University of Oxford


Oxford University Gazette, 15 January 2009: Lectures

Bampton Lectures

'Le christianisme est étrange': Christian particularity in writing of the French seventeenth century

PROFESSOR RICHARD PARISH, Professor of French and Fellow of St Catherine's College, will deliver a series of Bampton Lectures at 5 p.m. on the following days in the University Church of St Mary the Virgin. The lectures will be delivered in English, and all exemplary material will be translated.

20 Jan.: 'Particularity and apologetics.'

27 Jan.: 'Particularity and physicality.'

3 Feb.: 'Particularity and language: (i) talking of God.'

10 Feb.: 'Particularity and language: (ii) talking for God.'

17 Feb.: 'Particularity and discernment.'

24 Feb.: 'Particularity and polemics: (i) Jansenism.'

3 Mar.: 'Particularity and polemics: (ii) Quietism.'

10 Mar.: 'Particularity and salvation.'

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Grinfield Lectures on the Septuagint

From oral translation to textual transmission

PROFESSOR ANNELI AEJMELAEUS, University of Helsinki, will deliver the first series of Grinfield Lectures on the Septuagint at 5 p.m. on the following days in the Examination Schools.

Tue. 17 Feb.: 'Once more: the origins of the Septuagint.'

Thur. 19 Feb.: 'Text-history of the Septuagint and the Hebrew text in the Books of Samuel.'

Thur. 26 Feb.: 'Towards a critical edition of the Septuagint of 1 Samuel.'

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Herbert Spencer Lectures

Modifying human behaviour

The Herbert Spencer Lectures will be given at 5.15 p.m. on the following days in the Lecture Theatre, the Medical Sciences Teaching Centre.

The lectures are arranged by a trust fund held by the University. They are held every three years, on a theme that would have been of interest to Herbert Spencer.

JUSTICE EDWIN CAMERON, Supreme Court of Appeal, South Africa
Thur. 5 Feb.: 'Rethinking rights and responsibilities in the AIDS epidemic.'

PROFESSOR ANTHONY DICKINSON, Experimental Psychology, Cambridge
Mon. 9 Feb.: 'Beast machines or cognitive creatures?'

PROFESSOR JON ELSTER, Philosophy, Columbia
Thur. 19 Feb.: 'How constitutions shape and change behaviour.'

PROFESSOR DAVID MACDONALD, WildCRU, Zoology, Oxford
Thur. 26 Feb.: 'People and nature: conservation, conflict, and compromise.'

PROFESSOR UTA FRITH, Cognitive Neuroscience, UCL
Thur. 5 Mar.: 'How our social brain modifies our behaviour.'

PROFESSOR JULIET B. SCHOR, Sociology, Boston College
Thur. 12 Mar.: 'The social consumer and the sustainability challenge—consumer behaviour, ecological challenge, and the new "social science".'

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James Ford Lectures in British History

The politics of feeling in the age of revolutions, 1770–1830

PROFESSOR JOHN BREWER, California Institute of Technology, will deliver the Ford's Lectures at 5 p.m. on Fridays in the Examination Schools.

23 Jan.: 'Mixed feelings: physiology, society, and morality, 1740–1800.'

30 Jan.: 'Conjugal love and aristocratic depravity, 1769–1809.'

6 Feb.: 'The politics of fear and love: Edmund Burke and Mary Wollstonecraft.'

13 Feb.: 'Attachment and distance: loyalism, patriotism, and benevolence in the 1790s.'

20 Feb.: 'The love of God and the fear of enthusiasm: vital religion.'

27 Feb.: 'A man without soul: Dr Erasmus Darwin and the spectre of materialism.'

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Slade Lectures

Style versus the state: naturalism and avant-gardism in Third Republic France, 1880–1900

PROFESSOR RICHARD THOMSON, Watson Gordon Professor of Fine Art, University of Edinburgh, Slade Professor 2009, will deliver the Slade Lectures at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the University Museum of Natural History.

21 Jan.: 'Defining the dominant naturalism.'

28 Jan.: 'Naturalism at the service of the Republic.' 4 Feb.: 'Naturalism: flexibility or failure of style?'

11 Feb.: 'The caricatural: visual humour and subversive style.'

18 Feb.: 'The "populaire": identifying or imagining art from below.'

25 Feb.: 'Organicism: national energy and natural flux.'

4 Mar.: 'Repudiating naturalism: the avant-garde seeking style.'

11 Mar.: 'Naturalism strikes back: tradition, consensus, rupture.'

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J.W. Jenkinson Memorial Lecture

PROFESSOR SEAN CARROLL, Wisconsin–Madison, will deliver a J.W. Jenkinson Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 19 January, in Lecture Theatre A, the Zoology/Psychology Building. Those with specific access requirements are asked to telephone Oxford (2)82464 before the lecture.

Subject: 'Endless flies most beautiful: cis-regulatory sequences and the evolution of animal form.'

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English Language and Literature, Music, Fine Art, Theology

The Bible in art, music, and literature

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Danson Room, Trinity College.

Conveners: Professor Christopher Rowland and Dr Christine Joynes.

DR JAMES CROSSLEY, Sheffield
26 Jan.: 'For every Manc a religion: biblical and religious language in the Manchester alternative music scene 1977–94.'

DR CHRISTINE JOYNES
9 Feb.: 'Wombs and tombs: the reception history of Mark 16:1–20.'

LIZZIE LUDLOW, Warwick
23 Feb.: 'Christina Rossetti and the Bible.'

PROFESSOR BEN QUASH, King's College, London
9 Mar.: 'How can Job contemplate the dead Christ? Some reflections on typological uses of the Bible in the light of Carpaccio's painting.' (Hussey Seminar)

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History

Graduate seminar in early modern intellectual history

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Hovenden Room, All Souls College.

Conveners: Professor Ian Maclean and Dr Noel Malcolm.

DR COLIN BURROW
21 Jan.: 'The Marprelate controversy.'

PROFESSOR NICHOLAS JARDINE, Cambridge
28 Jan.: 'The war of the worlds: conflict and priority in early modern astronomy.'

DR FILIPPO DE VIVO, Birkbeck College, London
4 Feb.: 'Wars of words: understanding polemics in seventeenth-century Venice.'

PROFESSOR MORDECHAI FEINGOLD, California Institute of Technology
11 Feb.: ' "Those Terrible Men" ;, the Wits: the polemics over science in early modern England.'

PROFESSOR ANN HUGHES, Keele
18 Feb.: 'Preachers, hearers, and polemic in revolutionary London.'

PROFESSOR MARTIN DZELZAINIS, Royal Holloway, London
25 Feb.: 'Ridicule and the fall of Clarendon.'

DR INGRID DE SMET, Warwick
4 Mar.: 'Historicising polemics: calumny and memory in the republic of letters.'

PROFESSOR RICHARD PARISH
11 Mar.: 'Intra-Catholic polemic in seventeenth-century France: winners and losers.'


Medieval history seminar

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Wharton Room, All Souls College.

Convener: Professor C.J. Wickham.

PATRICK HEALY
19 Jan.: 'Miracles of the papal reform, 1049–95.'

SOPHIE CRICHTON
26 Jan.: 'Medieval Mallorca, 1276–1349.'

ELINA SCREEN
2 Feb.: 'Old ideologies in a new kingdom? Lothar I and Carolingian ideology, 843–55.'

FELICITY CLARK
9 Feb.: 'The frontiers of early medieval Northumbria: perception and experience.'

RORY COX
16 Feb.: 'John Wyclif on war and politics.'

KERRITH DAVIES
23 Feb.: 'The Knights of Mortain: some thoughts on the development of Anglo-Norman feudalism.'

MAYKE DE JONG
2 Mar.: 'Becoming Jeremiah: Paschasius Radbertus and Carolingian political polemics.'

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History, Medieval and Modern Languages

Language and history seminar

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Wednesdays in the MacGregor Room, Oriel College.

Conveners: David Cram, Robert Evans, and Suzanne Romaine.

ANTHEA FRASER GUPTA, Leeds
21 Jan.: 'Malay and English: trade and conquest 1614–2008.'

DAVID CRAM
28 Jan.: 'Edward Lhuyd's Archaeologia Britannica (1707): method and madness in early modern comparative philology.'

YORICK WILKS, Sheffield
4 Feb.: 'On ownership of text.'

DAVID WILLIS, Cambridge
11 Feb.: 'Non-literary sources as evidence for the history of the Welsh language in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.'

CRISTINA PSOMADAKIS, London
18 Feb.: To be announced.

PATRICK HONEYBONE, Edinburgh
25 Feb.: 'History and historical linguistics: two types of cognitive reconstruction.'

NILS LANGER, Bristol
4 Mar.: 'Multilingualism in nineteenth-century Schleswig-Holstein.'

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History, Medieval and Modern Languages, and the Centre for the Book, Bodleian Library

Seminar on the history of the book, 1450–1830

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Fridays in the Wharton Room, All Souls College.

Convener: Professor I.W.F. Maclean.

PROFESSOR M.M. SMITH, Reading
23 Jan.: 'Hand rubrication: the mid fifteenth- century method of textual articulation.'

DR HANS-JÖRG KÜNAST, Erlangen
30 Jan.: 'Konrad Peutinger's library (1466–1547): the history and reconstruction of a Renaissance collection.'

DR MALCOLM WALSBY, St Andrews
6 Feb.: 'Printers, booksellers, and the printed word in fifteenth- and sixteenth-century Brittany.'

DR GILES BERGEL
13 Feb.: 'Oral tradition, print culture, and "The Wandering Jew's Chronicle" ;, 1634–1830.'

DR NOEL MALCOLM
20 Feb.: 'The printing of Hobbes's Leviathan: a case study in material bibliography and textual criticism.'

DR CRISTINA DONDI
6 Mar.: 'Book provenance as evidence for economic and social history of the Renaissance.'

PROFESSOR MICHAEL SUAREZ, Fordham
13 Mar.: 'Peers' pounds and antiquaries' nous: publishing learned pictures in Restoration and early eighteenth-century England.'

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Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences

Department of Statistics: Corcoran Memorial Prize Ceremony

The Corcoran Memorial Prize Ceremony will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Thursday, 22 January, in the Tsuzuki Lecture Theatre, St Anne's College. The prizewinners will each deliver a lecture: Dr Anja Sturm (2004), Dr Simon Myers (2006), Dr Ludger Evers and Dr Chris Spencer (2008). The lectures will be followed by a reception.

Enquiries may be directed to cstone@stats.ox.ac.uk.


Computational Mathematics and Applications

Except where otherwised indicated, the following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Thursdays in Lecture Theatre A, the Computing Laboratory. Enquiries may be directed to Lotti Ekert (telephone: Oxford (2)73885, e-mail: lotti.ekert@comlab.ox.ac.uk).

Conveners: L.N. Trefethen and S. Dollar (Rutherford Appleton Laboratory).

DR MIRO ROZLOZNIK, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic
15 Jan.: 'On the accuracy of inexact saddle point solvers.'

DR FRED WUBS, Groningen
22 Jan., RAL: 'Preconditioning of linear systems in an ocean flow model.'

DR MARTIN LOTZ, City University of Hong Kong
29 Jan.: 'Coverage processes on spheres and condition numbers for linear programming.'

DR ROBERT NÜRNBERG, Imperial College, London
5 Feb.: 'Parametric approximation of geometric evolution equations and their coupling to bulk equations.'

DR RAPHAEL HAUSER
12 Feb.: 'A new perspective on the complexity of interior point methods for linear programming.'

DR CHRISTIAN MEHL, Birmingham
19 Feb.: 'Numerical methods for palindromic eigenvalue problems.'

DR RICHARD KATZ
26 Feb.: 'Golden syrup, lubrication theory, and PETSc—a recipe for models of ice-sheet dynamics.'

PROFESSOR REINOUT QUISPEL, Latrobe
5 Mar.: To be announced.

PROFESSOR KE CHEN, Liverpool
12 Mar., RAL: 'On fast multilevel algorithms for nonlinear variational imaging models.'


Atmospheric, Ocean, and Planetary Physics

The following seminars will be held at 4.15 p.m. on Thursdays in the Dobson Lecture Room, the Atmospheric Physics Laboratory. Because on rare occasions the arrangements need to be changed, anyone intending to come to Oxford specially to attend should check first by telephoning Oxford (2)72933.

DR G. TINETTI, University College London
22 Jan.: 'Exploring extrasolar worlds, from gas giants to terrestrial planets.'

DR H. BÖSCH, Leicester
29 Jan.: 'Remote sensing of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere—the NASA Orbiting Carbon Observatory Mission.'

PROFESSOR R. GREATBATCH, IFM-GEOMAR, Kiel
5 Feb.: 'Tropical storm and meteorological tsunami events affecting Atlantic Canada.'

DR A. THOMPSON, Cambridge
12 Feb.: 'Jets, topography, and transport.'

DR J. LOWE, Hadley Centre, Meteorological Office
19 Feb.: 'Mitigation of future climate change.'

DR U. QUAAS, Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg
26 Feb.: 'Analysis of clouds and cloud–aerosol interactions with satellite data and general circulation models.'

DR J. PHILLIPS, Bristol
5 Mar.: 'The dynamics and structure of short duration volcanic eruption plumes: insights from laboratory experiments and field measurements.'

MS B. HARRIS, Reading
12 Mar.: 'The potential impacts of super- volcanic eruptions on the Earth's climate: a GCM study.'


Department of Plant Sciences

Unless otherwise indicated the following research talks will be given at 4 p.m. on Thursdays in the Large Lecture Theatre, the Department of Plant Sciences. Abstracts may be found at www.plants.ox.ac.uk.

Convener: Professor Nicholas Harberd.

PROFESSOR LEWIS ZISKA, US Department of Agriculture
Mon. 19 Jan.: 'Exploring the links between climate change, plant biology, and public health.'

DR TIMOTHY BARRACLOUGH, Imperial College, London
29 Jan.: 'Changing landscapes: the evolutionary origins of a plant diversity hotspot.'

DR LARS OSTERGAARD, John Innes Centre, Norwich
5 Feb.: 'Cell fate determination by hormonal patterning in fruits.'

DR OWEN LEWIS
12 Feb.: 'Insect food webs: patterns, processes, and applications.'

DR JIRI FRIML, Ghent
19 Feb.: 'Auxin transport—developmental output of subcellular dynamics.'

PROFESSOR DAVID MABBERLEY, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew
26 Feb.: 'The citrus story.'

PROFESSOR CHRISTOPHER HOWE, Cambridge
5 Mar.: 'Who bother with a chloroplast genome? Hints from dinoflagellate algae.'

PROFESSOR SUSAN MCCOUCH, Cornell
12 Mar.: To be announced. (Mary Snow Lecture)


Organic Chemistry colloquia

The following colloquia will be held at 4 p.m. on Thursdays in the Dyson Perrins Lecture Theatre. Enquiries may be directed to Dr Michael Willis (e-mail: michael.willis@chem.ox.ac.uk).

PROFESSOR JOHN NJARDARSON, Cornell
15 Jan.: 'Natural product synthesis and new synthetic methods.'

PROFESSOR DAVID HARROWVEN, Southampton
22 Jan.: 'The total synthesis of colombiasin A, elisapterosin B, and cavicularin.'

DR MICHAEL GREANEY, Edinburgh
5 Feb.: 'Synthesis using reversible and irreversible reactions.'

PROFESSOR MAGNUS RUEPING, Frankfurt
12 Feb.: 'Bio-inspired catalysis: from concepts to applications.' (Lilley Lecture)

PROFESSOR ANTONIO ECHAVARREN, Institute of Catalysis, Taragona
19 Feb.: 'New approaches to molecular diversity through gold catalysis.'

DR NICK TOMKINSON, Cardiff
26 Feb.: 'Chemical and theoretical tools to understand iminium ion catalysis.'

PROFESSOR THOMAS CARELL, Munich
5 Mar.: 'The chemistry of DNA repair and mutagenesis.'

PROFESSOR CHRIS MOODY, Nottingham
12 Mar.: 'Recent developments in the synthesis of heterocyclic natural products.'


Theoretical Chemistry Group

The following seminars will be held at 4.45 p.m. on Mondays in the John Rowlinson Seminar Room (20.12, opposite the Main Lecture Theatre), the Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory.

Convener: Dr W. Barford.

DR CLAUDIO CASTELNOVO
26 Jan.: 'Magnetic monopoles in spin ice.'

PROFESSOR DAVID WALES, Cambridge
9 Feb.: 'Exploring energy landscapes.'

DR JEREMY HARVEY, Bristol
23 Feb.: 'Computational prediction of mechanisms and rate constants for chemical reactions in solution.'

DR MICHAEL TOWLER, Cambridge
9 Mar.: 'Are highly accurate quantum Monte Carlo calculations of any use in quantum chemistry?'


Department of Materials

The following colloquia will be held at 4 p.m. on Thursdays in the Hume Rothery Lecture Theatre, the Department of Materials. Talks by second-year D.Phil students will be held on 5 March and 12 March.

DR VALERIA NICOLOSI
22 Jan.: 'Processing of organic and inorganic 1-D nanostructures: problems and "solutions".'

DR MARK H. RÜMMELI, IFW Dresden, Germany
29 Jan.: 'Advances in understanding carbon nanotube nucleation and growth.'

PROFESSOR MICHAEL WEINERT, Wisconsin–Milwaukee
5 Feb.: 'Stability and structure of polar surfaces and interfaces.'

DR MARTIN HŸTCH, CEMES-CNRS, France
12 Feb.: 'New electron holographic technique for the measurement of strain at the nanoscale: application to strained-silicon transistors.'

PROFESSOR COLIN J. LAMBERT, Lancaster
19 Feb.: 'Controlled electron transport through single molecules.'

DR KYRIAKOS PORFYRAKIS
26 Feb.: 'Ehdohedral fullerenes: challenges and opportunities.'

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Medical Sciences

Department of Physiology, Anatomy, and Genetics

Unless otherwise indicated the following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Fridays in the Large Lecture Theatre, the Sherrington Building.

Conveners: Dr Deborah Goberdhan and Dr Ole Paulsen.

DR MALCOLM LOGAN, MRC NIMR
23 Jan.: 'Understanding vertebrate limb development and disorders.' (Jenkinson Seminar)

DR FIONA GRIBBLE, Cambridge
30 Jan.: 'Taking a new look at entero- endocrine cells.'

PROFESSOR KATRIN AMUNTS, Aachen
6 Feb.: 'Towards a multimodal architectonic atlas of the human brain—aims, methods, and application.'

PROFESSOR FREDDIE HAMDY
13 Feb.: To be announced.

DR GERALD FINNERTY, King's College, London
20 Feb.: 'What does experience-dependent plasticity tell us about learning and memory?'

DR AFSANEH GAILLARD, Poitiers
27 Feb.: 'Cellular repair of CNS disorders.'

DR OLE PAULSEN and DR MATTHEW WOOD
Mon. 2 Mar., 4 p.m., Library, Sherrington Building: To be announced. (Research seminar)

PROFESSOR ARTHUR KONNERTH, Munich
6 Mar.: 'Metabotropic glutamate receptor- mediated synaptic signalling in the CNS.'

PROFESSOR ANNE FERGUSON-SMITH, Cambridge
13 Mar.: 'Genomic imprinting and the epigenetic control of mammalian gene expression.' (Jenkinson Seminar)


Neuroscience Grand Round Guest Lectures

The following lectures will be given at 11.30 a.m. on Fridays in Lecture Theatre 1, the Academic Block, the John Radcliffe Hospital.

PROFESSOR MICHAEL HANNA, National Hospital for Neurology
16 Jan.: 'Update on channelopathies.'

PROFESSOR GAVIN GIOVANNONI, Barts and the London Centre for Neurosciences
13 Feb.: 'Update on anti-basal ganglia antibodies.'

PROFESSOR GERAINT REES, UCL
20 Mar.: 'Imaging consciousness.'


Institute of Musculoskeletal Sciences, Botnar Research Centre

The following seminars will be held at 12.30 p.m. on Fridays in Rooms NDO 7 and 8, the Nuffield Department of Orthopaedic Surgery.

DR KENNETH POOLE, Addenbrooke's Hospital
13 Feb.: ' Through thick and thin: new insights into hip fracture mechanisms from 3D computed tomography.'

PROFESSOR ALEX SEIFALIAN, Royal Free Hospital, Hampstead
27 Mar.: 'Nanocomposite polymer and its application in development of medical implant using tissue engineering.'


OXION seminars

The following seminars will be given on Thursdays in the Seminar Room, the Henry Wellcome Centre for Gene Function, South Parks Road (or, if numbers exceed capacity, the Small Lecture Theatre, the Sherrington Building).

PROFESSOR BIRGIT LISS, Research Centre for Life Sciences, University of Ulm
15 Jan., 3 p.m.: 'Dopamine midbrain neurons: functional and molecular diversity in health and disease.'

PROFESSOR BERNARD ATTALI, Tel Aviv
29 Jan., 4.30 p.m.: 'Gated motions and assembly modalities of voltage-gated Kv7 potassium channels: the case of the cardiac IKS potassium channel.'


Pharmacology, anatomical neuropharmacology, and drug discovery seminars

The following seminars will be held at 12 noon on Tuesdays in the Lecture Theatre, the Department of Pharmacology.

DR LLEWELYN RODERICK, Cambridge
20 Jan.: 'InsP3- stimulated nuclear calcium signals are a common and requisite signal for the induction of cardiac myocyte hypertrophy by diverse stimuli.'

DR STUART CONWAY
27 Jan.: 'Better living through chemistry: molecular probes for biological systems.'

DR MAJOR LORINCZ, Cardiff
3 Feb.: 'Cellular and network mechanisms of the occipital alpha rhythm.'

DR RUTH MURRELL-LAGNADO, Cambridge
10 Feb.: 'P2X purinergic receptors: the molecular basis for diversity of function.'

DR HEIKKI TANILA, Kuopio, Finland
17 Feb.: 'Neurobiological mechanisms of memory loss in Alzheimer's disease.'

PROFESSOR ANNETTE DOLPHIN, University College London
24 Feb.: 'Calcium channel alpha2delta subunits, mechanism of action, involvement in disease and target site for drugs.'

PROFESSOR HANS CHRISTIAN PAPE, Westfaelische Wilhelms UniversitĄt, Germany
3 Mar.: 'Patterns of activity in the amygdale and beyond: significance for fear memory and extinction.'

DR THOMAS BORAUD, Bordeaux
10 Mar.: 'Decision making as a competition mechanism in the cortex–basal ganglia loop circuits.'

PROFESSOR GYÖRGY BUZSÁKI, Rutgers
24 Mar.: 'Self- organised cell assemblies in cerebral cortex support cognitive actions.' (David Smith Lecture)


Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research: The signalling pathways and genetics of cancer

DR HOLGER GERHARDT, Cancer Research UK London Research Institute, will hold a seminar in this series at 11 a.m. on Wednesday, 21 January, in the Ludwig/Jenner Room, Lower Ground Floor, Old Road Campus Research Building.

Subject: 'Guided vascular patterning during sprouting angiogenesis.'

Convener: Dr Gareth Bond.

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Medieval and Modern Languages, History

From 'Stasiland' to 'Ostalgie': remembering the GDR—twenty years on

The following seminars will be held at 5.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Noël Salter Room, New College. Professor Jan-Wener Müller, Princeton, will deliver a special lecture on Thursday, 21 May, to conclude the series.

A programme with full details, abstracts, and directions, is available at www.mod-langs.ox.ac.uk/g erman/rememberthedgr/.

Convener: Dr Karen Leeder (e-mail: karen.leeder@new.ox.ac.uk).

PROFESSOR WOLFGANG EMMERICH, Bremen
20 Jan.: 'Cultural memory East/West: is what belongs together growing together?'

PROFESSOR T.J. REED
27 Jan.: 'Revisiting the Wende.'

PROFESSOR KATRIN KOHL
3 Feb.: 'Conceptualising the GDR—twenty years after.'

DR PETER THOMPSON, Sheffield
10 Feb.: ' "Die unheimliche Heimat": the GDR as the presence and absence of hope.'

DR DANIELA BERGHAHN, Royal Holloway
17 Feb.: 'Remembering the Stasi: from DEFA Gegenwartsfilm to the Stasi fairytale Das Leben der Anderen.'

DR LYN MARVEN, Liverpool
24 Feb.: ' "Berlin ist bekannt [...] für die Mauer, die es aber nicht mehr gibt" (Monika Maron): the persistence of East Berlin in the contemporary city.'

DR CHLOE PAVER, University of Exeter
3 Mar.: 'Memory and place in the new Bundesländer.'

PROFESSOR TIMOTHY GARTON ASH
10 Mar.: ' "A footnote in world history": the GDR as memory, myth, and history.'

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Oriental Studies

Jewish history and literature in the Graeco-Roman period

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Oriental Institute.

Convener: Professor Martin Goodman.

DENNIS MIZZI
27 Jan.: 'The cemeteries at Qumran: re-evaluation of the evidence.'

SACHA STERN, University College London
3 Feb.: 'Rabbinic perspectives on pagan ritual, public shows, and Roman civic life: some fresh evidence.'

PROFESSOR GOODMAN
10 Feb.: 'Sectarianism before and after 70 ce.'

GAIA LEMBI, University College London
17 Feb.: 'Geographical descriptions in Josephus: the case of Jerusalem.'

SARAH PEARCE, Southampton
24 Feb.: 'Philo on the extreme allegorists.'

MARKUS BOCKMUEHL
3 Mar.: 'Locating paradise.'

TESSA RAJAK, Reading and Oxford
10 Mar.: 'Translation and identity: the language of the Greek Bible.'


Hebrew and Jewish Studies Unit: David Patterson Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 8 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Yarnton Manor. Details of minibus arrangements will be found at www.ochjs.ac.uk.

Convener: Dr Piet van Boxel.

DR JOSEPH SHERMAN
21 Jan.: 'David Bergelson (1884–1952) in Weimar Berlin: 'language, ideology and modern Jewish identity.'

DR DILWYN KNOX, University College London
28 Jan.: 'Maimonides' reflections on the immortality of the soul.'

DR GHIL'AD ZUCKERMANN, University of Queensland, Australia
4 Feb.: ' Language, religion, and identity in Israel.'

DR JOSEFINA RODRIGUEZ ARRIBAS
11 Feb.: ' Technical terminology in Abraham ibn Ezra's Biblical excursuses: the sciences of stars.'

DR ANNA AKASOY
18 Feb.: 'Andalusian exiles and identities. The experience of Jewish and Muslim scholars in the eastern Mediterranean (twelfth and thirteenth centuries).'

DR DAVID ARIEL
25 Feb.: 'Objectivity and engagement: the changing agenda of Jewish studies.'

PROFESSOR TESSA RAJAK, Reading
4 Mar.: 'Martyrdom, Kiddush Ha-shem and resistance: from Josephus to Akiva.'

DR CHRISTINE KRUEGER, Oldenbourg
11 Mar.: 'Are we not brothers? French and German Jews in the Franco-Prussian War, 1870–1.'

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Philosophy

James Martin advanced research seminar series

The James Martin advanced research seminars, led by Professor Julian Savulescu and Professor Nick Bostrom, provide an opportunity to discuss issues surrounding the future of humanity and the ethics of the new biosciences. They are open to scholars and Oxford graduate students. The seminar programme can be found at www.fhi.ox.ac.uk/teaching.html and www.bep.ox.ac.uk/teaching.html.

Unless otherwise stated on the seminar programme, all seminars in Hilary Term will take place at 3 p.m. on Wednesdays in weeks 1–8, in Seminar Room 1, the James Martin Twenty-first Century School, Old Indian Institute, Broad Street, Oxford OX1 3BD.

Reminders and information about the talks and speakers may be obtained by e-mailing to fhi@philosophy.ox.ac.uk.

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Social Sciences

Lessons in Government seminars

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in Lecture Room XI, Brasenose College.

Conveners: Mr Tom Lubbock and Dr Andrew Stockley.

22 Jan.: LORD HUTTON, former Law Lord

29 Jan.: RICHARD THOMAS, Information Commissioner

Fri. 30 Jan.: CLEMENCY BURTON-HILL, actress and political commentator

5 Feb.: PROFESSOR ANTHONY KING, University of Essex

Fri. 6 Feb.: PETER KELLNER, YouGov

12 Feb.: ANN ABRAHAM, Parliamentary and Health Ombudsman

19 Feb.: LORD BEST, President, Local Government Association

26 Feb.: MICHAEL HOWARD, MP, former Leader, Conservative Party

Fri. 27 Feb.: MR LUBBOCK and DR STOCKLEY (on the US elections)

5 Mar.: RHODRI MORGAN, AM, First Minister of Wales

Wed. 11 Mar., 11 a.m.: CHARLES CLARKE, MP, formerly Education Secretary and Home Secretary


Controversies in post-conflict state-building

The following seminars will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in Seminar Room C, the Manor Road Building.

Convener: Professor Richard Caplan.

SIR ADAM ROBERTS
27 Jan.: 'Post-conflict state destruction in Iraq.'

PROFESSOR JENNIFER WELSH
10 Feb.: 'Evaluating the ethics of post-conflict reconstruction.'

PROFESSOR PAUL COLLIER
24 Feb.: 'Post-conflict risks.'

DR HUGO SLIM, Director, Corporates for Crisis
10 Mar.: `The role of business in post-conflict state-building.'


Oxford Institute for Ethics, Law, and Armed Conflict: Strengthening international authority

The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Mondays in the James Martin Twenty-first Century School, the Old Indian Institute Building, corner of Broad Street and Catte Street. Enquiries should be directed to Jennifer Wilkinson (e-mail: elac@politics.ox.ac.uk).

Details of the 16 February seminar will be announced later.

Conveners: Dr David Rodin and Professor Jennifer Welsh.

PROFESSOR MERVYN FROST, King's College, London
19 Jan: 'Understanding contemporary warfare in ethical terms.'

PROFESSOR HENRY SHUE
26 Jan.: 'Indiscriminate disproportionality: another attempt at rules with teeth.'

DR ANTHONY LANG, St Andrews
2 Feb.: 'The just war tradition as political theory: authority and the use of force.'

DR JAMES PATTISON, West of England
9 Feb.: 'Who should intervene? The agents of humanitarian intervention and the responsibility to protect.'

PROFESSOR NIGEL WHITE, Sheffield
23 Feb.: 'Institutional responsibility for private military contractors.'

PROFESSOR NICHOLAS WHEELER, Aberystwyth
2 Mar.: 'A leap of trust? Overcoming the distrust in US–Iranian nuclear relations.'

DR TONI ERSKINE, Aberystwyth
9 Mar.: 'Kicking bodies and damning souls: the danger of harming "innocent" individuals while punishing "delinquent" states.'


Israel: historical, political, and social aspects

Unless otherwise indicated, the following lectures will be given at 8 p.m.

Convener: Peter Oppenheimer, Christ Church.

PROFESSOR ANITA SHAPIRA, Tel Aviv
Thur. 15 Jan., Lower Lecture Room, Lincoln: 'The Holocaust as a pro-Zionist and anti- Zionist narrative.'

PROFESSOR ALON HAREL, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Mon. 26 Jan., Lower Lecture Room, Lincoln: 'Judicial review of human rights in Israel.'

PROFESSOR CHAIM GANS, Tel Aviv
Mon. 16 Feb., Harris Lecture Theatre, Oriel: 'Could Zionism be rejected just because of its defining principles?'

PROFESSOR SHIMON SHAMIR, Tel Aviv
Thur. 19 Feb., Harris Lecture Theatre, Oriel: 'Israel's relations with Egypt and Jordan: cold peace or cooperation?'

A.B. YEHOSHUA, Israeli novelist and playwright
Thur. 26 Feb., 5.30 p.m.: Venue and title to be announced.

TOM SEGEV, Israeli novelist and journalist, Ha'aretz
Mon. 2 Mar., Harris Lecture Theatre, Oriel: 'Israeli society and the Holocaust.'


Centre for Socio-Legal Studies: Human investigation and privacy in a regulatory age

The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Mondays in Seminar Room D, the Manor Road Building. Enquiries may be directed to admin@csls.ox.ac.uk.

PROFESSOR FRANK FUREDI, Kent at Canterbury
19 Jan.: 'If it moves—regulate! Society's uneasy relationship with the informal.'

DR REBECCA WONG, Nottingham Trent
26 Jan.: 'Social networking: the application of the data protection framework.'

PROFESSOR ROBERT DINGWALL, Nottingham
2 Feb.: 'Motherhood and apple pie? Questioning ethical regulation in the social sciences and humanities.'

DR RENATE GERTZ, Glasgow
9 Feb.: 'Quo vadis, FOI?'

ANTHONY WHITE, QC, Matrix Chambers
16 Feb.: 'Data protection, freedom of expression, and the media.'

PROFESSOR GAVIN PHILLIPSON, Durham
23 Feb.: 'Media freedom and privacy under the Human Rights Act.' PROFESSOR CHARLES WARLOW, Edinburgh2 Mar.: 'Proportionality—regulate the banks, keep off the backs of clinical researchers,'


Foundation for Law, Justice, and Society, and Centre for Socio-Legal Studies

PROFESSOR ANTONIO CASSESE, Professor of Law, University of Florence, and formerly President of the International Criminal Court for the Former Yugoslavia, will lecture at 5.30 p.m. on Wednesday, 28 January, in Mordan Hall, St Hugh's College. Further information may be found at www.fljs.org. Subject: 'The International Criminal Court and evolving conceptions of victim-centred justice.'


Department of Social Policy and Social Work: Sidney Ball Memorial Lecture

PROFESSOR GREG DUNCAN will deliver the Sidney Ball Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 26 February, in the Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College.

Subject: 'Poverty and child development.'


Department of Social Policy and Social Work: Values, ideas and welfare cultures in comparative perspective

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Violet Butler Room, Barnett House. Enquiries may be directed to Bryony Groves (e-mail: bryony.groves@socres.ox.ac.uk).

STEINAR STJERNO, Oslo
20 Jan.: 'The history of an idea: three traditions of solidarity.'

ALEX WADDAN, Leicester
27 Jan.: 'American exceptionalism and social policy.'

PROFESSOR WIM VAN OORSHOT, Tilburg
3 Feb.: 'Popular deservingness perceptions and conditionality of solidarity in Europe.'

RANA JAWAD, Centre for Research in Ethnic Relations, Warwick
10 Feb.: 'Possibilities of positive social action: religion and social welfare in the Middle East.'

PROFESSOR ROBERT WALKER
17 Feb.: 'European and American welfare values: case studies in cash benefits reform.'

DR MARTIN SEELEIB-KAISER
24 Feb.: 'From conservative to liberal- communitarian welfare states: changing interpretative patterns in Austria, Germany, and the Netherlands.'

PROFESSOR PETER TAYLOR-GOOBY, Kent
3 Mar.: 'Social justice and social provision: qualitative and quantitative evidence from Germany and the UK.'

RACHEL HINTON, Department for International Development
10 Mar.: 'Culture and social policy in developing countries: a perspective from UK development policy.'


All Souls Criminology Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 3.30 p.m. on Thursdays in the Old Library, All Souls College. Enquiries may be directed to ccr@crim.ox.ac.uk.

DR PHIL CLARK
22 Jan.: 'Restorative justice for genocide? Assessing the impact of the Gacaca Community Courts in Rwanda.'

PROFESSOR DAVID NELKEN, University of Macarata, Italy
5 Feb.: 'What makes concepts travel well? Comparing prison rules and corruption standards.'

DR ANNA SOUHAMI, Edinburgh
19 Feb.: 'Transforming youth justice: power, ambiguity, and the governance of youth crime.'

PROFESSOR PAUL WILES, PROFESSOR IAN LOADER, and other speakers
12 Mar.: 'Does crime policy need criminology, and does criminology need crime policy?' (Debate)


School of Geography and the Environment

TIM SCHWANEN will lecture at 2 p.m. on Monday, 15 December, in the Boardroom, the School of Geography and the Environment.

Subject: 'Analytical, critical, and cultural understandings of every mobility and beyond.'

Open lecture series: Sustainable transport

PROFESSOR CHENG YUAN LIN will deliver the first lecture in this series at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 20 January, in the School of Geography and the Environment. The full series programme will be published later. Enquiries may be directed to Lara Scott (e-mail: lara.scott@ouce.ox.ac.uk).

Subject: 'Approaches towards sustainable maritime transportation.'

Louwes Lecture

PROFESSOR LAURENCE BOISSON DE CHAZOURNES, Geneva, will deliver the Louwes Lecture at 4.30 p.m. on Wednesday, 21 January, in Lecture Room 2, Christ Church.

Subject: 'Freshwater and international law: universal and regional perspectives.'

Ethnicity and Identity Seminar: The identity of ghosts: haunting, corporeality, and the spectre

The following seminars will be held at 11 a.m. on Fridays in the Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, 51 Banbury Road.

Conveners: Shirley Ardener, Elisabeth Hsu, Lidia Sciama, and Katherine Swancutt.

OLGA ULTURGASHEVA, Cambridge
23 Jan.: 'The wandering spirits of the dead: ghosts, social imagination, and memory about Gulag in north-eastern Siberia.'

GREGORY DELAPLACE, Cambridge
30 Jan.: 'Who sees what, and how? Ghosts and Mongolian regimes of communicability.'

DAVID BERLINER, Université Libre de Bruxelles
6 Feb.: 'Persistent spirits: interactive aspects of religious transmission.'

THOMAS THORNTON
13 Feb.: 'Land otter men and other spectral forces in Tlingit environmental perception.'

EMMANUEL NUESIRI
20 Feb.: 'Kindred spirits and the fate of the Bimbia Forest, Cameroon.'

MICHAEL POLTORAK, Kent
27 Feb.: ' "Run from dead ghosts, but enjoy the living ones!" Tongan tevolo as anthropological inter-subjects.'

KJERSTI LARSEN, Oslo
6 Mar.: 'A body of spirits: problems of identity and shared realities among humans and spirits in Zanzibar.'

KATHERINE SWANCUTT
13 Mar.: 'Spectres of slavery and a false start to death rites among the Nuosu of Yunnan, China.'


Institute of Cognitive and Evolutionary Anthropology and the Ian Ramsey Centre, Faculty of Theology

DR GRAHAM WOOD, School of Philosophy, University of Tasmania, will lecture at 2 p.m. on Thursday, 22 January, in the Institute of Cognitive and Evolutionary Anthropology, 64 Banbury Road.

Subject: 'Detecting design: fast and frugal or all things considered?'


ESRC Centre on Migration, Policy, and Society seminars: Immigration and low-wage labour markets

The following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Thursdays in the Seminar Room, the Pauling Centre, 58a Banbury Road. Further information is available at www.compas.ox.ac.uk/e vents/seminars_lectures.shtml.

Convener: Martin Ruhs.

KEN MAYHEW, SKOPE, Oxford
22 Jan.: 'Low-wage work in the EU and US.'

STEPHEN NICKELL, Nuffield
29 Jan.: 'The impact of immigration on occupational wages in Britain.'

DAVID METCALFE, LSE; Chairman, MAC
5 Feb.: 'Labour shortages and immigration policy: the work of the UK's Migration Advisory Committee (MAC).'

DON DEVORETZ, Simon Fraser
12 Feb.: 'Border thickness: obese or svelte?'

MARTIN RUHS, COMPAS
19 Feb.: 'Economic research and labour immigration policy.'

SONIA MCKAY, London Metropolitan
26 Feb.: 'Undocumented worker transitions.'

JO MORIARTY, King's College, London
5 Mar.: 'Immigration and the social care sector in the UK.'

BRIDGET ANDERSON, COMPAS
12 Mar.: 'Smoke, mirrors, and magic numbers: immigration and labour markets.'


Contemporary South Asia seminar

The following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Thursdays in Seminar Room 2, the Department of International Development, Queen Elizabeth House.

Conveners: Dr Nikita Sud, Mr Rajesh Venugopal, and Dr Nandini Gooptu.

ARADHNA AGGARWAL, Delhi
22 Jan.: 'SEZs in India: past experience, current status, and future prospects.'

DEEPAK MISHRA
29 Jan.: 'Institutional diversity and capitalist transformation in the eastern Himalayas: the case of Arunachal Pradesh.'

THOMAS BLOM HANSEN, Amsterdam
5 Feb.: 'The India that does not shine: Muslims and the new urban security regimes in India.'

NIKITA SUD
12 Feb.: 'From zamindari to land reform and back again: the liberalisation of Gujarat's land.'

NIAZ KHAN
19 Feb.: 'Society versus social forestry: implications of patronage for community-based forestry in Bangladesh.'

SUBIR SINHA
26 Feb.: 'Theorising the developmental state: some culs-de-sac and some ways forward.'

NANDINI GOOPTU
5 Mar.: 'Enterprise culture, society and politics in India today.'

MATTHEW NELSON
12 Mar.: To be announced.


Department of International Development: Development seminar

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in Seminar Room 2, the Department of International Development, Queen Elizabeth House. Those wishing to attend are asked to note that there is no access to Queen Elizabeth House after 5.15 p.m.

Late alterations to the arrangements will be made available at www.qeh.ox.ac.uk/event-info.

Enquiries may be directed to Denise Watt (telephone: Oxford (2)81803, e-mail: denise.watt@qeh.ox.ac.uk).

Conveners: Professor A.J.B. Wood and Professor E.V.K. Fitzgerald.

DUNCAN GREEN, Head of Research, Oxfam GB
22 Jan.: Book- launch: From Poverty to Power.

FRANCES STEWART
29 Jan.: 'CRISE findings on horizontal inequalities and conflict: an overview.'

RAUFU MUSTAPHA
5 Feb.: 'Limits of ethnic engineering: rebuilding Nigerian unity by building Abuja.'

ROZANA HIMAZ
12 Feb.: 'Using longitudinal data to understand the dynamics of poverty: examples from Young Lives.'

JOHN WILLIAMSON, Peterson Institute for International Economics, Washington, DC
19 Feb.: 'Are financial crises an inevitable feature of the landscape?'

MARTIN WOODHEAD, Open University
26 Feb.: 'What does education for all mean in practice for young children in Ethiopia, India, Peru, and Vietnam?'

GRAHAM BROWN, Bath
5 Mar.: 'The political economy of secessionism: a quantitative model and case studies from south-east Asia.'

GINA CRIVELLO
12 Mar.: 'The "place" of aspirations: youth transitions through school, work, and migration; evidence from Young Lives in Peru.'


Department of Education: public lectures

The following lectures will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in Seminar Room A, the Department of Education. The lectures are followed at 6.30 p.m. by a short reception.

ANNE EDWARDS, INGRID LUNT, and ELENI STAMOU
19 Jan.: 'Schools and inter-professional working.'

JEAN-MARC DEWAELE, London
26 Jan.: 'The effect of authentic communication during foreign language acquisition on later self- perceived communicative competence and foreign language anxiety.'

MAGGIE SNOWLING, York
2 Feb.: 'Children at risk of dyslexia and implications for intervention.'

CATHERINE BRISSEAU, visiting research fellow
9 Feb.: 'Is French spelling more difficult than English spelling?'

ANNE WATSON
16 Feb.: 'Teaching mathematics mathematically.'

PAM SAMMONS, Nottingham
23 Feb.: 'Leadership and pupil outcomes: findings from a mixed method longitudinal study of leadership in effective and improving schools funded by DCSF.'

EVE GREGORY, Goldsmiths, London
2 Mar.: 'The role of the family in bilingual learning.'

ZOLTAN DORNYEI, Nottingham
9 Mar.: 'The ideal self and motivation.'


Sociology Group seminars: Inequality, politics, religion, and moral attitudes: theoretical issues and empirical findings

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Clay Room, Nuffield College.

Conveners: Nan Dirk de Graaf and Kenneth Macdonald.

PROFESSOR GEOFF EVANS
21 Jan.: 'Structural transformation, party strategy, and the end of class politics.'

DR EVA JASPERS, Nijmegen
28 Jan.: 'A comparative study on attitudes towards euthanasia: testing the "slippery slope" and "dignity with death" argumens.'

PROFESSOR HERMAN G. VAN DE WERFHORST, Amsterdam
4 Feb.: 'Skills, signals, or closure? A cross-national comparison of the usefulness of three mechanisms explaining the schooling effect on the labour market.'

DR FRANCESCA BORGONOVI, LSE
11 Feb.: 'The relationship between education and levels of trust and tolerance in Europe.'

DR MAN YEE KAN
18 Feb.: 'Analysing social rhythms by optimal matching: working week schedules of France 1998–9 and UK 2000-1.'

PROFESSOR ANTHONY HEATH
25 Feb.: 'Class dominance, male dominance, or individualisation? Class identity in Britain, 1965–2005.'

DR MICHELLE JACKSON
4 Mar.: 'The relative importance of primary and secondary effects in creating ethnic inequalities in educational attainment.'

PROFESSOR DAN OLSON, Purdue
11 Mar.: 'Why do small religious groups have more committed members?'

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Theology

Interdisciplinary seminars in the study of religions

The following films will be shown at 7.45 p.m. on Mondays in the Harris Lecture Theatre, Oriel College.

Convener: Dr Elizabeth de Michelis.

26 Jan.: Judaism—Everything is Illuminated (film, 2005). A young Jewish American man endeavours to find the Ukrainian woman who saved his grandfather during WW II. He and his guides discover more than they expected. See wip.warnerbros.com/everythingisilluminated. Presenter: Dr Jordan Finkin.

9 Feb.: Judaism—In Her Own Time (documentary, 1985). Subtitled 'the final fieldwork of Barbara Myerhoff', this profound documentary describes an anthropologist;s exploration of life and death in the context of Judaism. See http://directcinema.com/dcl/title.php?id=225. Presenter: Dr Miri Freud-Kandel.

23 Feb.: Buddhism—The Burmese Harp (film, 1956). A soldier, thought to be dead, disguises himself as a Buddhist monk and stumbles upon spiritual enlightenment. In lyrical black and white, this is a classic anti-war film. See www.imdb.com/title/tt0049012. Presenter: Representative of Oxford Buddha Vihara.


Ian Ramsey Centre

The following seminars will be held at 8.15 for 8.30 p.m. on Thursdays in the Old Dining Room, Harris Manchester College. Full details may be found at http://users.ox.ac.uk/~theo0038/semin ar.html. Enquiries may be directed to Dr David Leech (e-mail: david.leech@theology.ox.ac.uk).

PROFESSOR TINA BEATTIE
29 Jan.: 'Science, religion, and the human condition: what really matters in the God debates.'

DR ARD LOUIS
12 Feb.: 'The evolution of biological complexity: a physicist's point of view.'

PROFESSOR KEITH WARD
26 Feb.: 'Are there limits to scientific explanation?'

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Oxford Institute of Ageing

Ageing and ethnic diversity

The following seminars will be held at 12.30 p.m. on Thursdays in Seminar Room G, the Manor Road Building.

Conveners: Dr Robin Mann and Susan Marcus.

PROFESSOR NAINA PATEL, Central Lancashire
22 Jan.: 'Age, enterprise, and change.'

DR CHIH HOONG SIN, Office for Public Management, London
29 Jan.: 'Ageing, ethnicity, and "the other": challenges for inclusive research.'

PROFESSOR MARK JOHNSON, De Montfort
5 Feb.: 'An ageing minority cohort: challenges for care services?'

PROFESSOR PHILIP REES, Leeds
12 Feb.: 'Ageing for Britain's ethnic groups: the national and local picture to mid-century.'

DR YASMIN GUNARATNAM, Central Lancashire and London
19 Feb.: 'Narrative methods in researching ageing and ethnicity: methods, emotions, and ethics.'

DR ALISON SHAW
26 Feb.: 'The negotiation of care for the elderly in transnational Pakistani families.'

DR SANDRA TORRES, Linkoping, Sweden
5 Mar.: 'Cross- cultural interactions in the context of Swedish elderly care: preliminary findings from an ethnographic study.'

PROFESSOR CHRISTINA VICTOR, Reading, and DR WENDY MARTIN, Reading
12 Mar.: 'Families and caring in south Asian communities.'

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Saïd Business School

BT Annual Lecture

MATT BROSS, CEO BT Innovate and BT Group Chief Technology Officer, will deliver the first annual BT Lecture at 5.45 p.m. on Tuesday, 20 January, in the Saïd Business School. The lecture will be open to the public. Those wishing to attend should register at www.sbs.oxford.edu/events/btlecture08 ).

Subject: 'Innovation at the speed of life.'


New organisational perspectives: design, networks, and practices

Unless otherwise indicated the following seminars will be held at 4 p.m. on Thursdays in the Andrew Cormack Seminar Room, the Saïd Business School. The series will continue in Trinity Term.

MATS ALVESSON, Lund
Tue. 20 Jan., Seminar Room 13: 'Identity issues in knowledge intensive firms.'

MEHDI BOUSSEBAA
5 Feb.: 'Managing across national borders: the case of global projects in professional service firms.'

ANDREW PETTIGREW, Bath
26 Feb.: 'Leading global professional service firms: preliminary thoughts for a research project.'

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International Gender Studies Centre

Gypsies, Travellers, and Roma throughout Europe

The following seminars will be held at 3.30 p.m. on Thursdays in Seminar Room 1, Queen Elizabeth House.

Details will be announced later of events to be held on International Women's Day, 12 March.

Conveners: Professor Judith Okeley and Dr Lidia Sciama.

PROFESSOR JUDITH OKELEY and DR MARCELO FREDIANI, Paris
29 Jan.: 'New (Age) and Gypsy travellers in England—change and continuities.'

PROFESSOR TOMMASO VITALE, Milan
5 Feb.: 'Continuous persecution of Gypsies in Italian local societies? De-historicisation and an historical–ethnographic link.'

LIVIA JAROKA, MEP
12 Feb.: 'The situation of Romani women in the European Union.'

DR IULIA HASDEU, Geneva
19 Feb.: 'Gender in Roma migration patterns in Belgium.'

DR COLIN CLARK, Strathclyde
26 Feb.: 'The 2008 legal recognition of Scottish Travellers as an ethnic group.'

DR MAREK JAKOUBEK and LENKA BUDILOVA, West Bohemia University, Pilsen
5 Mar.: 'Ritual im/purity: new perspectives from Czecho/Slovakia.'

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Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine

Local and global perspectives in the history of medicine

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Mondays in the Wellcome Unit, 47 Banbury Road. Further details may be found at www.wuhmo.ox.ac.uk.

Convener: Dr Sloan Mahone.

SLOAN MAHONE
19 Jan.: ' "A beautiful case of catatonia": the photography of movement disorders in colonial Kenya.'

NIKLAS THODE JENSEN, Copenhagen
26 Jan.: 'Disease, medicine, and the struggle for power among the enslaved population in the Danish West Indies, 1803–48.'

MATTHEW SAVELLI
2 Feb.: 'Was there a Communist psychiatry?'

MATTHEW THOMSON, Warwick
9 Feb.: 'Geoffrey Gorer and the "social science" of modern sexuality.'

SEBASTIAO SILVA
16 Feb.: 'Portuguese planters and British humanitarians: international politics and the sleeping sickness epidemic in Principe.'

SABINE CLARKE
23 Feb.: 'New uses for sugar: the search for medical products from Caribbean resources, 1940–60.'

JONATHAN REINARZ, Birmingham
2 Mar.: 'From rowdy youths to marginal men: a social history of medical students in provincial England, c.1825–1939.'

REBEKAH LEE, Goldsmiths College, London
9 Mar.: 'Mobility, migration, and the management of death in South Africa.'

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Museum of the History of Science

Telescopes now: real stories of astronomy today

The following lectures will be given at 7 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Museum of the History of Science. Admission is free and open to the public.

PROFESSOR ALEXANDER BOKSENBERG, Cambridge
3 Feb.: 'The William Herschel telescope.'

PROFESSOR PHIL DIAMOND, Manchester
10 Feb.: 'Jodrell Bank, the Lovell telescope, and e- MERLIN.'

PROFESSOR ROGER DAVIES
17 Feb.: 'The Gemini telescopes.'

PROFESSOR ALAN WATSON, Leeds
24 Feb.: 'The Pierre Auger Observatory.'


Other lectures

DR JIM BENNETT will lecture at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, 20 January, in the Museum of the History of Science. Admission is free and open to the public.

Subject: 'Longitude revisited: James Short and John Harrison.'

PROFESSOR MARCUS DU SAUTOY will discuss his television series, The Story of Maths, at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, 31 March, in the Museum of the History of Science. Admission is free and open to the public.

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Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies

Ottomans, Safavids, and Mughals: strategies of central power

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies, George Street.

PROFESSOR CHARLES MELVILLE, Cambridge
21 Jan.: 'History and its illustration in the early Safavid period.'

DR COLIN IMBER, Manchester
28 Jan.: 'Who owned the land? Land tenure in the Ottoman empire.'

PROFESSOR POLLY O'HANLON
4 Feb.: To be announced.

DR KATHERINE BROWN, King's College, London
11 Feb.: 'Sense and sensibility: the domain of pleasure and the place of music in Mughal society.'

DR ANDREW NEWMAN, Edinburgh
18 Feb.: 'Shahs and subalterns: the response of the Safavid court to "voices from below".'

PROFESSOR EDMUND HERZIG
25 Feb.: 'Messing with the market: Safavid trade policy under Abbas I and his successors.'

SUSAN STRONGE, Victoria and Albert Museum
4 Mar.: 'Portraits of power at the Mughal court.'

DR EVRIM BIN BAS, Chicago
11 Mar.: 'The constitutional crisis of the fifteenth century and the Timurid antecedents of the early modern Islamic discourse on the absolute monarch.'

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Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

The following seminars will be held at 12 noon on Wednesdays in the Barclay Room, Green Templeton College. Enquiries shoudl be directed to Kate Hanneford-Smith (e-mail: kate.hanneford-smith@politics.ox.ac.u k).

For details of this term's Media and Politics seminars, see under 'Nuffield College' below.

DAVID LEIGH, Investigations Editor, the Guardian
21 Jan.: 'The future for investigative journalism.'

RAGEH OMAAR, Middle East Correspondent, Al-Jazeera News UK
28 Jan.: 'Al- Jazeera and the media in the Middle East.'

RUTH GLEDHILL, Religion Correspondent, The Times
4 Feb.: 'Muslims in the media.'

JOHN BRIDCUT
11 Feb.: 'Impartiality.'

STRYKER MCGUIRE, London Bureau Chief, Newsweek
18 Feb.: 'Barack Obama and the US media.'

ANDREW CURRAH, Research Associate, Oxford Internet Institute
25 Feb.: 'Business models for the media.'

STEPHEN WHITTLE, expert adviser to the Council of Europe and formerly BBC Controller of Editorial Policy
4 Mar.: 'Private privacy or the public's right to know.'

RICHARD DOWDEN
11 Mar.: 'The state of journalism in Africa.' (Arrangements subject to confirmation)

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Latin American Centre

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Latin American Centre.

Convener: Dr Diego Sánchez-Ancochea.

DANIELA DI PIRAMO, Griffith University
20 Jan.: ' "I am not Evita": symbolic reincarnation, political memory, and charisma in Argentina.'

DAVID LEHMANN, Cambridge
27 Jan.: 'From multiculturalism to interculturidad.'

TONY KAPCIA, Nottingham
3 Feb.: 'Cuba at fifty: balancing necessary continuity and urgent change?'

JEAN DAUDELIN, Carleton University
10 Feb.: 'Frontier violence, property rights regimes, and Latin America's new civil war.'

LEWIS TAYLOR, Liverpool
17 Feb.: 'How did the peasants vote? The implications for Peruvian democracy of the 2006 elections in rural Cajamarca.'

LUCIO RENNÓ ;, Brasília
24 Feb.: 'Electoral systems and political information in Latin America.'

DUNCAN GREEN, Oxfam
3 Mar.: 'From poverty to power: Oxfam's new narrative on development—presentation and some lessons for Latin America.'

SARAH RADCLIFFE, Cambridge
10 Mar.: 'Re-mapping the nation: cartography, geographical knowledge, and Ecuadorian multiculturalism.'

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Oxford Learning Institute

Research seminars

The following seminars will be held at 4 p.m. on Thursdays in the Oxford Learning Institute, Level 2, Littlegate House, St Ebbe's.

The full programme is available at www.learning.ox.ac.uk/oli.php?page=138. Those wishing to attend should first contact the OLI (telephone: Oxford (2)86811, e-mail: research@learning.ox.ac.uk).

DR CLAIRE STOCKS
22 Jan.: 'Does linking teaching with research add value? The view from a research-intensive university.'

PROFESSOR ROSEMARY DEEM, Bristol
29 Jan.: 'Valuing leadership and leadership development in England's universities: a route to isomorphism?'

PROFESSOR ALAN JENKINS, Oxford Brookes
5 Feb.: 'Delivering undergraduate research for all students? International perspectives.'

DR BARRY STIERER, Westminster
12 Feb.: 'An analysis of "hybrid" scholarly journals: new spaces for developing distinctive ways of knowing?'

PROFESSOR GRAHAM GIBBS, formerly Director of the Oxford Learning Institute
19 Feb.: 'Characteristics of excellent teaching departments, and the role of leadership of teaching, in elite research universities.'

PROFESSOR BRUCE MACFARLANE, Portsmouth
26 Feb.: 'Researching with integrity: exploring the role of character.'

PROFESSOR SANDRA ACKER, Toronto
5 Mar.: 'Tears and fears: Canadian tenure reviews and gender equity.'

DR ALAN SKELTON, Sheffield
12 Mar.: 'Too good to be true? Teaching excellence in higher education.'

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Library Services

WISER: Workshops in Information Skills and Electronic Resources

The following one-hour workshops, delivered by subject librarians, will be held at 12.30 p.m. in the Oxford University Computing Services or the Radcliffe Science Library (the seminars held in the RSL are indicated below). Places on the OUCS seminars should be booked online through www.ouls.ox.ac.uk/wiser, where further information will also be found. Booking is not needed for the seminars held in the RSL.

The workshops provide an opportunity to gain understanding of specialist information resources. Attendance is free.

JUDY READING and ANGELA CARRITT
Mon. 26 Jan.: 'Key search tools.'

MAT ANDREWS
Fri. 30 Jan.: 'Theses and dissertations.'

JULIET RALPH
Mon. 2 Feb.: 'Doing a literature search in biomedicine.'

KARL HARRISON and LJILJA RISTIC
Wed. 4 Feb., RSL: 'Chemistry and materials science.'

DINAH MANISTY
Fri. 6 Feb.: 'Middle East and Islamic studies.'

ROGER MILLS and JULIET RALPH
Mon. 9 Feb.: 'The Ovid databases.'

LJILJA RISTIC and RACHEL TUCKER
Wed. 11 Feb., RSL: 'Engineering and technology: reference management.'

SUE BIRD and ROGER MILLS
Fri. 13 Feb.: 'Google Scholar—pros and cons.'

LJILJA RISTIC
Mon. 16 Feb.: 'Physics, engineering, and computing: key databases.'

ISABEL MCMANN and PENNY ROBERTS
Wed. 18 Feb., RSL: 'SCOPUS for science and medicine.'

KATE WILLIAMS
Fri. 20 Feb.: 'Education.'

SUE BIRD and JUDITH PINFOLD
Mon. 23 Feb.: 'Resources for geography and the environment.'

ROGER MILLS and JULIET RALPH
Wed. 25 Feb.: 'Biosciences: reference management.'

HILLA WAIT and KATE ALDERSON-SMITH
Fri. 27 Feb.: 'Resources for research in theology.'

CHRIS FLEGG
Mon. 2 Mar.: 'Management and business literature.'

NICK HEARN
Fri. 6 Mar.: 'French language and literature: research resources.'

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Pitt Rivers Museum

Research seminar in material and visual anthropology: Re-visiting Victorian anthropology?

The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Fridays in the Pitt Rivers Museum Lecture Theatre (entrance via Robinson Close).

Conveners: Christopher Wingfield and Alison Petch.

ALISON PETCH
23 Jan.: 'Total immersion or paddling? The different methods of fieldwork in Victorian anthropology.'

HILDE NIELSSEN, Bergen
30 Jan.: 'James Sibree and Lars Dahle: Norwegian and British missionary ethnography as a transnational and national activity.'

OLIVER DOUGLAS, Museum of English Rural Life, University of Reading
6 Feb.: 'Upstairs, downstairs: the materialisation of Victorian folklore studies.'

FRANCES LARSON, Durham
13 Feb.: 'The politics of theory at the Pitt Rivers Musem 1885–1900.'

EMMA COHEN
20 Feb.: 'Animism and the "Tylorian echoes" of cognitive anthropology.'

KATHERINE COOPER, Cambridge
27 Feb.: 'Hopelessly entwined? Alpine lake dwellings and the relationship of anthropology to archaeological reconstructions of the prehistoric past in the later nineteenth century.'

SARAH BYRNE, University College London
6 Mar.: 'Rethinking the relationship between museums, archaeology, and anthropology: are Victorian perspectives valid today?'

CHRISTOPHER WINGFIELD
13 Mar.: 'Back to the future? Locating and re- locating England.'

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James Martin Twenty-first Century School

Global governance challenges

The following seminars will be held at 3.30 p.m. on Thursdays in the James Martin Institute, the Old Indian Institute, corner of Broad Street and Catte Street. Reservation is not required. Enquiries may be directed to events@21school.ox.ac.uk.

DR EDWARD LUCK, Senior Adviser to UN Secretary General
22 Jan.: 'Building global norms: the curious case of responsibility to protect (RtoP).'

DR AUGUSTO LOPEZ-CLAROS, Director, EFD—Global Consulting Network, Spain
29 Jan.: 'What would a new Bretton Woods Conference mean for the world's financial system?'

PROFESSOR JONATHAN WEBER, Imperial College, London
'Can a pandemic infection be controlled without a vaccine?' PROFESSOR ALLEN BUCHANAN, Duke University 12 Feb.: 'Innovation and inequality.'

DR KHALID KOSER, Geneva Centre for Security Policy
19 Feb.: 'International migration and the global financial crisis.'

DR IAN BROWN
26 Feb.: 'Faraday cages, marbled palaces, and Humpty Dumpty: the reality of Internet governance.'

PROFESSOR BEN CASHORE, Yale
5 Mar: 'Sustainable businesses in the global era: can market driven certification systems reward responsible behaviour?'

DR ANDREW MAYNARD, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars
12 Mar.: 'Rethinking science and technology innovation for the twenty-first century: a nanoscale perspective.'


Distinguished Public Lecture

PROFESSOR LORD (MARTIN) REES, President of the Royal Society, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 23 February, in the Sheldonian Theatre. Registration is required: see www.21school.ox.ac.uk/registration , or e-mail: events@21school.ox.ac.uk. The lecture is open to the public.

Subject: 'The world in 2050.'

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Balliol College

Oliver Smithies Lectures

PROFESSOR IAN STOREY, Professor of Classics, Trent University, Ontario, will give two Oliver Smithies Lectures at 5 p.m. on Fridays in the Classics Centre.

6 Feb.: 'On looking (again) into Kratinos' Dionysalexandros.' What happens when Paris cannot be found for the (in)famous Judgement of Paris, and the only substitue that can be found is the comic god, Dionysos? In 1904 a papyrus from Oxyrhynchus yielded most of the plot-summary of this lost comedy by Kratinos (career: 454–423 bc).

20 Feb.: 'The play before the play: when did a Greek play "begin"?'

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Brasenose College

Tanner Lectures on Human Values

Meeting the challenges of the twenty-first century

The Tanner Lectures on Human Values will be held on Friday, 20 February, and Saturday, 21 February, in the Nelson Mandela Lecture Theatre, the Saïd Business School.

Tickets will be required for admission: see www.bnc500.co.uk/bnc500/events.html . Registration is free. Enquiries may be directed to Merry Donati (e-mail: merry.donati@bnc.ox.ac.uk).

PROFESSOR ROBIN WEISS, University College London, PROFESSOR JANE CARDOSA, Universiti Malaysia Sarawak, and PROFESSOR EDDIE HOLMES, Penn State
Fri., 9.30 a.m.–1 p.m.: 'The challenge of emerging infection.'

LT.-COL. JOHN NAGL, Center for a New American Security, TANVIR KHAN, Institute of Strategic Studies, Islamabad, LEO DOCHERTY, author of Desert of Death and former serving officer in Iraq and Helmand, and PADDY DOCHERTY, author of The Khyber Pass
Fri., 2–5.30 p.m.: 'Terrorism and security: what have we learned from Afghanistan and Iraq?'

PROFESSOR VERNON BOGDANOR, SIR NICOLAS BRATZA, UK Judge on the European Court of Human Rights, KATE ALLEN, Director of Amnesty International Uk, SIR IAN KENNEDY, Chairman of the Healthcare Commission, and PROFESSOR JULIAN SAVULESCU
Sat., 9.30 a.m.–1 p.m.: 'Human rights in the twenty-first century.'

GEORGE MONBIOT, Guardian columnist, SIR DAVID KING, PROFESSOR DIETER HELM, and PROFESSOR ROBERT WATSON, Chief Scientific Adviser, DEFRA (Chair: David Shukman, Environment and Science Correspondent, BBC News)
Sat., 2–5.30 p.m.: 'Environmental challenges in a warming world.'

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Linacre College

Linacre Lectures

Societies in transition

The Linacre Lectures will be given at 5.30 p.m. on Thursdays in the OUCE Main Lecture Theatre, the Dyson Perrins Building.

The lectures are arranged in conjunction with the Research Laboratory for Archaeology and the History of Art, and are supported by Tetra Laval. The series organiser is Professor Mark Pollard.

PROFESSOR CHRIS STRINGER, Natural History Museum
22 Jan.: 'The Neanderthal–modern human transition.'

PROFESSOR GRAEME BARKER, Cambridge
29 Jan.: 'Footsteps, clearings, and fields: transitions to farming in island south-east Asia.'

PROFESSOR DAVID KILLICK, Arizona
5 Feb.: 'Did metals matter? An examination of the contexts of early metallurgy around the world.'

PROFESSOR STURT MANNING, Cornell
12 Feb.: 'The volcanogenic context of Europe's first state-level civilisation: Santorini, Crete and the origins of the classical world.'

PROFESSOR CHRIS GOSDEN
19 Feb.: 'Becoming Roman in Britain: imperial impositions and indigenous agency.'

DR BRYAN WARD-PERKINS
26 Feb.: 'The end of Roman civilisation: a man-made disaster?'

PROFESSOR MARILYN PALMER, Leicester
5 Mar.: 'Industrial transformation: innovation, diffusion, and continuity.'

PROFESSOR STEVE RAYNER
12 Mar.: 'Technology and transition in the twenty-first century.'

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Nuffield College and the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

Media and Politics seminars

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Fridays in the Seminar Room, Nuffield College. Undergraduates are welcome to attend.

For details of this term's RISJ seminars, see under 'Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism' above.

Conveners: David Butler and John Lloyd.

SIR JEREMY GREENSTOCK, formerlu Ambassador to the UN and Special Representative in Iraq
23 Jan.: 'Diplomacy and the media.'

SIR JULIAN PRIESTLEY, Secretary General, European Parliament, 1998–2008
30 Jan.: 'The media and Europe.'

SIR CHRISTOPHER MEYER, Chairman, Press Complaints Commission, 2003–8
6 Feb.: 'Can the press be regulated?'

ANDREW MILLER, author of 'Bagehot' column, The Economist
13 Feb.: 'Analysing the political scene.'

MICHAEL WHITE, political writer, the Guardian
20 Feb.: 'Lobby journalism.'

JOHN BURNS, Head of London Bureau, New York Times
27 Feb.: 'Being a foreign correspondent.'

CHRIS HUHNE, MP
6 Mar.: 'Fair play for politicians?'

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St Antony's College

Visiting Parliamentary Fellows Seminar:
Democracy: who wants it?

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Nissan Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College.

Conveners: Professor David Marquand, Professor Robert Service, Gisela Stuart, MP, and John Horam, MP.

THE RT HON. LORD HURD, PROFESSOR MARGARET MACMILLAN, and PROFESSOR ADAM ROBERTS
20 Jan.: 'The historical setting.'

PROFESSOR RANA MITTER, DR STEVE TSANG, and GEORGE WALDEN, former diplomat and MP
27 Jan.: 'China.'

DR VLADIMIR BULDAKOV, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, THE RT HON. LORD OWEN, and PROFESSOR LORD SKIDELSKY, Warwick
3 Feb.: 'Russia.'

THE RT HON. DAVID CURRY, MP, PROFESSOR DAVID MARQUAND, and GISELA STUART, MP
10 Feb.: 'The European Union.'

SIR MARK LYALL-GRANT, Political Directorate, FCO, DR YUNAS SAMAD, Bradford, and DR S. AKBAR ZAIDI, Karachi
17 Feb.: 'Pakistan.'

CHRISTOPHER BREWIN, Keele, IHSAN DAGI, Ankara, and MICHAEL LEIGH, European Commission
24 Feb.: 'Turkey.'

DR DAVID JOHNSON, PROFESSOR PETER LAWRENCE, Keele, and a third speaker, to be announced
3 Mar.: 'Southern Africa.'

PROFESSOR JOHN DUNN, Cambridge, JOHN HORAM, MP, and CONSTANZA STELZENMÜLLER, German Marshall Fund of the US
10 Mar.: 'Democracy: who wants it?'


Fifty years of revolution: politics, economics, and value(s) in the Cuba of today and tomorrow

This seminar will be held on Thursday, 19 February, 1–5 p.m., in the Nissan Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College. Attendance is free.

The seminar will be chaired by Dr Laura Rival and Mr Laurence Whitehead.

The speakers will include: Dr Tony Kapcia, Head of the Hispanic and Latin American Studies Department and Chair of the Cuba Research Forum, Nottingham University; Emily Morris, Senior Research Fellow, International Institute for the Study of Cuba (IISC) of London Metropolitan University and former country editor for Cuba of the Economist Unit; Stephen Wilkinson, Assistant Director of the IISC, London Metropolitan University; Marisa Wilson, D.Phil candidate in Social Anthropology, St Antony's College; Dr George Lambie, Professor of Public Policy, De Montfort University and Director of the Cuba Financial Reform Group (responsible for the delivery of a major EU project in Cuba).

Enquiries may be directed to Marisa Wilson (e-mail: marisa.wilson@sant.ox.ac.uk).


Asian Studies Centre

South-east Asian studies seminars

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the Deakin Room, Founder's Building, St Antony's College. Enquiries may be directed to asian@sant.ox.ac.uk.

Convener: Dr Eva-Lotta Hedman.

PROFESSOR GREG BANKOFF, Hull
5 Feb.: 'Cultures of disaster, cultures of coping: hazard as a frequent life experience in the Philippines.'

DR CLAUDIA MERLI, Durham
12 Feb.: 'Traditional midwives in southern Thailand and the hybridisation of birth cosmology.'

DR FILOMENO ABEL
26 Feb.: 'East Timor: "Like there is no tomorrow".'


Contemporary China seminars

The following seminars, arranged with the Oxford China Centre, will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Oxford China Centre, 74 Woodstock Road. Enquiries may be directed to Veronique Cubilie-Ratio (e-mail: veronique.cubilie-ratio@area.ox.ac.uk).

Conveners: Dr Rachel Murphy and Dr Eileen Walsh.

DR FRANK PIEKE
20 Jan.: 'The production of rulers: Communist Party schools and the transition to neo-socialism in contemporary China.'

DR EMILY HANNUM, Pennsylvania
27 Jan.: 'Educational stratification by ethnic group in China.'

DR XIANG BIAO
3 Feb.: 'Shijie: Chinese notions of the world.'

DR YIK CHAN CHIN
10 Feb.: 'Media policy processes and the role of the province in China.'

DR AARON MOORE
17 Feb.: 'Physical dimensions of self: language, experience, and the diary as a material object in modern east Asian armed forces.'

DR JIANXIANG BI, West of England
24 Feb.: 'Search for security: China's space projects.'

DR MARIA CSANADI, Hungarian Academy of Sciences
3 Mar.: 'Globalisation, transformation dynamics, and political change in China.'

DR JAKOB KLEIN, SOAS
10 Mar.: 'Ecologically based foods and household food strategies in urban south-west China.'


Pluscarden Programme for the Study of Global Terrorism and Intelligence

Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 6 p.m. on Thursdays in the Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College. The seminars are open to members of the University on production of their university card. Enquiries may be directed to pluscarden.programme@sant.ox.ac.uk.

Convener: Professor Steve Tsang.

DR JACK CARAVELLI, formerly US Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy
5 Feb.: 'Iran: a memo to President Obama.'

ROBERT HANNIGAN, Security Adviser to the Prime Minister
12 Feb.: 'Coordinating responses to the threats of transnational terrorism.'

REAR-ADM. CHRIS PARRY, formerly Head, Development, Concepts, and Doctrine Centre, the Ministry of Defence
5 Mar.: 'Future shock or future proof? What do we know and what don't we know?'


Half-day workshop: Conflict economics, underdevelopment, and counter-terrorism

This workshop will be held on Wednesday, 25 February, 2–6.30 p.m., in the Dahrendorf Room, Founder's Building, St Antony's College. The workshop is open to members of the University on production of their university card. Enquiries may be directed to pluscarden.programme@sant.ox.ac.uk.

Convener: Professor Steve Tsang.

PROFESSOR PAUL COLLIER: 'Framework for understanding conflict economics, underdevelopment and terrorism.'

PROFESSOR KRISTIAN SKREDE GLEDITSCH, Essex: 'Failure of states: what drives them? What can be done to arrest state failure?'

DR ANKE HOEFFLER: 'Lack of security and underdevelopment: how to break the vicious circle?'

Speaker to be confirmed: 'Counter-terrorism as driver behind development aid: the wrong paradigm?'


Conference: Countering home-grown terrorism

This conference will be held in the Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College, on 23 March (from 9.30 a.m) and 24 March.

Fees are as follows:

Standard rate: £590
British Government concessionary rate (to include members of the armed forces): £150
Non-Oxford University academic and student concessionary rate: £80
Oxford University student concessionary rate (maximum of five): £25

Enquiries and registration requests may be directed to Jennifer Griffiths (e-mail: jennifer.griffiths@sant.ox.ac.uk).

Convener: Professor Steve Tsang.

ORLA LYNCH, St Andrews
Mon., 23 Mar., 10.10 a.m.: 'Home-grown terrorists: who are they and what drives them?'

SHEIKH MUSA ABUBAKER ADMANI, London Metropolitan University
11.50 a.m.: 'The preaching and understanding of Islam.'

MAAJID NAWAZ, Quilliam Foundation
2.30 p.m.: 'Identity, loyalty, and other social factors.'

SARA THORNTON, Thames Valley Police
3.45 p.m.: 'Policing, counter-terrorism tactics and government policies.'

PROFESSOR BRUCE HOFFMAN, Georgetown
5.25 p.m.: 'The external links, leadership, and support network.'

MAJ.-GEN. (RETD) TIM CROSS, Staff College
Tue., 24 Mar., 9.05 a.m.: 'Can adopting the "comprehensive approach" in Afghanistan and elsewhere help to combat home-grown terrorism?'

DR EMILE NAKHLEKH, CIA (retd)
10.20 a.m.: 'Engaging with the Islamic world at home and abroad in countering home-grown terrorism.'

CHARLES ALLEN, US Department of Homeland Security
11.50 a.m.: 'Home-grown terrorism in the USA: why is it a lesser threat than in Europe?'

A senior British official
2.30 p.m.: 'Countering home-grown terrorism in the UK: how to strike the right balance?'


Russian and East European Studies Centre

Society and economy of post-Communist countries

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Nissan Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College. Further information may be obtained from the Centre (telephone: Oxford (2)84728, e-mail: richard.ramage@sant.ox.ac.uk).

Conveners: Dr Carol Scott Leonard and Dr Judith Pallot.

DR JUDITH PALLOT
19 Jan.: 'Remembering the past to secure the future: patriotic discourses in Russia's penal peripheries.'

GALINA MYAZHEVICH, Gorbachev Fellow in Global Media, RAI, Oxford
26 Jan.: 'Moderating the extreme: the role of Vladimir Pozner's Vremena in mediating xenophobia in Russia.'

ANNA BADYNA, Economic Commission for Europe, Committee on Housing and Land Management
2 Feb.: 'Informal settlements in Russia and Eastern Europe: challenges and policy responses.'

DR DAVID STUCKLER
9 Feb.: 'Transition policies and the post- Communist mortality crisis.'

CRAIG YOUNG, Manchester Metropolitan, and DUNCAN HOPE, Liverpool Hope
16 Feb.: 'Media representations of post-accession migrants in the UK and Romanian press.'

CAMERON ROSS, Dundee
23 Feb.: 'Federalism and local politics in Russia.'

DANA BROWN
2 Mar.: 'The investment environment in Russia.'

TINA JENNINGS
9 Mar.: 'Big business in Russia under Putin and Medvedev.'

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Trinity College

Richard Hillary Memorial Lecture

COLM TÓIBÍN will deliver the Richard Hillary Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 27 January, in the Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, the St Cross Building.

Subject: 'The art of losing: on grief and reason in the poetry of Thom Gunn and Elizabeth Bishop.'

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Wolfson College

Translation seminar

PROFESSOR MANANA GELASHVILI, PROFESSOR DONALD RAYFIELD, and PROFESSOR JON STALLWORTHY will discuss Georgian poetry in English translation (Galaktion Tabidze), at 7.30 p.m. on Monday, 26 January, in the Haldane Room, Wolfson College. Enquiries may be directed to Carmen Bugan (e- mail: carmen.bugan@wolfson.ox.ac.uk).


Public lecture

PROFESSOR JAMES CRABBE, Supernumerary Fellow of Wolfson College, and Executive Dean and Professor at the University of Bedfordshire, will lecture at 6 p.m. on Thursday, 12 February, in the Buttery, Wolfson College.

Subject: 'Climate change and coral reefs: moving from science to conservation actions.'

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Regent's Park College

Oxford Centre for Christianity and Culture

Darwin reconsidered: marking the 150th anniversary of On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection

The following lectures, which are open to the public, will be given at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in Regent's Park College.

PROFESSOR STEPHEN FULLER, Warwick
20 Jan.: 'Darwin's original sin: the rejection of theology's claims to knowledge.'

PROFESSOR JOHN HEDLEY BROOKE, Durham
27 Jan.: 'Darwin on nature and God.'

DR THOMAS DIXON, Queen Mary, London
3 Feb.: 'Darwin and ethics: morals from history.'

PROFESSOR CELIA DEANE-DRUMMOND, Chester
10 Feb.: 'Beyond separation or synthesis: Christ and evolution as theodrama.'

DR JUSTIN BARRETT
17 Feb.: 'From Homo erectus to Homo religiosus: cognitive evolution and religion.'

PROFESSOR JOHN LENNOX
24 Feb.: 'Darwin and secularism.'

DR CONOR CUNNINGHAM, Nottingham
3 Mar.: 'Darwin contra Darwinism: the anti-evolutionary thinking of some recent Darwinists.'

DR JOHN WEAVER, President, Baptist Union of Great Britain
10 Mar.: 'The challenge of evolutionary theory for the twenty-first century Church.'

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Oxford Centre for Hindu Studies

Hinduism II: Hindu ideas of liberation (Paper 21)

PROFESSOR GAVIN FLOOD will lecture at 11 a.m. on Wednesdays in the Seminar Room, the Theology Faculty Centre.

21 Jan.: 'Introduction: the question of soteriology in India.' 28 Jan.: 'The Samkhya and Yoga.'

4 Feb.: 'Yoga-sutras of Patanjali.'

11 Feb.: 'Bhakti and Yoga in the Bhagavad-gita and its interpreters.'

18 Feb.: 'Bhakti literatures and ritual texts.'

25 Feb.: 'The Sant tradition: Kabir, Mirabai.'

4 Mar.: 'The Pancaratra.'

11 Mar.: 'Monistic Saivism.'


The importance of religion

PROFESSOR GAVIN FLOOD will lecture at 10 a.m. on Fridays in the Library, the Oxford Centre for Hindu Studies.

23 Jan.: 'Religion and spirituality.'

30 Jan.: 'Religion and literature.'

6 Feb.: 'Religion and music.'


Religious experience in psychology, anthropology, and sociology

DR JESSICA FRAZIER will lecture at 10 a.m. on Fridays in the Library, the Oxford Centre for Hindu Studies.

13 Feb.: 'Anthropology of religion and the religious imagination.'

27 Feb.: 'Psychology of religion and the cartography of belief.'

6 Mar.: 'Sociology of religion and the force of the individual.'


Hindu understandings of God

The following lectures will be given at 2 p.m. on Thursdays in the Oxford Centre for Hindu Studies.

DR JESSICA FRAZIER
29 Jan.: 'Ideas of God in Hinduism.'

PROFESSOR KEITH WARD
12 Feb.: 'The theology of Ramanuja.'

DR REMBERT LUTJEHARMS
26 Feb.: 'The theology of Jiva Gosvami.'

PROFESSOR GAVIN FLOOD
12 Mar.: 'The theology of Utpaladeva and the monistic Shaivas.'


Readings in the Jayakhya-samhita

Lectures on this subject will be held at 10 a.m. on Mondays, weeks 2–8, in the Library, the Oxford Centre for Hindu Studies.

Convener: Professor Gavin Flood.


Reading in phenomenology

Lectures on this subject will be held at 10 a.m. on Thursdays, weeks 2–8, in the Library, the Oxford Centre for Hindu Studies.

Convener: Professor Gavin Flood.


Other lectures

DR THOMAS DAFFERN will lecture at 2 p.m. on Thursday, 5 February, in the Library, the Oxford Centre for Hindu Studies.

Subject: 'Hinduism, non-violence, and the costs of terrorism: towards an Indian mediation service?'


DR MAYA WARRIER, University of Wales, Lampeter, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 16 February, in the Faculty Room, the Oriental Institute.

Subject: 'Bovine slaughter, media representations, and the construction of Hindu identity in Britain' (Majewski Lecture)


BJARNE WERNICKE OLESEN will lecture at 2 p.m. on Thursday, 5 March, in the Library, the Oxford Centre for Hindu Studies.

Subject: 'The origins and development of Shaktism.'

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Oxford Italian Association

Lectures

The following lectures will be given as shown. Admission costs £1 for members, £3 for non-members; students under thirty are admitted free.

For further information about the Association, e-mail pmilner@clara.net, or telephone Oxford 377479.

FERDINANDO GIUGLIANO Wed. 21 Jan., 7.30 p.m., Pauling Centre, 58 Banbury Road: 'Lapdog or watchdog: politics and the Italian press.'

PROFESSOR MARK ROBINSON
Thur. 5 Feb., 7.30 p.m., Mary Ogilvie Theatre, St Anne's: 'Recent excavations of Roman gardens at Pompeii.'

DR THIERRY MOREL
Tue. 17 Feb., 5 p.m., Oriel: 'Sixth among such mighty minds: Vasari's painting of Dante and His Peers.' (To attend, telephone the Secretary: Oxford 377479)


Other events

Fri. 16 Jan., Rewley House: showing of film Le Fate Ignoranti, Ferzan Ozpetek, 106 minutes, sub-titles. Admission free.

Wed. 11 Feb.: 'Facciamo quattro chiacchiere insieme', for members and guests only. For further information, telephone Oxford 377479.

Tue. 3 Mar.: Wine-tasting, for members and guests only. This is a ticketed event.


Exhibition

From Monday, 19 January, for two weeks, exhibition of paintings: `Mediterranean fishes', by Antonio De Rosa, in collaboration with Wolfson College. Open daily, 10 a.m.--4 p.m., Wolfson College, Linton Road. Intending visitors should telephone the college beforehand (Oxford (2)74100). Admission free.

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