University of Oxford


Oxford University Gazette, 4 February 2010: Diary

Friday 5 February

DR GILLIAN TETT: 'People losing credit: models and innovation in finance' (Ethnicity and Identity Seminar: 'Plausible pasts, uncertain futures—diviners, prophets, and forecasters'), Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, 51 Banbury Road, 11 a.m.

RICHARD COOPER: 'The "Renaissance" in Italy and France' (seminar series: 'Key words in French culture (sixteenth to eighteenth centuries)'),Maison Française, 11.30 a.m.

LEARNING INSTITUTE seminar: 'The history of the University' (for new administrative, research, library, IT, clerical, technical and ancillary staff), 2 p.m. (for details, see the Learning Institute site).

PROFESSOR DAVID BATES: 'William the Conqueror as maker of empire' (Ford's Lectures in British History: 'The Normans and empire'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PETER RIDDELL: 'The influence of the press in Westminster and Washington' (Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism: Media and politics seminar), Seminar Room, Nuffield, 5 p.m.

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Saturday 6 February

WOLFGANG ZERER performs works by J.S. Bach, Dietrich Buxtehude, and François Couperin (Celebrity Organ Recital), St John's, 5.30 p.m. (admission free, with retiring collection; enquiries and requests for tickets to organ.scholar@sjc.ox.ac.uk).

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Sunday 7 February

PROFESSOR A.M. HONORÉ delivers the Sermon on the Grace of Humility, All Souls, 10.30 a.m.

ANTHONY PAY and MICHAEL BELL perform piano and clarinet works by Brahms, Delgado, Stravinsky, Schumann, Bernstein, Cage, Saint-Saëns, and Debussy, Auditorium, St John's, 3 p.m. (admission by free programme, available from college lodge).

CALLUM AU and JAZZ BAND perform a selection of jazz classics, Balliol, 9 p.m. (admission free; further programme information at http://users.ox.ac.uk/~kch/musicsoc).

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Monday 8 February

CARRIE HAMILTON: 'Narrating AIDS in Cuba: oral history between myth and memory' (seminar series: 'Local and global perspectives in the history of medicine'), Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine, 2.15 p.m.

PROFESSOR MOHAMMAD TALIB: 'Stereotyping of madrassahs and politics of violence' (lecture series: 'The anthropology of madrassahs in South Asia'), Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies, 4 p.m. Open only to matriculated members of the University.

DR RAMA MANI: 'Conflict prevention and reconciliation after mass atrocity' (Centre for Socio-legal Studies/Oxford Transitional Justice Research seminar series), Seminar Room D, Manor Road Building, 4.30 p.m.

DR MICHAEL SONENSCHER: 'How the sans-culottes got their name: politics and economics in the French Revolution' (Besterman Centre for the Enlightenment workshops), Voltaire Foundation, 99 Banbury Road, 5 p.m.

JAAN VALSINER: 'Cultural psychology and education: what would history tell us of this possible marriage?' (Department of Education public lecture programme), Seminar Room A, 15 Norham Gardens, 5 p.m.

PETER PARSONS: 'Artemidorus: a new papyrus and an old forger' (Oxford Bibliographical Society lecture), Taylor Institution, 5.15 p.m.

ERNST FEHR: 'Social and cultural foundations of economic preferences' (Clarendon Lectures in Economics: 'The biological foundations of economic and social behaviour'), St Cross Building, 5.30 p.m.

RENEE HLOZEK: 'Our Universe—from the tiny to the infinite' ('Astronomy for all' lecture series), Lecture Theatre, Green Templeton, 6 p.m.

PROFESSOR DANIEL STATMAN: 'Whose land is this anyway? Reflections on "our right to our land" ' (lecture series: 'Israel: historical, political, and social aspects'), Harris Lecture Theatre, Oriel, 8 p.m.

PROFESSOR ELEANOR NESBITT: 'Sikh diversity in the UK: contexts and evolution' (Interdisciplinary seminars in the study of religions: 'Religion in diaspora—perspectives from the social sciences'), Dorfman Centre, St Peter's, 8 p.m.

IRENE FREEDEN: 'From Hades to Oedipus: from psychotic to erotic transference and beyond' (St John's Research Centre: Interdisciplinary seminars in psychoanalysis), 45 St Giles', 8.15 p.m. (free to University members and mental health professionals but space limited; to attend, e-mail: paul.tod@sjc.ox.ac.uk).

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Tuesday 9 February

LEARNING INSTITUTE seminar: 'Presentation skills' (day 1), 9.30 a.m. (see information above).

LESLEY SMITH: 'Jews and Christians imagining the Temple' (lecture series: 'Crossing borders: Hebrew manuscripts as a meeting place of cultures'), Convocation House, Bodleian Library, 1 p.m.

PROFESSOR MICHAEL DOYLE: 'Human rights, sovereignty and military intervention: a dialogue with J.S. Mill' (Oxford Institute of Ethics, Law and Armed Conflict/Programme on the Changing Character of War seminar series), Seminar Room G, Manor Road Building, 1 p.m.

PROFESSOR ALANNA NOBBS: 'Distinguishing between Jewish and Christian divine names in fourth century papyri' (European Seminar on Advanced Jewish Studies: 'Greek scripture and the rabbis'), Oriental Institute, 2.30 p.m.

GEORGE WILLIAMS: 'The prospect and possibilities of an Australian Human Rights Act' (Centre for Socio-legal Studies lecture, followed by a panel), Seminar Room D, Manor Road Building, 4 p.m.

LORD GRIFFITHS OF FFORESTFACH: 'Scientific evidence and environmental stewardship' (Chavasse Lectures: 'Markets, money and morals: a vision for capitalism after the crisis'), Lower Common Room, Wycliffe Hall, 5 p.m. [information received 22/10/09 from laura.wu@wycliffe.ox.ac.uk]

PROFESSOR MICHAEL ROSEN: 'Freedom without arbitrariness' (Isaiah Berlin Lectures: 'History and freedom in German idealism'), Schools, 5 p.m.

LORD GRIFFITHS OF FFORESTFACH: 'Scientific evidence and environmental stewardship' (Chavasse lectures: 'Markets, money and morals: a vision for capitalism after the crisis'), Lower Common Room, Wycliffe Hall, 5 p.m.

SIR GERALD KAUFMAN and PROFESSOR AVI SHLAIM: 'Judaism in Israel and the diaspora' (Visiting Parliamentary Fellows seminar: 'God and Caesar'), Nissan Lecture Theatre, St Antony's, 5 p.m.

DR GUY BEN-PORAT: 'Live and let buy: consumerism, secularisation and liberalism in Israel' (seminar series), Middle East Centre, 68 Woodstock Road, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR STEPHEN GARRETT: 'No more heros' (News International Visiting Professor of Broadcast Media Lectures), Green Templeton, 5.15 p.m.

DR SUSAN WOLLENBERG: ' "New paths to analysis": the case of women composers' (Graduate students' colloquia), Denis Arnold Hall, Faculty of Music, 5.15 p.m.

ERNST FEHR: 'Hormonal foundations of economic preferences' (Clarendon Lectures in Economics: 'The biological foundations of economic and social behaviour'), Department of Economics, Manor Road Building, 5.30 p.m.

CLAIRE TOMALIN: 'Off the record: recovering forgotten lives' (Lectures on life-writing), Haldane Room, Wolfson, 5.30 p.m.

ROGER CARR (Cadbury): 'Hostile bids and takeovers' (Distinguished speaker seminars), Saïd Business School, 6 p.m. (free and open to all, but advance electronic registration required at: www.sbs.oxford.edu/events/).

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Wednesday 10 February

LEARNING INSTITUTE seminar: 'Selection and interview skills for research staff,' 9.30 a.m. (for details, see the Learning Institute site).

ROBIN LAURANCE: 'Photojournalism—its relevance in today's media' (Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism seminar series), Barclay Room, Green Templeton, 12 noon.

PROFESSOR ONORA O'NEILL: 'Ethics for mediated communication' (Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism/McDonald Centre for Theology, Ethics and Public Life lecture series: 'Journalism and public responsibility'), Lecture Room 2, Christ Church, 4 p.m.

PROFESSOR DAWN ADES: 'The experimental demonstration of critical paranoia: Salvador Dali's The Tragic Myth of Millet's Angelus' (Slade Lectures: 'Surrealism and the avant-garde in Europe and the Americas'), University Museum of Natural History, 5 p.m.

DR NOEL MALCOLM: 'Despotism' (lecture series: 'What makes an "ism"? Doctrines and traditions in early modern thought and later historiography'), Hovenden Room, All Souls, 5 p.m.

ERNST FEHR: 'The neural circuitry of economic preferences' (Clarendon Lectures in Economics: 'The biological foundations of economic and social behaviour'), Department of Economics, Manor Road Building, 5.30 p.m.

JAMES TULLY: 'Rethinking human rights and the Enlightenment: a view from the twenty-first century' (Oxford Amnesty Lectures, in collaboration with the Besterman Centre for the Enlightenment), Taylor Institution, 5.30 p.m. (tickets £8/£5 from www.ticketsoxford.com, and at the door if available).

PROFESSOR GUY STROUMSA: 'Gershom Scholem and Morton Smith' (David Patterson Seminars), Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Yarnton Manor, 5 p.m. (minibus available: see www.ochjs.ox.ac.uk).

DR XIAOXIN WU: 'The Hall of Four: politics, faith and daily life in a northern Chinese village' (Martin D'Arcy Memorial Lectures: 'The dragon and the cross: contemporary Chinese perspectives on Christianity in China'), Examination Schools, 5 p.m.

FIONA KERLOGUE: 'Researching stories and dance in Bali' (Oxford Asian Textile Group lecture), Pauling Centre, 58 Banbury Road, 5.45 p.m. Visitors welcome; cost £2.

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Thursday 11 February

LEARNING INSTITUTE seminars: 'Lecturing performance' (for academic staff), 9 a.m.; and 'Voice coaching' (for academic staff), 2 p.m. (for details, see the Learning Institute site).

ALEX STRICK VAN LINSCHOTEN and FELIX KUEHN: 'Losing Kandahar, 1968–2010' (seminar), Middle East Centre, 68 Woodstock Road, 12.30 p.m.

THE AGON PIANO TRIO performs Shostakovich's Piano trio no. 2 in E minor, op. 67, followed by masterclass with

THE BRANDUKOV PIANO TRIO, Jacqueline du Pré Music Building, St Hilda's, 1.15 p.m. (admission free).

JANE GARNETT, BEN GIDLEY, ALANA HARRIS AND MICHAEL KEITH: 'Local citizenship, diaspora belonging: associational politics, faith and settlements in twentieth-century London' (COMPAS and IMI seminar series: 'The impact of diasporas: connection, contestation, convergence'), Seminar Room, Pauling Centre, 58a Banbury Road, 2 p.m.

DEBORAH FAHY BRYCESON and RICHARD SHERRINGTON: 'Miners' magic: fetish creation in Tanzanian artisanal mining' (International Gender Studies Centre seminars series: 'Gender and the struggle for economic, civil and social survival in the twenty-first century'), Lecture Room 3, Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

PROFESSOR ANGELO CAMPODONICO: 'Reading Aquinas on natural law' (Aquinas Seminar), Blackfriars, 4.30 p.m.

LORD DRAYSON (Minister of State for Science and Innovation): 'The future for UK science' (Nairne Lecture), Mary Sunley Lecture Theatre, St Catherine's, 5 p.m. (to reserve a place, contact: franca.potts@stcatz.ox.ac.uk).

PROFESSOR J. HANKINS: 'The post-monarchical moment' (Carlyle Lectures: 'The transformation of the republican idea in the Italian Renaissance'), Schools, 5 p.m.

JOHN MARTIN: 'The jobs crisis: how OECD countries are responding on the labour market and social policy fronts' (lecture series: 'Current issues in social policy: the welfare state in uncertain times'), Green Templeton, 5 p.m.

SARA JAMES: 'Narratives of possession in the short fiction of Marceline Desbordes-Valmore' (Modern French seminar), Maison Française, 5.15 p.m.

PROFESSOR DONALD ORTNER: 'Bones, pathogens, and disease: environmental factors in past human populations' (Linacre Lectures: 'Disease and environmental change'), Main Lecture Theatre, Department of Plant Sciences, 5.30 p.m.

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Friday 12 February

LEARNING INSTITUTE seminar: 'Breakfast at OUCS—an introduction to Oxford University Computing Services' (for new administrative, research, library, IT, clerical, technical and ancillary staff), 8.30 a.m. (for details, see the Learning Institute site).

DR LINSEY MCGOEY: 'Gaming the future: the use of profitable unknowns in drug regulation' (Ethnicity and Identity Seminar: 'Plausible pasts, uncertain futures—diviners, prophets, and forecasters'), Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, 51 Banbury Road, 11 a.m.

KATE TUNSTALL: 'The European "Enlightenment" ' (seminar series: 'Key words in French culture (sixteenth to eighteenth centuries)'), Maison Française, 11.30 a.m.

DR PETER WILLIAMS: 'In transition? The future shape of housing and mortgage markets in England and the housing policy challenges' (Oxford Housing Seminars), Clay Room, Nuffield College, 1 p.m.

PROFESSOR DAVID BATES: 'Hegemony' (Ford's Lectures in British History: 'The Normans and empire'), Schools, 5 p.m.

JON SNOW: 'Getting TV news right?' (Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism: Media and politics seminar), Seminar Room, Nuffield, 5 p.m.

AHMED RASHID: 'Afghanistan and Pakistan: past mistakes, future directions?' (Tanner lectures on human values) (lecture 1), Nelson Mandela Lecture Theatre, Saïd Business School, 5 p.m. (open to the public, but space limited. Places can be reserved at: http://bnctannerlectures2010.eventbrite.com).

LUC BOROT: 'Les débats sur la laïcité: histoire et enjeux' (lecture), Maison Française, 5.15 p.m.

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