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Oxford University Gazette, 11 February 2010: Examinations and Boards

Changes in Regulations

With the approval, where appropriate, of the Education Committee of Council, the following changes in regulations made by the Social Sciences Board and the Continuing Education Board will come into effect on 26 February.

1 Social Sciences Board

(a) D.Phil

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 902, l. 44, delete 'register for' and substitute 'apply for transfer to'.

2 Ibid., l. 46, after 'student.', insert 'such applications will be considered by the Graduate Studies Committee.'


(b) Special regulations for the D.Phil in Anthropology

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first PRS examination in 2011)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 892, after l. 37 insert:

'3. Probationer research students with coursework

Probationer research students entering the Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology should normally have a prior, full taught-course degree in social or cultural anthropology at either the graduate or undergraduate levels before being admitted to this status. Exceptionally, however, students who have earned a distinction in either (1) a degree in a closely related subject that includes some social or cultural anthropology, or (2) a mixed degree in social or cultural anthropology and another closely related subject may be admitted directly to the status of probationer research student in anthropology. In addition to the standard requirements for probationer research students in anthropology (and except as varied below), students entering the above Institute via this route should satisfy the following conditions:

(1) they enter the Institute as research students in the Michaelmas term of their first academic year and not in any other term;

(2) the topic of their proposed research lies in the general thematic or geographical area covered by their prior degree;

(3) they undertake a full course of eight tutorials in general anthropology, with essays, in the first Michaelmas term of their admission as probationer research students. Three of the essays produced for these tutorials are to be submitted for assessment as described below;

(4) they follow a course in an option (area or topic) offered to master's students in the above Institute in the first Hilary and, where provided for, Trinity terms after their admission as research students. The option must be relevant to their proposed research if one is available (area or topic), except that they may not repeat an option in which they have been examined as part of a prior degree in the University of Oxford. If the student cannot take such an option for either of these reasons, a free choice may be allowed with the agreement of the Director of Graduate Studies for Anthropology or his or her delegate. The student shall write one essay of tutorial standard on the option for assessment as described below;

(5) the proposed supervisor has given his or her approval of this course of action in writing to the Director of Graduate Studies for anthropology or, in case the latter is the proposed supervisor, to the Director of the Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology.

Note: the work specified in (3) and (4) above shall constitute Part I of the assessment for transfer from probationer research student to full D.Phil student, and the text for transfer that the student will be required to prepare on the basis of his or her proposed research (in the same manner as for ordinary probationer research students in anthropology) shall constitute Part II of the said assessment.

Students following these arrangements must pass an assessment of the work they have carried out under (3) and (4) above (Part I), which shall normally involve scrutiny of three tutorial essays and the option essay. This assessment shall be carried out at the same time as the standard assessment of the text on the proposed research (Part II). An extra assessor or assessors, one of whom in special cases may be the student's supervisor, may but need not be appointed to scrutinise the work carried out for Part I. The extra assessor(s), if any, need not be present at the assessment interview with the student, but should advise the assessors conducting the interview in writing beforehand of the standard of work achieved by the student in Part I.

Both parts of the assessment, i.e. Parts I and II as specified above, must be passed by the student, though not necessarily on the same occasion. If the student fails in either Part I or Part II, or both, he or she will be required to resubmit materials for, and pass, the relevant part(s) within one term of the original submission. Both elements in Part I, as described under 3) and 4) above, must be passed by the student.

The deadline for a student following this path to submit materials for assessment for upgrade to full status as a doctoral student shall normally be the fourth term after admission as a research student (i.e. the Michaelmas Term of the second year in the status of probationer research student). Such students are expected to start work on their text for upgrade during the Hilary term after their admission as probationer research students at the latest.'

2 Ibid., l. 38, delete '3' and substitute '4'.

3 Ibid., p. 893, l. 18, delete '4' and substitute '5'.


(c) M.Phil in Geography and the Environment

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 517, l. 40, delete 'without compensating strength on other papers'.

2 Ibid., p. 518, l. 9, delete 'of the fifth Monday of Trinity Full Term' and substitute 'on the first weekday of September'.

3 Ibid., l. 20, delete 'noon of Friday of week nought of Hilary Term' and substitute 'the deadline(s) stipulated in the course handbook'.


(d) M.Phil in Evidence-Based Social Intervention

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011 (Qualifying Test) and in 2012 (Final Examination))

1 In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 514, l. 6 and l. 15, delete 'third' and substitute 'sixth'.

2 Ibid., l. 17, after 'on a topic related to' insert ',and attentive to the methods of,'.


(e) M.Sc in Evidence-Based Social Intervention

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 715, l. 5, after 'on a topic related to' insert ',and attentive to the methods of,'.


(f) M.Sc in Contemporary India

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 694, delete ll. 43–4, and renumber cl. 6 as 5.


(g) M.St in Legal Research

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 637, l. 31, after 'Research' insert: '/Socio-Legal Research'.


(h) Honour School of Philosophy, Politics, and Economics

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 417, delete ll. 6–11 and substitute:

'Welfare measurement and cost-benefit analysis, with applications to healthcare and the environment; taxes and transfers; optimal income and commodity taxation, and intertemporal public finance including pensions provision; government expenditure, including healthcare and education; political economics.'

2 Ibid., delete ll. 21–7 and substitute:

'Employer–employee relations; human resource management including the role of government; trade unions and other collective groupings; the theory and practice of collective bargaining; the application of economic analysis to labour markets; economic aspects of trade unions; the economics of labour policy; factors affecting the distribution of earnings.'


(i) Honour School of Economics and Management

With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2011)

As specified for the Honour School of Philosophy, Politics, and Economics (see ( h) above).


2 Continuing Education Board

M.St in International Human Rights Law

With effect from 1 October 2010

In Examination Regulations, 2009, pp. 628–9, delete from l. 21, p. 628, to l. 10, p. 629 and substitute:

'1. Candidates must follow a course of instruction in International Human Rights Law. The course will be taken on a part-time basis over a period of not fewer than six terms and not more than twelve terms.

2. Every candidate will be required to satisfy the examiners in the following:

(a) i. Attendance at classes, individual tutorials, group seminars, and other teaching sessions as required;

ii. Active participation in all parts of the course to the satisfaction of the Course Director;

iii. Active participation in (electronic) group discussions under the guidance, and to the satisfaction, of the student's academic tutor;

(b) four written papers, each of three hours' duration, as set out below: i. Fundamentals of International Human Rights Law II

ii. The Implementation and Development of International Human Rights Law I

iii. The Implementation and Development of International Human Rights Law II

iv. Populations at Risk

(c) six essays, each of not more than 2,000 words in length, covering the Fundamentals of International Human Rights Law I;

(d) an advocacy exercise;

(e) a dissertation prospectus not to exceed 1,500 words in length that identifies the dissertation topic, central question, thesis and methodology; provides a summary of the dissertation; a schedule for completion and a working bibliography. The bibliography will not count towards the word length of the prospectus;

(f) submission of a dissertation of no more than 12,000 words on a topic selected by the student in consultation with the tutor and agreed by the Board of Studies.

The assignments under 2 (c)–(e) and the dissertation under 2 (f) will be forwarded to the examiners c/o Registry, Department for Continuing Education, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JA, for receipt by such date as the examiners shall determine and shall notify the candidates and tutors.

3. Candidates may be required to attend a viva voce examination at the end of the course of study at the discretion of the examiners.

4. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.

5. Candidates who fail to satisfy the examiners in the written examinations under 2 (b), the written portfolios under 2 (c) and 2 (e), the advocacy exercise under 2 (d) or the dissertation under 2 (f) may be permitted to resubmit work in respect of the part or parts of the examination which they have failed on not more than one occasion which shall normally be within one year of the original failure.'

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