University of Oxford


Note:
1. Viva notices are not published in the online Gazette -- please refer to the printed Gazette.
2. An asterisk against an entry in the Contents indicates a previously published notice.


Oxford University Gazette, 30 July 2009: Examinations and Boards

Appointments, Reappointments, and Conferments of Title

Humanities Division

Appointments

UNIVERSITY LECTURER

English Language and Literature

MICHÈLE MENDELSSOHN, BA Concordia, M.PHIL PH.D Camb, Fellow of Mansfield College. In English Literature. From 1 September 2009 to 31 August 2014.

Oriental Studies

MOHAMED-SALAH OMRI, MA PH.D Washington, Fellow of St John's College. In Modern Arabic Language and Literature. From 1 September 2010 to 31 August 2015.

UNIVERSITY LECTURER (NTF)

History

MARK WHITTOW, MA D.PHIL Oxf, Fellow of Corpus Christi College. In Byzantine History. From 1 October 2009 until the retiring age.

CUF LECTURER

Classics

CHRISTINA TRAUTE KUHN, MA Heidelberg, D.PHIL Oxf, Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall. In Ancient History. From 1 October 2009 to 30 September 2014.

DEPARTMENTAL LECTURER

Oriental Studies

GIAN PIERO PERSIANI, MA Leic, M.PHIL PH.D Colombia. In Japanese. From 20 April 2009 to 30 June 2010


Reappointments

UNIVERSITY LECTURER

Classics

JOSEPHINE CRAWLEY QUINN, MA PH.D California, MA Oxf, Fellow of Worcester College. In Ancient History. From 1 October 2009 until the retiring age.

History

HOWARD BAIER HOTSON, D.PHIL Oxf, Professor of Early Modern Intellectual History, Fellow of St Anne's College. In Modern History. From 1 October 2008 until the retiring age.

Medieval and Modern Languages

XON MARIA DE ROS, MA D.PHIL Oxf, Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall. In Modern Spanish Literature. From 1 October 2008 until the retiring age.

Philosophy

THOMAS KJELLER JOHANSEN, BA PH.D Camb, Fellow of Brasenose College. In Ancient Philosophy. From 1 October 2009 until the retiring age.

Theology

MARKUS BOCKMUEHL, BA British Colombia, M.DIV MCS Vancouver, PH.D Camb, Professor of Biblical and Early Christian Studies, Fellow of Keble College. In New Testament Studies. From 1 September 2009 until the retiring age.

UNIVERSITY LECTURER (NTF)

Linguistics, Phonology and Phonetics

MARY ELIZABETH DALRYMPLE, BA Cornell, MA Oxf, MA Texas, PH.D Stanford, Fellow of Linacre College. Professor of Linguistics. In General Linguistics. From 1 October 2009 until the retiring age.

Oriental Studies

WALTER ARMBRUST, BA Washington, MA PH.D Michigan, Fellow of St Antony's College. In Modern Middle Eastern Studies. From 1 October 2006 until the retiring age.

CUF LECTURER

History

ROBERT HARRIS, BA Durh, D.PHIL Oxf, Fellow of Worcester College. In History. From 1 October 2009 until the retiring age.

Medieval and Modern Languages

HELEN JANE SWIFT, MA M.ST D.PHIL Oxf, Fellow of St Hilda's College. In Medieval French. From 1 January 2010 until the retiring age.


Conferments of Title

CUF LECTURER

Classics

LUKE PITCHER, M.ST D.PHIL Oxf, Fellow of Somerville College. In Classical Languages and Literature. From 1 October 2009 to 30 September 2014.

History

SARAH MORTIMER, M.ST D.PHIL Oxf, Student of Christ Church. In Early Modern History. From 1 October 2009 to 30 September 2014.


Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences Division

Appointments

UNIVERSITY LECTURERS

HOLGER WENDLAND, DR.PHIL HABIL DIPL Göttingen, Fellow-elect of Exeter College. In Numerical Analysis. From 1 October 2009 until 30 September 2014.
Conferment of title. On behalf of the Recognition of Distinction Committee, the Vice-Chancellor has conferred the title of Professor of Numerical Analysis on Dr Wendland.

BUDIMIR ROSIC, M.SC DIPL.ING Belgrade, PH.D Camb, Fellow-elect of St Anne's College. In Engineering Science (Turbomachinery). From 1 September 2009 until 31 August 2014.

THERESA BURT DE PERERA, B.SC Card, D.PHIL oxf, fellow-elect of st john's college. In zoology. From 1 September 2009 until 31 august 2014.


Reappointments

UNIVERSITY LECTURERS

DR ANDRE LUKAS. In Theoretical Physics. From 1 October 2009 until the retiring age.

DR TAMAS HAUSEL. In Pure Mathematics. From 1 October 2009 until the retiring age.

DR JOEL OUAKNINE. In Computer Science. From 1 October 2009 until the retiring age.


Social Sciences Division

Appointments

UNIVERSITY LECTURERS

A. LORA-WAINWRIGHT, BA MA Lond, D.PHIL Oxf, Fellow of St Cross College. In the Human Geography of China. From 1 September 2008 to 31 August 2014.

E. KEENE, BA Oxf, M.SC PH.D Lond, Student of Christ Church. In International Relations. From 1 September 2009 to 31 August 2014.

R. ZUBEK, MA Adam Mickiewicz, Poland, M.SC PH.D Lond, Fellow of Hertford College. In European Politics. From 1 September 2009 to 31 August 2014.

J. SHAPIRO, AB Washington, MA PH.D Princeton, Fellow of St Cross College. In Finance. From 1 October 2009 to 30 September 2014.

UNIVERSITY LECTURER AND ASSISTANT KEEPER

E. STANDLEY, B.SC MA Durh, Fellow of St Cross College. In Medieval Archaeology (ad 500–1800). From 1 April 2010 to 31 March 2015.

TITULAR UNIVERSITY LECTURER (CUF)

C. MITCHELL, BA Oxf, LL.M PH.D Lond, DIPL.LAW City, Fellow of Jesus College. In law. From 1 October 2009 to 30 September 2014.


Reappointment

UNIVERSITY LECTURER

J. TILLEY, BA D.PHIL Oxf, Fellow of Jesus College. In Quantitative Political or Social Science. From 1 September 2009 until the retiring age.

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M.Sc in Mathematics and the Foundations of Computer Science

The following courses have been approved for examination in 2009–10.

Section A

Schedule I

Algebraic Number Theory

Analytic Number Theory

Analytic Topology

Axiomatic Set Theory

Gödel's Incompleteness Theorems

Group Theory

Introduction to Representation Theory

Lambda Calculus and Types

Lie Algebras

Model Theory

Recursion Theory

Schedule II

Local Group Theory

Representation Theory of Semisimple Lie Algebras

Representation Theory of Symmetric Groups

Section B

Schedule I

Applied Probability

Categories, Proofs and Processes

Communication Theory

Computational Complexity

Concurrency

Graph Theory

Foundations of Computer Science

Logic of Multi-Agent Information Flow

Schedule II

Automata, Logic and Games

Computing with Finitely Presented Groups

Computational Number Theory

Computer-Aided Formal Verification

Elliptic Curves

Game Semantics

Percolation

Probabilistic Combinatorics

Quantum Computer Science

Random Graphs

Theory of Data and Knowledge Bases

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Changes in Regulations

With the approval, where appropriate, of the Education Committee of Council, and, where applicable, of divisional boards, the following changes in regulations made by divisional boards, faculty boards, and the Continuing Education Board will come into effect on 14 August.

1 Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences Board

(a) M.Sc by Coursework: Mathematical and Computational Finance

With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2008, delete from p. 741, l. 46, to p. 742, l. 15, and substitute:

'4. The examination will consist of the following parts:

(i) Four written examinations, each of two hours duration. The written examinations will cover the core courses in mathematical methods and numerical analysis, based on the schedule below. Two of the examinations will be based on Michaelmas Term courses and will be held before the start of Hilary Full Term, the date and time to be specified by the Examiners. Two of the examinations will be based on Hilary Term courses and will be held before the start of Trinity Full Term, the date and time to be specified by the Examiners. The examinations will be organised within the department.

(ii) Two options chosen from a list that will be published by the start of Michaelmas Full Term each year in the Course Handbook. Unless otherwise stated each option will be assessed by a written mini-project. Completed mini-projects must be delivered to the Chairman of Examiners, MSc Mathematical and Computational Finance, c/o Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, by dates which will be specified in the Course Handbook. Mini-projects must be accompanied by a signed statement that the work offered for assessment is the candidate's own.

(iii) One course in Financial Computing which will be assessed by practical examination arranged within the Department. The practical examination will normally be held in, or shortly after, Trinity Term. The details will be specified by the Examiners.

(iv) A dissertation of between twenty-five and forty pages on a topic approved by the examiners.'

2 Ibid., p. 742, l. 21, delete 'on the course Web site' and substitute 'in the Course Handbook'.


(b) Honour Moderations in Biological Sciences

With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

In Examination Regulations, 2008, delete from p. 71, l. 24, to p. 72, l. 33, and substitute:

'A

The subjects of the examination, the syllabus, and the number of papers shall be as prescribed by regulation from time to time by the Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences Board.

B

1. The Biological Sciences Steering Committee shall publish the First Year Biology Handbook not later than the beginning of Michaelmas Full Term before the examination in the following Trinity Term. Further details of the papers, data handling course, and practical requirements shall be set out in that Handbook.

2. Candidates will be required to take three papers, each lasting three hours, as follows:

Paper 1: Organisms

Paper 2: Cells and Genes

Paper 3: Ecology

3. Candidates will be required to complete satisfactorily a course on data handling

4. All candidates will be required to undertake a course of practical work, including laboratory exercises, computing classes and the first year field course. Practical Class co-ordinators and the convenor for the field course shall make available to the chairman of the examiners records showing the extent to which each candidate has pursued an adequate course of practical work. The moderators may request coursework from any candidate; such candidates will be named in a list posted by the day of the first written paper. Each notebook submitted shall be accompanied by a certificate signed by the candidate indicating that the notebook is the candidate's own work. Failure to complete the coursework to the satisfaction of the moderators, in the absence of appropriate documentary evidence, may result in a reduction of the Honor Moderation class. Under extreme conditions this may constitute failure of the examination.

5. The moderators will not provide calculators, but will permit the use of any hand-held pocket calculator subject to the conditions set out under the heading 'Use of calculators in examinations' in the Special Regulations concerning Examinations.'


(c) Preliminary Examination in Biological Sciences

With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

In Examination Regulations, 2008, delete from p. 114, l. 27, to p. 115, l. 4, and substitute:

'A

1. The subjects of the examination, the syllabus, and the number of papers shall be as prescribed by regulation from time to time by the Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences Board.

2. The Chairman of the Moderators for Honour Moderations in Biological Sciences shall designate such of their number as may be required for the Preliminary Examination in Biological Sciences.

B

1. Candidates will be required to take three papers, each lasting three hours, as follows:

Paper 1: Organisms

Paper 2: Cells and Genes Paper 3: Ecology

2. The questions set may be of an elementary and straightforward nature.

3. A practical examination and/or a computer/data handling exercise may be set in the case of candidates deemed to have an inadequate record of practical or class work.'


(d) Honour School of Biological Sciences

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first Part I examination in 2011, and first Part II examination in 2012)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2008, p. 173, l. 1, before 'SPECIAL REGULATIONS FOR THE HONOUR SCHOOL OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES' insert '[Until 2011:'.

2 Ibid., after l. 2, insert:

'For candidates embarking on the Honour School in or before October 2009, taking the Final Examination in or before 2011'.

3 Ibid., p. 177, l. 20, after 'disease.' insert: ']'.

4 Ibid., after p. 177, insert:

'Honour School of Biological Sciences (new regulations)

SPECIAL REGULATIONS FOR THE HONOUR SCHOOL OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

For candidates embarking on the Honour School in or after October 2010, taking Part I in or after 2011, and Part II in or after 2012.

A

1. The subject of the Honour School of Biological Sciences shall be the study of Biological Sciences.

2. No candidate shall be admitted to examination in this school unless he or she has either passed or been exempted from the First Public Examination.

3. The examination in this school shall be under the supervision of the Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences Board, which shall prescribe the necessary regulations.

4. The examination in Biological Sciences shall consist of Part I (taken at a time not less than two terms after passing the First Public Examination) and Part II (taken at a time not less than five terms after passing the First Public Examination).

5. The name of a candidate shall not be published in a class list until he or she has completed all parts of the examination. The examiners shall give due consideration to the performance in all parts of the respective examinations.

6. Candidates will be expected to show knowledge based on practical work. This requirement shall normally be satisfied by the examiners' assessment of the practical work done by candidates in Part I and Quantitative Methods, based on attendance records and/or marks awarded. Exceptionally, the examiners may require a candidate to submit a practical notebook. The penalties for unsatisfactory practical performance are given in detail below.

7. Part I may only be taken once, but no candidate who has completed the examination may be deemed to have failed. In Part II, a candidate who obtains only a pass, or fails to satisfy the examiners, may enter again for Part II of the examination on one, but no more than one, subsequent occasion.

B

1. The subjects of the examination shall be those prescribed in Parts I and II below.

2. The examination for Part I shall be taken at the start of Trinity Term of the candidate's second year. The examination for Part II shall be taken during Trinity Term of the candidate's third year. The dates of submission for the Part I practical work, Part II project work and Part II course assignments are those prescribed in Parts I and II below.

3. In the following, 'the FHS Handbook' refers to the Final Honour School Handbook, published annually at the start of Michaelmas Term of the candidate's second year. The 'Guidelines on Projects and Course Assignments' is published annually at the start of Trinity Term of the candidate's second year. Further details of the requirements for Parts I and II shall be set out in the Handbook and Guidelines.

4. The examiners will permit the use of any hand-held calculator subject to the conditions set out under the heading 'Use of calculators in examinations' in the Regulations for the Conduct of University Examinations.

5. Supplementary Subjects

(a) Candidates may, in addition to any one or more of the below-mentioned subjects, offer themselves for examination in one or more Supplementary Subjects.

(b) Candidates for Supplementary Subjects may offer themselves for examination in the academic year preceding that in which they take the Final Honour School.

(c) Candidates awarded a pass in a Supplementary Subject examination may not retake the same Supplementary Subject examination.

(d) The Supplementary Subjects available in any year will be published, together with the term in which each subject will be examined, in the University Gazette not later than the end of the Trinity Term of the academic year prior to delivery of the courses. Regulations governing the use of calculators in individual Supplementary Subjects will be notified when the availability of these subjects is published in the Gazette.

PART I

Assessment in Part I will consist of three written papers that will be taken at the start of Trinity Term in the second year as follows:

Paper 1: Evolution and Systematics

Paper 2: Quantitative Methods

Paper 3: Essay Paper

In Paper 3, candidates will be required to answer four questions, with no more than one from each of the folliwng themes: (i) Animal Behaviour; (ii) Adaptations to the Environment; (iii) Cell and Developmental Biology; (iv) Disease; (v) Ecology; (vi) Plants and People. Knowledge of first year coursework will be assumed.

The written papers for Part I may be taken only once.

Satisfactory performance in four practical blocks will also be required.

The examiners will issue a list of candidates deemed to have completed Part I of the examination, in the form of the completion of the three written papers, and satisfactory performance in the four practical blocks.

Under exceptional circumstances, candidates who have not been able to complete sufficient practicals may be allowed to fulfill the practical requirement in their third year.

PART II

In Part II, Candidates will select from a number of Options, and complete a research project and two course assignments. The Options may be varied from time to time by the Biological Science Steering Committee, and such variations shall be notified by publication in the University Gazette by the end of Week 8 of Trinity Term of the academic year preceding the first examination of the changed options. Each candidate will be expected to have studied at least six Options in order to address the synoptic questions of Paper 4, and to have prepared sufficient of those Options in depth to be able to address the requirements of Papers 5–7.

Assessment in Part II will consist of four written papers, each of three hours' duration, submission of a research project dissertation, and two course assignments, one of which will be examined as an oral presentation.

1. Written papers

Four written papers, each of three hours, will be set during Trinity Term of the third year. The papers will be as follows:

Paper 4: General Paper

Paper 5: Long Essay Paper

Paper 6: Short Essay Paper

Paper 7: Data Interpretation Paper

In the General Paper, candidates will be required to answer two questions and will be expected to bring together knowledge of the different areas of Biology covered in the Options. In the Long Essay Paper, candidates will be required to answer three questions, with no more than one from any specific Option. In the Short Essay Paper, candidates will be required to answer six questions, with no more than one from any specific Option. In the Data Interpretation Paper, candidates will be required to answer four questions.

2. Project dissertation

(i) Form and subject of the project

The project shall consist in original experiments, fieldwork or computer-based research project in any area of biology done by the candidate alone or in collaboration with others (where such collaboration is, for instance, needed to produce results in the time available). When choosing a research project, candidates must bear in mind the prohibition on duplicating material in different parts of the examination.

(ii) Registration

Candidates must register the provisional title of their project and the name of their supervisor to the Examinations Co-ordinator no later than noon on Friday of Week 8 of Hilary Term of their second year. Candidates must submit their completed safety registration form to the appropriate Departmental Safety Officer by the same deadline.

(iii) Examination

Candidates shall submit to the examiners a dissertation based on their project according to guidelines that will be published by the Biological Sciences Steering Committee in Week 1 of Trinity Term in the academic year preceding the examination. The project dissertation shall be of not more than 7,000 words, excluding any tables, figures, or references, and must be prefaced by an Abstract of not more than 250 words, to be included within the word limit.

(iv) Submission and assessment of project-based written work

The project report (two copies) must be legibly typed or word-processed (double line spacing to be used throughout) on one side only of A4 paper, held firmly in a stiff cover, and submitted on or before 12 noon on the Thursday of week 2 of Hilary Full Term of the academic year in which Part II of the examination is taken. It must be addressed to the Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, for the Chairman of Examiners for the Final Honour School of Biological Sciences. Each project report shall be accompanied by a certificate signed by the candidate indicating that the project report is the candidate's own work. This certificate shall be submitted separately in a sealed envelope addressed to the Chairman of Examiners. No report will be accepted if it has already been submitted, wholly or substantially, for another Honour School or degree of this University, or for a degree of any other institution.

In all cases, the examiners shall obtain and consider a written report from each supervisor indicating the extent of the input made by the candidate to the outcome of the project and also any unforeseen difficulties associated with the project (e. g. unexpected technical issues or problems in the availability of materials, equipment, or literature or other published data). Material in a candidate's dissertation must not duplicate material that has been included in the submitted course assignments.

3. Course assignments

(i) Form and subject of the course assignments

Each candidate must complete two course assignments. One assignment shall be examined by means of a written essay, and one shall be examined by means of an oral presentation as set out below. The precise format of the course assignment may vary between Options and will be specified by the Biological Sciences Steering Committee.

The written essay shall be of not more than 3,000 words, excluding any tables, figures, or references, and must be prefaced by an Abstract of not more than 250 words, to be included within the word limit. All sources used in the essay must be fully documented. The written essay (two copies) must be legibly typed or word-processed on one side only of A4 paper, held firmly in a stiff cover. The oral presentation shall be a maximum of fifteen minutes in duration, followed by ten minutes of questions. The oral presentation should use appropriate audio-visual aids as specified in the Guidelines on Projects and Course Assignments. Candidates shall also submit an Abstract of the oral presentation of not more than 500 words. The Abstract (two copies) must be legibly typed or word-processed on one side only of A4 paper.

Candidates may discuss the proposed topic for both the written essay and the oral presentation, the sources available, and the method of presentation with an adviser. The advisor for the written essay must also read and comment on a first draft. Candidates shall not deal with substantially the same material in their course assignments as is covered in their project report.

(ii) Registration

Each assignment will be on a topic proposed by the student and approved by the Chairman of the Biological Sciences Steering Committee. The approval of assignments shall be given not later than Friday of the seventh week of the Michaelmas Full Term of the academic year in which the examination is taken.

(iii) Authorship

For each assignment, candidates must sign a certificate stating that the assignment is their own work. This certificate must be submitted at the same time as the essay and abstract in a sealed envelope addressed to the Chairman of Examiners.

(iv) Submission

The written course assignment (two copies), the abstract for the oral presentation (two copies) and the sealed envelope containing the certificate of authorship, should be submitted in an envelope clearly labelled with the candidate's number by noon on Friday of 0th week of the Trinity Term of the academic year in which the examination is taken. The envelope should be addressed to the Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford for the Chairman of the Examiners in the Final Honour School of Biological Sciences. Assignments previously submitted for the Honour School of Biological Sciences may be resubmitted. No assignment will be accepted if it has already been submitted, wholly or substantially, for another degree in the University or elsewhere; and each certificate must also contain a confirmation that the assignment has not already been so submitted. An assignment remains eligible even if it has been submitted, in whole or in part, for any scholarship or prize in this University. Each essay and each abstract shall clearly indicate on the first page the part of the examination and the subject under which the assignment is submitted. Further guidance on the essay and oral presentation will be published in the FHS Handbook.

PARTS I AND II

Practical Coursework

All candidates shall be assessed as to their practical ability through coursework. Coursework includes Quantitative Methods classes, and a range of laboratory practicals, computer-based exercises or field work, as set out by the Biological Sciences Steering Committee. The following provisions apply:

(a) The Chairman of the Steering Committee, or a deputy, shall make available to the examiners, at the end of the first week of the term in which the written examinations in Part II are held, records showing the extent to which each candidate has completed the prescribed coursework in Part I to a satisfactory standard.

(b) The examiners may request coursework from any candidate. Such candidates will be named in a list posted by the day of the first written paper in Part II of the examination. Each notebook submitted shall be accompanied by a certificate signed by the candidate indicating that the notebook is the candidate's own work.

(c) In assessing the record of coursework undertaken, the examiners shall have regard to the attendance record of the candidates at the classes provided, and to the marks awarded for the classes provided. Candidates whose overall coursework performance is not satisfactory may have their degree class reduced. If the work is judged by the examiners to be insufficient to warrant the award of Honours they may either be deemed to have failed the examination, or may, at the discretion of the examiners, be awarded a Pass.'

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2 Medical Sciences Board

(a) Honour School of Experimental Psychology

With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2008, p. 252, delete ll. 18-33 and substitute:

'1. Five written papers will be set:

Paper I Biological Bases of Behaviour

Components: (i) Cognitive Neuroscience, (ii) Behavioural Neuroscience.

Paper II Human Experimental Psychology 1.

Components: (i) Perception, (ii) Memory, Attention, and Information Processing.

Paper III Human Experimental Psychology 2.

Components: (i) Language and Cognition, (ii) Developmental Psychology

Paper IV Social Psychology, and Individual Differences and Psychological Disorders.

Components: (i) Social Psychology, (ii) Individual Differences and Psychological Disorders.

In papers I–IV candidates will be required to answer essay and short answer questions from each of the components.

Paper V Experimental Design and Statistics'.

2 Ibid., p. 253, l. 7 delete 'IV' and substitute 'V'.


(b) Honour School of Medical Sciences

With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

In Examination Regulations, 2008, p. 337, delete ll. 6–8 and substitute:

'2. No candidate shall be admitted for examination in this school unless he or she has passed Part I of the First Examination for the Degree of Bachelor of Medicine.'


(c) Honour School of Psychology, Philosophy and Physiology

With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2008, p. 448, delete ll. 12–17 and substitute:

'For candidates offering Psychology, the examination shall consist of two parts. Part I will consist of one subject area, Psychology, which shall count as two papers for the Final Honour School. Part II will consist of six papers covering two or three subject areas; Psychology, and one or both of Philosophy and Physiology.'

2 Ibid., p. 448, delete from l. 44 to p. 449, l. 23 and substitute:

'1. The five written papers as specified for Part I of the Honour School of Experimental Psychology will be set:

Paper I Biological Bases of Behaviour

Component parts: (i) Cognitive Neuroscience, (ii) Behavioural Neuroscience.

Paper II Human Experimental Psychology 1

Component parts: (i) Perception, (ii) Memory, Attention, and Information Processing.

Paper III Human Experimental Psychology 2

Component parts: (1) Language and Cognition, (ii) Developmental Psychology.

Paper IV Social Psychology, and Individual Differences and Psychological Disorders.

Component parts: (i) Social Psychology, (ii) Individual Differences and Psychological Disorders.

Paper V Experimental Design and Statistics

Candidates will be required to answer essays and short answer questions in four of the eight components of Papers I–IV. All candidates are required to offer Paper V.

Candidates who wish to be deemed eligible for Graduate Basis of Registration (GBR) for the British Psychological Society (BPS) must ensure that the components they select provide coverage of all five of the areas defined in the GBR curriculum. In order to achieve this candidates must offer one component from each of four areas chosen from the five areas prescribed below:

1. Cognitive Neuroscience or Behavioural Neuroscience from Paper I;

2. Perception; or Memory, Attention and Information Processing; or Language and Cognition from Papers II and III;

3. Developmental Psychology from Paper III;

4. Social Psychology from Paper IV;

5. Individual Differences and Psychological Disorders from paper IV.

In addition, candidates must sit additional short answers questions covering one component from the remaining fifth area.

The other requirements for BPS Graduate Membership are set out in Part II below.'

3 Ibid., p. 450, l. 10 delete 'IV' and substitute 'V'.


(d) M.Sc in Clinical Embryology

With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

In Examinations Regulations, 2008, p. 695, l. 33, delete 'Two' and substitute 'Three'.


(e) M.Sc in Medicinal Chemistry for Cancer

With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2008, p. 748, l. 11, after 'Schedule below.' insert:

'Candidates following an alternative course of instruction will be examined by extended essay. Candidates will collect the examination paper one week before the deadline for essay submission, at the end of Hilary Term. The paper will consist of optional essay titles and each candidate will be required to submit to the examiners two copies of a typewritten or printed essay of not more than 5,000 words, on one of these titles.'

2 Ibid., p. 749, insert after l. 9:

'Candidates who have already received training in Pharmacology may be required to follow an alternative course of instruction and examination as approved by the organising committee.'

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3 Social Sciences Board

(a) M.Phil in Development Studies

With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

In Examination Regulations, 2009, p. 509, after l. 9 insert:

'(p) Power and Punishment: Creating Social Order in Africa

This option explores the construction of social order in Africa through the discourses and practices of punishment, broadly defined. It looks at how both states and informal groups defined and policed criminality and deviance, marked differences of race and ethnicity, regulated labour and gender relations, and contested ideas of rights and citizenship. Drawing on the disciplines of history, politics and anthropology, the option explores the establishment of colonial legal codes and their consequences for social order; the criminalisation of politics and the politicisation of punishment; and the visions of order expressed through popular and private efforts to discipline anti-social and criminal activities. the option draws primarily on cases from central and southern Africa.'


(b) M.Phil in Comparative Social Policy

With effect from 1 October 2009

In Examination Regulations, 2008, p. 500, ll. 44 and 45, delete 'The thesis should have a comparative dimension, that is, it should normally compare one or more country or system.' and substitute 'The thesis should employ comparative method in the study of a social policy topic'.


(c) M.Sc in Comparative Social Policy

In Examination Regulations, 2008, p. 697, l. 45, and p. 698, ll. 1 and 2, delete 'The thesis should have a comparative dimension, that is, it should normally compare one or more country or system.' and substitute 'The thesis should employ comparative method in the study of a social policy topic'.

(d) M.Sc in Criminology and Criminal Justice

With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

In Examination Regulations, 2008, p. 703, after l. 53 insert:

'Transitional Justice'.


(e) M.Sc in Criminology and Criminal Justice (Research Methods)

With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

In Examination Regulations, 2008, p. 706, after l. 21 insert:

'Transitional Justice'.


(f) M.Sc in Contemporary India

With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2008, p. 700, ll. 8–10, delete:

'candidates will submit three short exercises by Friday of Noughth Week of Hilary Term and one research proposal of 2,500 words by Monday of Fourth Week of Hilary Term.' and substitute:

'Research Methods for Asian Studies: a series of assignments and/or unseen written examinations as specified by the teaching committee for the M.Sc in Modern Chinese Studies. The forms of assessment, and the dates and times of submission, where applicable, will be notified to students by not later than Friday of Noughth Week of Michaelmas Full Term.'

2 Ibid., p. 700, l. 11, delete '/epistemology'.

3 Ibid, l. 13, delete 'third' and substitute'second'.


(g) M.Sc in Modern Chinese Studies

With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2008, p. 749, l. 35, delete 'or'.

2 Ibid., p. 749, ll. 36–41, delete:

'The Upper Intermediate Chinese Language paper and the oral examination at the end of Trinity Term. The written language paper will comprise a translation into Chinese, a comprehension exercise and a translation into English. The oral examination will consist of two parts: a comprehension test and an individual test. Full details of the oral examination will be provided in the course handbook.' and substitute:

'Students may elect a modern Chinese language paper at the appropriate level to be determined by the language teaching staff at the Faculty of Oriental Studies at the start of the academic year. The examination paper will consist of both a written and an oral part.'

3 Ibid., p. 750, ll. 1–3, delete 'candidates will submit three short exercises by Friday of Noughth Week of Hilary Term and one research proposal of 2,500 words by Monday of Fourth Week of Hilary Term' and substitute: 'Research Methods for Asian Studies: a series of assignments and/or unseen written examinations as specified by the teaching committee for the M.Sc in Modern Chinese Studies. The forms of assessment, and the dates and times of submission, where applicable, will be notified to students by not later than Friday of Noughth Week of Michaelmas Full Term'.

4 Ibid., p. 750, l. 28, delete 'With permission of the student's supervisor, the student can elect the Upper Intermediate Chinese Language option' and substitute 'With the permission of the language teaching staff at the Faculty of Oriental Studies, the student can elect an appropriate language option as one of the two optional papers'.


(h) MBA (part-time)

With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

In Examination Regulations, 2008, delete ll. 44–5, and substitute '(d) an International module and satisfy the examiners in the form of an essay submission associated with this module of not more than 15,000 words;'.

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4 Continuing Education Board

Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies

With effect from 1 October 2010

In Examination Regulations 2008 p 1002 after line 29 insert:

'Historical Studies

1. Each candidate shall follow for at least three terms and a maximum of six terms a part- time course of instruction in historical studies.

2. The course will consist of seminars, classes, tutorials, and on-line distance learning.

3. The course will consist of five units listed in the schedule below.

4. Every candidate will be required to satisfy the examiners in the following:

(a) a minimum of 75 per cent attendance at the classroom-based sessions and active participation in all parts of the course to the satisfaction of the course director;

(b) four assignments that shall not exceed 2,500 words based on units one to four in the schedule below;

(c) two primary source evaluations of not more than 1,500 words each;

(d) a dissertation of not less than 8,000 words and not exceeding 10,000 words.

The assignments under 4 (b)–(c) and the dissertation under 4(d) shall be submitted electronically to the examiners c/o Registry, Department for Continuing Education, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JA for consideration by such date as the examiners shall determine and shall notify candidates.

5. Candidates may be required to attend a viva voce examination at the end of the course of studies at the discretion of the examiners.

6. The examiners may award a distinction to candidates for the Certificate.

7. A candidate who fails to satisfy the examiners in the assignments under 4 (b)–(c) or in the dissertation under 4(d) above may normally be permitted to resubmit work in respect of the part or parts of the examination which they have failed on not more than one occasion which shall normally be within one year of the original failure.

Schedule

Unit One: Princes, States and Revolutions

Unit Two: European Court Patronage

Unit Three: Religious Reformations and Movements

Unit Four: Memory and Conflict

Unit Five: Special Subjects'.

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5 Board of the Faculty of Linguistics, Philology and Phonetics

M.St in General Linguistics and Comparative Philology

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

In Examination Regulations, 2008, p. 624, delete ll. 17–37 and substitute:

'7. The general paper A and the papers in C and D are each assessed by three- hour written examination. The papers in B are assessed by:

Either (a) three-hour written examination.

Or (b) An essay of between 5,000 and 7,500 words (these limits to exclude the bibliography, any text that is being edited or annotated, any translation of that text, and any descriptive catalogue or similar factual matter, but to include quotations, notes and appendices). The essay (in two typewritten copies) must be sent in a parcel bearing the words 'Essay for the M.St/M.Phil in General Linguistics and Comparative Philology' to the Chair of Examiners for the Degree of M.St/M.Phil in General Linguistics, c/o Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford.

Or (c) A written report of between 5,000 and 7,500 words on the design and execution of an original research project. The report (in two typewritten copies) must be sent in a parcel bearing the words 'Research report for the M.St/M.Phil in General Linguistics and Comparative Philology' to the Chair of Examiners for the Degree of M.St/M.Phil in General Linguistics, c/o Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford.

In addition, the lecturer on the course of instruction may require:

(a) one or more practical problem set(s), to be completed and submitted at a time specified by the lecturer; and

(b) one or more oral presentation(s) in a public forum.

For each paper in B, the lecturer on the course of instruction shall prescribe a suitable combination of these options, and shall make available to the Chair of Examiners evidence showing the extent to which each candidate has pursued an adequate course of work.'

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6 Board of the Faculty of Theology

Special Regulations for the M.St in Theology

With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

In Gazette No. 4887, 26 June 2009, p. 1307, right-hand column, delete:

'I. Old Testament

The examination shall consist of:

(i) a three-hour paper on prescribed Old Testament Texts in Hebrew. The prescribed texts for the examination are published in the course handbook.'

and substitute:

'I. Old Testament

The examination shall consist of:

(i) A three-hour paper on prescribed Old Testament Texts in Hebrew. The prescribed texts for the examination will be published in the Gazette by the Board of the Faculty of Theology before the end of Michaelmas Term.'

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