University of Oxford


Oxford University Gazette, 14 May 2009: Diary

Friday 15 May

CONFERENCE: 'The background of Cudworth's ethics in early modern moral philosophy' (continues tomorrow), Maison Française (enquiries: maison@herald.ox.ac.uk).

LEARNING INSTITUTE seminar: 'Dealing with stress in your teams: a course for managers', 9.30 a.m. (see information above).

PROFESSOR CAROL SANGER: 'Not pictured: abortion and the visual construction of loss' (Oxford Centre for Family Law and Policy Seminar), Department of Social Policy and Social Work, 12 noon.

DR PETER ANDREAS: 'Blue helmets and black markets: the business of survival in the siege of Sarajevo' (Extra-Legal Governance Institute lecture), Seminar Room A, Manor Road Building, 1 p.m.

ADEEL MALIK: 'Finance, politics, and inequality—an empirical investigation' (seminar), Seminar Room B, Manor Road Building, 1 p.m. (enquiries: janet.caldwell@nuffield.ox.ac.uk).

PROFESSOR DAVID GELLNER (Professor of Social Anthropology): 'The awkward social science? Anthropology on schools, elections, and revolution in Nepal' (Inaugural Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m. [This from Alison Miles 17.12.08; title from same 27.2.09]

PROFESSOR THOMAS RAWSKI: 'China's economy: past, present, and future' (Astor Lecture), Nissan Lecture Theatre, St Antony's, 5 p.m. (further details at www.chinacentre.ox.ac.uk). [From veronique cubillie-ratio, 26.2.09]

PROFESSOR MAIRE HERBERT: 'British saints in Ireland, Irish saints in Britain: the view from hagiography' (O'Donnell Lecture), Lecture Theatre 2, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

GEOFF MULGAN lectures in series 'Lessons in government', Lecture Room XI, Brasenose, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR THOMAS RAWSKI: 'China's economy: past, present, and future' (Visiting Astor Lecture), Nissan Lecture Theatre, St Antony's, 5 p.m.

PHILIP BASSETT: 'The Westminster world' (seminar series: Media and Politics), Seminar Room, Nuffield, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR PEDRO MANUEL CÁTEDRA: 'Uso y usos de la literatura en la Edad Media española' (Taylor Special Lecture), Room 2, Taylor Institution, 5 p.m.

THE REVD PROFESSOR ALISTER MCGRATH: 'Religious and scientific faith: the case of Charles Darwin's Origin of Species' (Eric Symes Abbott Memorial Lecture), the chapel, Keble, 5.30 p.m.

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Saturday 16 May

CONVOCATION ELECTION: election of Professor of Poetry 2009–14, Schools, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. (identification required: see further on University Elections Web site).

THE HON. MR JUSTICE BEATSON: 'Reforming an unwritten constitution' (Blackstone Lecture), Gulbenkian Theatre, St Cross Building, 11 a.m.

AVERIL CAMERON and RACHEL COOKE: 'Is feminism dead?' (workshop and panel discussion), Griffiths Room, Arco Building, Keble, 4 p.m. (enquiries: averil.cameron@keble.ox.ac.uk).

MUSEUM OF THE HISTORY OF SCIENCE: 'Death and dissection', 7–11 p.m.: talks on the history of dissection and anatomical study in Oxford, with a courtroom drama presented by the Strolling Players (admission free; see further at www.mhs.ox.ac.uk).

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Sunday 17 May

THE VERY REVD DR JIM KOWALSKI (Dean of the Cathedral of St John the Divine, New York), preaches on 'The saints of God: the function of tradition and theology', the chapel, Oriel, 6 p.m.

OLIVER COATES, cello, and HUW WATKINS, piano, perform works by Huw Watkins, Beethoven, Martin Suckling, and Brahms, Balliol, 9 p.m. (Admission free. Further information at http://users.ox.ac.uk/~ballmsoc/)

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Monday 18 May

LEARNING INSTITUTE seminar: 'Personnel management seminars: contracts', 9.30 a.m. (see information above).

PROFESSOR ROGER O'KEEFE: 'The "Cultural heritage of all mankind": metaphysics, ethics and the positive laws of war' (Oxford Institute for Ethics, Law and Armed Conflict seminars), Seminar Room G, Manor Road Building, 11 a.m.

CONFERENCE: 'Oxford forum on China and the world economy', Lecture Theatre, Manor Road Building, from 2 p.m.

WORKSHOP: 'India's general election results: what they mean for India and beyond', Seminar Room G, Manor Road Building, 2 p.m. (enquiries: janet.caldwell@nuffield.ox.ac.uk).

DAVID WRIGHT: ' "Worse than being married": the exodus of British doctors from the National Health Service to Canada, c.1950–75' (seminar series: 'Medicine, surgery, and culture'), Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine, 2.15 p.m.

PROFESSOR PHYLLIS LEE: 'Elephant sociality and behaviour: flexible solutions to the problems of group life' (public lecture), Institute of Cognitive and Evolutionary Anthropology, 64 Banbury Road, 4 p.m.

PROFESSOR VESNA WALLACE (Numata Professor of Buddhist Studies): 'When a Buddha becomes a Mongol' (Inaugural Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

DR MILAD DOUEIHI: 'Bayle on obscenities' (Besterman Centre for the Enlightenment seminars), Voltaire Foundation, 99 Banbury Road, 5 p.m.

H.E. FLT. LT. J.J. RAWLINGS (formerly President of Ghana): 'Democracy and security in West Africa' (Oxford Research Network for Government in Africa lecture), Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, St Cross Building, 5 p.m. (University Card required for admission).

DR NATASHA O'HEAR: 'From the Trier Apocalypse to the political blogosphere: reflections on the visual history of the four horsemen of the Apocalypse (Rev. 6.2&endash;8)' (lecture series: 'The Bible in art, music and literature'), Danson Room, Trinity, 5 p.m.

ISAIAH GAFNI: 'Jews and Judaism in late antiquity: can texts (still) tell the tale?' (Oxford Centre for Late Antiquity lecture), Rainolds Room, Corpus Christi, 5 p.m.

JAMES CAMPBELL: 'Wren and Freemasonry: separating myth from fact' (Oxford Architectural History Seminar), New Seminar Room, St John's, 5.30 p.m.

FILM-SHOWING: Hinduism: Forest of bliss (documentary, 1986) (Interdisciplinary seminars in the Study of Religion), Harris Lecture Theatre, Oriel, 7.45 p.m.

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Tuesday 19 May

LEARNING INSTITUTE seminars: 'Introductory Certificate in Management' (for all staff) (day 3), 9.30 a.m., and 'Voice coaching', 1 p.m. (for details, see the Learning Institute site).

PROFESSOR FRANCIS ROBINSON: 'Islamism comes to power: Khomeini and the Iranian revolution' (lecture series: 'The emergence of the modern Muslim world. Part II: Islamic revivalism and Western domination c.1920–2000'), Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies, 10 a.m. (Open only to matriculated members of the University)

PROFESSOR MOHAMMAD TALIB: 'Mirroring Islam and Muslims in media' (lecture series: 'The anthropology of Muslim societies'), Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies, 11.30 a.m. (Open only to matriculated members of the University)

DR MARK HINNELLS: 'Climate change and housing' (Housing Seminars), Large Lecture Room, Nuffield, 1 p.m. (to reserve a place, e-mail: events@socres.ox.ac.uk).

PROFESSOR NICK WAREHAM: 'Investigating the causes and prevention of type-2 diabetes' (Richard Doll Seminars in Public Health and Epidemiology), Lecture Theatre, Richard Doll Building, Old Road Campus, 1 p.m.

PROFESSOR MARTIN KITCHEN: 'Rommel's desert war' (lunchtime discussion seminars: 'Oxford Leverhulme Programme on the Changing Character of War'), Seminar Room G, Manor Road Building, 1 p.m. (enquiries: ccw@politics.ox.ac.uk).

DR JAMES MALLINSON: 'Siddhas, Munis, and Yogins but no Naths: the early history of Hathayoga' (Wahlstrom Lecture), Oxford Centre for Hindu Studies, 15 Magdalen Street, 2 p.m.

DR STEVEN VANDERHEIDEN lectures in series: 'Justice and climate change', Seminar Room G, Manor Road Building, 4 p.m.

PROFESSOR ALLEN BUCHANAN: 'Beyond humanity? The ethics of biomedical enhancement' (third of three Uehiro Lectures), Martin Wood Lecture Theatre, Clarendon Laboratory, 4.30 p.m.

PROFESSOR ANDREW HURRELL (Montague Burton Professor of International Relations): 'Provincialising Westphalia: the study of global international society in the twenty-first century' (Inaugural Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

DR CHRISTOPHER DE HAMEL: 'Fragments in bookbindings (4): a Caxton indulgence, 1480' (Lyell Lectures in Bibliography: 'Fragments in bookbindings'), Museum of Natural History, 5 p.m.

DR JEREMY GREGORY: 'John Wesley's context: "the long eighteenth century" ' (John Wesley Lecture), Oakeshott Room, Lincoln, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR CARYL PHILLIPS: reading, Lecture Theatre 2, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR BOBBY BANERJEE: 'Climate change or climate justice? Climate change discourses, corporate rationality and the boundaries of corporate strategy' (Smith School seminar series: 'Environmental regulations and corporate strategy'), Seminar Room, Hayes House, 75 George Street, 5 p.m.

DENISE DUNOVANT: ' "Life was good in Atyak": war and urban displacement in northern Uganda' (Oxford Transitional Justice Research Seminars), Seminar Room D, Manor Road Building, 5 p.m. (enquiries: philip.clark@csls.ox.ac.uk).

VERA TOLZ: 'Post-colonial scholarship as a "descendant" of Russian orientology of the early twentieth century' (lecture series: 'Understanding the self: subjectivity and Russian thought in late imperial and early Soviet Russia'), Dahrendorf Room, St Antony's, 5 p.m.

BERNHARD VOEGEL (formerly Prime Minister of Rhineland-Palatinate and Thuringia): 'Germany's way to unification—are there lessons for the current crisis? An insider's perspective' (Adenauer Lecture), Nissan Lecture Theatre, St Antony's, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR RICHARD HEEKS: 'Virtual worlds: routes and destinations' (Oxford Centre for Christianity and Culture public lectures: 'Alternative worlds'), Collier Room, Regent's Park, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR BARRY IFE: 'Reading, writing, and travelling in the world of Columbus' (lecture, sponsored by the British Society for Renaissance Studies), Auditorium, St John's, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR P.J. BUCKLEY: 'From multinational enterprise to global factory' (Sanjaya Lall Programme Lecture), Seminar Room 2, Queen Elizabeth House, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR MARJORIE PERLOFF (Weidenfeld Visiting Professor of European Comparative Literature): ' "The rattle of statistical traffic": citation and found text in Susan Howe's The Midnight' (lecture series: 'Unoriginal genius: constraint, concretism, citation'), Tsuzuki Lecture Theatre, St Anne's, 5.30 p.m.

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Wednesday 20 May

LEARNING INSTITUTE online course begins: 'Recruitment and selection' (see information above).

DR AFIFI AL-AKITI: 'Women and Islam' (lecture series: 'Islam in contemporary society'), Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies, 9 a.m. (Open only to matriculated members of the University)

LEARNING INSTITUTE seminars: 'Voice coaching', 9 a.m., and 'CVs, selection, and interview skills for research staff', 9.30 a.m. (for details, see the Learning Institute site).

WORKSHOP: 'Translation and linguistic mediation in the late antique and medieval empires of the East', Seminar Room, Corpus Christi, from 9.30 a.m. (enquiries and registration: arietta.papaconstantinou@orinst.ox.ac .uk).

WORKSHOP: Current research on elites', Maison Française, 10 a.m.&endash;4 p.m. (enquiries: maison@herald.ox.ac.uk).

MARK THOMSON: 'Television in Europe's new democracies: the end of reform' (Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism seminar series), Barclay Room, Green Templeton, 12 noon (enquiries: kate.hanneford-smith@politics.ox.ac.u k).

ORGAN RECITAL: organist Gerard Gillen, the chapel, Queen's, 1.10 p.m. (admission free, with retiring collection).

BOOK-LAUNCH, presented by the Institute for Science, Innovation, and Society: New Directions in Surveillance and Privacy, by Dan Neyland and Ben Goold, Reception Room, Saïd Business School, 4 p.m.; includes a paper by Professor Charles Raab on privacy and surveillance, and discussion (further at www.sbs.ox.ac.uk/insis/privacy.htm ).

YANNIK MAIGNIEN and MARIN DACOS: 'The French policy on research infrastructures and e-journals for the humanities: Adonis and Revue.org' (Digital Humanities seminar), Maison Française, 4.30 p.m. (enquiries: maison@herald.ox.ac.uk).

PROFESSOR ANTHONY COXON: ' "Something sensational...": the sexual diary as a tool for mapping gay men's detailed sexual behaviour', and DR RICHARD DE VISSER: ' "That's not masculine": masculine capital and health-related behaviour' (seminar series: 'Rethinking gender in the twenty-first century: masculinities, well-being, and health'), Dahrendorf Room, St Antony's, 5 p.m. (enquiries: yiu.suen@sant.ox.ac.uk).

PROFESSOR PEREGRINE HORDEN: 'Early Islamic hospitals: new evidence, old questions' (Islam and science seminars), Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies, 5 p.m.

ZHU GUANGLI: 'An introduction to the history and practice of taijiquan' (seminar series: 'Eastern medicines and religions: Chinese nurturing life practices'), Pauling Centre, 5 p.m.

JEREMY HAYES, JON UNGOED-THOMAS, and STEVE WOOD: 'A shock to the system: journalism, government, and the Freedom of Information Act 2000' (seminar), Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism, 13 Norham Gardens, 5 p.m. (enquiries: kate.hanneford-smith@politics.ox.ac.u k).

PROFESSOR CAROLYN R. NORDSTROM: 'Fractures and flows: Africa, Elizabeth Colson, and the current global meltdown' (Refugee Studies Centre: Colson Lecture), the Auditorium, Magdalen, 5 p.m. (enquiries: katherine.salahi@qeh.ox.ac.uk).

LT.-GEN. ANDREW FIGGURES lectures in Oxford Leverhulme Programme on the Changing Character of War series: 'Campaigning and generalship', Wharton Room, All Souls, 5.15 p.m. (enquiries: ccw@politics.ox.ac.uk).

DR GEORGE JOFFE: 'Terrorist and security threats in North Africa', with discussant Dr Michael Willis (Pluscarden Programme for the Study of Global Terrorism and Intelligence seminar), Fellows' Dining Room, St Antony's, 6 p.m. (University card required for attendance. Enquiries: pluscarden.programme@sant.ox.ac.uk)

BETH KAPLAN: 'Finding the Jewish Shakespeare: the life and legacy of Jacob Gordin' (David Patterson Seminars), Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Yarnton Manor, 8 p.m.

THE BRENTANO QUARTET performs works by Monteverdi, Lee Hyla, and Beethoven, Auditorium, St John's, 8.30 p.m. (Admission by free programme, available from the college lodge).

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Thursday 21 May

QUEEN'S COLLEGE: service with music for Ascension Day, front quad, 8 a.m.

DR ADEEL MALIK: 'Foreign direct investment' (lecture series: 'International trade and finance'), Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies, 9 a.m. (Open only to matriculated members of the University)

PROFESSOR ELIZABETH BURTON: 'Neighbourhood design and the well- being of older people' (seminar series: 'Home and place in an ageing world'), Seminar Room F, Manor Road Building, 12.30 p.m.

THIRTY-MINUTE RECITAL: 'Nature in all her glory'—music for voice, clarinet, and piano by Beethoven, Schubert, and Debussy, Jacqueline du Pré Music Building, St Hilda's, 1.15 p.m. (Admission free. See further at www.st-hildas.ox.ac.uk/index.php/jdp/)

MYLES HARTLEY performs organ works by the Swedish composer Oscar Lindberg (Festival of Swedish Organ Music, Recital 2), the chapel, Harris Manchester, 1.30 p.m. (admission free, with retiring collection).

RACHEL CUMMINGS: 'Minding the gap: women's campaign and the Vice-President women' (International Gender Studies: research in progress), Seminar Room 1, Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

DR CHRISTINA BOSWELL: 'What governments really want: rethinking the migration policy process' (ESRC Centre of Migration, Policy, and Society seminars: 'The agency of borders: perspectives on UK immigration policy and practice'), Pauling Centre, 58a Banbury Road, 2 p.m. (further information: www.compas.ox.ac.uk/events/).

COLLOQUIUM (McDonald Centre for Theology, Ethics, and Public Life): 'Justice: rights and wrongs', Christ Church, 4 p.m. (Continues tomorrow. Attendance by prior registration only: e-mail mcdonaldcentre@theology@ox.ac.uk)

DR ALBERTO AMARAL: 'Quality assurance and assessment in higher education: recent trends' (Oxford Learning Institute: research seminars), Level 2, Littlegate House, 4 p.m. (to attend, e-mail: research@learning.ox.ac.uk).

DR CHRISTOPHER DE HAMEL: 'Fragments in bookbindings (5): a petition to Archbishop Parker, c.1571' (Lyell Lectures in Bibliography: 'Fragments in bookbindings'), Museum of Natural History, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR JONATHON SIMON: 'No rationale for the law of homicide: how governing through crime has devolved the law of homicide and locked in hyper-punishment' (Roger Hood Lecture), Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

LORD SAVILLE lectures in series 'Lessons in government', Lecture Room XI, Brasenose, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR MARY KALDOR: 'Inconclusive wars: is Clausewitz still relevant?' (Oxford Institute for Ethics, Law, and Armed Conflict, and European Studies Centre lecture), Lecture Theatre, Manor Road Building, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR JAN-WERNER MÜLLER: 'Just another Vergangenheitsbewältigung? Coming to terms with the GDR past' (Taylor Special Lecture, associated with seminar series 'From "Stasiland" to "Ostalgie": remembering the GRD twenty years on'), Room 2, Taylor Institution, 5 p.m. (open to those without German).

ROBERT BAGNALL: 'Trimithis: a late antique city in an Egyptian oasis' (Oxford Centre for Late Antiquity lecture), Danson Room, Trinity, 5 p.m.

DAVID BROWN: 'Sacrifice and imagination: finding God in evil' (public lecture), Trinity, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR CHRISTOPHER BIGSBY: 'Arthur Miller—un-American?' (Esmond Harmsworth Lecture in American Arts and Letters), Rothermere American Institute, 5 p.m. (Open to the public. To attend, register (without charge) with Lucy Dugmore: academic.programme@rai.ox.ac.uk, tel. (2)82711).

A SENIOR MEMBER OF THE CABINET: 'Our shared future: broadening coalition and winning consent' (lecture), Taylor Institution, 5.15 p.m. (admission by ticket, from the Academic Assistant, Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies, George Street, Oxford OX1 2AR: telephone: (2)78730, fax: (2)48942, e-mail: islamic.studies@oxcis.ac.uk).

PROFESSOR CARYL PHILLIPS: 'British subjects: identity and self-fashioning since the 1960s' (discussion with Professor Louise Yelin), Wadham, 5.15 p.m.

PROFESSOR MARJORIE PERLOFF (Weidenfeld Visiting Professor of European Comparative Literature): 'Towards a conceptual poetics: Caroline Bergvall's Dante and Chaucer, Craig Dworkin's 'Legion', and Kenneth Goldsmith's Traffic' (lecture series: 'Unoriginal genius: constraint, concretism, citation'), Tsuzuki Lecture Theatre, St Anne's, 5.30 p.m.

PHILIPPE HAYEZ: 'Tribes in need of flags—the new French intelligence community' (Oxford Intelligence Group lecture), Large Lecture Room, Nuffield, 5.30 p.m. (enquiries: claire.bunce@nuffield.ox.ac.uk).

MARY BEARD lectures on Jane Harrison: 'Living with Jane Harrison' (Wolfson College Lectures: 'Lives and works'), the Hall, Wolfson, 6 p.m.

PROFESSOR DAVID BARTHOLOMEW: 'God, chance and purpose' (Ian Ramsey Centre lectures), Old Dining Room, Harris Manchester, 8.30 p.m.

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Friday 22 May

SEMINAR: 'Breakfast at the OUCS—an introduction to Oxford University Computing Services', OUCS, 8.30 a.m.

LEARNING INSTITUTE seminar: 'Springboard' (workshop 2) (see information above).

NIC CHEESEMAN: 'How Africans vote: inequality, class, and the rise of populism' (seminar), Seminar Room B, Manor Road Building, 1 p.m. (enquiries: janet.caldwell@nuffield.ox.ac.uk).

PROFESSOR PATRICK O'BRIEN: 'An architectural blueprint for the fiscal history of an exceptionally efficient fiscal state: Britain and its European rivals, 1642–1815' (Hicks Lecture in Economic History), Old Library, All Souls, 5 p.m.

GILLIAN TETT: 'Reporting the City' (Media and Politics seminars), Seminar Room, Nuffield, 5 p.m.

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