University of Oxford


Oxford University Gazette, 29 January 2009: Diary

Friday 30 January

SYMPOSIUM: 'Justice for apartheid crimes: corporations, states and human rights' (Oxford Transitional Justice Research symposium), Nissan Lecture Theatre, St Antony's, 9 a.m.–5 p.m. (enquiries or to register: janet.jobson@sant.ox.ac.uk).

GREGORY DELAPLACE: 'Who sees what, and how? Ghosts and Mongolian regimes of communicability' (Ethnicity and Identity seminars: 'The identity of ghosts: haunting, corporeality, and the spectre'), Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, 51 Banbury Road, 11 a.m.

WORKSHOP: 'Theses and dissertations' (Workshops in Information Skills and Electronic Resources), Computing Services, 12.30 p.m. (booking at www.ouls.ox.ac.uk/wiser/).

KALYPSO NICOLAÏDIS: 'Can a post-colonial power export democracy and the rule of law?' (Oxford Centre for the Study of Inequality and Democracy seminars), Seminar Room B, Manor Road Building, 1 p.m.

DR CLARE HARRIS: 'The museum on the roof of the world: the spectacle of public space in Lhasa, Tibet' (Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology: departmental seminars), Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, 64 Banbury Road, 4 p.m.

PROFESSOR JOHN BREWER: 'Conjugal love and aristocratic depravity, 1769–1809' (Ford's Lectures in British History: 'The politics of feeling in the age of revolutions, 1770–1830'), Schools, 5 p.m.

SIR JULIAN PRIESTLEY: 'The media and Europe' (Media and Politics seminars), Seminar Room, Nuffield, 5 p.m.

CLEMENCY BURTON-HILL lectures in series 'Lessons in Government', Lecture Room XI, Brasenose, 5 p.m.

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Saturday 31 January

MUSEUM OF THE HISTORY OF SCIENCE: demonstration of hand-working mirrors for reflecting telescopes, with Terry Pearce, 2–4 p.m., and 'Stargazing': an evening of observing in and around the Museum, with the Hanwell Community Observatory, 6–9 p.m. (includes talk by Christopher Taylor on 'Celestial objects for common telescopes', 7 p.m).

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Sunday 1 February

THE RT REVD JOHN GLADWIN preaches at Inter-collegiate Evensong, St Mary's, 5.30 p.m.

JULIA HSU performs piano works by Beethoven, Wolfson, 5 p.m. (admission £5: proceeds in aid of African Medical and Research Foundation).

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Monday 2 February

STUDY-DAY: 'Genetic criticism: editions, principles, practices', Maison Française, 9.30 a.m.–6 p.m. (Continues tomorrow, 9.30 a.m.–1 p.m. Enquiries: maison@herald.ox.ac.uk)

LEARNING INSTITUTE seminars: 'Chairing meetings', 9.30 a.m., and 'The history of the University', 2 p.m. (for details, see the Learning Institute site).

DR AYO WAHLBERG: 'Plausibility as epistemological rectification: examining the colonisation hypothesis in a collaborative effort to industrially standardise a Vietnamese herbal remedy' (Medical Anthropology Research Seminars: 'Materiality in medicine'), Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, 61 Banbury Road, 11 a.m.

WORKSHOP: 'Doing a literature search in biomedicine' (Workshops in Information Skills and Electronic Resources), Computing Services, 12.30 p.m. (booking at www.ouls.ox.ac.uk/wiser/).

DR ANTHONY LANG: 'The just war tradition as political theory: authority and the use of force' (Oxford Institute for Ethics, Law, and Armed Conflict seminars: 'Strengthening international authority'), James Martin Twenty-first Century School (Old Indian Institute, Broad Street), 1 p.m. (enquiries: elac@politics.ox.ac.uk).

MATTHEW SAVELLI: 'Was there a Communist psychiatry?' (seminar series: 'Local and global perspectives in the history of medicine'), Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine, 47 Banbury Road, 2.15 p.m.

PROFESSOR ROBERT DINGWALL: 'Motherhood and apple pie? Questioning ethical regulation in the social sciences and humanities' (Centre for Socio-Legal Studies seminars: 'Human investigation and privacy in a regulatory age'), Seminar Room D, Manor Road Building, 4.30 p.m

JAMES CAMPBELL: 'Wren and Freemasonry: separating myth from fact' (Oxford Architectural History Seminar), North Lecture Room, St John's, 5.30 p.m.

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Tuesday 3 February

LEARNING INSTITUTE seminar: 'Time management for support staff', 9.30 a.m. (see information above).

DR HUW BENNETT: 'Detainees in Northern Ireland' (Oxford Leverhulme Programme on the Changing Character of War: lunchtime discussion seminars), Seminar Room G, Manor Road Building, 1 p.m.

NOORTJE MARRES: 'Invisible, non-toxic but not exactly odourless? Experiments in carbon-based living and post-calculative forms of engagement' (James Martin Institute for Science and Civilisation seminar series: 'Governance, accountability, and innovation in turbulent times'), James Martin Institute Seminar Room, Saïd Business School, 4 p.m.

PROFESSOR RICHARD PARISH: 'Particularity and language: (i) talking of God' (Bampton Lectures: 'Le christianisme est étrange: Christian particularity in writing of the French seventeenth century'), University Church, 5 p.m.

DR VLADIMIR BULDAKOV, THE RT HON. LORD OWEN, and PROFESSOR LORD SKIDELSKY: 'Russia' (St Antony's College Visiting Parliamentary Fellows Seminar: 'Democracy: who wants it?'), Nissan Lecture Theatre, St Antony's, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR WIM VAN OORSHOT: 'Popular deservingness perceptions and conditionality of solidarity in Europe' (Department of Social Policy and Social Work seminars: 'Values, ideas, and welfare cultures in comparative perspective'), Violet Butler Room, Barnett House, 5 p.m.

DR THOMAS DIXON: 'Darwin and ethics: morals from history' (Oxford Centre for Christianity and Culture public lectures: 'Darwin reconsidered: marking the 150th anniversary of On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection'), Regent's Park, 5 p.m.

DR TAMAR MEISELS: 'Can terrorism ever be justified?' (Transitional Justice Research Seminars), Seminar Room D, Manor Road Building, 5 p.m.

DR ROBIN HICKMAN: 'Carbon efficiency in the transport sector: backcasting from London' (Transport Studies unit: open lectures on sustainable transport), School of Geography and the Environment, 5 p.m.

SAURO GELICHI: 'Local exchange—international exchange. The economy of northern Italy from Lombard to Carolingian times' (Oxford Centre for Late Antiquity lecture), Danson Room, Trinity, 5 p.m.

SOPHIE PREVOST: 'Changements linguistiques et grammaticalisation' (Medieval French Seminar), Maison Française, 5.15 p.m.

PROFESSOR PAUL GAMBACCINI (News International Visiting Professor of Broadcast Media): 'So you wanna be a rock 'n' roll star' (lecture), St Anne's, 5.30 p.m.

PROFESSOR KATRIN KOHL: 'Conceptualising the GDR—twenty years after' (lecture series: 'From "Stasiland" to "Ostalgie": remembering the GDR—twenty years on'), Noël Salter Room, New College, 5.30 p.m. (full details at www.mod-langs.ox.ac.uk/ge rman/rememberthegdr).

DAVID MACKINLAY: 'Understanding financial control' (lecture series: 'Building a business'), Saïd Business School, 5.30 p.m. (Open to all members of the University. Enquiries: buildingabusiness@sbs.ox.ac.uk)

TIMOTHY OTTY, QC: 'Honour bound to defend freedom? The Guantanamo Bay litigation' (lecture), Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, St Cross Building, 5.30 p.m.

GEORGINA FERRY: 'Biography and science' (series of 'Lectures on life- writing'), Haldane Room, Wolfson, 5.30 p.m.

PROFESSOR ALEXANDER BOKSENBERG: 'The William Herschel telescope' (lecture series: 'Telescopes now: the real story of astronomy today'), Museum of the History of Science, 7 p.m.

PROFESSOR LAURENT THÉVENOT: 'Conventions and below' (Oxford Seminar on Conventions and Rules), Old Common Room, Balliol, 8 p.m. (to attend, e-mail john.latsis@balliol.ox.ac.uk).

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Wednesday 4 February

LEARNING INSTITUTE seminars: 'Introduction to finance', 9.30 a.m., and 'Lecturing for Humanities and Social Sciences' (second session), 12 noon (for details, see the Learning Institute site).

RUTH GLEDHILL: 'Muslims in the media' (Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism seminars), Barclay Room, Green Templeton, 12 noon (enquiries: kate.hanneford-smith@politics.ox.ac.u k).

PROFESSOR HELEN MARGETTS: 'Personalising the tools of government', and PROFESSOR YORICK W

ILKS: 'Personalising public policy with companions' (workshop series: 'Technology, individuality, and public policy'), Seminar Room, Oxford Internet Institute, 1 St Giles', 12.30 p.m. (register with name and affiliation to: public-services@politics.ox.ac.uk).

WORKSHOP: 'Chemistry and materials science' (Workshops in Information Skills and Electronic Resources), Radcliffe Science Library, 12.30 p.m. (booking not required: see further at www.ouls.ox.ac.uk/wiser/).

ORGAN RECITAL: Matthew Owens and Daniel Moult, the chapel, Queen's, 1.10 p.m. (admission free, with a retiring collection).

ELENA KISELEVA (piano) performs Liszt's Mephisto Waltz (thirty-minute recital), Jacqueline du Pré Music Building, St Hilda's, 1.15 p.m. (Admission free. Further details at www.st-hildas.ox.ac.uk)

WORKSHOP: 'How to deal with cancer? Research, innovation, and politics', Maison Française, 2.30 p.m. (enquiries: maison@herald.ox.ac.uk).

PROFESSOR RICHARD THOMSON: 'Naturalism: flexibility or failure of style?' (Slade Lectures: 'Style versus the state: naturalism and avant-gardism in Third Republic France, 1880–1900'), University Museum of Natural History, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR NIGEL BIGGAR: 'Integrity, not distinctiveness' (McDonald Centre for Theology, Ethics, and Public Life lecture series: 'Behaving in public: Christian ethics outside of the Church'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR ANGELA LEIGHTON: 'Poetry and the imagining ear' (F. W. Bateson Memorial Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR POLLY O'HANLON: ' "Regional centralisations" in the Mughal empire: some perspectives on a comparative history' (seminar series: 'Ottomans, Safavids, and Mughals: strategies of central power'), Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies, George Street, 5 p.m.

CHRISTOPHER ALLSOPP: 'The financial crisis, world recession and energy' (lecture series: 'Geopolitics of energy'), Nissan Lecture Theatre, St Antony's, 5 p.m.

DR ANGELIKA MESSNER: 'New perspectives on the history of emotions' (seminar series: 'Chinese medicine in practice'), Pauling Centre, 58 Banbury Road, 5 p.m.

DR GHIL'AD ZUCKERMANN: 'Language, religion, and identity in Israel' (David Patterson Seminars), Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Yarnton Manor, 8 p.m.

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Thursday 5 February

LEARNING INSTITUTE seminars: 'Presentation skills' (day 1), 9.30 a.m.; 'Lecturing for MPLS and Medical Sciences' (second session), 12 noon; 'Developing student learning in medicine', 2 p.m. (for details, see the Learning Institute site).

PROFESSOR MARK JOHNSON: 'An ageing minority cohort: challenges for care services?' (Oxford Institute of Ageing seminar series: 'Ageing and ethnic diversity'), Seminar Room G, Manor Road Building, 12.30 p.m.

VALERIA PIZZINI-GAMBETTA: 'Women in the Mafia: opportunities before emancipation' (discussion group seminar series: 'Organised Crime'), Seminar Room D, Manor Road Building, 12.45 p.m.

DAVID METCALFE: 'Labour shortages and immigration policy: the work of the UK's Migration Advisory Committee (MAC)' (ESRC Centre on Migration, Policy, and Society seminars: 'Immigration and low-wage labour markets'), Institute of Human Sciences, Pauling Centre, 58a Banbury Road, 2 p.m. (further information at www.compas.ox.ac.uk/e vents/seminars_lectures.shtml).

PROFESSOR DAVID NELKEN: 'What makes concepts travel well? Comparing prison rules and corruption standards' (All Souls Criminology Seminars), Old Library, All Souls, 3.30 p.m. (enquiries: ccr@crim.ox.ac.uk).

PROFESSOR JONATHAN WEBER: 'Can a pandemic infection be controlled without a vaccine?' (James Martin Twenty-first Century School seminar series: 'Global governance challenges'), Seminar Room, Old Indian Institute, Broad Street, 3.30 p.m.

PROFESSOR TOMMASO VITALE: 'Continuous persecution of Gypsies in Italian local societies? De-historicisation and an historical–ethnographic link' (International Gender Studies Centre seminars: 'Gypsies, Travellers, and Roma throughout Europe'), Seminar Room 1, Queen Elizabeth House, 3.30 p.m.

PROFESSOR ALAN JENKINS: 'Delivering undergraduate research for all students? International perspectives' (Oxford Learning Institute: Research Seminars), level 2, Littlegate House, St Ebbe's, 4 p.m. (to attend, e-mail: research@learning.ox.ac.uk).

PROFESSOR GRACIANA DEL CASTILLO: 'Rebuilding war-torn states: the challenge of post-conflict economic reconstruction' (Oxford Institute for Ethics, Law, and Armed Conflict lecture), Lecture Theatre, Manor Road Building, 4 p.m. (enquiries: elac@politics.ox.ac.uk).

PROFESSOR ANTHONY KING lectures in series 'Lessons in Government', Lecture Room XI, Brasenose, 5 p.m.

THE RT HON. BARONESS HAYMAN: 'The Speakership in the Lords, where the House is self-regulatory' (seminar series: 'Towards a new constitutional settlement?'), Auditorium, Magdalen, 5 p.m. (the Chatham House Rule applies).

DR ISTVAN HONT: 'Commercial sociability: Das Jean-Jacques Rousseau Problem' (Carlyle Lectures: 'Visions of politics in commercial society: comparing Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Adam Smith'), Schools, 5 p.m.

LAURENT PERNOT: 'The intellectual concentration of Plotinus (Vit. Plot. 8) between philosophy and rhetoric' (lecture), Ryle Room, Philosophy Faculty Centre, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR JOHN KAY: 'The long and the short of it: finance and investment for normally intelligent people who are not in the industry' (lecture to mark book launch), Auditorium, St John's, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR MARY CARRUTHERS: 'Hot tears and cold reason' (seminar series: 'The experience of beauty in the Middle Ages'—second seminar), Wharton Room, All Souls, 5 p.m.

JUSTICE EDWIN CAMERON: 'Rethinking rights and responsibilities in the AIDS epidemic' (Herbert Spencer Lectures: 'Modifying human behaviour'), Lecture Theatre, Medical Sciences Teaching Centre, 5.15 p.m.

MARION LAFOUGE: 'L'opéra ou de la tératologie poétique: la querelle d'Alceste et l'invention du genre merveilleux' (Early Modern French Seminar), Maison Française, 5.15 p.m.

PROFESSOR DAVID KILLICK: 'Did metals matter? An examination of the contexts of early metallurgy around the world' (Linacre Lectures: 'Societies in transition'), OUCE Main Lecture Theatre, Dyson Perrins Building, 5.30 p.m.

DR JACK CARAVELLI: 'Iran: a memo to President Obama' (Pluscarden Programme for the Study of Global Terrorism and Intelligence seminar), Lecture Theatre, St Antony's, 6 p.m. (Open to members of the University on production of university card. Enquiries: pluscarden.programme@sant.ox.ac.uk)

STEPHEN RAPP (Chief Prosecutor, Special Court for Sierra Leone): 'Prosecutor versus Chief of State: the test of international justice' (Oxford Transitional Justice Research lecture), Lecture Theatre, Manor Road Building, 7.30 p.m.

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Friday 6 February

WORKSHOP: 'New approaches in central European historiography', Rees Davies Room, History Faculty Building, 10.45 a.m. (details and registration: robert.pyrah@sant.ox.ac.uk).

DAVID BERLINER: 'Persistent spirits: interactive aspects of religious transmission' (Ethnicity and Identity seminars: 'The identity of ghosts: haunting, corporeality, and the spectre'), Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, 51 Banbury Road, 11 a.m.

LEARNING INSTITUTE seminar: 'Developing management and leadership at Oxford, level 3 (for principal investigators), workshop 1: Good practice in leading people (1)—the basics', 12.30 p.m. (for details, see the Learning Institute site).

WORKSHOP: 'Middle East and Islamic studies' (Workshops in Information Skills and Electronic Resources), Computing Services, 12.30 p.m. (booking at www.ouls.ox.ac.uk/wiser/).

CONFERENCE: 'What conditions favour innovation?', Maison Française, 4 p.m. (enquiries: maison@herald.ox.ac.uk).

DR EMMA TARLO: 'Hijab online: cyber Islamic fashion, commerce and the challenges of representation' (Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology: departmental seminars), Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, 64 Banbury Road, 4 p.m.

PROFESSOR JOHN BREWER: 'The politics of fear and love: Edmund Burke and Mary Wollstonecraft' (Ford's Lectures in British History: 'The politics of feeling in the age of revolutions, 1770–1830'), Schools, 5 p.m.

LORD PATTEN OF BARNES, with students TOBIAS LENZ, CHRISTOPHER BICKERTON,

LEE JONES and ANNA OLDMEADOW: debate on Lord Patten's book What Next? Surviving the twenty-first century, Nissan Lecture Theatre, St Antony's, 5 p.m. (enquiries: european@sant.ox.ac.uk).

SIR CHRISTOPHER MEYER: 'Can the press be regulated?' (Media and Politics seminars), Seminar Room, Nuffield, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR IAN STOREY: 'On looking (again) into Kratinos' Dionysalexandros' (Oliver Smithies Lectures), Classics Centre, 5 p.m.

THE REVD DR WOJCIECH GIERTYCH: 'St Thomas's understanding of human freedom' (Aquinas Lecture), Blackfriars, 5 p.m.

PETER KELLNER lectures in series 'Lessons in Government', Lecture Room XI, Brasenose, 5 p.m.

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