University of Oxford


Oxford University Gazette, 11 February 2010: Diary

Friday 12 February

LEARNING INSTITUTE seminar: 'Breakfast at OUCS—an introduction to Oxford University Computing Services' (for new administrative, research, library, IT, clerical, technical and ancillary staff), 8.30 a.m. (for details, see the Learning Institute site).

DR LINSEY MCGOEY: 'Gaming the future: the use of profitable unknowns in drug regulation' (Ethnicity and Identity Seminar: 'Plausible pasts, uncertain futures—diviners, prophets, and forecasters'), Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, 51 Banbury Road, 11 a.m.

KATE TUNSTALL: 'The European "Enlightenment" ' (seminar series: 'Key words in French culture (sixteenth to eighteenth centuries)'), Maison Française, 11.30 a.m.

DR PETER WILLIAMS: 'In transition? The future shape of housing and mortgage markets in England and the housing policy challenges' (Oxford Housing Seminars), Clay Room, Nuffield College, 1 p.m.

PROFESSOR DAVID BATES: 'Hegemony' (Ford's Lectures in British History: 'The Normans and empire'), Schools, 5 p.m.

JON SNOW: 'Getting TV news right?' (Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism: Media and politics seminar), Seminar Room, Nuffield, 5 p.m.

AHMED RASHID: 'Afghanistan and Pakistan: past mistakes, future directions?' (Tanner Lectures on Human Values) (lecture 1), Nelson Mandela Lecture Theatre, Saïd Business School, 5 p.m. (open to the public, but space limited. Places can be reserved at: http://bnctannerlectures2010.eventbrite.co m).

LUC BOROT: 'Les débats sur la laïcité: histoire et enjeux' (lecture), Maison Française, 5.15 p.m.

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Saturday 13 February

MUSEUM OF THE HISTORY OF SCIENCE: a programme of talks, music, film, and activities on the theme of 'Steam', 10 a.m.–10 p.m. (see further at www.mhs.ox.ac.uk).

STUDY-DAY: 'Durkheim and other thinkers, including Belot, Huvelin and Foucault', Maison Française, 10.30 a.m.

AHMED RASHID: 'Afghanistan and Pakistan: past mistakes, future directions?' (Tanner Lectures on Human Values) (lecture 2), Nelson Mandela Lecture Theatre, Saïd Business School, 11 a.m. (open to the public, but space limited. Places can be reserved at: http://bnctannerlectures2010.eventbrite.com).

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Sunday 14 February

INTER-COLLEGIATE EVENSONG, St Mary's, 6 p.m.

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Monday 15 February

LEARNING INSTITUTE seminar: 'Time management for managers, academics and research staff,' 9.30 a.m. (for details, see the Learning Institute site).

DR GERSHOM GORENBERG: 'Quagmire: the genesis of Israeli settlements in occupied territory' (seminar series), Middle East Centre, 68 Woodstock Road, 12.30 p.m.

SLOAN MAHONE: 'Female circumcision in the history of medicine and anthropology' (seminar series: 'Local and global perspectives in the history of medicine'), Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine, 2.15 p.m.

STEFAN ECKS: 'India on Prozac: antidepressants in a globalising world' (Medical anthropology research seminars: 'Bodies in transformation'), 64 Banbury Road, 4 p.m.

DR IOANNIS ARMAKOLAS: 'A hard case: thinking "out of the box" on transitional justice and reconciliation in Bosnia' (Centre for Socio-legal Studies/Oxford Transitional Justice Research seminar series), Seminar Room D, Manor Road Building, 4.30 p.m.

DR MARK PHILP AND DR DAVID O'SHAUGHNESSY: 'The Godwin Project' (Besterman Centre for the Enlightenment workshops), Voltaire Foundation, 99 Banbury Road, 5 p.m.

FERENCE MARTON: 'Watching koalas does not help you know them: why solving 1,000 quadratic equations may not help you know what a quadratic equation is, while solving ten might' (Department of Education public lecture programme), Seminar Room A, 15 Norham Gardens, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR ERICA CARTER: 'Béla Balázs and the fairy-tale close-up' (Taylor Special Lecture), Main Hall, Taylor Institution, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR DAVID G. ROSKIES: 'Crossing the Jew-zone: Yiddish writing and the making of Holocaust literature' (Hebrew and Jewish Studies Unit: Corob Lecture in Yiddish Culture), Taylor Institution, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR ROBERTA GILCHRIST: 'The archaeology of heirlooms: memory, materiality and the medieval household' (Medieval Studies lecture), Schools, 5.15 p.m.

DR ALLAN CHAPMAN: 'Oxford's astronomical century, 1690 to 1790—the age of Edmund Halley, James Bradley and Thomas Hornsby' ('Astronomy for all' lecture series), Lecture Theatre, Green Templeton, 6 p.m.

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Tuesday 16 February

JUDITH OLSZOWY-SCHLANGER: 'Christian Hebraism in thirteenth-century England' (lecture series: 'Crossing borders: Hebrew manuscripts as a meeting place of cultures'), Convocation House, Bodleian Library, 1 p.m.

DR BASTIEN IRONDELLE: 'Rethinking the nuclear taboo: the French perspective' (Oxford Institute of Ethics, Law and Armed Conflict/Programme on the Changing Character of War seminar series), Seminar Room G, Manor Road Building, 1 p.m.

DR JULIA KRIVORUCHKO: 'Greek loanwords in rabbinic literature' (European Seminar on Advanced Jewish Studies: 'Greek scripture and the rabbis'), Oriental Institute, 2.30 p.m.

PROFESSOR LEWIS WOLPERT: 'Not set in concrete: from civil engineer to cell biologist' (Julia Bodmer Memorial Lecture), Lecture Theatre A, Department of Zoology, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR MICHAEL ROSEN: 'Die Weltgeschichte ist das Weltgericht' (Isaiah Berlin Lectures: 'History and freedom in German idealism'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR ANATOL LIEVEN and DR ANDREW PRESTON: 'America and the evangelical right' (Visiting Parliamentary Fellows seminar: 'God and Caesar'), Nissan Lecture Theatre, St Antony's, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR HELGA TAWIL-SOURI: 'Israeli air power: media technologies in times of war' (seminar series), Middle East Centre, 68 Woodstock Road, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR STEPHEN GARRETT: 'Tomorrow got here yesterday' (News International Visiting Professor of Broadcast Media Lectures), Green Templeton, 5.15 p.m.

ANNE PAUPERT: ' "Lasse, fet ele"... Le long écho de chansons de femmes' (Medieval French seminar), Maison Française, 5.15 p.m.

DR ANNA STIRR: 'Singing of love in the remembered village: migration and Nepali dohori songs' (Graduate Students' Colloquia), Denis Arnold Hall, Faculty of Music, 5.15 p.m.

SUSAN HILL: 'A life in reading' (Lectures on life-writing), Haldane Room, Wolfson, 5.30 p.m.

PAOLO SCARONI: 'Their oil, not ours: a vision for twenty-first century oil' (Distinguished Speaker Seminars), Saïd Business School, 6 p.m. (free and open to all, but advance electronic registration required at: www.sbs.oxford.edu/events/).

DR ROUSLAN KHOUMAKOV: 'The economic psychology of conventions' (Oxford Seminar on Conventions and Rules (OSCAR)), Old Common Room, Balliol, 8 p.m. (free to University members, but space limited. To attend, e-mail: john.latsis@balliol.ox.ac.uk).

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Wednesday 17 February

LEARNING INSTITUTE seminars: 'Recruitment and selection online' (begins); 'Time management for support staff: managing your work,' 9.30 a.m.; and 'Proof reading,' 2 p.m. (for details, see the Learning Institute site).

CAROLINE THOMSON: 'Running the BBC' (Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism seminar series), Barclay Room, Green Templeton, 12 noon.

BEN LINDLEY (baritone) performs Lieder by Wolf, Beethoven and Schubert, and

ALEXANDRA KNIGHT (violin) performs Handel's Violin sonata in F, and Hubay's cBolero, Jacqueline du Pré Music Building, St Hilda's, 1.15 p.m. (admission free).

PROFESSOR DAWN ADES: 'Poetry, politics, and sexuality: Surrealism in Latin America' (Slade Lectures: 'Surrealism and the avant-garde in Europe and the Americas'), University Museum of Natural History, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR SYDNEY ANGELO: 'Machiavell[ian]ism' (lecture series: 'What makes an "ism"? Doctrines and traditions in early modern thought and later historiography'), Hovenden Room, All Souls, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR FRED ASTREN: 'Shadows of Jews in early medieval Muslim conquests' (David Patterson Seminars), Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Yarnton Manor, 5 p.m. (minibus available: see www.ochjs.ox.ac.uk).

KARMA NABULSI: ' "That the General Will is Indestructible": from the citizen of Geneva to the citizens of Gaza' (Oxford Amnesty Lectures, in collaboration with the Besterman Centre for the Enlightenment), Taylor Institution, 5.30 p.m. (tickets £8/£5 from www.ticketsoxford.com, and at the door if available).

DR RHYS EVANS: 'What does the heart like to eat?—feeding fat to the heart in health and disease' (lecture), Pusey Lecture Room, Keble, 5.30 p.m.

DR XIAOXIN WU: 'Economic growth and spiritual nourishment: Shenzhen and its entrepreneur citizens' (Martin D'Arcy Memorial Lectures: 'The dragon and the cross: contemporary Chinese perspectives on Christianity in China'), Schools, 5 p.m.

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Thursday 18 February

LEARNING INSTITUTE seminars: 'Working with systems thinking and the unconscious in the organisation' (workshop 1), 9.30 a.m.; 'Class teaching' (for academic staff in Humanities and Social Sciences) (part 1), 12 noon; and 'An introduction to small group teaching in medicine' (for medical teachers), 2 p.m. (for details, see the Learning Institute site).

PROFESSOR LINDA MCDOWELL; DR HELENE NEVEU KRINGELBACH: 'Youth, economic change and diaspora–local relations'; 'Multinational families, creolised practices and new identities: Euro-Senegalese cases' (COMPAS and IMI seminar series: The impact of diasporas: connection, contestation, convergence), Seminar Room, Pauling Centre, 58a Banbury Road, 2 p.m.

ALISON-LOUISE KAHN: 'Captured by women: unveiling the lost film archives from the Pitt Rivers Museum' (International Gender Studies Centre seminars: 'Gender and the struggle for economic, civil and social survival in the twenty-first century'), Lecture Room 3, Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

DR DIANE BEBBINGTON: 'Higher education leaders and leadership: the relevance of diversity' (Learning Institute public seminar series), Littlegate House, St Ebbe's Street, 4 p.m.

PROFESSOR STEPHEN MEREDITH: 'Reading Thomas Aquinas on human nature in an age of biotechnology' (Aquinas Seminar), Blackfriars, 4.30 p.m.

PROFESSOR J. HANKINS: 'The Roman republic in Renaissance historical thought' (Carlyle Lectures: 'The transformation of the republican idea in the Italian Renaissance'), Schools, 5 p.m.

KAREN ANDERSEN RADBOUD lectures in series: 'Current issues in social policy: the welfare state in uncertain times', Violet Butler Seminar Room, Department of Social Policy and Social Work, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR ANNELI AEJMELAEUS: 'Collation of evidence' (Grinfield Lectures on the Septuagint: 'From textual transmission to critical edition of the Septuagint of 1 Samuel'), Examination Schools, 5 p.m.

ALAIN BRUNN: 'La Rochefoucauld et le laboratoire moraliste' (Early Modern French seminar), Maison Française, 5.15 p.m.

PROFESSOR BRUCE CAMPBELL: 'Panzootics, pandemics, and climatic anomalies in the fourteenth century' (Linacre Lectures: 'Disease and environmental change'), Main Lecture Theatre, Department of Plant Sciences, 5.30 p.m.

CHRIST CHURCH Cathedral Lent Course: 'The sound of scripture', Priory Room, Christ Church, 7.15 p.m.

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Friday 19 February

LEARNING INSTITUTE seminar: 'Working with systems thinking and the unconscious in the organisation' (workshop 2), 9.30 a.m. (for details, see the Learning Institute site).

DR LAURA WATTS: 'Futures-makers: relocating innovation stories from the Thames Valley to the Orkney Islands' (Ethnicity and Identity Seminar: 'Plausible pasts, uncertain futures—diviners, prophets, and forecasters'), Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, 51 Banbury Road, 11 a.m.

JEAN-MARC DREYFUS: 'The importance of Holocaust testimonies' (lecture as part of a conference), Maison Française, 4 p.m.

SIR NIGEL RODLEY, DR WILLIAM CALLAHAN, and DR ALICE EDWARDS: 'Shift of power and human rights' (Weidenfeld Debates: 'The shift of power'), the Auditorium, Magdalen, 4.30 p.m.

PROFESSOR J. TEMPLE LANG, DR C. BICKERTON AND DR K. ZIEGLER: 'The new EU treaties—institutional problems ahead?' (lecture), Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, 4.30 p.m.

PROFESSOR DAVID BATES: 'Core, periphery, and networks' (Ford's Lectures in British History: 'The Normans and empire'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PATIENCE WHEATCROFT: 'Financial reporting' (Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism: Media and politics seminar), Seminar Room, Nuffield, 5 p.m.

BARONESS HALE OF RICHMOND: 'Justice for the Jains: remedies for bad administration' ( Neill Lecture), Examination Schools, 5 p.m.

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