Compulsory paper taken from the M.Phil. in Politics (Political Theory)

Candidates will satisfactorily complete the lectures, classes and practical work in Introduction to the Advanced Study of Politics and International Relations, Ethics, Philosophy of the Social Sciences and Text and Interpretation. Each candidate must also complete one long-course option or two short-course options in Hilary and/or Trinity Term. Students are required to produce a Research Design Essay of between 4,000 and 6,000 words on research design as it bears on some aspect of political theory, to be submitted to the Examination Schools by noon on the Friday of Sixth Week of Trinity Term. It must be accompanied by a statement that it is the candidate's own work except where otherwise indicated and that it has not previously been submitted as part of another degree programme. The essay will normally be related to the subject of the student's proposed M.Sc. thesis. The Director of Graduate Studies in Politics shall draw the attention of the examiners to the names of any candidates who have failed to complete their research methods training to a satisfactory level of quality, and the examiners may require candidates to retake the course or a specified part thereof.

(c) Submit two copies of a thesis of not more than 15,000 words. It must be handed to the Examination Schools by noon on the last Friday of August following the end of Trinity Full Term. It must be accompanied by a statement that it is the candidate's own work except where otherwise indicated and that it has not previously been submitted for assessment as part of another degree programme. The thesis must be clearly marked with the candidate's examination number, the title of the thesis and the words "M.Sc. in Political Theory Research".

The examiners may also examine any candidate viva voce. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.'

(d) M.Sc in Politics Research

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

In Examination Regulations, 2010, delete from p. 752, l. 23 to p. 753, l. 11 and substitute:

'(See also the general notice at the commencement of these regulations. The current edition of the 'Notes of Guidance for Graduate Students and Supervisors' in Politics contains an elaborated version of these regulations)

A candidate for the M.Sc. in Politics Research shall follow for twelve months a course of instruction in Politics Research. Each candidate must pass the M.Sc. Examination at the end of Trinity Term in the two compulsory papers. Each student must also submit a thesis during the Long Vacation. The two compulsory papers are Research Methods in Political Science and either Comparative Government or European Governance.

Compulsory papers:

(a) Comparative Government

Compulsory paper taken from the M.Phil. in Politics (Comparative Government)

The theory and practice of government in modern states.

Or

(b) European Governance

Compulsory paper taken from the M.Phil. in Politics (European Politics and Society)

The constitutions and formal structure of governments in European states, including the UK, and the theory and practice of integration in Europe.

and

(c) Research Methods in Political Science

Compulsory paper taken from the M.Phil. in Politics

Candidates will satisfactorily complete a course of lectures, classes and practical work in: Introduction to the Advanced Study of Politics and International Relations, Statistical Methods in the Social Sciences, Applied Statistics for Political Scientists, Philosophy of the Social Sciences, and Research Design in Comparative Political Science. Each candidate must also complete one long-course option (either Formal Analysis or Intermediate Social Statistics) or two short-course options in Hilary and/or Trinity Term. Students are required to produce a Research Design Essay of between 4,000 and 6,000 words on research design as it bears on some aspect of politics, to be submitted to the Examination Schools by noon on the Friday of Sixth Week of Trinity Term. It must be accompanied by a statement that it is the candidate's own work except where otherwise indicated and that it has not previously been submitted as part of another degree programme. The essay will normally be related to the subject of the student's proposed M.Sc. thesis. The Director of Graduate Studies in Politics shall draw the attention of the examiners to the names of any candidates who have failed to complete their research methods training to a satisfactory level of quality, and the examiners may require candidates to retake the course or a specified part thereof.

(d) Where necessitated by a candidate's choice of subject the Politics Graduate Studies Committee may require a candidate to pass a test of proficiency in a language other than English. Candidates who fail the test will normally be allowed to retake the test before the beginning of the next academic year.

(e) Submit two copies of a thesis of not more than 15,000 words. It must be handed to the Examination Schools by noon on the last Friday of August following the end of Trinity Full Term. It must be accompanied by a statement that it is the candidate's own work except where otherwise indicated and that it has not previously been submitted for assessment as part of another degree programme. The thesis must be clearly marked with the candidate's examination number, the title of the thesis and the words 'M.Sc in Politics Research'. The examiners may also examine any candidate viva voce. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.'


3 Continuing Education Board

(a) Undergraduate Certificate in Archaeology

With effect from 1 October 2010

In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 1012, l. 24, After 'Archaeology' insert 'For students admitted until October 2010'.

(b) Undergraduate Certificate in the History of Art

With effect from 1 October 2010

In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 1013, l. 27, after 'History of Art' insert 'For students admitted until October 2010'.


4 Board of the Faculty of Theology

(a) Preliminary Examination in Theology

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

In Examination Regulations 2009, p. 156, ll. 30–31, delete 'Mark 1–4 and John 1 and 3', and substitute 'Mark 14:1–16:8 and John 6 and 9'.

(b) Honour School of Theology

(i) With effect from 1 October 2011 (for first examination in 2012)

1 In Examination Regulations 2009, p. 444, ll. 37–39, delete ', but in paper (2)... (Stuttgart, 1977)'.

2 Ibid., p. 447, ll. 8–9, delete ', or to comment... in Mark and/or Luke'.

3 Ibid., ll. 20–23, delete 'Candidates will be required... Galatians in Greek', and substitute 'Candidates will be required to comment on two on two passages from 1 Corinthians, and on two passages from Romans. Candidates for Track 1 will be required to comment on at least one passage from 1 Corinthians in Greek, and at least one passage from Romans in Greek. Of the passages printed in Greek only, at least one will be taken from 1 Corinthians 1–7, 15, and at least one from Romans 3–8. Of the passages printed in English only, at least one will be taken from 1 Corinthians 1–7, 15, and at least one from Romans 3–8.'

(ii) With effect from 1 October 2011 (for first examination in 2012)

1 In Examination Regulations 2009, p. 444, delete ll. 30–32, and substitute:

'3. Candidates not offering the full Hebrew paper (24) as one of their eight papers may, in addition to their eight papers, offer the Hebrew translation component of paper 24 as an optional extra paper. All candidates may, in addition to their eight papers, offer the optional translation paper in New Testament Greek (paper 28). Candidates who so wish may offer both the Hebrew paper (whether as a full paper or as an optional translation paper) and the optional translation paper in New Testament.'

2 Ibid., p. 450, ll. 28–29, delete 'This paper may only be offered by candidates also offering paper 14.'

3 Ibid., l. 51, delete 'This paper may only be offered by candidates also offering paper 16.'

4 Ibid., p. 451, ll. 11–13, delete 'This paper may only be offered by candidates also offering paper 18.'

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