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Oxford University Gazette, 26 June 2009: Examinations and Boards

Changes in Regulations

With the approval, where appropriate, of the Education Committee of Council, and, where applicable, of divisional boards, the following changes in regulations made by divisional and faculty boards will come into effect on 11 July.

1 Humanities Board and Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences Board

(a) Special Regulations for the Moderations in Physics and Philosophy

With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

In Examination Regulations, 2008, p. 112, l. 5, delete `CP4P: Mathematical Methods 2P' and substitute `CP4: Mathematical Methods 2'.

(b) Special Regulations for the Honour School of Physics and Philosophy

With immediate effect

In Examination Regulations, 2008, p. 440, ll. 46–8, after 'A unit in Physics consists of either a written paper on a Major Option, or a project report on either advanced practical work or other advanced work, as specified for Part C of the Honour School of Physics.' insert ' Candidates may be examined by viva voce.'

2 Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences Board

Special Regulations for the Honour School of Physics

With immediate effect

In Examination Regulations 2008, p. 436, after l. 47, insert '(c) candidates may be examined by viva voce.'


3 Board of the Faculty of Law

(a) Bachelor of Civil Law

With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2008, p. 932, after l. 42, insert 'Commercial remedies;'.

2 Ibid., l. 45, after 'Restitution', insert ' of Unjust Enrichment;'.

3 Ibid., after l. 47, insert:

'Advanced Property and Trusts; Comparative and European Corporate Law;'.

4 Ibid., p. 933, delete ll. 1–14 and substitute:

'Competition Law;

Conflict of Laws;

Constitutional Principles of the European Union;

Constitutional Theory;

Corporate Finance Law;

Corporate Insolvency;

Criminal Justice and Human Rights;'.

5 Ibid., delete ll. 12–14 and substitute:

'Evidence;

International Intellectual Property Rights;'.

6 Ibid., delete ll. 23–25 and substitute:

'Medical Law and Ethics;

Personal Taxation;

Philosophical Foundations of the Common Law;

Principles of Civil Procedure;

Punishment, Security and the State;'.


(b) Final Honour School of Jurisprudence and Diploma in Legal Studies

With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

In Examination Regulations, 2008, p. 1007, after l. 34 insert:

'6. The Law Board will approve and offer a Research Skills Programme, as outlined in the Special Regulations for the Honour School of Jurisprudence. Candidates for the Diploma are required to undertake units one and two of the course, and to complete the assessments which form part of it, to the satisfaction of the Programme Coordinator appointed by the Law Board.'


4 Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies

(a) M.Phil in Oriental Studies (xiii) Modern South Asian Studies

With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2008, p. 574, l. 6, delete 'grammar knowledge' and substitute 'knowledge of grammar, translation'.

2 Ibid., l. 14, after 'Hindi' insert 'Literary Hindi,'.

3 Ibid., l. 41, delete 'Early modern Hindi Reading' and substitute 'Early Modern Hindi Texts'.

4 Ibid., l. 42, delete 'Written Urdu' and substitute 'Modern Hindi Texts'.

5 Ibid., l. 43, delete 'Reading' and substitute 'Texts'.


5 Board of the Faculty of Theology

(a) Special Regulations for the M.St in Theology

With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2008, p. 667, delete ll. 32-34, and substitute:

'1. All candidates will be required to follow a course of instruction and directed research for three terms and present themselves for examination in one of the following subjects: Old Testament; New Testament; Ecclesiastical History (split into 6 subsections, see below); Christian Doctrine (split into 4 subsections, see below); Christian Ethics; Science and Religion; Biblical Interpretation.'.

2 Ibid., delete p. 667, l. 37 to p. 669, l. 30, and substitute:

'3. The examination shall consist of:

(i) a three-hour examination as prescribed in the regulations for each course;

(ii) two essays of not more than 5,000 words on topics proposed by the candidate and accepted by the Theology Faculty Board (candidates should be very aware of this word limit when proposing their titles; the most significant cause of rejected essay titles is insufficient focus);

(iii) a dissertation of not more than 15,000 words on a topic proposed by the candidate and accepted by the Theology Graduate Studies Committee. For candidates intending to proceed to doctoral study, the topic of the thesis should be such as to provide a foundation for future research.

The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.

4. Proposals for titles of essays and dissertations must be submitted to the Theology Faculty by Monday of week 5 of Hilary Term for consideration by the Theology Graduate Studies Committee. These will be considered by the committee in consultation with the examiners. Candidates are advised that some time may be required for communication with the Examiners to take place before permission is granted; permission will normally be granted by Monday of week 8 of Hilary Term. All proposals should be accompanied by a brief indication of how the subject will be treated and a brief account of the primary and secondary sources used. The titles and contents of essays and the dissertation should not substantially overlap with each other, though they may cover ground included in the scope of examinations as detailed below, and, in the case of Christian Doctrine and Ecclesiastical History, they may fall within the same section.

5. Two copies of essays must be submitted not later than the Friday before the beginning of Trinity Term. Two copies of the dissertation must be submitted at the end of eighth week of Trinity Term. All submitted work must be printed and sent in a parcel bearing the words 'M.St in Theology' to The Chairman of Examiners, c/o the Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford. The 3-hour examination will take place in the tenth or eleventh week of Trinity Term. Each candidate will be required to present himself or herself for an oral (viva voce), which will take place within a few days of the written examination, and may include discussion of both the examination paper and any pre-submitted work. Candidates must not put their names on the examination paper or on any pre- submitted work. The dissertation must be accompanied by the candidate's signed statement that it is entirely his or her own work except where otherwise indicated.

I. Old Testament

The examination shall consist of:

(i) a three-hour paper on prescribed Old Testament Texts in Hebrew. The prescribed texts for the examination are published in the course handbook.

(ii) Two essays of not more than 5,000 words on topics approved by the Theology Graduate Studies Committee (see 4 above).

(iii) A dissertation of not more than 15,000 words on a topic approved by the Theology Graduate Studies Committee (see 4 above).

II. New Testament

The examination shall consist of:

(i) a three-hour paper on prescribed New Testament Texts in Greek. The prescribed texts for the examination will be published in the Gazette by the Board of the Faculty of Theology before the end of Michaelmas Term.

(ii) Two essays of not more than 5,000 words on topics approved by the Theology Graduate Studies Committee (see 4 above).

(iii) A dissertation of not more than 15,000 words on a topic approved by the Theology Graduate Studies Committee (see 4 above).

III. Ecclesiastical History

The examination shall consist of:

(i) a three-hour general paper on the nature and practice of ecclesiastical history. Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of a range of historiographical approaches to key questions in ecclesiastical history and of the variety of approaches to historical method which have emerged as a result of the professionalisation of teaching and research in history and of the introduction of new methods into the writing of history.

(ii) Two essays of not more than 5,000 words on topics approved by the Theology Graduate Studies Committee (see 4 above).

(iii) A dissertation of not more than 15,000 words on a topic approved by the Theology Graduate Studies Committee (see 4 above). All work submitted by a candidate under (ii) and (iii) shall lie within one (and only one) of the following sections:

(a) The Early Church AD 200–476

(b) The Western Church AD 476–1050

(c) The Western Church AD 1050–1400

(d) English Church History AD 1066–1272

(e) European Christianity AD 1400–1800

(f) European Christianity AD 1800–2000

IV. Christian Doctrine

Work submitted on Christian doctrine shall lie within one of the following sections:

(a) History of Doctrine: Patristic Theology (c. 100–451 ad)

(b) History of Doctrine: Scholastic Theology (c. 1050–1350 ad)

(c) History of Doctrine: Theology of the Reformation period (c. 1500–1650 ad)

(d) Modern Doctrine (post-1789)

The examination shall consist of:

(i) a three-hour paper. For section (a), this will include passages for translation and comment from one or more prescribed texts in Greek or Latin. For section (b) it will include passages for translation and comment from prescribed texts in Latin. Prescribed texts will be published in course handbooks.

For section (c) it will consist of passages for translation and comment from prescribed texts in Latin, German or French of the Reformation period. The prescribed texts will be approved by the Graduate Studies Committee on the advice of course leaders and ratified by the Faculty Board before the end of Michaelmas Term in the year when the course commences, and will be published in the Gazette. Essays will also be set, both on the prescribed texts and on general topics within the stated period. For section (d), the examination will be on methods and styles in theology.

(ii) Two essays of not more than 5,000 words on topics approved by the Theology Graduate Studies Committee (see 4 above).

(iii) A dissertation of not more than 15,000 words on a topic approved by the Theology Graduate Studies Committee (see 4 above).

All work submitted by a candidate shall fall within the same section. In proposing titles for essays and the dissertation, candidates in section (d) should explain in which pieces of work they will demonstrate competence in (a) exploring the encounter between theology and some non-theological discipline; (b) exploring a modern theological response to some theological reflection of the past.

V. Christian Ethics

The examination shall consist of:

(i) a three-hour paper on Christian Moral Concepts and Methodology: Contemporary and Historical Discussions.

(ii) One essay of not more than 5,000 words on select texts in Christian ethics and one essay of not more than 5,000 words on practical fields of Christian Ethics. The select texts will be approved by the Graduate Studies Committee, on the advice of the course leader, before the end of the Michaelmas Term in which the course commences, and will be published in the Gazette. The selected texts may comprise, e.g. classic expressions of a range of Christian traditions, the works of a selection of major theologians, texts on a chosen theme. There are three designated fields for the second essay: (a) sexual, (b) medical and (c) political. In each year any two of (a)–(c) will be studied. The choice of fields will take into account the preferences of students.

(iii) A dissertation of not more than 15,000 words on a topic approved by the Theology Graduate Studies Committee (see 4 above).

In proposing titles for essays and the dissertation, candidates should explain in which pieces of work they will demonstrate competence in (a) exploring an ethical question, substantive or conceptual, in relation to contemporary discussion; (b) the interpretation of a Biblical text of moral significance; (c) the discussion of a non-Biblical text of moral significance from some period of history prior to 1900.

VI. Science and Religion

The examination shall consist of:

(i) a three-hour paper on topics in Science and Religion.

(ii) Two essays of not more than 5,000 words on topics approved by the Theology Graduate Studies Committee (see 4 above).

(iii) A dissertation of not more than 15,000 words on a topic approved by the Theology Graduate Studies Committee (see 4 above).

In proposing titles for essays and the dissertation, candidates should explain in which pieces of work they will demonstrate competence in (a) exploring a historical debate in which scientific and religious issues are involved; (b) exploring a philosophical debate with a bearing on the discussion of science and religion; (c) analysing a contemporary issue on the interface between science and religion.

VII. Biblical Interpretation

The examination shall consist of:

(i) a three-hour paper on the History and Principles of Biblical Study with special reference to a selected period. The period will be selected by the student in consultation with his or her supervisor. Where there is more than one student, each will be able to answer on the period that he or she has selected.

(ii) Two essays of not more than 5,000 words on topics approved by the Theology Graduate Studies Committee (see 4 above).

(iii) A dissertation of not more than 15,000 words on a topic approved by the Theology Graduate Studies Committee (see 4 above). Pre-submitted work under (ii) and (iii) shall fall within the period covered by the examined paper (i).'


(b) Special Regulations for the M.St in Philosophical Theology

With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2008, p. 657, delete ll. 26–41, and substitute:

'Candidates must make a written application for approval of the essay topic, to reach the Theology Graduate Studies Committee not later than Monday of fifth week in Hilary Term. In cases where there is some uncertainty about the acceptability of the proposal, candidates are advised to submit their applications earlier if possible. All applications should be accompanied by a recommendation from the candidate's supervisor. Two copies of the dissertation must be sent to the Chairman of Examiners for the M.St in Philosophical Theology, c/o the Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford by the Friday of eighth week in Trinity Term of the year in which the examinations are taken. The dissertation must be accompanied by a signed statement by the candidate that the essay is the candidate's own work, except where otherwise indicated. The candidate's name should not appear on the dissertation itself.

Written examinations will be set in the tenth or eleventh week of Trinity Term.'

2 Ibid., after l. 45, insert: 'see also regulations for Paper 1 of the M.Phil in Philosophical Theology in the "Course Regulations for the M.Phil in Philosophical Theology" section of the course handbook.'

3 Ibid., p. 658, after l. 4, insert:

'Lectures, tutorials etc.: as for Paper 3 of the M. Phil. in Philosophical Theology.'

4 Ibid., delete ll. 7–8, and substitute: 'see regulations for Paper 1 of Section A and Paper 1 of Section C of the Christian Doctrine option of the M. Phil. in Theology in the "Course Regulations for the M.Phil in Theology" section of the course handbook.'


(c) Special Regulations for the M.St in the Study of Religions

With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2008, delete p. 663, l. 35, to p. 664, l. 19, and substitute:

'2. Candidates intending to offer a 10,000–15,000 word dissertation must make a written application for approval of the topic no later than Monday of fifth week of Hilary Term. The application should be submitted to the Theology Faculty for consideration by the Theology Graduate Studies Committee. In cases where there is some uncertainty about the acceptability of the proposal, candidates are asked to submit their applications earlier if possible. All applications should be accompanied by a recommendation from the candidate's supervisor. Two copies of the dissertation must be sent to the Chairman of Examiners for the Degree of M.St in the Study of Religion, c/o the Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford before the end of eighth week of Trinity Term in the year of examination.

Titles for the two shorter essays (and, where required in the regulations, for permission to substitute the essay for a paper) must likewise be submitted to the Theology Faculty no later than Monday of fifth week of Hilary Term for consideration by the Graduate Studies Committee. Two copies of the essays must be submitted to the Examination Schools by the Friday before the beginning of Trinity Term in the year in which the examination is taken. Decisions on the suitability of titles for both dissertation and essays will be taken in consultation with the Chair of Examiners for that year.

The three-hour examination will be held in tenth or eleventh week of Trinity Term.

3. Each candidate will be required to present himself or herself for an oral (viva voce) examination unless individually dispensed by the examiners. This will take place within a few days of the written examination, and may include discussion of both the examination paper and any pre-submitted work.'

2 Ibid., l. 20, delete '5' and substitute '4'.

3 Ibid., l. 22, delete '6' and substitute '5'.

4 Ibid., p. 665, delete ll. 13–34, and substitute:

'Students should refer to the student handbook for a list of the texts to be used in studying the subject.'

5 Ibid., p. 666, delete ll. 14–29, and substitute:

'Selections from the texts listed in the student handbook will be assigned by the course tutor by the beginning of Michaelmas Term.'

6 Ibid., p. 666, l. 42, delete 'brahman (ultimate reality)', and substitute 'ultimate reality (brahman)'.

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