University of Oxford


Note:
1. Viva notices are not published in the online Gazette -- please refer to the printed Gazette.
2. An asterisk against an entry in the Contents indicates a previously published notice.


Oxford University Gazette, 22 April 2010: Examinations and Boards

Appointments, Reappointments, and Conferments of Title

With the approval of the relevant divisional board, the following appointments and reappointments have been made, and titles conferred, for the periods stated.

Humanities Division

Appointments

UNIVERSITY LECTURERS (NTF)

Classics

FIONA MACINTOSH, MA Leeds, PH.D Lond, Fellow of St Hilda's College. Director of the Archive of Performances of Greek and Roman Drama. In the Reception of Greek and Latin Literature. From 1 January 2010 until 31 December 2014.

CHARLES VOLGRAFF CROWTHER, MA Cincinatti, MA Oxf, PH.D Lond, Fellow of Queen's College. In Greek Epigraphy. From 1 May 2010 until the retiring age.

Oriental Studies

ZEYNEP YÜREKLI-GÖRKAY, M.ARCH Istanbul, PH.D Harvard, Fellow of Wolfson College. In Islamic Art and Architecture. From 1 September 2010 until 31 August 2015.

CUF LECTURER

Classics

PETER JAMES THONEMANN, MA M.PHIL D.PHIL Oxf, Fellow of Wadham College. In Ancient History. From 1 October 2010 until 31 August 2012.

English

KATHRYN JEAN MURPHY, MA Glas, M.ST D.PHIL Oxf, Fellow of Oriel College. In English Literature. From 1 October 2010 until 31 September 2015.

History

HANNAH SARAH SKODA, D.PHIL Oxf, DEA Sorbonne, Fellow of St John's College. In History. From 1 October 2010 until 30 September 2015.

DEPARTMENTAL LECTURERS

Oriental Studies

CSABA DEZSÖ ;, MA Budapest, D.PHIL Oxf. In Sanskrit. From 1 January 2010 until 30 June 2010. PETER BRIAN DITMANSON, BA MA Minnesota, PH.D Harvard. In Classical Chinese. From 1 January 2010 until 30 September 2012.

Reappointments

UNIVERSITY LECTURERS

Classics

JONATHAN RALPH WARBURG PRAG, MA Oxf, PH.D Lond, Fellow of Merton College. In Ancient History. From 1 October 1010 until the retiring age.

English Language and Literature

FREYA RACHEL JOHNSTON, PH.D Camb, Fellow of St Anne's College. In Eighteenth-Century English Literature. From 1 October 2009 until the retiring age.

Medieval and Modern Languages

CHRISTOPHER WESLEY CHARLES WILLIAMS, MA D.PHIL Oxf, Fellow of St Edmund Hall. In French. From 1 January 2011 until the retiring age.

FACULTY LECTURER

Medieval and Modern Languages

KATHERINE SARAH LUNN-ROCKLIFFE, M.ST D.PHIL Oxf, Fellow of Hertford College. In French. From 1 October 2010 until the retiring age.

CUF LECTURER

English

TIFFANY PAULA STERN, BA Oxf, M.PHIL PH.D Camb, Fellow of University College. Professor of Early Modern Drama. In English. From 1 October 2010 until the retiring age.

History

DAVID MATTHEW HOPKIN, PH.D Camb, Fellow of Hertford College. In Modern History. From 1 October 2010 until the retiring age.

Medieval and Modern Languages

JANE HIDDLESTON, MA Camb, MA PH.D Lond, MA Oxf, Fellow of Exeter College. In French Literature. From 1 October 2010 until the retiring age.

CAROLINE WARMAN, MA Camb, MA Oxf, PH.D Lond, Fellow of Jesus College. In French. From 1 October 2010 until the retiring age.

Philosophy

ALEXANDER PASEAU, BA PH.D Camb, B.PHIL MA Oxf, Fellow of Wadham College. In Philosophy. From 1 September 2010 until the retiring age.

DAVID MARK WEDGWOOD WALLACE, B.PHIL M.PHIL D.PHIL Oxf, Fellow of Balliol College. In Philosophy. From 1 October 2010 until the retiring age.

Theology

JOHANNES ZACHHUBER, M.ST D.PHIL Oxf, Fellow of Trinity College. In Modern Christian Theology. From 1 October 2010 until the retiring age.

Conferment of Title

CUF LECTURER

Medieval and Modern Languages

NIKOLAJ D'ORIGNY LÜBECKER, MA Copenhagen, PH.D DEA Paris, Fellow of St John's College. In French. From 1 October 2010 until 30 September 2015.


Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences Division

Appointments

UNIVERSITY LECTURERS

RAMIN GOLESTANIAN, B.SC Tehran, M.SC PH.D Zanjan, Fellow-elect of St Cross College. In Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics. From 1 July 2010 until 30 June 2015.

BRIAN SMITH, BA St Peter, USA, PH.D Oregon, Fellow-elect of Keble College. In Experimental Quantum Physics. From 19 April 2010 until 18 April 2015.

ALEXIS VASSEUR, BS MA PH.D Paris, Fellow-elect of Lincoln College. In the Analysis of Nonlinear Partial Differential Equations. From 1 August 2010 until 31 July 2015.

Reappointments

UNIVERSITY LECTURERS

DR MARTIN BUREAU. In Astrophysics. From 1 January 2010 until the retiring age.

DR BYRON BYRNE. In Civil Engineering. From 1 October 2010 until the retiring age.

PROFESSOR PEDRO FERREIRA. In Astrophysics. From 1 January 2010 until the retiring age.

DR JOHN HUBER. In Mechanical Engineering Design. From 1 April 2010 until the retiring age.

DR ACHILLES KAPANIDIS. In Biological Physics. From 1 December 2009 until the retiring age.

DR ANDREI NOMEROTSKI. In Experimental Particle Physics. From 1 July 2010 until the retiring age.

DR TOMMASO PIZZARI. In Ornithology. From 1 January 2010 until the retiring age.

PROFESSOR DAVID PYLE. In Igneous Processes. From 10 December 2009 until the retiring age.

DR SEBASTIAN SHIMELD. In Zoology. From 1 October 2009 until the retiring age.

DR MICHAEL WILLIS. In Organic Chemistry. From 18 February 2010 until the retiring age.

DR ANGUS WILKINSON. In Materials in Structure/Property Relationships. From 1 August 2010 until the retiring age.

DR PAUL NEWMAN. In Control/Robotics. From 1 October 2010 until the retiring age.

PROFESSOR SIMON HOOKER. In High-Intensity Light-Matter Interactions. From 1 October 2010 until the retiring age.


Medical Sciences Division

Reappointment

UNIVERSITY LECTURER

ROBERT JAMES WILKINS, MA D.PHIL Oxf, Fellow of St Edmund Hall. In Epithelial Physiology. From 1 January 2012 until the retiring age.


Social Sciences Division

Appointments

UNIVERSITY LECTURERS

R. CONDRY, B.SC PH.D LSE, Fellow of St Hilda's College. In Criminology. From 1 August 2010 until 31 July 2015.

R. GRENYER, B.SC KCL, M.SC PH.D Imp Lond, Fellow of Jesus College. In Physical Geography. From 1 August 2010 until 31 July 2015.

J.M. HILLIER, M.SC St And, PH.D Leeds, Fellow of Kellogg College. In Science Education (Physics). From 1 September 2010 until 31 August 2015.

J. LEE-THORP, BA B.SC PH.D Cape Town, Fellow of St Cross College. In Scientific Archaeology. From 1 May 2010 until 30 April 2015.
Conferment of title. On behalf of the Recognition of Distinction Committee, the Vice-Chancellor has conferred the title of Professor of Scientific Archaeology on Dr Lee-Thorp.

P. MATTEI, B.SC Georgetown, M.PHIL Oxf, PH.D LSE, Fellow of St Antony's College. In Comparative Social Policy. From 1 April 2010 until 31 March 2015.

S. MAVROEIDIS, BA Camb, M.PHIL D.PHIL Oxf, Fellow of University College. In Economics. From 1 January 2011 until 31 December 2015.
Conferment of title. On behalf of the Recognition of Distinction Committee, the Vice-Chancellor has conferred the title of Reader in Economics on Dr Mavroeidis.

Reappointments

UNIVERSITY LECTURERS

A.M. BARRY, BA Camb, D.PHIL Sus, Fellow of St Catherine's College. In Human Geography. From 1 January 2011 until the retiring age.

I. CRAWFORD, BA CNAA, M.SC Brist, PH.D UCL, Fellow of New College. In Economics. From 1 April 2010 until the retiring age.

E.J. EWART, BA East Ang, M.PHIL Camb, PH.D LSE, Fellow of Linacre College. In Social Anthropology. From 1 October 2010 until the retiring age.

M.G. NEW, B.SC M.SC Cape Town, PH.D Camb, Student of Christ Church. In Water Science, Policy and Management. From 1 August 2010 until the retiring age.

D. PRATTEN, BA Oxf, MA Manc, PH.D Lond, Fellow of St Antony's College. In the Social Anthropology of Africa. From 1 January 2011 until the retiring age.

C. ROCHON, B.SC MA M.SC PH.D Louvain, Fellow of Oriel College. In Finance. From 1 September 2010 until the retiring age.

B. XIANG, BA MA Beijing, D.PHIL Oxf, Fellow of St Hugh's. In Social Anthropology. From 1 October 2010 until the retiring age.

^ Return to Contents of this section


Changes in Regulations

With the approval, where appropriate, of the Education Committee of Council, and, where applicable, of divisional boards, the following changes in regulations made by divisional boards, faculty boards, and the Continuing Education Board will come into effect on 7 May.

1 Humanities Board and Social Sciences Board

Honour School of Philosophy, Politics and Economics

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 411, l. 1, delete '206b' and substitute '206'.

2 Ibid., p. 413, delete l. 40 and substitute '[Until 1 October 2011 221. British Society in the Twentieth Century'.

3 Ibid., p. 420, ll. 35–36, delete 'head of the department of' and substitute 'Director of Undergraduate Studies for'.

4 Ibid., p. 421, ll. 24–25, delete 'Two copies shall be submitted to the examiners' and substitute 'Two bound copies shall be submitted to the examiners, along with one electronic copy'.


2 Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences Board

Honour School of Engineering Science

(i) With effect from 1 October 2010 (for Part II examination in 2011, for first Part B examination in 2011, and for first Part C examination in 2012)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 213, ll. 3–5, delete:

'All pages should be numbered, have margins of not less than 20mm all round, and type face not less than eleven- point with line spacing of no less than 8mm.'

and substitute:

'All pages must be numbered, have margins of not less than 20mm all round and type face of Arial 11 pt font with double-line spacing.'

2 Ibid., p. 217, ll. 8–10, delete:

'All pages should be numbered, have margins of not less than 20mm all round, and type face not less than eleven- point with line spacing of no less than 8mm.'

and substitute:

'All pages must be numbered, have margins of not less than 20mm all round and type face of Arial 11 pt font with double-line spacing.'

3 Ibid., ll. 28–30, delete:

'All pages should be numbered, have margins of not less than 20mm all round, and type face not less than eleven- point with line spacing of no less than 8mm.'

and substitute:

'All pages must be numbered, have margins of not less than 20mm all round, and type face of Arial 11 pt font with double-line spacing.'


3 Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences Board and Social Sciences Board

(a) Honour School of Engineering, Economics and Management

(i) With immediate effect (for first examination in Part A in 2010)

In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 229, ll. 13–15, delete:

'Paper M1 Introduction to Management (as specified in the regulation relating to the Introduction to Management paper of the Economics and Management Preliminary Examination)' and substitute:

'Paper M1 General Management (as specified in the regulation relating to the General Management paper of the Economics and Management Preliminary Examination)'.

(ii) With effect from 1 October 2010 (for Part II examination in 2011, for first Part B examination in 2011, and for first Part C examination in 2012)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 226, ll. 43–45, delete:

'all pages should be numbered, have margins of not less than 20mm all round, and type face not less than 11 font with line spacing of no less than 8mm.'

and substitute:

'all pages must be numbered, have margins of not less than 20mm all round and type face of Arial 11 pt font with double-line spacing.'

2 Ibid., p. 230, ll. 6–8, delete:

'all pages should be numbered, have margins of not less than 20mm all round, and type face not less than eleven- point with line spacing of no less than 8mm.'

and substitute:

'all pages must be numbered, have margins of not less than 20mm all round and type face of Arial 11 pt font with double-line spacing.'

3 Ibid., ll. 41–43, delete:

'all pages should be numbered, have margins of not less than 20mm all round, and type face not less than eleven- point with line spacing of no less than 8mm.'

and substitute:

'all pages should be numbered, have margins of not less than 20mm all round, and type face not less than eleven font with line spacing of no less than 8mm.'

(b) Honour School of Materials, Economics and Management

With immediate effect (for first examination in Part I 2010)

In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 321, ll. 29–30, delete:

'Introduction to Management (as specified in the regulation relating to the Introduction to Management paper of the Economics and Management Preliminary Examination)'

and substitute:

'General Management (as specified in the regulation relating to the General Management paper of the Economics and Management Preliminary Examination)'.


4 Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences Board and Continuing Education Board

PG Cert, PG Dip, and M.Sc in Bioinformatics

With effect from 1 October 2011

1 In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 673, delete ll. 13–15.

2 Ibid., delete from p. 683, l. 47 to p. 685, l. 14.

3 Ibid., delete from p. 991, l. 18 to p. 992, l. 6.

4 Ibid., delete from p. 1000, l. 20, to p. 1002, l. 5.


5 Medical Sciences Board

M.Sc in Integrated Immunology

With effect from 1 October 2010

1 In Examinations Regulations, 2009, p. 725, l. 18, delete 'lectures' and substitute 'the teaching, assessments'.

2 Ibid., l. 23, delete 'subsequent'.

3 Ibid., l. 27, delete 'will be' and substitute 'are'.

4 Ibid., ll. 30–31, delete 'of breadth of knowledge and understanding of the syllabus. The examination shall be'.

5 Ibid., l. 33, delete 'in the week preceding Hilary Term (Week –1)' and substitute 'no later than Friday of the week preceding Week 0 of Hilary Term'.

6 Ibid., ll. 35–36, delete 'of breadth of knowledge and understanding of the syllabus. The examination shall be'.

7 Ibid., l. 38, delete 'in the week preceding Trinity Term (Week –1)' and substitute 'no later than Friday of the third week preceding Week 0 of Trinity Term'.

8 Ibid., l. 40, delete 'typewritten or'.

9 Ibid., l. 41, delete 'eight' and substitute 'seven'.

10 Ibid., l. 42, delete 'Organising Committee' and substitute 'Examining Board'.

11 Ibid., l. 46, delete 'Week One of Hilary Term' and substitute 'the week preceding Week 0 of Hilary Term'.

12 Ibid., p. 726, l. 2, delete 'typewritten or'.

13 Ibid., l. 3, delete 'Eight' and substitute 'Seven'.

14 Ibid., l. 4, delete 'Organising Committee' and substitute 'Examining Board'.

15 Ibid., ll. 8–9, delete 'Week One of Trinity Term' and substitute 'the third week preceding Week 0 of Trinity Term'.

16 Ibid., l. 12, delete 'typewritten or'.

17 Ibid., after l. 26, insert:

'7. Candidates must pass each element of the examination in each term before being permitted to progress to the next term.'

18 Ibid., p. 726, renumber existing cll. 7–10 as 8–11 respectively.


6 Social Sciences Board

(a) Special Regulations for the Preliminary Examination in Geography

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

In Examination Regulations, 2009, delete from p. 119, l. 25 to p. 120, l. 37 and substitute:

'B

1. Each candidate shall offer four papers as follows:

* Earth Systems Processes

* Human Geography

* Geographical Techniques

* Geographical Controversies

Each paper will be of three hours' duration.

2. All candidates will be assessed as to their practical ability under the following provisions:

(a) Fieldwork. Candidates shall submit to the Chair of Moderators not later than noon on the Monday of the sixth week of Trinity Full Term a fieldwork folder containing accounts of fieldwork exercises. The requirements for this folder will be published by the Geography Undergraduate Teaching and Examining Committee at the beginning of the Michaelmas Full Term in the academic year of the examination.

(b) Geographical Techniques. The Chairman of the Undergraduate Teaching Committee, or a deputy, shall make available to the Moderators, by the date of the first written paper, evidence showing the extent to which each candidate has pursued an adequate course of practical work for Geographical Techniques.

(c) Geographical Controversies. Candidates shall submit to the Chair of Moderators not later than noon on the Monday of the sixth week of Trinity Full Term a folder of practical work for the Geographical Controversies paper. The requirements for this folder will be published by the Geography Undergraduate teaching and examining Committee at the beginning of the Michaelmas Full Term in the academic year of the examination.

In assessing the candidate's performance in the examination, the moderators shall take this evidence into account.

3. Candidates shall be deemed to have passed if they have satisfied the examiners in all four subjects and in the practical work requirements as outlined in section 2.

4. A candidate who fails in one or more subjects may offer that subject or subjects at one, and only one, subsequent examination. A candidate who fails to satisfy the practical requirements as outlined in section 2 will be allowed one opportunity to resubmit this work.

5. Examiners may award a distinction to candidates of special merit who have passed all four subjects and satisfied the requirements for practical work outlined in section 2.

6. The examiners will not provide calculators but will permit the use of any handheld calculator subject to the conditions set out under the heading Use of calculators in examinations in the Regulations for the Conduct of University examinations.

Papers for the Preliminary Examination in Geography 1. Earth Systems Processes

The paper will require an understanding of the physical geography of the Earth, based around core concepts and principles. Candidates should be able to display familiarity with mechanisms and processes under the headings of atmosphere, biosphere, and lithosphere, and a grasp of linkages between topics taught under these headings.

2. Human Geography The paper will examine the following themes and the relationships between them at a variety of scales Economy and Transformation, Territories and Identities, Culture and Society.

3. Geographical Controversies The paper will require an understanding of geographical controversies past and present. Candidates will be expected to demonstrate critical understanding of the use of evidence and data in geographical argument. Details of the materials to be covered for this course will be published by the Geography Undergraduate Teaching and Examining Committee at the beginning of the Michaelmas Full Term in the academic year of the examination

4. Geographical Techniques The subject will comprise theoretical and practical aspects of geographical techniques. Candidates will be expected to be conversant with problem–solving in both human and physical branches of the discipline. Details of the areas to be covered will be published by the Geography Undergraduate Teaching and Examining Committee at the beginning of the Michaelmas Full Term in the academic year of the examination.'

(b) Honour School of Archaeology and Anthropology

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2012)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 160, after 'Asia', delete '(caste and Hinduism)'.

2 Ibid., p. 161, delete 1.4 and substitute '(e) Gender theories and realities cross cultural perspectives'.

3 Ibid., delete l. 15 and substitute '(a) The Later Prehistory of Europe'.

4 Ibid., delete ll. 23, 24 and 38 and renumber (k) to (v) as (i) to (t) accordingly.

5 Ibid., delete 1.32 and substitute '(p) Anglo–Saxon Society and Economy in the Early Christian Period'.

6 Ibid., delete ll. 42–47 and substitute:

'Some options may not be available in every year. Candidates will be circulated a list of options offered for examination in the following two years of study by Friday of the eighth week of the Michaelmas Full Term.'

(c) Honour School of Geography

With effect from 1 October 2011 (for first examination in 2013)

In Examination Regulations, 2009, delete from p. 260, 3 to p. 262, l. 14, and substitute:

'A

1. The examination in the Honour School of Geography shall always include, as stated subjects to be offered by all candidates:

Geographical Research

2. Candidates shall be required to offer, in addition to the above subject, two foundational courses chosen from the following list:

(i) Earth Systems Dynamics

(ii) Space, Place and Society

(iii) Environmental Geography

3. Candidates shall be required to offer, in addition to the above subjects, and after giving due notice of the subjects they select, three Optional Subjects chosen under arrangements determined by the board by regulation.

4. The examination shall be partly practical.

5. No candidate shall be admitted to the examination in the Honour School unless either

(a) he or she is a Senior Student, or

(b) he or she has passed or been exempted from the First Public Examination.

6. The examination in the Honour School shall be under the supervision of the Social Sciences Board.

B

1. All candidates will be required to offer the following subjects:

i. Geographical Research

ii. Two foundational courses chosen from the following list Earth Systems Dynamics; Space, Place and Society; Environmental Geography

iii. Three Optional Subjects to be chosen from a list published by the department (3 papers). Submitted work will also be required in three subjects, and the combined submitted work will be treated as the equivalent of one and a half further papers.

iv. A Geographical Dissertation in accordance with the detailed regulations given below. The Dissertation will be treated as the equivalent of two papers.

v. A fieldwork report in accordance with the detailed regulations below.

2. Candidates are required to have undertaken field-work as an integral part of their course. Candidates may be examined viva voce.

Theses, practical notebooks or extended essays previously submitted for the Honour School of Geography may be resubmitted. No thesis, practical notebook or extended essay will be accepted if it has already been submitted, wholly or substantially, for another final honour school or degree of this University, or a degree of any other institution.

3. The requirements for each subject are as follows:

I. Geographical Research A course on the practice of human, physical and environmental geographical research. Emphasis will be placed on the provision of research skills and the relation between conceptual and methodological issues and the practice of research

II. Earth Systems Dynamics The dynamics of climatic, ecological and geomorphological systems, studied over a wide range of timescales and covering past, present and future changes. Emphasis will also be given to interactions between these components of the earth's system.

III. Space, place and society A human geographical perspective on space, place and society, taking account of relevant and major concepts in geographical thought, and acknowledging differing theoretical approaches. Specific cases and practices will be introduced at a range of geographical scales.

IV. Environmental geography The nature of environmental issues, their causes and consequences, and the development of policies to manage the environment. A range of case studies will be used across various geographical scales.

V. Candidates must offer three Optional Subjects to be chosen from a list to be published by the Head of the School not later than the end of the Trinity Full Term preceding the candidate's admission to the Final Honour School. One paper of three hours will be set on each subject. Each candidate must also submit an individual piece of work (as specified on the rubrics for each special subject) for all three Optional Subjects to the Chairman of Examiners in the Final Honour School of Geography, c/o the Examination Schools, High Street not later than 12 noon on the Friday of the first week of the Trinity Term in which they present themselves for examination. The submitted work, which will be combined and treated as equivalent to one and a half papers, should not duplicate material in the candidate's dissertation. Instructions for the submitted work will be published by the Head of the School not later than the end of the Trinity Full Term preceding the candidate's admission to the Final Honour School. The specified word limit is exclusive of tables, diagrams, and appendices. Information about the Special Subjects and submitted work will be published on the departmental Web site under 'Information for Undergraduates' by early October.

Each candidate will submit:

1. A fieldwork report of 5,000 words based on research undertaken as part of the fieldcourse during the Easter vacation of the year in which a candidate is admitted to the Honour School. The requirements for the fieldwork report will be published in the course handbook by the Undergraduate Teaching and Examining Committee at the beginning of Michaelmas Full Term in the year in which the candidate is admitted to the Honour School. The fieldwork report must be submitted no later than 12 noon on the Monday in the eighth week of Trinity term in the year preceding that in which they propose to take the examination.

2. A Geographical Dissertation on a Selected Topic.

The Dissertation, exclusive of bibliography, maps and statistical appendices, must not be more than 12,000 words. The attention of candidates is drawn to the fact that limited rather than large areas are more likely to allow for adequate depth of study. The Dissertation should embody original practical work based on primary data (e.g. data collected in the field, archival materials, census data, etc), and not be based on secondary material (e.g. text books, published local histories, published papers in learned journals, government or local government reports).

Candidates having first secured the approval of their tutors are required to submit to the Head of the School for approval, not later than noon on Friday at the end of the fourth week of the Trinity Full Term in the year preceding that in which they propose to take the examination, an outline of approximately 500 words of the proposed Dissertation. Special permission must also be sought from the Head of the School for any substantive change in the original proposal.

Candidates must give notice of the subject on which they propose to submit a Dissertation not later than the Friday in the fourth week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examination. Such notice must be accompanied by a statement from the candidate's tutor that permission to offer the intended Dissertation has been granted by the Head of the School.

The Dissertation must be typed in double-spacing and bound simply or filed securely. It must be the work of the author alone and aid from others must be limited to prior discussion as to the subject and sources and advice on presentation. Every candidate shall sign a certificate to the effect that the Dissertation is his or her own work, and this certificate shall be presented with the Dissertation.

Candidates must submit two copies of their Dissertation not later than 12 noon on the Monday in the first week of the following Hilary Term, to the Chairman of Examiners in the Final Honour School of Geography c/o Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford OX1 4BG.

4. The Examiners will require evidence of a candidate's satisfactory attendance at two of the departmental skills workshops.'

(d) Special regulations of divisional and faculty boards concerning research degrees: Saïd Business School

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 905, l. 14, delete 'M.Sc in Management Research' and substitute 'Research Methods and Specialist Training Programme'.

(e) Special regulations of Divisional and Faculty Boards concerning research degrees: Economics

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 898, after l. 21 insert:

'D.Phil students coming from the M.Phil in Economics must confirm status by the end of their eleventh term as a graduate student in Economics at the University of Oxford, inclusive of the time spent on the M.Phil'

(f) Special Regulations of Divisional and Faculty Boards concerning Research Degrees: Department of Education

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 894, l. 27, after 'study' insert 'and lives locally to the University'.

2 Ibid., p. 895, delete l. 2 and substitute the following, renumbering (ii) and (iii) as (iii) and (iv) accordingly:

'(i) a working title for the research

(ii) an outline description/draft abstract of the research (one side of A4 paper)'.

3 Ibid., l. 15, after 'the research' insert 'which demonstrates that the project is feasible and practicable and can be completed within the timeframe'.

4 Ibid., p. 896, l. 1, delete 'an outline' and substitute 'a clear outline'.

5 Ibid., l. 9, delete 'M.Sc by research' and substitute 'M.Litt.'

(g) BCL and M.Juris

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 927, delete l. 8 and substitute 'Comparative and Global Environmental Law;'.

2 Ibid., after l. 25, insert 'Principles of Financial Regulation;'.

3 Ibid., after l. 26, insert 'The Roman and Civilian Law of Contracts;'.

( h) M.Phil in Development Studies

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 503 (as amended in Gazette, 30 July 2009, Vol. 139, p. 1409, 3 (a)), after l. 7 insert:

'(ab) Technology and Industrialisation in Developing Countries

This course will examine technology and industrial development and policy in developing countries and their role in the development process, drawing upon the experience of a wide range of countries, particularly from East Asia and BRICS, to illustrate the analysis. Key topics and debates likely to be covered include industrialisation, economic growth and the industrial policy debate; national innovation systems and role of the state; transfer of technology and role of trade, TNCs and migration; lessons from the East Asian Tigers; indigenous versus foreign innovation efforts and catch–up the BRICS experience; appropriate technology and industrialisation in Africa; bridging the digital divide information technology and development; and technology for inclusive and sustainable development.'

(i) M.Phil in Geography and the Environment

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

In Examination Regulations, 2009, delete from p. 517, l. 34 to p. 518, l. 24 and substitute:

'2. During the first year, candidates for the M.Phil will:

(a) follow a course of instruction for three terms under the aegis of the School of Geography and the Environment in one of the two M.Sc programmes, either Nature, Society and Environmental Policy, or Biodiversity, Conservation and Management. They will be assessed in all aspects of the M.Sc programme, with the exception of the dissertation.

(b) develop a thesis topic, the title and proposal for which will be submitted for approval to the Course Director by the end of Hilary Term of the first year, on the date specified by the department. Candidates registered for the M.Sc programmes listed in paragraph 2 may petition for transfer to the M.Phil degree by submitting a thesis title and proposal by the deadline stipulated above.

3. Examinations at the end of the first year will serve to qualify for entry into the second year of the M.Phil course. Candidates who fail one or more papers at the end of the first year without compensating strength on other papers will be required to resit and pass the failed paper or papers, as determined by the Standing Committee, by the start of the Michaelmas Term of their second year in order to proceed with the degree.

4. In the second year, candidates for the M.Phil will:

(a) offer a thesis of not more than 30,000 words, excluding footnotes, appendices and the abstract. The thesis shall be accompanied by an abstract not exceeding 150 words. Two typewritten copies of the thesis must be submitted to the Examination Schools and addressed to the Chairman of Examiners of the M.Phil in Geography, c/o the Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, by noon of the first weekday of September at the end of the second year. Successful candidates will be required to deposit one copy of their thesis in the Bodleian Library, and will be required to sign a form stating whether they will permit their thesis to be consulted. The thesis shall be accompanied by a statement certifying that the thesis is the candidate's own work except where otherwise indicated.

(b) submit one extended essay based on new work set as part of the assessment of the appropriate SoGE M.Sc elective module not taken in the first year of study. Essays based on an elective taken during Michaelmas Term shall be submitted by noon on the first weekday of Hilary Term. Essays based on an elective taken during Hilary Term, shall be submitted by noon on the first weekday of Trinity Term. Approval for the topic of the essay must have been obtained from the elective leader prior to submission. The extended essay shall be accompanied by a statement certifying that the extended essay is the candidate's own work except where otherwise indicated.'

(j) M.Phil in International Relations

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 531, after l. 48 insert:

'(o) From a European to a Global International Society. This paper analyses the transition from a European to a global international society. The paper will address topics including principal theories and historical approaches to the expansion of international society, including postcolonial and other critical perspectives; nineteenth-century theories of economic globalisation, geopolitical change, and cultural hierarchy; inter-war pan-regionalism; decolonisation and racial equality; the Third World movement and Third World coalitions; concepts of emerging powers, Great Powers, regional powers; the role of emerging states including China, India and Brazil in relation to major power-relations, global governance and multilateral institutions, and within their regional context; the evolution of transnational social movements in the South; the role and impact of radical anti-western and non-state actors, including transnational Islamic groups.'

2 Ibid., l. 49, delete '(o)' and substitute '(p)'.

(k) M.Phil in Latin American Studies

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011 (Qualifying Test) and in 2012 (Final Examination))

1 In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 536, delete ll. 37–39 and substitute 'For the purposes of this examination, 'Latin America' will be interpreted as the eighteen Spanish- speaking republics of the Western Hemisphere, plus Brazil, Haiti, and Puerto Rico.'

2 Ibid., p. 536, ll. 41– 51 and p. 537 ll. 1–6, delete and substitute:

'Year 1:

1. In the first year, candidates for the M.Phil in Latin American Studies will:

(a) Follow for three terms a course of instruction in the M.Sc in Latin American Studies with the exception of the extended essay. Candidates will present three qualifying examinations, each of which counts for 16.6 per cent of the final degree mark. Examinations at the end of the first year will serve to qualify for entry onto the second year of the course.

(b) Develop a thesis topic, which will be the subject of fieldwork in the long vacation between the first and second year. A draft title for the thesis must be submitted for approval by the Latin American Centre Management Committee by 12:00 noon on the Friday of Week 3 of Hilary Term.

(c) Candidates may also be required to present themselves for an oral examination if requested to do so by the examiners. The oral examination will focus on the candidate's examination papers.

2. The list of examination papers will be published on the Latin American Centre Web site and in the University Gazette in Week 0 of Michaelmas Term. Candidates must take the core paper in Economics if they wish to take a further paper in that discipline. Specialisation on a single country or a combination of countries is permitted so long as the choice appears in the list of available papers published.

3. Candidates shall be deemed to have passed the qualifying examination if they have passed all three examination papers.

4. Candidates who fail one of the three papers taken at the end of the first year without compensating strengths on the other papers shall be deemed to have failed the qualifying examination. Such candidates will be required to retake it and pass it by the start of the Michaelmas Term of their second year, on a date stipulated by the Chair of Examiners, in order to continue the course without interruption.

5. Candidates who fail more than one paper shall be deemed to have failed the qualifying examination. Such candidates will be permitted to retake the papers failed on one (but not more than one) subsequent occasion, in Trinity Term, one year after the initial attempt. Such candidates must pass the papers that they have retaken in order to continue onto the second year of the course.'

3 Ibid., p. 537, delete ll. 7–33 and substitute:

'Year 2:

6. In the second year, candidates for the M.Phil in Latin American Studies will:

(a) Offer a thesis of not more than 30,000 words, including footnotes and appendices. Two typewritten copies of the thesis must be delivered to the Examination Schools and addressed to the Chair of Examiners for the M.Phil in Latin American Studies, c/o Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, by 12 noon on the Monday of Week 5 of Trinity Term in the calendar year in which the examination is to be taken. Successful candidates will be required to deposit one copy of their thesis in the Bodleian Library, and will be required to sign a form stating whether they will permit their thesis to be consulted. The thesis will be equivalent to two examination papers, and so will count for 33.3 per cent of the final degree mark.

(b) Take another examination paper from the list; or by agreement with the Latin American Centre Director of Graduate Studies and the relevant department, take a methodology or other paper from an appropriate M.Phil elsewhere in the University of Oxford. The examination will count for 16.6 per cent of the final degree mark.

(c) Candidates will be required to present themselves for an oral examination. The oral examination may focus on the candidate's examination papers, thesis, or both.

7. Candidates shall be deemed to have passed the examination if they have passed all examination papers and the thesis.

8. Candidates who fail the second year examination paper (without compensating strengths on the thesis) or who fail the thesis shall be deemed to have failed the examination. Such candidates will be permitted to resubmit the thesis or retake the examination paper on one (but not more than one) subsequent occasion, in Trinity Term, one year after the initial attempt. Such candidates must pass the thesis or examination paper in order to pass the examination.

9. Candidates who fail both the thesis and the examination paper shall be deemed to have failed the examination. Such candidates will be permitted to retake the examination and resubmit the thesis on one (but not more than one) subsequent occasion, in Trinity Term, one year after the initial attempt. Such candidates must pass both the thesis and the examination paper in order to pass the examination.

10. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.'

(l) M.Phil in Politics (Comparative Government, Political Theory, European Politics and Society)

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 576, after l. 42 insert:

'(ag) Comparative European Parliaments

Candidates will explore generic and comparative themes in European legislative politics, at both national and EU level, using a range of analytical perspectives. Candidates are expected to be familiar with legislative politics in at least two European states and the EU level, as well as to show awareness of the basic literature in the comparative study of legislatures.'

(m) M.Phil in Russian and East European Studies

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first year examination in 2011 and final examination in 2012)

In Examination Regulations, 2009, delete from p. 577, l. 9 to p. 578, l. 6 and substitute:

'There will be three compulsory papers to be taken at the end of the first year of the course.

1. An examination paper on Twentieth Century Russian, Soviet and East European History.

2. An examination paper on Political and Economic Transitions in the Former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe.

3. An examination paper on Culture of Russia and Eastern Europe.

The papers shall be set and administered by the examiners appointed to examine the M.Phil in Russian and East European Studies. The examination will be held in the eighth week of Trinity Full Term.

Candidates who pass these papers will proceed to the second year of the course and take the final examination at the end of the second year. Candidates who fail one or more of the examination papers may, by permission of the School of Interdisciplinary Area Studies Committee, proceed to the second year of the course and resit the failed papers during the final examination. Candidates will also be required to demonstrate competence in Methods and in either Russian or, in the case of candidates who select a thesis topic concerned with Eastern Europe, a relevant East European language, to be approved by the Management Committee for Russian and East European Studies (see below).

Final Examination

No candidate shall enter the final examination unless he or she has already passed the three compulsory papers in the first-year examination, save that the School of Interdisciplinary Area Studies may permit any candidate who has failed one or more of the compulsory examination papers to resit the papers at the same time as the final examination. Candidates must also have satisfied the Methods and Language requirements, as outlined below. In the final examination, every candidate must offer:

(a) a thesis of at least 25,000 words but not more than 30,000 words on a subject approved by the committee, to be delivered to the Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, by Friday in the third week of Trinity Term in which the final examination is taken. The thesis must be accompanied by a statement that the thesis is the candidate's own work except where otherwise indicated.

(b) two subjects chosen from a list of optional courses approved by the Management Committee. The subjects which candidates wish to offer for examination must be submitted to the committee for approval by Week 1 of Trinity Term of the first year of the course. Note as not all special subjects may be available in every year, candidates should apply to the Management Committee for Russian and East European Studies for permission to offer them before undertaking any work on them.

The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.

Methods Requirement. Before admission to the final examination all candidates will be required to have achieved pass marks for the assessed components of methods training, as specified in the Notes of Guidance of the year of matriculation of the candidates.

Language Requirement. Before admission to the final examination all candidates will be required to pass a language qualifying test as evidence that they have acquired a satisfactory knowledge of Russian or, in the case of candidates who select a thesis topic concerned with Eastern Europe, of a relevant East European language. The specific arrangements for the provision and methods of assessment of language training are governed by the Examination Conventions and Notes of Guidance of the year of matriculation of the candidates.'

(n) M.Sc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition

With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 679, l. 46, delete 'second Tuesday of September' and substitute 'last Friday of August'.

(o) M.Sc in Educational Research Methodology

With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 706, ll. 23–24, delete 'second Tuesday of September' and substitute 'last Friday of August'.

2 Ibid., after l. 33 insert '9. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.'

3 Ibid., l. 46, delete 'course committee' and substitute 'board of examiners'.

(p) M.Sc in Education

With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 707, l. 48, delete 'Trinity' and substitute 'the fifth week in Hilary'.

2 Ibid., p. 708, after l. 12 insert '9. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.'

3 Ibid., p. 709, l. 14, delete 'critically analyse' and substitute 'analyse critically'.

4 Ibid., delete ll. 21–26 and substitute:

'(i) Interventions and policies to promote children's development

The aim of this course is to encourage students to analyse critically research on interventions and policies designed to promote children's development in the family and in institutional settings. Risk factors and policies that aim to ameliorate these factors will be discussed.'

(q) M.Sc in Biodiversity, Conservation, and Management

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 683, l. 1, delete 'option' and substitute 'elective'.

2 Ibid., ll. 4–5, delete 'first week of Trinity Term' and substitute 'Hilary Term'.

3 Ibid., delete ll. 8–20 and substitute:

'5. The dissertation shall be of a maximum length of 15,000 words and accompanied by an abstract not exceeding 150 words. The maximum word count shall exclude appendices, references and the abstract. The detailed format and specification of the dissertation shall be approved by the Standing Committee, and published in the course handbook.

6. The deadline for submission is noon on the first weekday of September in the year in which the written examination is taken. Two copies of the dissertation must be submitted, to the M.Sc examiners (Biodiversity, Conservation, and Management), c/o Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford OX1 4BG. The examiners may retain one copy of the dissertation of each candidate who passes the examination for deposit in an appropriate library. Both copies must bear the candidate's examination number but not his/her name.

7. All submitted work shall be accompanied by a separate statement certifying that the submitted work is the candidate's own work except where otherwise indicated.'

4 Ibid., l. 21, delete '7' and substitute '8' and renumber clauses 8 to 10 as 9 to 11 accordingly.

5 Ibid., l. 44, delete 'Option' and substitute 'Elective'.

6 Ibid., l. 45, delete 'option' and substitute 'elective'.

(r) M.Sc in Environmental Change and Management

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 712, l. 37, delete 'Option' and substitute 'Elective'.

2 Ibid., delete ll. 42–43 and substitute:

'5. The dissertation shall be of maximum length 15,000 words excluding abstract, appendices and references. The dissertation shall be accompanied by an abstract not exceeding 150 words.'

3 Ibid., p. 713, delete ll. 28–32 and substitute:

'(iv) Electives. Candidates will be expected to show advanced knowledge of two of the elective courses on offer in any one year.'

(s) M.Sc in Nature, Society, and Environmental Policy

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 747, l. 6, delete 'option' and substitute 'elective'.

2 Ibid., ll. 9–10, delete 'first week of Trinity Term' and substitute 'Hilary Term'.

3 Ibid., delete ll. 18–30 and substitute:

'5. The dissertation shall be of a maximum length of 15,000 words and accompanied by an abstract not exceeding 150 words. The maximum word count shall exclude appendices, references and the abstract. The detailed format and specification of the dissertation shall be approved by the Standing Committee, and published in the course handbook.

6. The deadline for submission is noon on the first weekday of September in the year in which the written examination is taken. Two copies of the dissertation must be submitted, to the M.Sc examiners (Nature, Society and Environmental Policy), c/o Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford OX1 4BG. The examiners may retain one copy of the dissertation of each candidate who passes the examination for deposit in an appropriate library. Both copies must bear the candidate's examination number but not his/her name.

7. All submitted work shall be accompanied by a separate statement certifying that the submitted work is the candidate's own work except where otherwise indicated.'

4 Ibid., l. 31, delete '7' and substitute '8' and renumber clauses 8 to 10 as 9 to 11 accordingly.

5 Ibid., p. 748, l. 7, delete 'Option' and substitute 'Elective'.

6 Ibid., l. 8, delete 'option' and substitute 'elective'.

(t) M.Sc in Water Science Policy and Management

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 773, ll. 14–15, delete 'first week of Trinity Term' and substitute 'Hilary Term'.

2 Ibid., delete ll. 19–33 and substitute:

'5. The dissertation shall be of a maximum length of 15,000 words and accompanied by an abstract not exceeding 150 words. The word count shall exclude appendices, references and the abstract. The detailed format and specification of the dissertation shall be approved by the Standing Committee, and published in the course handbook.

6. The deadline for submission of the dissertation is noon on the first weekday of September in the year in which the written examination is taken. Two copies of the dissertation must be submitted, to the M.Sc Examiners (Water Science, Policy and Management) c/o Examinations Schools, High Street, Oxford OX1 4BG. The examiners may retain one copy of the dissertation of each candidate who passes the examination for deposit in an appropriate library. Both copies must bear the candidate's examination number but not his/her name.

8. All submitted work shall be accompanied by a separate statement certifying that that the submitted work is the candidate's own work except where otherwise indicated.'

4 Ibid., l. 34, delete '7' and substitute '8' and renumber clauses 8 to 10 as 9 to 11 accordingly.

5 Ibid., l. 45, delete 'and Technology'.

6 Ibid., p. 774, l. 10, delete 'Option' and substitute 'Elective'.

7 Ibid., l. 11, delete 'option' and substitute 'elective'.

(u) M.Sc in Global Governance and Diplomacy

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 719, l. 12, delete 'Diplomatic Practice' and substitute 'International Diplomacy'.

2 Ibid., delete 'approved by the Course Director' and substitute 'submitted to the Course Director for approval'.

3 Ibid., delete from p. 719, l. 46 to p. 720, l. 7, and substitute:

'(b) International Diplomacy substantive knowledge and theoretical background concerning the institutions and processes of international diplomacy.

(c) Research methods common research methods in the social sciences including but not limited to the topics of concept formation, social mechanisms and theory building, comparative method, case selection, historiography, ethnography, genealogy, textual content and discourse analysis, qualitative interviewing, and common quantitative analytic methods.'

(v) M.Sc in Latin American Studies

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 727, l. 7 after 'Latin American Studies' insert:

'(See also the the general notice at the commencement of these regulations)

For the purposes of this examination, 'Latin America' will be interpreted as the eighteen Spanish-speaking republics of the Western Hemisphere, plus Brazil, Haiti, and Puerto Rico.'

2 Ibid., delete ll. 8–28, and substitute:

'The regulations are as follows:

1. Candidates for the M.Sc in Latin American Studies will:

(a) Follow a course of instruction for three terms and present three examination papers at the end of Trinity Term in the year of registration. These papers must include at least two of the core papers from among the following five disciplines Economics, History, International Relations, Politics and Sociology. Each of the examination papers counts for 25 per cent of the final degree mark.

(b) Submit an extended essay, not exceeding 10,000 words, including footnotes and appendices. A draft title for the extended essay must be submitted for approval by the Latin American Centre Management Committee by 12:00 noon on the Friday of Week 3 of the Hilary Term preceding the written examination. Two typewritten copies of the extended essay must be delivered to the Examination Schools, addressed to the Chair of Examiners for the M.Sc in Latin American Studies, c/o Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, by 12 noon on the Monday of Week 5 of Trinity Term in the calendar year in which the examination is taken. The extended essay will be equal to one examination paper, i.e. 25 per cent of the final degree mark.

(c) Candidates may also be required to present themselves for an oral examination if requested to do so by the examiners. The oral examination may focus on the candidate's examination papers, extended essay, or both.'

3 Ibid., delete ll. 29–39 and substitute:

'2. The list of examination papers will be published on the Latin American Centre Web site and in the University Gazette in Week 0 of Michaelmas Term. Candidates must take the core paper in Economics if they wish to take a further paper in that discipline. Specialisation on a single country or a combination of countries is permitted so long as the choice appears in the list of available papers published.

3. Candidates shall be deemed to have passed the examination if they have passed all examination papers and the extended essay.

4. Candidates who fail one of the examination papers or the extended essay (without compensating strengths on the other components) shall be deemed to have failed the examination. They will be permitted to resubmit the extended essay or retake the examination paper on one (but not more than one) subsequent occasion, in Trinity Term, one year after the initial attempt. Such candidates must pass the extended essay or examination paper in order to pass the examination.'

(w) M.Sc in Public Policy in Latin America

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 756, l. 1 after 'Public Policy in Latin America' insert:

'(See also the the general notice at the commencement of these regulations)

For the purposes of this examination, 'Latin America' will be interpreted as the eighteen Spanish-speaking republics of the Western Hemisphere, plus Brazil, Haiti, and Puerto Rico.'

2 Ibid., delete ll. 2–20, and substitute:

'The regulations are as follows:

1. Candidates for the M.Sc in Public Policy in Latin America will:

(a) Follow for at least three terms a course of instruction in Public Policy in Latin America.

(b) Present a written examination paper from the list to be published on the Latin American Centre Web site for this degree and in the University Gazette in Week 0 of Michaelmas Term. The examination will count for 33.3 per cent of the final degree mark.

(c) Submit a dissertation of not more than 15,000 words, including footnotes and appendices. The title of the dissertation must be submitted for approval by the Latin American Centre Management Committee by 12:00 noon on the Friday of Week 6 of the Michaelmas Term in which they are admitted. Two typewritten copies of the dissertation must be delivered to the Examination Schools, addressed to the Chair of Examiners for the M.Sc in Public Policy in Latin America, c/o Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, by 12:00 noon on the Monday of Week 5 of Trinity Term in the calendar year in which the examination is taken. The dissertation will count for 66.7 per cent of the final degree mark.

(d) Candidates will be required to present themselves for an oral examination. The oral examination will focus on the candidate's examination paper and their dissertation.'

3 Ibid., delete ll. 21–27, and substitute:

'2. Candidates who fail the examination paper (without compensating strengths on the dissertation) or who fail the dissertation shall be deemed to have failed the examination. They will be permitted to resubmit the dissertation or retake the examination paper on one (but not more than one) subsequent occasion, in Trinity Term, one year after the initial attempt.

3. Candidates shall be deemed to have passed the examination if they have passed the examination paper and the dissertation.

4. Candidates who fail both the dissertation and the examination paper shall be deemed to have failed the examination. They will be permitted to retake the examination and resubmit the dissertation on one (but not more than one) subsequent occasion, in Trinity Term, one year after the initial attempt.

5. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.'

(x) M.Sc in Russian and East European Studies

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 760, delete ll. 22–44, and substitute:

'1. Each candidate will be required to follow a course of instruction for three terms and to present himself or herself for examination in the three compulsory papers in Week Eight of Trinity Term, as well as to present a thesis for examination. In addition, each candidate will be required to participate in training in methodology and research skills related to Russian and East European Studies and to have achieved pass marks for the assessed components, as specified in the Notes of Guidance of the year of matriculation of the candidate. Two copies of a thesis should be delivered to the Chair of Examiners for the M.Sc in Russian and East European Studies, c/o Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, by noon on the Friday of the sixth week of Trinity Term in the calendar year in which the examination is taken.

2. The marking conventions will be those of other M.Sc degrees.

3. Candidates who fail a written examination may be allowed to retake it in the following year. In the case of a failed thesis, this may be resubmitted in Trinity term of the following year. Only one resubmission is permitted In special circumstances, the Examiners may allow a marginal failure in one component in accordance with the rules outlined in the Examination Conventions.

4. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.

Schedule of Papers 1. Twentieth-Century Russian, Soviet and East European History (compulsory paper Michaelmas Term).

2. Political and Economic Transitions in the Former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe (compulsory paper Hilary Term).

3. Culture of Russia and Eastern Europe (compulsory paper Hilary and Trinity Terms).

4. A thesis of at least 12,000 words but not more than 15,000 words.'

(y) M.Sc in Social Anthropology (Research Methods)

With immediate effect

In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 763, ll. 3–4, delete 'School of Anthropology Graduate Studies Committee', and substitute 'Examination Schools'.

(z) M.St. in Classical Archaeology

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2009, delete ll. 2–4 and substitute: 'Aegean Area, 2000–1100 BC

Early Iron Age Greece, 1200–700 BC'.

2 Ibid., delete l. 11 and substitute 'Late Antiquity, AD 280–650'.

3 Ibid., delete l. 15 and substitute 'Aegean Bronze Age Scripts'.

(aa) M.St. in Archaeology

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

In Examination Regulations, 2009, as published in Gazette, 26 November 2009, p. 304, column 1, delete list of Schedule A Main Subjects and list of Schedule B Options, and substitute:

'Schedule A: Main subjects

Aegean Area, 2000–1100 BC

Ancient Indian Ocean Corridors and Connections

Archaeological method and theory

Archaeology of Southern African hunter-gatherers

Body and Adornment material culture of later medieval Britain, AD 1000–1500

Chinese Archaeology

Environmental Archaeology

Landscape Archaeology

Neolithic and Bronze Age Europe

Mesolithic and Neolithic Europe

Palaeolithic and Mesolithic Europe

Palaeolithic Archaeology

Regional studies in Australian and Pacific prehistory

The Archaeology of Colonialism

The Formation of the Islamic World

Transformation of the Celtic World 500 BC–AD 100

Visual Cultures of the Ancient World

Western Europe in the Early Middle Ages AD 400–900

Schedule B: Options

Aegean Bronze Age religion

Aegean Bronze Age trade interaction and identities

Archaeology of Early Anglo-Saxon England

Archaeology of Late Anglo-Saxon England

Archaeology and Geographical Information Systems

Archaeology and Material Culture

Coinage and Society in Anglo-Saxon England

Farming and States in Sub-Saharan Africa

Hunter-gatherers in world perspective

Object Analysis and Research Methods

Practical Archaeobotany

Themes in Archaeological Science

Topics in Aegean Prehistory'.

(bb) M.Sc in Archaeological Science

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 682, delete ll. 35–37.

(cc) D.Phil in Geography and the Environment

With effect from 1 October 2010

1 In Examination Regulations, 2009, delete l. 36 p. 898 to l. 22 p. 900,and substitute:

'1. Transfer from Probationer Research Student status to M.Litt, M.Sc, or D.Phil status

The transfer of status normally takes place not later than the third term after admission as a research student. Students are required to demonstrate that the research already accomplished shows promise of the ability to produce a satisfactory M.Litt, M.Sc, or D.Phil thesis on the intended topic. Students are required to submit to the director of Graduate Studies a report title and abstract (of no more than 300 words/one side of A4) by Friday of Eighth Week Michaelmas Term. Each student will also give a Transfer of Status Presentation of fifteen minutes (plus ten minutes of questions) during Noughth Week of Hilary Term. Students should submit two copies (and one electronic copy) of a research proposal of no more than 7,500 words, including an outline of research plans, a preliminary review of the literature, methodology, bibliography and a timetable for completion to the Director of Graduate studies by Friday of Eighth Week Hilary Term. On receiving the application, the Director of Graduate studies will, on behalf of the Graduate studies Committee, appoint two assessors (normally two members of the academic staff) neither of whom will normally be the student's supervisor. The interviewers will read the script before submitting to the board a reasoned report supporting their recommendation. Student s will be required to attend a Transfer of Status Assessment Meeting with their supervisor(s) and transfer of status assessors to discuss their report. These meetings will be held during 1st Week of Trinity Term. A student whose first application is unsuccessful may be given one further opportunity to apply for transfer, following the procedures laid down, and may apply for an extension of time for one term if this is necessary for the purpose of making the application.

2. Confirmation of D.Phil status

Application for Confirmation of D.Phil status should normally be made not earlier than sixth term from admission as a research student and not later than the ninth term. The department expects that, in most cases, the conformation will be made immediately after return from field-work and no later than Eighth Week Trinity Term of the student's third year. No candidate may submit a thesis for the doctoral degree without having first obtained confirmed doctoral status. Any student who does not confirm by the end of their ninth term, will be required to apply for deferral of confirmation of status and may be allowed up to three terms for this purpose. Any student who does not confirm by the end of their ninth term, will be required to apply for a deferral of confirmation of status and may be allowed up to three terms for this purpose. Any student who fails to confirm status within twelve terms of registering as a PRS will have their student status lapsed. Students who are have taken an MPhil first and were admitted directly to D.Phil status, should confirm status within three terms of starting the D.Phil Any student who fails to confirm within twelve terms of starting the M.Phil will have their status lapsed. The purpose of the submission for confirmed status is to ensure that the candidate is working to a doctoral standard. The confirmation report should show evidence that the research already accomplished gives promise of the ability to produce a satisfactory D.Phil thesis on the intended topic. For this purpose the candidate must submit to the Director of Graduate Studies two copies (together with an electronic version) of a report describing in approximately 3,000 words the aims and methods of the projected thesis. The student will also be required to include with the written work an outline of the proposed thesis, including the topics to be covered in individual chapters, and a timetable for completion. In addition, two substantive chapters of no ore than 10,000 words each must also be submitted. Candidates wishing to undertake the DPhil via scientific papers should substitute the chapters of the thesis with two papers. On receiving the application the Director of Graduate studies will appoint two assessors (normally two academic members of staff) neither of whom will normally be the student's supervisor. The assessors will read the script before submitting to the board a reasoned report supporting their recommendation. A student whose first application is unsuccessful may be given one further opportunity to apply for confirmation, following the procedures laid down, normally within one term if necessary for the purpose of making the application. Students will be notified of the outcome and they should receive advice from their supervisor(s) on their conformation assessment.

3. Submission of theses

Candidates for the Degrees of M.Sc, M.Litt, and D.Phil are required to submit at least two sets of all maps, diagrams, and other illustrations, one of which should be a reproduction of the original set. The copy of the thesis deposited in the Bodleian should be one of those with a complete set of maps and illustrations. Applications for leave to present only one set of maps, diagrams and other illustrations may be granted in exceptional circumstances, but such concessions will be granted only very sparingly. M.Sc theses should be approximately 40,000 words, inclusive of appendices but exclusive of tables, figures, and references. M.Litt theses should not exceed 50,000 words, exclusive of the bibliography, unless for exceptional reasons and on the recommendation of the candidate's supervisor the board otherwise determines. D.Phil theses submitted by students in Geography must not exceed 100,000 words, exclusive of the bibliography but including notes, glossary, appendices, etc., unless for exceptional reasons and on the recommendation of the candidate's supervisor the board otherwise determines. A D.Phil thesis may be accepted for examination if comprised of a minimum of four scientific papers submitted for publication if not yet accepted or published. Such a body of work will be deemed acceptable provided it represents a coherent and focused body or research. It should include an Introduction, a Survey of Literature, and a conclusion. Current word limits and conditions remain in place. A D.Phil thesis submitted under this rubric may include joint publications. In that case, all co-authors must certify in writing to the Director of Graduate Studies of the school that the majority of the work represents that of the candidate. candidates wishing to proceed in this manner must obtain permission from his/her supervisor, the School, and the Divisional Board and must be approved at the time of confirmation for D.Phil status. Evidence must be submitted at the time permission is sought that the scientific papers have been submitted to identified journals. If, after a petition is accepted, a candidate wishes to revert to a standard D.Phil thesis format, the candidate must lodge a petition with his/her supervisor, the school, the divisional Board showing good cause for the change.'

(dd) PG Dip in Learning and Teaching in Higher Education

With immediate effect

In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 989, l. 49 after 'Education' insert 'or the Diploma in Learning and Teaching in Higher Education'.

(ee) PG Dip in Education and PG Dip in Learning and Teaching in Higher Education

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 987, delete ll. 1–5 and substitute:

'REGULATIONS FOR THE POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMAS IN EDUCATION, IN LEARNING AND TEACHING IN HIGHER EDUCATION, AND IN TEACHING ENGLISH LANGUAGE IN UNIVERSITY SETTINGS'.

2 Ibid., l. 10, after 'Education' insert 'and Postgraduate Diplomas in Teaching English in University Settings'.

3 Ibid., p. 988, l. 11, after 'SPECIAL REGULATIONS' insert 'FOR THE POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN EDUCATION'.

4 Ibid., delete ll. 17–18 and renumber clause 3 as clause 2 accordingly.

5 Ibid., p. 989, ll. 12–13, delete 'Postgraduate Diploma in Learning and Teaching in Higher Education'.

6 Ibid., delete ll. 15–16, and renumber clauses 6–11 as 5–10 accordingly.

7 Ibid., delete ll. 40–48.

8 Ibid., delete ll. 50–51 and substitute '10. Candidates for the Postgraduate Diploma in Education who fail the'.

9 Ibid., after l. 53 insert:

'SPECIAL REGULATIONS FOR THE POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN LEARNING AND TEACHING IN HIGHER EDUCATION

1. Candidates for the Postgraduate Diploma in Learning and Teaching in Higher Education ('the Diploma') shall be engaged as teachers in higher education.

2. All candidates for admission as students for the Diploma must apply to the Course Director at the Oxford Learning Institute not later than March 31st in the calendar year in which they wish to start the course. The Course Director shall forward his or her recommendations for decision to the Graduate Studies Committee of the Department of Education.

3. All candidates for the Diploma shall follow a course of study approved by the Graduate Studies Committee of the Department of Education.

4. Every candidate for admission to the examination must apply to the Graduate Studies Committee of the Department of Education by submitting an examination entry form to the Course Director at the Oxford Learning Institute no later than the first day of Hilary Full Term preceding the Michaelmas Term in which he or she wishes to be examined. No candidate shall be examined later than in the seventh term following the start of his or her course of study except with the approval of the Graduate Studies Committee of the Department of Education following written application via the Oxford Learning Institute.

5. Candidates for the Diploma must submit a portfolio of written work of between 12,000 and 15,000 words in total. Two typewritten copies of the portfolio and a certificate from the Oxford Learning Institute confirming that the candidate has participated in no fewer than six of the full–day seminars in the Diploma programme must be delivered to the Postgraduate Diploma Examiners, Department of Education, 15 Norham Gardens, Oxford OX2 6PY, not later than noon on the Monday of the first week of the Michaelmas Full Term in which the candidate is to be examined. In exceptional circumstances, following written application in advance via the Oxford Learning Institute, the Graduate Studies Committee of the Department of Education may allow late submission by specifying a revised deadline not later than noon on the Friday of the first week of that Michaelmas Term. One bound copy of the dissertation of each candidate who passes the examination shall be retained for deposit in the Oxford Learning Institute.

6. Candidates for the Diploma in Learning and Teaching in Higher Education may be awarded a distinction.

7. Notwithstanding the provisions in clause 4 above regulating the time allowed for completion of the course, candidates for the Diploma who fail the examination may be re-examined on not more than one occasion which shall be in the Michaelmas Term following their initial failure.

SPECIAL REGULATIONS FOR THE POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN TEACHING ENGLISH LANGUAGE IN UNIVERSITY SETTINGS

1. Candidates for the Postgraduate Diploma in Teaching and Learning in University Settings ('the Diploma') shall normally have successfully obtained an honours degree. They shall be engaged as teachers of English as a second or foreign language at the time of application, and shall expect to continue this engagement during the Diploma course.

2. All candidates for admission as students for the Diploma must apply to the Course Director at the Department of Education. The Course Director shall forward his or her recommendations for decision to the Graduate Studies Committee of the Department of Education.

3. All candidates for the Diploma shall follow a course of study approved by the Graduate Studies Committee of the Department of Education.

4. Every candidate will be required to complete all eight summatively assessed online Modules of the course by carrying out tasks and participating in discussions as directed by the Course Director. Every candidate will also be required to complete both formatively assessed residential modules, or, in exceptional cases and as determined by the Course Director, to give evidence of equivalent learning for one of these two modules.

5. Every candidate will be required to satisfy the examiners in the following:

(i) Satisfactory participation in the appropriate web–based tasks and discussions for each module

(ii) Satisfactory performance in the take-home examinations every candidate must complete all eight take-home examinations, each examination consisting of an essay which will be given a numerical mark and a reflective portfolio which will be marked on a pass/fail basis. The overall mark for the Diploma shall be the mean of the seven best marks of the eight essays completed in the take-home examinations.

6. In each of the two years of this part-time course, three word-processed or printed copies of each of two module take-home examinations must be delivered to the Chair of Examiners, PG Diploma in Teaching English Language in University Settings, c/o Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, no later than noon on the Monday of Week 1 of Hilary Full Term, and three word-processed or printed copies of each of two module take-home examinations must be delivered to the same address no later than noon on the Monday of Week 1 of Trinity Full Term.

7. Every candidate for admission to the examination must apply for entry to the examination by a date specified in the course handbook early in the Michaelmas Full Term of each year of the course. No candidate shall be examined later than in the seventh term following the start of his or her course of study except with the approval of the Graduate Studies Committee of the Department of Education.

8. Notwithstanding the provisions in clause 7 above regulating the time allowed for completion of the course, candidates for the Diploma who fail the examination may be re-examined on not more than one occasion which shall be in the year following their initial failure.

9. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence on the whole examination.

10. In the case of failure of a student to reach an average passing mark over the seven highest- marked module essays, a resit of all module take-home examinations will be permitted, and the resit examinations must be submitted electronically by 12 midday on Monday of Week 1 of Trinity term of the year following the student's final year of taught modules.

Schedule p Summatively assessed modules by distance learning\:

Module 1 Individual and group differences in language learning

Module 2 Listening to and reading English in university settings

Module 3 Understanding and teaching the grammar of English

Module 4 Speaking and writing in university settings

Module 5 Learning and teaching of vocabulary

Module 6 Evaluating and designing English language teaching materials for university settings

Module 7 New technologies and language learning and teaching

Module 8 Assessing language learning


Formatively assessed residential modules:

Module 0 Induction

Module 9 Research methods'.


7 Board of the Faculty of Classics

Honour School of Classical Archaeology and Ancient History

(i) With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 180, l. 30, after 'and history', insert:

'Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the material and written evidence for the Greek world and the areas of contact between Greek and other Mediterranean peoples. Areas of emphasis will include the development of Athens and Attica; the non-Greek states bordering the Mediterranean; the relationships between them and the Greeks; Greek settlement overseas; trade and coinage; problems of method in history and archaeology; and problems of chronology.'

2 Ibid., l. 31, after 'and history', insert:

'The course studies the political and cultural interaction and conflict between the Hellenistic East and Roman Italy. Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the material, visual, and written evidence of the period and to show ability in interpreting it in its archaeological and historical contexts. Candidates should be familiar with the relevant archaeology of the following cities and sites Pella, Alexandria, Pergamon, Ai Khanoum, Athens, Priene, Delos, Praeneste, Pompeii, Rome.'

3 Ibid., l. 39, after 'Roman Empire', insert:

'The paper studies the archaeology and art of the Roman Empire from Diocletian through the death of Heraclius. Subjects include urban change; development of the countryside in the east; industry; patterns of trade; persistence of pagan art; and the impact of Christianity (church building, pilgrimage, monasticism) on architecture and art. The main sites to be studied are Rome, Constantinople, Trier, Verulamium, Ravenna, Justiniana Prima, Caesarea Maritima, Scythopolis, Jerusalem, and sites in the Roman provinces of Syria and Palestine.'

4 Ibid., p. 181, l. 8, after 'Greek and Roman Coins', insert:

'Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the principal developments in coinage from its beginnings c.600 BC until the reign of Diocletian (AD 284–305). Emphasis will be placed on the ways in which numismatic evidence may be used to address questions of historical and archaeological interest.'

5 Ibid., p. l. 11, after 'Roman World', insert:

'The course focuses on the inscribed text, mainly on stone and bronze, as monument, physical object and medium of information, and it explores the evidence of particular inscriptions, or groups of inscriptions, for the political, social, and economic history of communities in the ancient world. Candidates may show knowledge of either Archaic–Classical Greek, or Hellenistic, or Republican Roman or Imperial Roman inscriptions. They will be expected to show knowledge of epigraphic texts in Greek and/or in Latin (though all texts will be accompanied by translations).'

(ii) With effect from 1 October 2011 (for first examination in 2012)

In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 180, l. 30, delete 'c.800–500' and substitute 'c.950–550'.


8 Board of the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages

Preliminary Examination for Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 133, delete ll. 13–14, and substitute:

'(e) Russian Course B (ab initio).'

2 Ibid., delete ll. 15–28 and substitute:

'3. A candidate shall be deemed to have passed the examination if he or she shall have satisfied the Examiners either (i) in all papers in both subjects (a) Language and (b) Literature in each of two languages, at least one of the languages being modern; or (ii) in all papers in both subjects (a) Language and (b) Literature in one modern language (other than Czech (with Slovak) or Celtic) and in all papers in subject (c) Linguistics; or (iii) in all papers in both subjects (a) Language and (b) Literature in either French or German and in all three papers in subject (d) Further Topics in the same language; or (iv) in all papers in both subjects (a) Language and (b) Literature in one modern language and in all papers in subject (e) Russian Course B (ab initio). Candidates must offer all the papers at one examination, provided that a candidate who has previously failed to satisfy the examiners in any paper or papers shall not be required to resit any paper or papers in which he or she has already satis'ed the examiners. The pair of papers IIA and IIB (and BIIA and BIIB) counts as a single paper.'


9 Oriental Studies Board

M.St Modern Middle Eastern Studies

With effect from 1 October 2011 (for first examination in 2012)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 598, delete l. 30.

2 Ibid., pp. 647–8, delete ll. 21–46 and ll. 1–24 respectively.

3 Ibid., p. 1107 (index), delete 'M.St. in 647'.

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