University of Oxford Homepage

University of Oxford Crest

Oxford University Gazette, 30 November 2006: Lectures

Wilde Lectures in Natural and Comparative Religion

Religion, ritual, and power in the Nepal Himalayas

DR DAVID GELLNER, University Lecturer in the Social Anthropology of South Asia, and Fellow of St Cross College, will deliver the Wilde Lectures in Natural and Comparative Religion at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays (except where otherwise indicated) in the Examination Schools.

Tue. 16 Jan.: 'Theories of ritual, types of religion.'

24 Jan.: 'Hinduism and the rites of kingship.'

31 Jan.: 'Buddhism and rituals of power.'

7 Feb.: 'Resistance and conversion.'

14 Feb.: 'Biopower or bioweakness? Rituals of democracy and development.'

21 Feb.: 'Rituals and cultural nationalism.'

28 Feb.: 'Maoism as a ritual system.'

7 Mar.: 'Max Weber on Asian religions revisited.'

^ Return to Contents of this section


Social Sciences

Department of International Development, Queen Elizabeth House

PROFESSOR JEFF HALPER, Coordinator of the Israeli Committee Against House Demolitions, Nobel Peace Prize nominee 2006, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 4 December, in the Nissan Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College. The event is organised by the Middle East Centre, St Antony's, the Refugee Studies Centre and the Department of International Development, Queen Elizabeth House. Enquiries: denise.watt@qeh.ox.ac.uk.

Subject: 'The end of unilateralism? Israel after the Lebanon war.'

^ Return to Contents of this section


Linacre College

Linacre Lectures

Remaking environments: histories, practices, politics

The Linacre Lectures will be given at 5.30 p.m. on Thursdays in the OUCE Lecture Theatre, the Dyson Perrins Building. The lectures are organised in conjunction with the Oxford University Centre for the Environment, and are supported by Tetra Laval.

Convener: Professor Sarah Whatmore.

PROFESSOR KENNETH OLWIG, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
18 Jan.: 'Embodied law v. bodies of law in the remaking of landscape: the "natural" legal and moral legacy of sheep.'

PROFESSOR NICK BLOMLEY, Simon Fraser
25 Jan.: 'Seeing like a judge: rivers, law and property.'

PROFESSOR DENIS COSGROVE, UCLA
1 Feb.: 'Images and imagination in twentieth-century environmentalism.'

PROFESSOR TIM INGOLD, Aberdeen
8 Feb.: 'Bindings against boundaries: entanglements of life in an open world.'

PROFESSOR CHRIS TILLEY, UCL
15 Feb.: 'Stonehenge: its landscape and its architecture: a re-analysis.'

PROFESSOR JACQUIE BURGESS, UEA
22 Feb.: 'The politics of risk and radioactive waste in the UK.'

PROFESSOR TIMOTHY LUKE, Virginia State University
1 Mar.: 'The politics of true convenience or inconvenient truth? Struggles over how to sustain capitalism, democracy and ecology in the twenty-first century?'

PROFESSOR MELISSA LEACH, Sussex
8 Mar.: 'Pathways to sustainability? Knowledge, power and politics in environment and development.'

^ Return to Contents of this section


St John's College Research Centre

Imagination

A one-day workshop will be held on Saturday, 13 January, 10.30 a.m.–5.30 p.m., in the St John's College Research Centre, 45 St Giles'. There will be five talks around the theme of 'Imagination'. The speakers are listed below. Full details of the programme may be found on the college Web site, www.sjc.ox.ac.uk (choose the link 'Research').

All members of the University are welcome, but space is limited. Those who wish to attend should e-mail paul.tod@sjc.ox.ac.uk.

RITCHIE ROBERTSON: 'Imagination and Romanticism.'

PAUL HARRIS: 'Imagination and testimony in cognitive development.'

GREG CURRIE: 'Two kinds of imagining.'

SIMON OAKES: ' "Figure a sua fantasia per mostrar l'arte": imagination in painting.'

LOUISE BRADDOCK: 'Richard Wollheim on imagination and identification.'

^ Return to Contents of this section


Society for the History of Medieval Technology and Science

CHRISTOPHER CLARKSON will lecture at 2.30 p.m. on Saturday, 9 December, in the Museum of the History of Science, Broad Street.

Subject: 'Parchment: its manufacture and uses.'

^ Return to Contents of this section