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Oxford University Gazette, 23 April 2009: Examinations and Boards

Appointment and Reappointment

Social Sciences Division

Appointment

UNIVERSITY LECTURER

DR L. CLUVER, MA PH.D Camb, M.SC Oxf, Fellow of Wolfson College. In Evidence-Based Intervention. From 1 April 2009 to 31 March 2014.


Reappointment

DR M. VENTRESCA, AB AM PH.D Stanford, Fellow of Wolfson College. In Strategy. From 1 July 2009 until the retiring age.

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Changes in Regulations

With the approval of the Education Committee of Council, and, where applicable, of divisional boards, the following changes in regulations made by divisional boards, faculty boards, and the Continuing Education Board will come into effect on 8 May.

1 Humanities Board and Social Sciences Board

(a) Honour School of History and Economics

(i) With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

As for the Honour School of Philosophy, Politics and Economics (see (c) (ii) below).


(ii) With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

As for the Honour School of Philosophy, Politics and Economics (see (c) (ii) below).


(b) Honour School of History and Politics

(i) With immediate effect

In Examination Regulations, 2008, p. 286, delete ll. 16–20 and substitute:

'4. Papers 3 and 4. Each candidate shall offer any two of the five "core subjects" in Politics, as specified for the Honour School of Philosophy, Politics and Economics (i.e. 201, 202, 203, 214, and 220). A thesis as specified in Regulation 6 below may not be substituted for a Politics core subject.'


(ii) With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

In Examination Regulations, 2008, p. 286, l. 24, l. 25, l. 27, and p. 287, l. 9 delete '227' and substitute '228'.


(iii) With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

As for the Honour School of Philosophy, Politics and Economics (see (c) (i) below).


(c) Honour School of Philosophy, Politics and Economics

(i) With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2008, p. 417, delete l. 31 and substitute:

'[until 1 October 2010: 206. Government and Politics in Western Europe *] [from 1 October 2009: 206. Politics in Europe]'.

2 Ibid., after l.52 insert:

'[from 1 October 2009: 228. The Politics of the European Union]'.

3 Ibid., p. 419, delete ll. 26–37 and substitute:

'206. Politics in Europe

This paper is a comparative study of the national party and institutional systems of Europe, and of comparative issues in European politics, including democratisation, institutional relations, political economy and party politics. Candidates are expected to show a broad knowledge of European politics, and may where appropriate include reference to the UK in answers, but should not answer any question mainly or exclusively with reference to the UK.'

4 Ibid., p.424, after l.9 insert:

'228. The Politics of the European Union

This paper focuses on the study of the history, institutions, and policy processes of the European Union. It includes analysis of the history and theories of the European integration process. Candidates are expected to show knowledge of politics of the European Union, including the main institutions of the EU, decision-making procedures and specific policies, as well as relations between the EU and the rest of the world. The paper also focuses on democracy in the European Union and the impact of European integration on the domestic politics and policies of the member states.'


(ii) With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2008, p. 418, delete ll. 14–29 and substitute:

'303. Microeconomic Theory

304. Money and Banking

305. Public Economics

306. Economics of Industry

307. Labour Economics and Industrial Relations (222)

308. International Economics

309. Command and Transitional Economies

310. Economics of Developing Countries

311. British Economic History since 1870

312. Classical Economic Thought: Smith, Ricardo, and Marx

313. Statistical Methods in Economics

314. Econometrics

315. Comparative Demographic Systems (225)

316. Economics of OECD Countries

317. Economic Decisions Within the Firm

318. Finance

319. Game Theory'.

2 Ibid., p. 426, delete ll. 1–10 and substitute:

'303. Microeconomic Theory

Rigorous study of core elements of microeconomic theory. Topics may (but not necessarily) include: decisions making under risk and uncertainty; theory of search under uncertainty; models of contracting under asymmetric information; theory of general economic equilibrium; theory of social choice. A descriptive list of the topics will be published on the Economics Web site before the beginning of the year in which the course is taught and examined.

Questions will be set requiring candidates to solve problems and demonstrate conceptual understanding of core elements of microeconomic theory.'

3 Ibid., p. 428, delete ll. 25–33 and substitute:

'314. Econometrics

The paper will be set in two parts. Candidates will be required to show knowledge of both parts.

I Multiple regression: interpretation, estimation, inference, prediction.

Both cross-sectional and time series implementations will be discussed.

A variety of econometric topics will be considered drawn from the following list: maximum likelihood, endogeneity and instrumental variables, unit roots and cointegration, limited dependent variable models, duration models and panel data models.

II Application of the introduced econometric methods to economic problems.

A descriptive list of the topics will be published on the Economics Web site before the beginning of the year in which the course is taught and examined.'

4 Ibid., p. 429, after l. 33 insert:

'319. Game Theory

Strategic-form games and extensive-form games. Solution concepts. Games with incomplete information. Applications and topics which may (but not necessarily) include bargaining, auctions, global games, evolutionary games, cooperative games, learning, games in political science.

The paper will be set in two parts. Candidates will be required to show knowledge on both parts of the paper.

Part A. Questions will be set requiring candidates to solve problems involving the core elements of game theory.

Part B. Questions will be set requiring candidates to solve problems in and show knowledge of specific applications and topics in game theory.'


(iii) With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2008 p. 418, after l. 29 insert '320. Mathematical Methods'.

2 Ibid., p. 429, after l. 33 insert:

'320. Mathematical Methods

The paper will cover mathematical tools such as Calculus, Linear Algebra, Differential and Difference Equations, Probability and Statistical Inference and their applications to Economics. Applications will not require knowledge of material covered in other optional papers but will assume knowledge of the core first and second year papers. A detailed syllabus will be published every year.'

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2 Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences Board

(a) Honour School of Engineering Science

With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

In Examination Regulations, 2008, pp. 223–7, as amended by Supplement (2) to Gazette No. 4852 (Wednesday, 23 July 2008), p. 1380, delete 'Paper A3 Structures, Mechanics and Materials' and substitute 'Paper A3 Structures, Materials and Dynamics'.

(b) Preliminary Examination in Chemistry

With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

In Examination Regulations, 2008, delete from p. 115, l. 7, to p. 116, l. 4, and substitute:

'A

1. The subjects of the Preliminary Examination in Chemistry shall be Chemistry (comprising Inorganic, Organic, and Physical Chemistry) and Mathematics for Chemistry.

2. The number of papers and other general requirements of the Preliminary Examination in Chemistry shall be prescribed by regulation from time to time by the Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences Board.

B

1. Candidates in the Preliminary Examination in Chemistry must offer four subjects at one examination, provided that a candidate who has failed in one or two subjects may offer that number of subjects at a subsequent examination.

2. The subjects shall be as follows:

(1) Inorganic Chemistry

(2) Organic Chemistry

(3) Physical Chemistry

(4) Mathematics for Chemistry

One two-and-a-half-hour paper will be set for each of subjects (1), (3) and (4); one three-hour paper will be set for subject (2).

3. Candidates shall be deemed to have passed the examination if they have satisfied the Moderators in all four subjects either at a single examination or at two examinations in accordance with the proviso to clause 1, and provided further that the same subjects as were failed at the first sitting have been passed at the same attempt at a subsequent examination.

4. In the case of candidates who offer all four subjects, the Moderators shall publish the names only of those who have satisfied them in two or more subjects. Candidates whose names do not appear on the pass list must offer four subjects at a subsequent examination. In the case of candidates who, in accordance with the proviso in clause 1, offer one or two subjects, the Moderators shall publish the names only of those who have satisfied them in each of the subjects offered.

5. The Moderators may award a distinction to candidates of special merit who have satisfied them in all four subjects at a single examination.

6. The Moderators will not provide calculators but unless otherwise specified will permit the use of any hand-held pocket calculator subject to the conditions set out under the heading 'Use of calculators in examinations' in the Regulations for the Conduct of University Examinations and further elaborated in the Course Handbook.

7. Candidates are required to complete an adequate course of laboratory work as specified in the Course Handbook. Heads of laboratories, or their deputies, and the IT Training Officer, shall make available to the Moderators records showing the extent to which each candidate has pursued an adequate course of laboratory work. Only work completed and marked by 5 p.m. on the Friday of the sixth week of Trinity Term will be taken into account.'


(c) Honour School of Chemistry

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first Part IA examination in 2011, first Part IB examination in 2012, and first Part II examination in 2013)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2008, p. 178, before l. 1 insert: '[Until 2011:'.

2 Ibid., after l. 2 insert:

'For candidates who embarked on the Honour School in or before October 2009, taking Part IA in or before 2010, Part IB in or before 2011, and Part II in or before 2012'.

3 Ibid., p. 118, l. 24, after 'is met.' insert ']'.

4 Ibid., after p. 181, insert

'SPECIAL REGULATIONS FOR THE HONOUR SCHOOL OF CHEMISTRY

For candidates embarking on the Honour School in or before October 2010, taking Part IA in or after 2011, Part IB in or after 2012, and Part II in or after 2013

A

1. The subject of the Honour School of Chemistry shall be the study of Chemistry.

2. No candidate shall be admitted to examination in this school unless he or she has either passed or been exempted from the First Public Examination.

3. The examination in this school shall be under the supervision of the Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences Board, which shall prescribe the necessary regulations.

4. The examination in Chemistry shall consist of three parts: IA, IB, II.

5. No candidate may present him or herself for examination in Part II unless he or she has been adjudged worthy of honours by the examiners in Part I (Part IA and Part IB).

6. The name of a candidate shall not be published in a class list until he or she has completed all parts of the examination, and has been adjudged worthy of honours by the examiners in Part I (Part IA and Part IB) and Part II of the examination in consecutive years. The Examiners shall give due consideration to the performance in all parts of the respective examinations.

7. The examiners shall be entitled to award a Pass to candidates in Part I (Part IA and Part IB) who have reached a standard considered adequate but who have not been adjudged worthy of honours.

8. A candidate who obtains only a pass, or fails to satisfy the examiners, may enter again for Part IB of the examination on one, but no more than one, subsequent occasion. Part IA and Part II shall be entered on one occasion only. Marks obtained at Part IA will be carried over to Part IB.

9. A candidate adjudged worthy of Honours in Part I (Parts IA and IB) and worthy of Honours in Part II may supplicate for the Degree of Master of Chemistry, provided that the candidate has fulfilled all the conditions for admission to a degree of the University.

10. A candidate who passes Part I (Parts IA and IB) or who is adjudged worthy of Honours in Part I (Parts IA and IB), but who does not enter Part II, or fails to obtain Honours in Part II, is permitted to supplicate for the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry (pass or unclassified Honours, as appropriate); provided that no such candidate may later enter or re-enter the Part II year or supplicate for the degree of Master of Chemistry; and provided in each case that the candidate has fulfilled all the conditions for admission to a degree of the University. 11. Candidates will be required to complete a core practical requirement: provided that this requirement may re be reduced for candidates who have passed one or more supplementary subjects. Details of the requirements and the eligible Supplementary Subjects shall be prescribed in the Course Handbook. Exceptionally, the examiners may require a candidate to take a practical examination.

B

1. In the following, 'the Course Handbook' refers to the Chemistry Undergraduate Course Handbook, published annually at the start of Michaelmas Term by the Faculty of Chemistry and also posted on the Web site at: www.chem.ox.ac.uk/tea ching/UndergradHandbook.pdf.

2. The examiners will permit the use of any hand-held calculator subject to the conditions set out under the heading 'Use of calculators in examinations' in the Regulations for the Conduct of University Examinations and further elaborated in the Course Handbook.

3. The syllabus for Parts IA and IB shall be published in the Course Handbook.

4. Supplementary Subjects

(i) Candidates may offer themselves for examination in one or more Supplementary Subjects, provided that no more than three Supplementary Subjects may be offered in total.

(ii) Candidates awarded a pass in a Supplementary Subject examination may not retake the same Supplementary Subject examination.

(iii) Supplementary Subjects may be offered in all or any of the years in which candidates take any Part of the Second Public Examination.

(iv) The Supplementary Subjects available in any year will be published, together with the term in which each subject will be examined, in the Course Handbook in the academic year in which the courses are delivered. Regulations governing the use of calculators in individual Supplementary Subjects will be notified in the Course Handbook.

(v) Where a Language Supplementary Subject is available, entry of candidates for examination in Language Supplementary Subjects shall require the approval of the Chairman of the Chemistry Academic Board and the Director of the Language Centre or their deputies. Approval shall not be given to candidates who have, at the start of the course, already acquired demonstrable skills exceeding the target learning outcomes in the chosen language.

(vi) In determining the place of candidates in the Class List the Examiners shall take account of distinction in any Supplementary Subjects which have been offered.

Parts IA and IB

In the Part IA examination, one compulsory two and a half hour paper will be set in each of Inorganic, Organic, and Physical Chemistry, covering the fundamental aspects of material from Years 1 and 2.

In the Part IB examination, there will be two compulsory two and a half hour papers in each of Inorganic, Organic, and Physical Chemistry, covering material in the core courses of Years 1–3. In addition, there will one three-hour Option Paper, which will examine the content of the Option courses, but will also require knowledge of core course material. The Option Papers will offer a choice of four questions from at least twelve.

Heads of the three main Sections of the Chemistry Department, or their deputies, and the IT Training Officer, shall make available to the Examiners records showing the extent to which each candidate has pursued an adequate course in laboratory work and in IT. Only that work completed and marked by 5 p.m. of the Friday of the fourth week of the Trinity Term in which the candidate takes Part IB shall be included in these records. The Examiners will require evidence of satisfactory completion of the core practical requirement, or the reduced requirement in the case of candidates who have passed one or more Supplementary Subjects. In determining the place of candidates in the Class List the Examiners shall take account of the marks reported for the core practical requirement.

Satisfactory completion of a the prescribed minimum amount of laboratory workcore practical requirement, (allowing for aor of a reduced core requirement if a Supplementary Subject where takenis passed) is an absolute requirement for passing the award of Honours at Part IB and for progression to Part II. Satisfactory completion of a smaller core practical requirement will be required for the award of a Pass degree at Part I. The details of these threshold requirements shall be published in the Course Handbook.

Candidates may be examined viva voce at the Examiners' discretion in Part IB, but not in Part IA.

Candidates are not permitted to enter their names for examination in Part IA until they have entered upon the fifth term from their matriculation.

Candidates are not permitted to enter their names for examination in Part IB until they have entered upon the eighth term from their matriculation, or before sitting all the papers set for Part IA in a previous year.

Part II

Candidates, who must have been judged worthy of Honours by the Examiners in Part I (Part IA and Part IB) in a previous year, must present a record of investigations carried out under the supervision of one of the following:

(i) any professor, reader, university lecturer, departmental demonstrator, or senior research officer who is also an official member of the Faculty of Chemistry;

(ii) any other person approved by the Chemistry Academic Board.

In case (ii), a co- supervisor as defined under (i) must also be approved, and so must the proposed project. Applications for project approval, including the names of the supervisor and a co-supervisor and a short project summary (not more than 250 words), should be sent by the student to the Chemistry Academic Board, c/o Chemistry Faculty Office, Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, South Parks Road, by Friday of the first week of Hilary Full Term preceding the intended Part II year. Students who are uncertain whether their intended Part II supervision is in category (ii) above should consult their College Tutor or the Chemistry Faculty Office.

Candidates shall be examined viva voce, and, if the Examiners think fit, in writing, on their investigations and matters relevant thereto. The Examiners may obtain a report on the work of each candidate from the supervisor concerned.

Heads of the three main Sections of the Chemistry Department, or their deputies, shall make available to the Chemistry Faculty office not later than the Friday of the fourth week of the Hilary Full Term records giving notice of the subject of investigations for each candidate working in their section, together with evidence (a) that the subject has been approved by the candidate's supervisor and (b), if it is to be carried out in a laboratory, that the person in charge of the laboratory considers that it is suitable for investigation in that laboratory. Candidates doing their project outside of the Chemistry Department are responsible for ensuring that records of their investigations are submitted to the Chemistry Faculty office not later than the Friday of the fourth week of the Hilary Full Term.

A candidate for Part II is required to send in, not later than noon on the Friday of the seventh week of the Trinity Full Term, a record of the investigations which he or she has carried out under the direction of his or her supervisor. Such record, which should conform in length and format with guidance which the examiners may give, should be addressed 'The Examination Schools, Oxford, for the Chairman of the Examiners in Part II of the Final Honour School of Chemistry' and should have included a Declaration of Authorship signed by the candidate that it is his or her own work.

Candidates for Part II are required to keep statutory residence and pursue their investigations in Oxford during a period of at least thirty-eight weeks in three terms, i.e. from the third Thursday before Michaelmas Full Term to the third Tuesday after Michaelmas Full Term; from the second Tuesday before Hilary Full Term to the Wednesday following Palm Sunday (i.e. the Sunday before Easter Day); and from the Monday following Easter Monday to the third Saturday after Trinity Full Term; provided that the divisional board shall have power to permit candidates to vary the dates of their residence so long as the overall programme requirement is met.'

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3 Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences Board and Social Sciences Board

(a) Honour School of Engineering, Economics, and Management

(i) With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

As for the Honour School of Philosophy, Politics and Economics (see 1 (c) (ii) above).

(ii) With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

As for the Honour School of Philosophy, Politics and Economics (see 1 (c) (iii) above).


(b) Honour School of Materials, Economics, and Management

(i) With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

As for the Honour School of Philosophy, Politics and Economics (see 1 (c) (ii) above).

(ii) With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

As for the Honour School of Philosophy, Politics and Economics (see 1 (c) (iii) above).

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4 Medical Sciences Board

(a) Honour School of Physiological Sciences

(i) With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

In Examination Regulations, 2008, p. 446, l. 37, delete 'submitted essay' and substitute 'Extended Essay'.


(ii) With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

In Examination Regulations, 2008, p. 446, l. 4, delete from 'Candidates must apply' to the end of l. 37 'submitted essay' and substitute:

'(ii) Registration

No later than Friday of Week 8 of Hilary Term in the academic year preceding the year of examination, every candidate must register through the Preclinical Studies Office the title of their essay, provide a brief outline of the subject matter, and confirm the main themes to which it relates. Decision on the application shall be made by the Director of Preclinical Studies or his or her deputy and shall be communicated to the candidate not later than Week 0 of Trinity Term in the academic year preceding the year of examination.

(iii) Authorship

The essay must be the candidate's own work. Candidates' tutors, or their deputies nominated to act as advisors, may discuss with candidates the proposed field of study, the sources available, and the method of treatment, but on no account may they read or comment on any written draft. Every candidate shall sign a certificate to the effect that this rule has been observed and that the essay is their own work; and the candidate's tutor or advisor shall countersign the certificate confirming that, to the best of their knowledge and belief, this is so.

(iv) Submission

Essays (two copies) must be submitted to the Chairman of Examiners in Physiological Sciences, c/o Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, not later than noon on the Friday of Week 8 of the Trinity Term in the academic year preceding the year of examination. Each essay shall be accompanied (in a separate sealed envelope addressed to the Chairman of Examiners) by certification of authorship as specified in the preceding paragraph and an electronic copy of the text of the essay.

6. Candidates may be examined viva voce; the topics may include the subject of any written paper taken by the candidate, or the research project or Extended Essay.'


(b) Preliminary Examination in Medicine

With immediate effect

In Examination Regulations, 2008, p. 957, l. 2, delete 'Week 9 of Hilary Term' and substitute 'Week 0 of Trinity Term'.

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5 Social Sciences Board

(a) Honour School of Economics and Management

(i) With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

In Examination Regulations, 2008, p. 211, delete ll. 8–22 and substitute:

(1) Microeconomic Theory

(2) Money and Banking

(3) Public Economics

(4) Economics of Industry

(5) Labour Economics and Industrial Relations (222)

(6) International Economics

(7) Command and Transitional Economies

(8) Economics of Developing Countries

(9) British Economic History since 1870

(10) Classical Economic Thought: Smith, Ricardo, and Marx

(11) Statistical Methods in Economics

(12) Econometrics

(13) Comparative Demographic Systems (225)

(14) Economics of OECD Countries

(15) Economic Decisions Within the Firm

(16) Finance

(17) Game Theory'.


(ii) With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

In Examination Regulations, 2008, p. 211, after l. 22 insert '(18) Mathematical Methods'.


(b) M.Sc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition

With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2008, p. 685, l. 25 delete 'Part I and Part II' and substitute 'Part 1 and Part 2'.

2 Ibid., l. delete 'A' and substitute 'Candidates will be required to submit a'.

3 Ibid., ll. 38-39 delete 'Tutor for Higher Degrees and Academic Board of the Department' and substitute 'Director of Graduate Studies and the Departmental Board'.

4 Ibid., delete ll. 45-46 and substitute:

'the Chairman of the Examiners, M.Sc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition, c/o Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, not later than noon on the second Tuesday of September of the year in which the final Module'.


(c) M.Sc in Educational Research Methodology

With effect from 1 October 2008 (for first examination in 2010)

In Examination Regulations, 2008, delete from p. 712, l. 32 to p. 714, l. 31 and substitute:

'1. Candidates must follow for three terms (or six terms part-time) a course of instruction in Educational Research Methodology as prescribed in the Schedule.

2. The course committee shall appoint a supervisor for each candidate.

3. The course will consist of four elements as listed in the schedule below, and candidates shall be examined in accordance with the schedule below. Candidates undertake a two week research internship. The dissertation will be 15,000–20,000 words long on a topic to be agreed by the Departmental Board.

4. The required written submissions, two copies of each, including the essays, the data analysis portfolio and the workbook, must be delivered to the Chairman of the Examiners, M.Sc in Educational Research Methodology, c/o Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, by the times and dates specified at the start of the course. Each submission must be accompanied by a declaration indicating that it is the candidate's own work.

5. Candidates will be required to submit a dissertation of 15,000 to 20,000 words (including footnotes/endnotes but excluding appendices and references or bibliography), the title to be selected in consultation with the supervisor, relevant to the subject of the course, and approved by the Departmental Board not later than the first day of the fifth week of Hilary Term in the year in which they complete the written examination.

6. Three typewritten/word-processed copies of the dissertation must be delivered to the Chairman of the Examiners, M.Sc in Educational Research Methodology, c/o Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, not later than noon on the second Tuesday of September in the year in which the written examination is completed. One copy should be hard bound and two soft bound, the latter of which should be anonymous except for the candidate number. The hard bound copy of the dissertation of each candidate who passes the examination shall be retained by the department for deposit in the departmental library. The dissertation must be accompanied by a declaration indicating that it is the candidate's own work.

7. Candidates may also be required to attend an oral examination. The oral examination may be on the candidate's written papers, dissertation, or both.

8. Candidates shall be deemed to have passed the examination if they have satisfied the examiners in the required written submissions and the dissertation.

Schedule

(i) Foundations of Educational Research The lectures with associated seminars and workshops, provide an introduction to educational and social research approaches and methods. The course will cover (a) an introduction to the nature, key concepts and issues and terminology of educational research, (b) the conceptualisation and design of educational research, including philosophical and ethical issues, framing of research questions, and theoretical underpinnings and (c) an introduction to the collection, analysis and use of data using a range of quantitative and qualitative approaches, and emphasising the synergy between quantitative and qualitative methodologies.

Each candidate will be required to submit two essays of no more than 2,500 words each, Essay topics must be approved by the course committee. The deadline for submission shall be notified to students at the start of the course.

(ii) Strategies for Educational Research The lectures with associated seminars and workshops, aim to develop practical competence in the design and major methods of data collection and analysis in educational and social research, including quantitative and qualitative methodologies.

Each candidate will be required to submit a workbook of practical exercises demonstrating competence in research methods. The deadline for submission shall be notified to students at the start of the course.

(iii) Qualitative data analysis This will consist of a taught course and associated workshops which cover major techniques of qualitative data analysis, including discourse analysis, grounded theory and other approaches to analysis and interpretation of qualitative data, and the use of computers for management of qualitative data.

Each candidate will be required to submit a portfolio of qualitative data analyses carried out during the course. The deadline for submission shall be notified to students at the start of the course.

(iv) Quantitative data analysis This will consist of a taught course and associated workshops which cover major techniques of quantitative data analysis. These include: descriptive and inferential statistics, an introduction to multivariate analysis, statistical modeling, multiple regression and categorical data analysis.

Each candidate will be required to submit a portfolio of SPSS and other data analyses carried out during the course. The deadline for submission shall be notified to students at the start of the course.'


(d) M.Sc in Education

With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

In Examination Regulations, 2008, delete from p. 714, l. 33 to p. 717, l. 31 and substitute:

'1. Candidates must follow for three terms a course of instruction in Education in one of the subjects (a) Comparative and International Education or (b) Higher Education or (c) e-Learning or (d) Child Development and Education as prescribed in the schedule.

2. The course committee shall appoint a supervisor for each candidate.

3. The course will consist of three elements and candidates shall be examined in accordance with the schedule below. Candidates for the subject Comparative and International Education are required to follow the courses (a), (b) and (c) in the Schedule below. Candidates for the subject Higher Education are required to follow the courses (a), (d) and (e) in the Schedule below. Candidates for the subject e-Learning are required to follow the courses (a), (f) and (g) in the Schedule below. Candidates for the subject Child development and education are required to follow the courses (a), (h) and (i) in the Schedule below. The dissertation will be 15,000–20,000 words long on a topic to be agreed by the Departmental Board.

4. The required written submissions, two copies of each, including the essays, must be delivered to the Chairman of the Examiners, M.Sc in Education, c/o Examination Schools. High Street, Oxford, by the times and dates specified at the start of the course. Each submission must be accompanied by a declaration indicating that it is the candidate's own work.

5. Candidates will be required to submit a dissertation of 15,000–20,000 words (including footnotes/endnotes but excluding appendices and references or bibliography), the title to be selected in consultation with the supervisor, relevant to the subject of the course, and approved by the committee not later than the first day of Trinity Term in the year in which they complete the written examination.

6. Three typewritten/word processed copies of the dissertation must be delivered to the Chairman of the Examiners, MSc Education, c/o Examination Schools. High Street, Oxford, not later than noon on the second Tuesday in September in the year in which the written examination is completed. One copy should be hard bound and two soft bound. The two soft bound copies should be anonymous except for the candidate number. The hard bound copy of the dissertation of each candidate who passes the examination shall be retained by the department for deposit in the departmental library. Each submission must be accompanied by a declaration indicating that it is the candidate's own work.

7. Candidates may also be required to attend an oral examination. The oral examination may be on the candidate's written papers, dissertation, or both.

8. Candidates shall be deemed to have passed the examination if they have satisfied the examiners in both written papers and the dissertation.

Schedule

(a) Foundations of Educational Research As specified in the Schedule for the M.Sc in Educational Research Methodology.

(b) Comparative and International Education I: Theoretical, Methodological and Systemic Studies

The course in comparative and international education aims to give a thorough introduction to theory, method, and practice. It includes study of the history and theory of comparative and international inquiry in education, systemic studies involving a range of various countries in the developed and developing world, thematic treatment of a range of topics that lend themselves to comparative analysis. By the end of the course students should have a comprehensive understanding of issues in comparative and international education.

The course is assessed by unseen written examination.

(c) Comparative and International Education II: Education in Developing Countries

The course aims to give a thorough introduction to theory, method and practice in international education, and study in depth of education in developing countries.

The course is assessed by unseen written examination.

(d) Higher Education I: Policy discourses and historical perspectives

Higher Education I is conceptualised as a research-led investigation of the main political, institutional and historical questions in the area of higher education. It draws on a range of international and philosophical perspectives to cover areas such as access, expansion, funding, and the role of the state in higher education. It explores the development and impact of different models of higher education systems and research traditions in the field. Inquiry-based, it combines an analysis of policy discourses at different levels (international, national system, institutional) with an assessment of the current research literature.

The course is assessed by unseen written examination.

(e) Higher Education II: Student experiences and changing academic practice

Higher Education II reviews research into student learning, university pedagogies, disciplinary structures and the changing nature of academic practice within higher education, drawing on a range of international examples and transnational developments. It explores the contribution of ethnographic and qualitative approaches to the field.

The course is assessed by unseen written examination.

(f) e-Learning I: Historical, theoretical and technological foundations of e- learning

The course focuses on the ways in which new technologies provide new modes and opportunities for learning across the age range, in learning contexts including schools, further education, higher education, the workplace and lifelong learning. E-Learning I addresses the historical, theoretical and technological foundations of e-Learning, and examines its global development as a major focus for policy, investment and innovation.

Candidates are required to submit two essays of no less than 2,500 and no more than 3,000 words each (inclusive of footnotes but excluding bibliography and appendices).

(g) e-Learning II: Practical applications of e-Learning

e-Learning II explores the practical applications of e-Learning, focusing on how educational technology innovations are put into practice and evaluated in a wide range of contexts.

Candidates are required to submit two essays of no less than 2,500 and no more than 3,000 words each (inclusive of footnotes but excluding bibliography and appendices).

(h) Child Development

The aim of this course is to critically analyse theories and research on three aspects of children's development: cognitive, language and social development. The course will include consideration of specific aspects of cognitive development such as the development of literacy, numeracy and the importance of working memory, and of social and moral development including the study of relationships and attachment.

Candidates are required to submit two essays of no more than 2,000 words each (inclusive of footnotes but excluding bibliography and appendices).

(i) Children's development in the family and in institutional settings

The aim of this course is to critically introduce the students to all components of children's development in both the family and institutional settings. Risk factors and policies that aim to ameliorate these factors will form the foci of the sessions. Research studies that evaluate early childhood interventions at local, national and international level will be part of the core readings of the course.

Candidates are required to submit two essays of no more than 2,000 words each (inclusive of footnotes but excluding bibliography and appendices).'


(e) M.Sc in Criminology and Criminal Justice

With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010

1 In Examination Regulations, 2008, p. 702, l. 3, delete 'methods' and substitute 'Methods'.

2 Ibid., ll. 40–41, delete 'The examiners may award a distinction to any candidate who achieves a mark of at least 70 per cent on at least half the papers' and substitute 'The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination'.

3 Ibid., p. 703, l. 51, delete 'Social Analysis and Data Explanation' and substitute 'Social Explanation and Data Analysis'.


(f) M.Sc in Criminology and Criminal Justice (Research Methods)

With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010

In Examination Regulations, 2008, p. 706, l. 19, delete 'Social Explanation and Data Explanation' and substitute 'Social Explanation and Data Analysis'.


(g) M.Sc in Management Research

With immediate effect

In Examination Regulations, 2008, p. 737, 1.14 delete 'Two' and substitute 'Three'.


(h) M.St in Classical Archaeology

With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2008, p. 614, after l. 47 insert 'Bronze Age'.

2 Ibid., delete l. 49 and substitute 'Iron Age Aegean 1200–700 BC'.

3 Ibid., p. 615, delete ll. 10–40 and substitute:

'Aegean Bronze Age trade: interaction and identities

Introduction to Aegean Scripts

Aegean Bronze Age religion

Topics in Aegean Prehistory

Aegean and the East, 1200–600 BC

Burials, settlements, and society in Early Greece, 1200–650 BC

Archaeology of the Early Greek polis, 800–450 BC

Early Ionia, 1000–450 BC

Greek sculpture

Greek vases

Myth and daily life in Greek art

Archaeology of Athens and Attica, 600–50 BC(This may be taken in conjunction with the British School at Athens taught course only if accepted by the British School at Athens on its programme, and it involves attendance at the residential course organised by the British School at Athens in even- numbered years in Athens)

The archaeology of ancient Macedonia, 600–100 BC

Greek funerary archaeology, 600–100 BC

Archaeology of Greek women

Greek coinage

Greek and Roman wallpainting

Roman sculpture

Myth in Greek and Roman art

Historical narrative in Hellenistic and Roman art

Problems and methods in ancient art-history

The human figure in Classical art

Roman architecture

Topography of Rome (This may be taken in conjunction with the British School at Athens taught course only if accepted by the British School at Athens on its programme, and it involves attendance at the residential course organized by the British School at Athens in even-numbered years in Athens)

Pompeii and Ostia

Greek and Roman housing

Archaeology of the Roman economy

The archaeology of Roman urban systems

Roman North Africa

Landscape archaeology in the Greek and Roman world

Maritime archaeology of the Greek and Roman Mediterranean

Roman Britain

Roman coinage

City, country and economy in the Late Roman Empire (fourth–seventh centuries)

Byzantine Constantinople

Late Roman and Byzantine mosaics and painting

Late Roman and Byzantine architecture

History of collections: classical art

Reception of classical art'.


(i) M.St in Landscape Archaeology

With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

In Examination Regulations, 2008, p. 643, l. 39, delete 'Cities and Settlements in the Roman Empire' and substitute 'The Archaeology of Roman Urban Systems.'


(j) Special Regulations governing research degrees in Geography

With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2008, p. 906, l. 10, delete 'three copies in typescript' and substitute 'two copies in typescript (and one electronic copy)'.

2 Ibid., delete ll. 22–41 and substitute:

'Application for confirmation of D.Phil status shall normally be made not earlier than the sixth term from admission as a research student and not later than the ninth term. The department expects that, in most cases, the confirmation will be made immediately after return from field-work and no later than Trinity Term of the student's third year. No candidate may submit a thesis for the doctoral degree without first having obtained confirmed doctoral status. Any student who does not confirm by the end of their ninth term, will be required to apply for deferral of confirmation of status and may be allowed up to three terms for this purpose. Any student who fails to confirm status within twelve terms of registering as a PRS will have their student status lapsed. Students who have taken an M.Phil first and were admitted directly to D.Phil status, should confirm status within three terms of starting the D.Phil. Any student who fails to confirm within twelve terms of starting the M.Phil will have their student status lapsed. The purpose of the submission for confirmed status is to ensure that the candidate is working to a doctoral standard.

The confirmation report should show evidence that the research already accomplished gives promise of the ability to produce a satisfactory D.Phil thesis on the intended topic. For this purpose the candidate must submit to the Director of Graduate Studies two copies in typescript (together with an electronic version) of a report describing in approximately 3,000 word the aims and methods of the projected thesis, and summarising the results obtained so far in the form of a substantive chapter of no more than 10,000 words. The student shall also include with the written work an outline of the proposed thesis, including the topics to be covered in individual chapters, and a timetable for completion. Candidates wishing to undertake the DPhil via scientific papers should substitute the chapter of the thesis with one paper.

On receiving the application the Director of Graduate Studies shall appoint two assessors (normally two members of the academic staff) neither of whom will normally be the student's supervisor. The assessors shall read the script before submitting to the board a reasoned written report supporting their recommendation. A student whose first application is unsuccessful may be given one further opportunity to apply for confirmation, following the procedures laid down, normally within one term of the original application, and may apply for an extension of time for one term if necessary for the purpose of making the application. Students will be notified of the outcome and they should receive advice from their supervisor(s) on their confirmation assessment.'

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6 Social Sciences Board and Mathematical, Physical, and Life Sciences Board

Honour School of Engineering, Economics and Management

With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

In Examination Regulations, 2008, pp. 223–7, as amended by Supplement (2) to Gazette No. 4852 (Wednesday, 23 July 2008), p. 1382, delete 'Paper A3 Structures, Mechanics and Materials (as specified in the Honour School of Engineering Science)' and substitute 'Paper A3 Structures, Materials and Dynamics (as specified in the Honour School of Engineering Science)'.

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7 Continuing Education Board

Postgraduate Diploma in Advanced Cognitive Therapy Studies

With effect from 1 October 2009

In Examination Regulations, 2008 p. 1009, delete from l. 15 to l. 20 and substitute:

'5. Candidates who fail to satisfy the examiners in the presentations under 2(c), (d) and (g), or the assessed work under (e) and (f), maybe permitted to resubmit work in respect of the part or parts of the examination which they have failed for examination on not more than one occasion which shall normally be within one year of the original failure.'

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8 Board of the Faculty of Classics

(a) Honour School of Literae Humaniores

With effect from 1 October 2011 (for first examination in 2012)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2008, p. 300, l. 15, delete 'III, VI' and substitute 'VII, VIII, XI, XIV, XVI'.

2 Ibid., p. 303, l. 5, delete 'Herodotus III.1–87' and substitute 'Herodotus I.1–94'.

3 Ibid., delete from p. 303, l. 29, to p. 304, l. 4 and substitute:

'(i) For Course I candidates:

α

Herodotus III.1-38, 61-88, 97-119

Thucydides III.1-19, 37-48, 69-85, 94-114

Claudius Quadrigarius fr. 10b Peter

Livy, preface, I.1–16, 39–60, VII.9.6–10

Tacitus, Annals XV.23–74

β

Rest of Herodotus III

Rest of Thucydides III

Xenophon, Anabasis I–IV

Caesar, De Bello Gallico VI–VII

Sallust, Bellum Iugurthinum

Rest of Livy I

(ii) For Course II candidates or single-language Classics and English candidates offering Greek:

α

Herodotus III.1–38, 61–88, 97–119

Thucydides III.1–19, 37–48, 69–85, 94–114

Xenophon, Anabasis I.7–III.2

β

Rest of Herodotus III

Rest of Thucydides III

Rest of Xenophon, Anabasis I–IV

Claudius Quadrigarius fr. 10b Peter

Caesar, De Bello Gallico VI–VII

Sallust, Bellum Iugurthinum

Livy preface, I, VII.9.6–10

Tacitus, Annals XV.23–74

(iii) For Course II candidates or single-language Classics and English candidates offering Latin:

α

Claudius Quadrigarius fr. 10b Peter

Caesar, De Bello Gallico VI

Livy, preface, I.1–16, 39–60, VII.9.6–10

Sallust, Bellum Iugurthinum 1–10, 20–31, 77–101, 107–14

Tacitus, Annals XV.23–74

β

Herodotus III

Thucydides III

Xenophon, Anabasis I–IV

Caesar, De Bello Gallico VII

Rest of Sallust, Bellum Iugurthinum

Rest of Livy I'.

4 Ibid., p. 305, delete ll. 18–21 and substitute:

Aeschylus, Choephori, Eumenides

Sophocles, Electra, Oedipus Coloneus

Euripides, Electra, Helen, Ion

Aristophanes, Frogs'.

5 Ibid., p. 307, l. 8, delete 'Satyrica 1–26.6, 79–end' and substitute 'Satyrica 1–26.6, 81–90, 114–124.3'.

6 Ibid., l. 11, delete 'Cena Trimalchionis (26.7–78)' and substitute 'Satyrica 79–80, 91–113, 124.4–end'.


(b) Honour School of Classical Archaeology and Ancient History

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Regulations 2008, p. 182, l. 29, insert '[Until 1 October 2010:'.

2 Ibid., p. 187, l. 42, insert:

']

[With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

1. Each candidate shall offer the following elements: I–VI Six papers from the following options, of which at least one must be taken from each of A, B and C, no more than two may be taken from D and E, and no more than one from F. At least two of the six papers must be archaeological (from B and D), and at least two must be historical (from C and E), unless a language paper is taken, as this can replace one of the archaeological or historical requirements.

A. Integrated Classes

i. Early Greece and the Mediterranean, c. 800–500 BC: archaeology and history

ii. Rome, Italy and the Hellenistic East c. 300–100 BC: archaeology and history

B. Core Papers: Classical Archaeology

i. Greek Art and Archaeology c.500–300 BC

As specified for the Honour School in Literae Humaniores, subject IV.2.

ii. Cities and Settlement under the Empire

As specified for the Honour School in Literae Humaniores, subject IV.4.

iii. Art under the Roman Empire, 14–337

As specified for the Honour School in Literae Humaniores, subject IV.3.

iv. The Archaeology of the Late Roman Empire, AD 284–641

C. Core Papers: Ancient History

i. Greek History 478–403 BC

As specified for the Honour School in Ancient and Modern History, subject 1 (a), except that candidates in Classical Archaeology and Ancient History will answer four questions.

ii. Alexander the Great and his Early Successors

As specified for the Honour School in Literae Humaniores, subject I. 8.

iii. Roman History 146–46 BC

As specified for the Honour School in Ancient and Modern History, subject 1 (c), except that candidates in Classical Archaeology and Ancient History will answer four questions.

iv. Politics, Culture and Society from Nero to Hadrian

As specified for the Honour School in Literae Humaniores, subject I. 11.

D. Further Papers: Classical Archaeology

i. Egyptian Art and Architecture

ii. The Archaeology of Minoan Crete, 3200–1000 BC

iii. The Formation of the Islamic World, AD 550–950

iv. Scientific Methods in Archaeology

v. Greek and Roman Coins

vi. Mediterranean Maritime Archaeology

E. Further Papers: Ancient History

i. Epigraphy of the Greek and/or Roman World

ii. Athenian Democracy in the Classical Age

As specified for the Honour School in Literae Humaniores, subject I. 7.

iii. Sexuality and Gender in Greece and Rome

As specified for the Honour School in Literae Humaniores, subject I. 13.

iv. Cicero: Politics and Thought in the Late Republic

As specified for the Honour School in Literae Humaniores, subject I. 10.

v. Religions in the Greek and Roman World, 31 BC–AD 312

As specified for the Honour School in Literae Humaniores, subject I.12.

vi. Julian the Apostate to Saint Augustine, AD 350–395

F. Classical Languages

i. Intermediate Ancient Greek

(This paper is available only to those undergraduates who offered Mods Paper III–IV C.I and, with the permission of the Standing Committee, to others with equivalent knowledge of Ancient Greek. It is not normally available to candidates with a qualification in Ancient Greek above AS–level or equivalent, nor to those who took paper C3 Intermediate Greek in Mods)

The set texts for the course are: Xenophon, Hellenica I–II.3.10 (Oxford Classical Text) and Lysias I (Oxford Classical Text).

ii. Intermediate Latin

(This paper is available only to those undergraduates who offered Mods Paper III–IV C.2 and, with the permission of the Standing Committee, to others with equivalent knowledge of Latin. It is not normally available to candidates with a qualification in Latin above AS–level or equivalent, nor to those who took paper C3 Intermediate Latin in Mods)

The set texts for the course are: Cicero, letters in D. R. Shackleton– Bailey, Cicero: Select Letters (Cambridge 1980), nos. 9, 17, 23, 27, 39. 42–3, 45, 48, 52, 58, 63–4, 70–1, 79; Tacitus, Agricola (Oxford Classical Text); Pliny, letters in A N. Sherwin–White, Fifty Letters of Pliny, second edn. (Oxford, 1969), nos. 1–3, 6–7, 9, 15–20, 25, 27, 29, 33–4, 36, 38–40, 47–48.

VII A Site or Museum report, prepared in accordance with Regulation 3 below. The report must be on

Either A. an excavation or archaeological site, based as far as possible on participation or autopsy and on a consideration of all relevant historical and archaeological sources;

Or B. a coherent body of finds from one site or of one category, based as far as possible on autopsy and on a consideration of all relevant historical and archaeological sources.

VIIIAn optional Additional Thesis, prepared in accordance with Regulation 3 below.

2. Candidates may also be examined viva voce.

3. Theses.

(a) This regulation governs theses submitted under Regulation 1.VIII, and the Site or Museum report submitted under 1.VII.

(b) The subjects for all theses and for the Site or Museum report must, to the satisfaction of the Standing Committee, fall within the scope of the Honour School of Classical Archaeology and Ancient History. The subject may, but need not, overlap any subject on which the candidate offers papers. Candidates are warned that they should avoid repetition in papers of materials used in their theses, and that substantial repetition may be penalised.

(c) Candidates proposing to offer a thesis must submit the following through their college, to the Secretary of the Standing Committee not later than the Friday of the second week of Trinity Full Term preceding the year of the final examination: (i) the title of the proposed thesis or report, together with (ii) a synopsis of the subject in about 100 words and (iii) a letter of approval from their tutor. The Standing Committee shall decide as soon as possible whether or not to approve the title and shall advise the candidate immediately. No decision shall be deferred beyond the end of the sixth week of the Trinity Full Term preceding the year of the final examination.

(d) Every thesis or report shall be the candidate's own work. Tutors may, however, discuss with candidates the field of study, the sources available, and the method of presentation, and may also read and comment on a first draft. The amount of assistance a candidate may receive shall not exceed an amount equivalent to the teaching of a normal paper. Candidates shall make a declaration that the thesis or report is their own work, and their tutors shall countersign the declaration confirming that, to the best of their knowledge and belief, this is so. This declaration must be placed in a sealed envelope bearing the candidate's examination number and presented together with the thesis or report.

(e) Theses and reports previously submitted for the Honour School of Classical Archaeology and Ancient History may be resubmitted. No thesis or report shall be accepted which has already been submitted, wholly or substantially, for another Honour School or degree of this or any other institution, and the certificate shall also state that the thesis or report has not been so submitted. No thesis or report shall, however, be ineligible because it has been or is being submitted for any prize of this university.

(f) Candidates should aim at a length of 10,000 words but must not exceed 15,000 words (both figures inclusive of notes and appendices but excluding bibliography). No person or body shall have authority to permit the limit of 15,000 words to be exceeded. Where appropriate, there shall be a select bibliography and a list of sources.

(g) All theses and reports must be typed in double spacing on one side only of quarto or A4 paper with any notes and references at the foot of each page, and must be bound or held firmly in a stiff cover and identified by the candidate's examination number only. Two copies of each thesis or report shall be submitted to the examiners. Any candidate wishing to have one copy of his or her thesis or report returned must enclose with it, in an envelope bearing only his or her candidate number, a self-addressed sticky label.

(h) Candidates wishing to change the title of a thesis or report after it has been approved may apply for permission for the change to be granted by the Chair of the Standing Committee (if the application is made before the first day of Hilary Full Term preceding the examination) or (if later) the Chair of the Examiners, Honour School of Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.

(i) Candidates shall submit any thesis or report, identified by the candidates' examination number only, not later than noon on Friday of the week after the Hilary Full Term preceding the examination to the Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, addressed to the Chair of the Examiners, Honour School of Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.]'

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9 Boards of the Faculties of Classics and English Language and Literature

(a) Honour Moderations in Classics and English

With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

In Examination Regulations, 2008, p. 101, delete ll. 1–3 and substitute:

'(a) Homer, Iliad 24; Lysias 1 and 3; Euripides, Bacchae 1–63, 180–369, 434–518.

(b) Virgil, Aeneid 6; Seneca, Epistles 54, 57, 79, 104 and 122; Catullus 1–16, 31–4.'


(b) Honour School of Classics and English

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

In Examination Regulations, 2008, p. 192, l. 27, delete 'Thyestes' and substitute 'Medea'.

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10 Boards of the Faculties of Classics and Oriental Studies

Honour School of Classics and Oriental Studies

With effect from 1 October 2010 (for first examination in 2011)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2008, p. 202, l. 9, delete '(xxxvii), (xxxviii)' and substitute '(xlvi), (xlvii)'.

2 Ibid., p. 202, l. 10, delete '(xxxvi)' and substitute '(xl)–(xlv)'.

3 Ibid., p. 202, l. 12, delete '(xxxvi), (xxxvii) and (xxxviii)' and substitute '(xl)–(xlv), (xlvi) and (xlvii)'.

4 Ibid., p. 202, l. 41, delete '(xxxvii), (xxxviii)' and substitute '(xlvi), (xlvii)'.

5 Ibid., p. 204, delete ll. 43-45 and substitute:

'E. Subjects in Ancient and Medieval Philosophy

These subjects are specified in Regulations for Philosophy in all Honour Schools including Philosophy. One or two subjects may be offered. 110 may not be combined with 111. 115 may not be combined with 130. 116 may not be combined with 132.

(xxxvi) 110 (Aquinas)

(xxxvii) 111 (Duns Scotus, Ockham)

(xxxviii) 115 (Plato, Republic, in translation)

(xxxix) 116 (Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics, in translation)

(xl) 130 (Plato, Republic, in Greek)

(xli) 131 (Plato, Theaetetus and Sophist)

(xlii) 132 (Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics, in Greek)

(xliii) 133 (Aristotle, Physics)

(xliv) 134 (Sextus Empiricus, Outlines of Pyrrhonism)

(xlv) 135 (Latin Philosophy)

F. Other subjects'.

6 Ibid., p. 204, l. 46, delete '(xxxvii), (xxxviii)' and substitute '(xlvi), (xlvii)'.

7 Ibid., p. 204, l. 48, delete '(xxxix)' and substitute '(xlviii)'.

8 Ibid., p. 202, add at the end of l. 48: 'If they offer Greek for Beginners they may if they wish offer Literae Humaniores subject III.1(b) as subject (i); in that case, they must also offer at least one of subjects (ii)–(xx), (xxviii), (xxix) and (xl)–(xlv) if they are offering Classics as their main subject. If they offer Latin for Beginners they may if they wish offer Literae Humaniores subject III.2(b) as subject (ii); in that case, they must also offer at least one of subjects (i), (iii)–(xx), (xxviii), (xxix) and (xl)–(xlv) if they are offering Classics as their main subject.'

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11 Board of the Faculty of English Language and Literature

Honour School of English

With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2008, p. 234, ll. 17–19, delete 'placed in a sealed envelope bearing the candidate's examination number and addressed to the Chairman of Examiners,'.

2 Ibid., p. 235, ll. 5–6, delete 'placed in a sealed envelope bearing the candidate's examination number and addressed to the Chairman of Examiners,'.

3 Ibid., p. 238, ll. 14–16, delete 'placed in a sealed envelope bearing the candidate's examination number and addressed to the Chair of Examiners,'.

4 Ibid., p. 239, ll. 31–32, delete 'placed in a sealed envelope bearing the candidate's examination number and addressed to the Chairman of Examiners,'.

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12 Board of the Faculty of History

(a) Honour School of History

(i) With effect from 1 October 2009

1 In Examination Regulations, 2008, delete from p. 270, l. 24, to p. 271, l. l5, and substitute:

'III. Further Subject: any one of an approved list of Further Subjects, as detailed in the Handbook for the Final Honour School in History published by the Board of the Faculty of History by Monday of first Week of Michaelmas Term each year for the academic year ahead.'

2 Ibid., p. 271, delete ll. 9–38, and substitute 'The Special Subjects available in any given year, as approved by the Board of the Faculty of History, will be publicised in the list posted by the Faculty of History in the Hilary Term of the preceding year.'


(ii) With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2011)

In Examination Regulations, 2008, p. 272 delete ll. 10–16 and insert:

'Candidates will be expected to answer two examination questions selected from a paper divided into two sections. One question should be answered from each section. The sections are: 1. Making Historical Comparisons; 2. Making Historical Arguments.'


(b) Honour School of History and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2009

In Examination Regulations, 2008, p. 282, delete ll. 35–8.


(c) Honour School of Modern History and Politics

With effect from 1 October 2006

In Examination Regulations, 2008, p. 286, delete ll. 16–20 and substitute:

'4. Papers 3 and 4. Each candidate shall offer any two of the five 'core subjects' in Politics, as specified for the Honour School of Philosophy, Politics and Economics (i.e. 201, 202, 203, 214, and 220). A thesis as specified in Regulation 6 below may not be substituted for a Politics core subject.'

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13 Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies

Moderations in Oriental Studies

With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

In Examination Regulations, 2008, p. 110, l. 3, delete 'Mengzi 6a and 6b, 1–5' and substitute'Selected philosophical texts from the pre-Qin era'.

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