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Oxford University Gazette, 26 July 2007: Examinations and Boards

Appointments, Reappointments, and Conferments of Title

Humanities Division

Appointments

UNIVERSITY LECTURERS

English Language and Literature

FREYA RACHEL JOHNSTON, BA PH.D Camb, Fellow of St Anne's. In Eighteenth-century English Literature. From 1 October 2007 until 30 September 2009.

History

ALISTAIR I. WRIGHT, BA Camb, MA Minnesota, PH.D Columbia, Fellow of St John's. In the History of Art. From 1 October 2007 until 30 September 2012.

Medieval and Modern Languages

PHILIP ROSS BULLOCK, BA Durh, M.ST D.PHIL Oxf, Fellow of Wadham. In Russian. From 1 September 2007 until 31 August 2012.

Oriental Studies

HILDE DE WEERDT, BA MA Belgium, PH.D Harvard, Fellow of Pembroke. In Chinese History. From 1 September 2007 until 31 August 2012.

JIEUN KIAER, BA MA Seoul, PH.D Lond, Fellow of Hertford. In Korean Language and Linguistics (Young Bin Min-KF). From 1 September 2007 until 31 August 2012.


UNIVERSITY LECTURERS (NTF)

English Language and Literature

ANDREW KLEVAN, BA MA PH.D Warw, Fellow of St Anne's. In Film Studies. From 1 November 2007 until 31 October 2009.

History

DEBORAH JAYNE OXLEY, BA PH.D New South Wales, Fellow of All Souls. In Social History. From 1 October 2007 until 30 September 2012.


UNIVERSITY LECTURERS (CUF)

Classics

RHIANNON ELIZABETH ASH, BA MA D.PHIL Toronto, Fellow of Merton. In Classics. From 1 October 2007 until 30 September 2012.

ANNA JANE CLARK, MA MLITT St And, D.PHIL Oxf, Student of Christ Church. In Roman History. From 1 October 2007 until 30 September 2012

TIMOTHY JOHN GUY WHITMARSH, BA M.PHIL PH.D Camb, Fellow of Corpus Christi. In Greek Language and Literature. From 1 October 2007 until 30 September 2012.

English Language and Literature

RHODRI LEWIS, BA M.ST D.PHIL Oxf, Fellow of St Hugh's. In English Language and Literature. From 1 October 2007 until 30 September 2012

Philosophy

GONZALO RODRIGUEZ-PEREYRA, M.PHIL PH.D Camb, Fellow of Oriel. In Philosophy. From 1 September 2007 until 31 August 2010.
Conferment of title. On behalf of the Recognition of Distinction Committee the Vice- Chancellor has conferred the title of Professor of Philosophy on Dr Rodriguez-Pereyra with effect from from 1 September 2007.


DEPARTMENTAL LECTURERS

Classics

CATHERINE MARY DRAYCOTT, BA Boston, M.Phil D.Phil Oxf. In Classical Art and Archaeology. From 1 October 2007 until 30 September 2008.


Oriental Studies

LAURA PARODI, MA PH.D Genoa. In Islamic Art and Archaeology. From 1 October 2007 until 30 September 2008.


INSTRUCTORS

Medieval and Modern Languages

JAVIER MUÑOZ-BASOLS, BA MA Zaragoza/Bourgogne, MA Pennsylvania. In Spanish. From 1 September 2007 until 31 August 2011.

Oriental Studies

OTARED HAIDAR, BA Damascus, MA D.PHIL Oxf. In Arabic. From 1 October 2007 until 30 September 2011.


TUTOR

Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art

ABIGAIL REYNOLDS, BA Chelsea, BA MA Lond. In Fine Art. From 1 May 2007 until 30 April 2011.


Reappointments

UNIVERSITY LECTURERS

History

STEPHEN GEORGE NEWSAM TUCK, BA PH.D Camb, Fellow of Pembroke. In the History of the USA since 1875. From 1 January 2008 until the retiring age.

Medieval and Modern Languages

REIDAR ANDREAS DUE, M.LITT Copenhagen, M.PHIL PH.D Oslo, Fellow of Magdalen. In European Cinema. From 1 October 2007 until the retiring age.


UNIVERSITY LECTURERS (CUF)

English Language and Literature

SEAMUS PETER PERRY, MA D.PHIL Oxf, Fellow of Balliol. In English. From 1 January 2008 until the retiring age.

ROBERT JOHN DOUGLAS-FAIRHURST, MA PH.D Camb, Fellow of Magdalen. In English. From 1 October 2007 until the retiring age.

Philosophy

VOLKER HALBACH, PH.D Munich, Fellow of New College. In Philosophy. From 1 October 2007 until the retiring age.

INSTRUCTOR

Medieval and Modern Languages

VILMA DE GASPERIN, MA Padua. In Italian. From 1 October 2007 until the retiring age.

Oriental Studies

SENEL SIMSEK, MA Oxf. In Turkish. From 1 October 2007 until the retiring age.


Conferment of title

UNIVERSITY LECTURER (CUF)

Philosophy

OFRA MAGIDOR, B.SC Jerusalem, B.PHIL D.PHIL Oxf, Fellow of Balliol. In Philosophy. From 1 October 2007 until 30 September 2012.

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Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences Division

Appointments

UNIVERSITY LECTURERS

VINCENTE GRAU COLOMER, PH.D Valencia, Fellow of Mansfield. RCUK Academic Fellowship In Computational Imaging. From 7 May 2007 until 6 May 2012.

CHEE YEOW LEONG, B.ENG UMIST, PH.D Camb, Cellow-elect of Worcester. RCUK Academic Fellowship In Electrical Power Engineering. From 1 August 2007 until 31 July 2012.

HUA YE, B.ENG Dalian, D.PHIL Oxf, Fellow-elect of Linacre. RCUK Academic Fellowship In Tissue Engineering. From 1 October 2007 until 30 September 2012.

HENRY SNAITH, M.SC Brist, D.PHIL Camb, Fellow-elect of Jesus. RCUK Academic Fellowship In Photovoltaics. From 1 October 2007 until 30 September 2012.

CHRISTOPH ORTNER, M.SC D.PHIL Oxf, Fellow-elect of Merton. RCUK Academic Fellowship In Solid Mechanics And The Mathematics of Solids. From 1 October 2007 until 30 September 2012.

SONIA ANTORANZ-CONTERA, LIC Madrid, D.ENG Osaka, Fellow-elect of Green College. RCUK Academic Fellowship In Biological Physics. From 1 October 2007 until 30 September 2012.

NIKI TRIGONI, B.SC Athens, PH.D Camb, Fellow of Kellogg. In Software Engineering. From 1 May 2007 until 30 April 2012 (joint appointment with Department For Continuing Education).

BOB COECKE, PH.D Brussels, Fellow of Wolfson. In Quantum Computer Science. From 1 June 2007 until 31 May 2012.

HEATHER BOUMAN, B.SC Guelph, M.SC PH.D Dalhousie, Fellow of St John's. In Biogeochemistry. From 16 July 2007 until 15 July 2012.

JONATHAN WHITELEY, B.SC D.PHIL Oxf, Fellow-elect of Linacre. In Computational Biology. From 1 August 2007 until 31 July 2012.

STEPHEN KREUTZER, DR.RER.NAT. DIPL Hachen, Fellow-elect of Linacre. In Computer Science. From 1 August 2007 until 31 July 2012.

ROEL DULLENS, M.SC PH.D Utrecht, Fellow-elect of Lincoln. In Physical And Theoretical Chemistry. From 1 August 2007 until 31 July 2012.

DAN OLTEANU, DR.RER.NAT. MUNICH, Fellow-elect of St Cross. In Information Systems. From 1 September 2007 until 31 August 2012.

MARK WILSON, MA D.PHIL Oxf, Fellow-elect of Brasenose. In Theoretical Chemistry. From 1 September 2007 until 31 August 2012.
Conferment of title. On behalf of the Recognition of Distinction Committee the Vice-Chancellor has conferred the title of Reader in Theoretical Chemistry on Dr Wilson.

SHIK (EDMAN) TSANG, B.SC Lond, PH.D R'dg, Fellow-elect of University. In Inorganic Chemistry. From 1 September 2007 until 31 August 2012.

JULIA SCHNABEL, M.SC Berlin, PH.D Lond, Fellow-elect of St Hilda's. In Medical Imaging. From 1 September 2007 until 31 August 2012.

JOCHEN KOENIGSMANN, BA Oxf, DR.RER.NAT. Konstanz, PH.D California, Fellow-elect of Lady Margaret Hall. In Mathematical Logic. From 1 October 2007 until 30 September 2012. CORNELIA DRUTU, DEA PH.D Paris, Fellow-elect of Exeter. In Topology. From 1 October 2007 until 30 September 2012.

CHRISTOF MELCHER, PH.D Max Planck Insitute, Leipzig, Fellow-elect of Lincoln. In Pure Mathematics. From 1 October 2007 until 30 September 2012.

GREGORY SEREGIN, MD PH.D Leningrad, DR.SCI Va Steklov Mathematical Institute, Fellow-elect of St Hilda's. In Pure Mathematics. From 1 October 2007 until 30 September 2012.
Conferment of title. On behalf of the Recognition of Distinction Committee the Vice-Chancellor has conferred the title of Professor of Pure Mathematics on Dr Seregin.

DAVID STEINSALTZ, MA PH.D Harvard, Fellow-elect of Worcester. In Statistics. From 1 October 2007 until 30 September 2012.

GIULIA ZANDERIGHI, PH.D Pavia, Fellow-elect of Wadham. In Theoretical Particle Physics. From 1 October 2007 until 30 September 2012.

ANDREW WELLER, B.SC Warw, PH.D Brist, Fellow-elect of Magdalen. In Inorganic Chemistry. From 1 October 2007 until 30 September 2012.

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TITLE OF UNIVERSITY LECTURER

HELEN JOHNSON, B.SC PH.D R'dg, Fellow of St Cross. University Lecturer in Climate and Ocean Modelling from 1 July 2007. Royal Society University Research Fellowship with title of University Lecturer from 1 July 2007 until a date until be confirmed.

JOHN MAGORRIAN, B.SC Belf, D.PHIL Oxf, Fellow-elect of Jesus. University Lecturer in Theoretical Astrophysics from 1 October 2008 until 30 September 2013. Royal Society University Research Fellowship with title of University Lecturer from 1 October 2007 until 30 September 2008.

TAMAS HAUSEL, MA PH.D Camb, Fellow-elect of Wadham. University Lecturer in Pure Mathematics from 1 October 2010 until 30 September 2015. Royal Society University Research Fellowship with title of University Lecturer from 1 October 2007 until 30 September 2010.


Reappointments

STEVE MCKEEVER, University Lecturer in Software Engineering. From 1 November 2007 until the retiring age.

XENIA DE LA OSSA, University Lecturer in String Theory. From 1 October 2007 until the retiring age.

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Social Sciences Division

Appointments

N. CHEESEMAN, BA M.PHIL D.PHIL Oxf, Fellow of Jesus. University Lecturer in African Politics. From 1 September 2007 until 31 August 2012. R.A. MURPHY, BA Murdoch, PH.D Camb, Fellow of St Antony's. University Lecturer in the Sociology of China. From 1 September 2007 until 30 September 2012.

Reappointments

PROFESSOR C.K. HARLEY, BA Wooster, MA PH.D Harvard, Fellow of St Antony's. University Lecturer in Economic History. From 1 October 2007 until the retiring age.

PROFESSOR R.D. CAPLAN, BA MA McGill, M.PHIL Camb, PH.D Lond, Fellow of Linacre. University Lecturer in Politics (International Relations). From 1 October 2007 until the retiring age.

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Changes in Regulations

With the approval, where applicable, of the Educational Policy and Standards Committee of Council, and, where applicable, of the Humanities Board, the following changes in regulations made by divisional boards, faculty boards,and the Continuing Education Board will come into effect on 10 August.

1 Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences Board

(a) Honour School of Materials Science

With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first examination in 2008)

In Examination Regulations, 2006, delete from p. 337, l. 46 to p. 338, l. 11, and substitute:

'Every candidate for Part II is required to submit three copies of a report on the investigations which he or she has carried out under the direction of his or her supervisor. The report on the investigations shall also include a literature survey, a brief account of the project management aspects of the investigation, and a description of the engineering context of the investigation and should be accompanied by a signed statement by the candidate that it is his or her own work. The copies should be handed in to the Chairman of the Examiners in the Honour School of Materials Science, Part II, c/o Head of Examinations and Assessments, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, not later than noon on the Friday of the seventh week of Trinity Full Term. The report shall be word- processed or typewritten on A4 paper (within a page area of 247 mm x 160 mm, using double line-spaced type of at least 11pt font size, printed on one side only of each sheet, with a left hand margin of at least 30mm) and presented in a binder. The main report should not normally exceed 15,000 words together with a maximum of a further 1,500 words for the reflective account of the project management aspects of the investigation that must be included in the final chapter. These word counts exclude references, title page, acknowledgements, table of contents and the three Project Management Forms. Additionally, the main report should not normally exceed 120 pages in length (including an abstract, the text as defined above for the word limits, the three Project Management Forms, computer programmes, graphs, diagrams, photographs, tables, and similar material). All pages of the report should be numbered sequentially. The report must be accompanied by a signed declaration that it is within the allowed word and page limits. Candidates seeking permission to exceed the word and/or page limits should apply to the Chairman of Examiners at an early stage. Further detailed data, computer programmes and similar material may be included in one or more appendices at the end of the main report, but appendices are not included within the limits of the word or page counts of the thesis and, entirely at the discretion of the Examiners for each report, may or may not be read. '


(b) Honour School of Engineering Science

With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first Part I examination in 2008)

In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 215, delete ll. 20–21 and substitute:

'Information Engineering Systems, Dynamical Systems and Optimal Control, Computer Controlled Systems, Software Engineering, Estimation and Inference, Digital Signal and Image Analysis. '


(c) Honour School of Physics

With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first examination in 2008)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 497, l. 22, after 'examination.' insert:

'Approval shall not be given to candidates who have, at the start of the course, already acquired demonstrable skills exceeding the target learning outcomes in the chosen language.'

2 Ibid., p. 498, l. 46, after 'Hilary Full Term.' insert: 'Approval shall not be given to candidates who have, at the start of the course, already acquired demonstrable skills exceeding the target learning outcomes in the chosen language.'


(d) Honour School of Engineering Science

With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first Part I examination in 2008)

In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 213, after l. 5 insert:

'Candidates will not normally be required to submit their Engineering Practical Work. However, the examiners may request practical work from some candidates. Such candidates will be named in a list posted by the day of the last written examination.'


(e) Honour School of Engineering and Computing Science

With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first Part I examination in 2008)

In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 219, after l. 25 insert:

'Candidates will not normally be required to submit their Engineering Practical Work. However, the examiners may request practical work from some candidates. Such candidates will be named in a list posted by the day of the last written examination.'

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2 Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences Board and Social Sciences Board

Honour School of Engineering, Economics, and Management

With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first Part I examination in 2008)

In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 225, after l. 25 insert:

'Candidates will not normally be required to submit their Engineering Practical Work. However, the examiners may request practical work from some candidates. Such candidates will be named in a list posted by the day of the last written examination.'

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3 Medical Sciences Board

Preliminary Examination in Medicine

With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first examination in 2008)

In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 995, delete ll. 12–14 and substitute:

'2. Paper 3: Ethics (one hour)

Candidates will be required to write one essay in response to a choice of topics.'

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4 Social Sciences Board

(a) Research degrees in Education

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 943, after l. 15, after l. 38, and on p. 944 after 1. 13, insert:

'Students will normally be expected to transfer status not later than the fourth term after admission as a Probationer Research Student.'

2 Ibid., p. 943, l. 21 and l. 43, and on p. 944, l. 18, delete 'submit' and substitute 'make a submission of about 10,000 words in length, which must include:'.

3 Ibid., p. 943, delete ll. 22–31; delete from p. 943, l. 44 to p. 944, l. 5; and on p. 944 delete ll. 19–28, and substitute:

'(i) an outline description of the research (one side of A4 paper)

(ii) an introductory section which provides a rationale, conceptual framework and background for the research, drawing on relevant literature and theoretical perspectives

(iii) a section which includes key research questions, the overall methodological approach and specific strategies and methods, ethical issues, and a brief preliminary description of planned data analysis, demonstrating evidence of a well thought out and well-argued research design; this may include a pilot study.

The following are also required, though they are not included in the 10,000 word limit:

(i) CUREC form(s) as required and clear evidence of how commitment to responsible (ethical) conduct of research will be realised

(ii) a clear timetable for the research

(iii) a list of references

(iv) a supporting commentary which introduces the thesis and guides the reader specifically to aspects of the work which provide evidence of meeting the criteria listed below (500–1000 words)

The submission should be accompanied by the appropriate form available from the Graduate Office which requires students to provide information on the training which they have taken. PRS students who have not taken the MSc in Educational Research Methodology should include a signed statement from the Course Leader for Educational Research Methodology attesting to satisfactory completion of the research training programme.'

4 Ibid., p. 943, ll. 36–37, and on p. 944, ll. 10–11 after 'part of it.' delete 'Candidates... one further application.', and substitute:

'The Academic Board will then decide whether the transfer to the status applied for will be approved. In cases where the Board is not satisfied that the candidate should be allowed to make the transfer, it may approve an extension of time in order to allow the candidate to submit at a later date on one further occasion only, with or without a second interview. Such resubmissions will normally involve the same assessors, and should take place within one term of the initial transfer interview.'

5 Ibid., p. 944, ll. 33–34 after 'part of it.' delete 'Candidates... one further application.', and substitute:

'The Academic Board will then decide whether the transfer to the status applied for will be approved. In cases where the Board is not satisfied that the candidate should be allowed to make the transfer, it may recommend admission to M.Sc or M.Litt. status or approve an extension of time in order to allow the candidate to submit at a later date on one further occasion only, with or without a second interview. Such resubmissions will normally involve the same assessors, and should take place within one term of the initial transfer interview.'

6 Ibid.,l. 36, after 'status' insert 'should normally take place after six or seven terms, and'.

7 Ibid., l. 38, after 'Research Student' insert:

'If a student is not able to meet this deadline, he or she should seek from the Director of Graduate Studies, in writing and in good time, permission to defer his or her application. The request should include a statement of reasons for the delay, and an indication of when it is proposed to apply for confirmation of status, and should be accompanied by a thesis outline indicating the progress made on each chapter, and a letter from the supervisor supporting the request.'

8 Ibid., l. 42, after 'submitted' insert 'which should be around 30,000 words in length,'.

9 Ibid., delete ll. 44–49, and substitute:

'(i) an abstract of the thesis (one side of A4 paper);

(ii) an outline structure of the thesis, including chapter headings, a brief statement of the contents of each chapter, and showing how the chapters link together and develop the thesis;

(iii) normally the equivalent of two completed chapters from the thesis in progress (one of the chapters should be a chapter presenting findings);

(iv) a short commentary on the work, and an outline timetable detailing the work which has already been carried out, and the activities planned for the remaining stages, including an anticipated timetable for submission.

The submission should be handed to the Higher Degrees Administrator, Department of Education, at least two weeks before the day of the viva meeting, accompanied by the appropriate form available from the Graduate Office and signed by the supervisor and appropriate college officer. A detailed written joint report by the assessors will be made to the Academic Board. If the Academic Board does not consider that the candidate's progress warrants confirmation of status, it may either:

(a) exceptionally require extra written work in order to recommend confirmation of status; or

(b) refer for resubmission for a second confirmation procedure, with or without a second interview, if further work is required. The second confirmation will normally involve the same assessors, and should take place within one term of the initial transfer interview; or

(c) recommend that the candidate should transfer status to M.Litt. or M.Sc; or

(d) reject the application.'


(b) BCL and M.Juris

With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first examination in 2008)

In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 973, after l. 17 insert: 'Socio-Economic Rights and Substantive Equality;'.


(c) M.Phil in Evidence-based Social Intervention

With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first examination in 2008)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 589, l. 36, after 'words' insert:

', on a topic related to Evidence-based Social Intervention,'.


(d) M.Sc in Evidence-based Social Intervention

With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first examination in 2008)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 776, delete ll. 30–31 and renumber subsequent sections.

2 Ibid, p. 776, delete ll. 40–43 and substitute:

'(iv) A thesis of not more than 10,000 words, on a topic related to Evidence-based Social Intervention and decided jointly with, and approved by, the supervisor on behalf of the Department.'

3 Ibid, p. 777, l. 29, delete 'in their country of origin'.


(e) M.Phil in Geography and the Environment

With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first examination in 2008 (Qualifying Test) and first final examination in 2009)

In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 590, after l. 10 insert:

'Geography and the Environment

1. The Social Sciences Board shall elect for the supervision of the course a Standing Committee, comprising the Director and Deputy Director of the International Graduate School and the two Course Directors of the M.Sc programmes identified in (2) below. The Director of the International School shall be the Course Director.

2. Candidates must follow for three terms a course of instruction under the aegis of the Oxford University Centre for the Environment in one of the two M.Sc programmes, either Nature, Society and Environmental Policy, or Biodiversity, Conservation and Management, with the exception of the dissertation. Examinations at the end of the first year will serve to qualify for entry into the second year of the M.Phil course. Candidates who fail one or more papers at the end of the first year without compensating strength on other papers will be required to resit and pass the failed paper or papers, as determined by the Standing Committee, by the start of the Michaelmas Term of their second year in order to proceed with the degree.

3. During the first year, candidates will develop a thesis topic, the title and outline of which will be submitted for approval to the Course Director by the end of Hilary Term of the first year. Candidates registered for the M.Sc programmes listed in paragraph 2 may petition for transfer to the M.Phil degree by submitting a thesis title and outline by the deadline stipulated above. Where appropriate, the thesis will be the subject of fieldwork in the long vacation between the first and second year.

4. In the second year, candidates for the M.Phil will:

(a) offer a thesis of not more than 30,000 words, including footnotes and appendices. A page of tables may be taken as the equivalent of 150 words. The title should be submitted for the approval of the Course Director no later than noon on the Friday of Week Nought of Trinity Term of the first year of the course. Two typewritten copies of the thesis must be delivered to the Examination Schools and addressed to the Chairman of Examiners of the M.Phil in Geography, c/o Head of Examinations and Assessments, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, by noon of the fifth Monday of Trinity Full Term in the calendar year in which the examination is to be taken. Successful candidates will be required to deposit one copy of their thesis in the Bodleian Library, and will be required to sign a form stating whether they will permit their thesis to be consulted.

The thesis shall be accompanied by a statement certifying that the thesis is the candidate's own work except where otherwise indicated.

(b) submit an extended essay of a maximum of 5,000 words in length to the Course Director, in the form of an essay based on new work set as part of the assessment of the appropriate OUCE M.Sc module on the syllabus of Nature, Society and Environmental Policy and Biodiversity, Conservation and Management NOT taken in the first year of study. This essay will be submitted by noon of Friday of week nought of Hilary Term in the year in which the examination is taken. Written approval for the topic of the essay must have been obtained from the module leader prior to submission.

The extended essay shall be accompanied by a statement certifying that the extended essay is the candidate's own work except where otherwise indicated.

5. Arrangements for reassessment shall be as follows:

Candidates who fail to satisfy the examiners on the thesis and/or the extended essay may resubmit the thesis and/or the extended essay on not more than one occasion, which shall normally be within one year of the original failure.

6. Viva voce examination: Candidates must present themselves for viva voce examination when required to do so by the examiners.

7. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.'


(f) M.Phil in Social Anthropology

With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first examination in 2008)

In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 644, l. 27, delete 'second' and substitute 'fourth'.


(g) M.Sc in Cognitive and Evolutionary Anthropology

With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first examination in 2008)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 754, after l. 39 insert:

'Cognitive and Evolutionary Anthropology

1. Candidates must follow a course of instruction in Cognitive and Evolutionary Anthropology, including training in research, for at least three terms, and will, when entering for the examination, be required to produce a certificate from their supervisor to this effect.

2. Candidates will be required to present themselves for written and (if requested by the examiners) oral examinations and to submit three copies of the dissertation in a prescribed form on an approved topic as defined below.

3. The written examination will consist of four papers, one in each of the subjects listed in the Schedule.

4. Each candidate will be required to submit one assessed essay in each of the subjects listed in the schedule.

5. Each candidate will be required to submit a dissertation of approximately 10,000 words in length by the first Monday of September of the year of the examination. The dissertation must be on a topic agreed with their supervisor and/or the Chair of Examiners.

6. Three typewritten copies of the assessed essays must be delivered not later than noon on the first Monday of Trinity Term in the year in which the examination is taken, to the Chair of Examiners, M.Sc in Cognitive and Evolutionary Anthropology, c/o Head of Examinations and Assessments, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford.

7. Three typewritten copies of the dissertation must be delivered not later than noon on the first Monday of September in the year in which the examination is taken, to the Chair of Examiners, M.Sc in Cognitive and Evolutionary Anthropology, c/o Head of Examinations and Assessments, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford.

8. The oral examination, if held, may be on any or all of the candidate's assessed essays, and dissertation.

9. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.

10. If it is the opinion of the examiners that the work done by a candidate is not of sufficient merit to qualify for the Degree of M.Sc, the candidate shall be given the option of resitting the M.Sc examination on one further occasion only, not later than one year after the initial attempt. Such a candidate will be permitted to resubmit the same dissertation provided that this reached a satisfactory standard, while a candidate who has reached a satisfactory standard on one or more examination papers will not be required to retake that part of the examination.

Schedule

(i) Quantitative Methods in the Human Sciences

(a) Hypothesis testing

(b) Descriptive and inferential statistics

(c) Power and effect sizes

(d) Observational designs

(e) Survey and questionnaire designs

(f) Experimental methodologies

(g) Quantitative textual and material techniques


(ii) Primate Evolution and Behaviour

(a) Primate evolutionary history

(b) Primate behaviour

(c) Primate ecology

(d) Social evolution

(e) Evolution of the social brain


(iii) Human evolution and Behaviour

(a) Hominid evolutionary history

(b) Human behaviour

(c) Human evolutionary psychology

(d) Kinship and inheritance

(e) Cultural evolutionary processes


(iv) Mind and Culture

(a) Historical perspectives on cognitive and evolutionary explanations in anthropology

(b) Pan-human cognition: developmental and evolutionary perspectives

(c) Communication and transmission of culture

(d) Cognitive constraint and social structures

(e) Cognitive origins of culture

(f) Religion and beliefs'.


(h) M.Sc in Material Anthropology and Museum Ethnography (Research Methods)

With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first examination in 2008)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 796, delete ll. 2–13 and substitute:

'Part 1 of this paper is entitled 'Fundamental Concepts in Social and Cultural Anthropology'. Part 2 is entitled 'Core Research Methods in Material Anthropology and Museum Ethnography'.

The syllabus for Part 1 of this paper is as specified for the M.Phil in Migration Studies ('Paper I: Fundamental Concepts in Social and Cultural Anthropology').

Part 2 consists of the following topics: methodological approaches to the study of arts, performance, museums and material culture; fieldwork and data collection methods; quantitative and qualitative techniques of data collection; cultural property and heritage; intellectual issues involved in schemes for classifying material culture; analysis of material culture, photographs, film and sound recordings, and methods of museum display; preparing research proposals; ethical issues to be considered in research; collaborative and participatory research strategies; photo and artefact elicitation; formal analysis of artefacts and photographs; archival research; software for material culture analysis and research.'

2 Ibid., l. 34, delete 'two' and substitute 'three'.


(i) M.Sc in Social Anthropology (Research Methods)

With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first examination in 2008)

In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 819, l. 26, delete 'two' and substitute 'three'.


(j) M.Sc in Visual Anthropology

With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first examination in 2008)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 823, l. 30, delete 'fifth' and substitute 'first'.

2 Ibid., l. 47, delete 'sixth' and substitute 'fifth'.

3 Ibid., p. 824, l. 5, delete 'seventh' and substitute 'fifth'.


5 Social Sciences Board and Humanities Board

(a) Preliminary Examination in History and Politics

With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first examination in 2008)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 134, l. 28, after 'Germany.', insert 'Candidates are expected, where appropriate, to show knowledge of the methodological issues involved in both normative and empirical political research.'

2 Ibid., delete ll. 29–38.


(b) Preliminary Examination in Philosophy, Politics and Economics

With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first examination in 2008)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 150, l. 11, after 'subjects.' delete 'Candidates must also pursue a course', and delete 11. 12–16.

2 Ibid., l. 18, after 'subjects' insert '.' and delete 'and has', and delete ll. 19– 23.

3 Ibid., ll. 25–26, delete 'and submitted a satisfactory Data Analysis and IT project'.

4 Ibid., p. 151, l. 31, after 'Germany' insert 'Candidates are expected, where appropriate, to show knowledge of the methodological issues involved in both normative and empirical political research.'


(c) Honour School of Economics and Management

With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 207, after 1. 9 insert:

'(iii) Quantitative Economics'.

2 Ibid., l. 21, delete 'eight' and substitute 'nine'.

3 Ibid., after l. 33 insert:

'(iii) Quantitative Economics

As specified for the Honour School of Philosophy, Politics, and Economics.' and renumber (iii) and (iv) as (iv) and (v) accordingly.

4 Ibid., l. 37 delete '(iii)' and substitute '(iv)'.


(d) Honour School of History and Economics

With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 375, after 1. 31 insert:

'3. Quantitative Economics.', and renumber subsequent sections 3 to 6 on pp. 375–6 as 4 to 7 accordingly.

2 Ibid., p. 376, delete ll. 31–33, and substitute:

'The syllabus for sections 1–4, 6(c) and 7(c) and (d) (ii) is as specified in the Honour School of Philosophy, Politics, and Economics and for sections 5, 6 (a)–(b), and 7(a), (b) and (d) (i) as specified for the Honour School of Modern History.'


(e) Honour School of Philosophy, Politics, and Economics

With effect from 1 October 2009 (for first examination in 2010)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 475, l. 40, after 'subjects' insert '300,'.

2 Ibid., p. 476, l. 15, after 'subjects' insert '300,'.

3 Ibid., l. 25, after '103,' insert '300,'.

4 Ibid., ll. 31, after 'thesis if offered);' insert: '(iii) one but only one may be a subject in Politics, selected from the following list: 201, 202, 214, 215, 216, 220;', and renumber (iii) and (iv) as (iv) and (v) accordingly.

5 Ibid., p. 477, after l. 54, insert:

'300. Quantitative Economics'.

6 Ibid., p. 478, after l. 17, insert:

'318. Finance'.

7 Ibid., p. 482, delete ll. 10–14, and substitute:

'The study of the social basis of political competition (including social cleavages and identities), social and political attitudes (including political culture), processes of political engagement and competition (including elections, protest politics, elite formation and the mass media), the social basis for the formation, change, and maintenance of political institutions (including democracy and welfare states). Candidates must show knowledge based on the study of at least three major industrial countries.'

8 Ibid., p. 484, after 1. 31 insert:

'300. Quantitative Economics

Unconditional Modelling: Descriptive statistics, basic statistical distributions and applications to economic data, sampling and hypothesis testing.

Conditional Modelling: Binary data with regressors, regression analysis with two and three variables, testing and interpretation of regression results.

Time series Modelling: introduction to issues of temporal correlation and regression analysis.

Empirical applications in micro and macroeconomics: Interpretation of current literature in two areas of microeconomics and two areas of macroeconomics. Topics will be announced at the beginning of Michaelmas Term for examination in Trinity Term two years later.

The examination will include questions covering theoretical issues and interpretation of econometric results.'

9 Ibid., delete ll. 33–42, and substitute:

'Macroeconomic theories and their policy implications; macroeconomic shocks and fluctuations; unemployment and inflation; exchange rates; interest rates and the current account; intertemporal adjustment, growth theory; monetary and fiscal policy.

The paper will be set in two parts. Candidates will be required to answer questions from both parts. Part A will consist of short questions and Part B will consist of longer questions.'

10 Ibid., delete ll. 44–52, and substitute:

'Risk, expected utility theory; welfare economics and general equilibrium, public goods and externalities; game theory and industrial organisation; information economics; applications of microeconomics.

The paper will be set in two parts. Candidates will be required to answer questions from both parts. Part A will consist of short questions and Part B will consist of longer questions.'

11 Ibid., p. 485, delete ll. 12–20, and substitute:

'The role of money in general equilibrium models. Aggregate models of price and output fluctuations. The role of banks and other financial intermediaries. Models of monetary policy. Inflation targeting and other policy regimes. Money and public finance. The transmission of monetary policy to asset prices and exchange rates.

The paper will be set in two parts. Candidates will be required to show knowledge on both parts of the paper. Part A will comprise questions requiring analysis of specific models. Part B will comprise essay questions requiring discussion of the theoretical and empirical literature.'

12 Ibid., p. 486, ll. 50–51, delete '(if offering as an Economics option)'.

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6 Continuing Education Board

(a) M.Sc in Bioinformatics

With immediate effect

In Examination Regulations, 2006, delete p. 749, l. 25, to l. 14 on p. 751 and substitute:

'Bioinfomatics

For candidates who enrolled on the M.Sc in October 2006 and subsequently, and available to candidates who enrolled on the M.Sc in October 2005

1. The Mathematical and Physical Sciences Divisional Board, in consultation with the Continuing Education Board, shall elect for the supervision of the course a standing committee that shall have the power to arrange lectures and other instruction.

2. Applicants will be expected to have satisfactorily completed the Postgraduate Diploma in Bioinformatics.

3. Every candidate must follow for at least six and at most twelve terms a part-time course of instruction in the theory and practice of Bioinformatics, which shall normally take place over a period of no longer than six years.

4. Every candidate will be required to satisfy the examiners in the following:

(a) attendance at ten modules chosen from those in the Schedule for the M.Sc in Bioinformatics, and two project and dissertation modules, comprising a programme of study approved by the Programme Director;

(b) ten written assignments based on the courses chosen in 4(a) above;

(c) a dissertation of not more than 50 pages of A4 in length (excluding tables, appendices, footnotes and bibliography) on a subject selected by the candidate in consultation with the supervisor and approved by the Chairman of the Standing Committee;

The assessed work set out in clause 4(b), shall be forwarded to the examiners c/o Registry, Department for Continuing Education, 1 Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JA, for consideration by such date as the examiners shall determine and of which they shall notify candidates. The dissertation set out in clause 4(c) shall be forwarded to the examiners c/o Head of Examinations and Assessments, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford OX14BG for consideration by such date as the examiners shall determine and of which they shall notify candidates.

5. Candidates may be required to attend a viva voce examination at the end of the course of studies at the discretion of the examiners.

6. The examiners may award a distinction to candidates for the M.Sc.

7. Any candidate who has successfully completed the Postgraduate Diploma in Bioinformatics may on admission to the M.Sc be exempted from the requirement to submit, for the examination for this degree, eight written assignments under 4(b) above. Any such candidate may be allowed to count not more than six terms completed in the study of the Postgraduate Diploma in Bioinformatics towards the minimum period of study for the M.Sc, but the actual number of terms, if greater than six, completed in the study of the Postgraduate Diploma shall be counted towards the maximum period of study for the M.Sc The M.Sc in Bioinformatics if successfully completed, will subsume a candidate's previously completed Postgraduate Diploma.

8. Any candidate who has been exempted from completing the Postgraduate Certificate in Bioinformatics, must follow for at least 6 and at most 12 terms a part-time course of instruction in the theory and practice of Bioinformatics, which shall normally take place over a period no longer than six years. Such candidates may on admission be exempted from the requirement to submit, for the examination for this degree, four written assignments under 4(b) above.

9. Candidates who fail to satisfy the examiners in any part of the examination may be permitted to resubmit work in respect of the part or parts of the examination which they have failed for examination on not more than one occasion which shall normally be within one year of the original failure.

10. The standing committee shall have the discretion to permit any candidate to be exempted from submitting up to one of the total of ten written assignments required under 4(b) above, provided that the Standing Committee is satisfied that such a candidate has undertaken equivalent study, or has appropriate work experience to an equivalent standard.

Schedule

Section A: Foundation Modules

Students must take the four following modules:

1. Biology, principles: basic molecular biology

2. Perl Programming for Bioinformatics

3. Statistics for Biosciences

4. The power of Bioinformatics in modern research


Section B: Specialised Modules

Students must take a minimum of eight modules from the following list:

1. Algorithm design and complexity

2. High Throughput Experimental techniques

3. Database Management Systems

4. Microarray Bioinformatics

5. Molecular Evolution

6. Statistical and Population genetics

7. Statistical data mining

8. Statistical genetics

9. Structural Bioinformatics

10. Symbolic machine learning

11. Systems Biology

12. Molecular evolution and comparative genomics

13. Proteomics

14. Agent Based Computing

15. Ethics for Biosciences

16. The experimental–Bioinformatics interface—current challenges and emerging solutions

17. Project and Dissertation I

18. Project and Dissertation II

19. Any other module as defined by the course director and approved by the Standing Committee

The Standing Committee shall approve the content of at least three modules to be given each year, the titles of which shall be circulated to candidates and their supervisors by the noughth week of Michaelmas Term.'


(b) Postgraduate Diploma in Bioinformatics

With immediate effect

In Examination Regulations, 2006, delete p. 1042 l. 14, to l. 5 on p. 1043 and substitute:

'Bioinformatics

1. The Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board, in consultation with the Continuing Education Board, shall elect for the supervision of the course a standing committee that shall have the power to arrange lectures and other instruction.

2. Candidates will normally be expected to have satisfactorily completed the Postgraduate Certificate in Bioinformatics. Applications for exemption from this requirement will be considered, in exceptional circumstances only, by the Standing Committee. To be exempt from this requirement, candidates must demonstrate that they have undertaken equivalent study, or have appropriate work experience to an equivalent standard.

3. Every candidate must follow for at least 6 and at most 9 terms a part-time course of instruction in the theory and practice of Bioinformatics, which shall normally take place over a period of no longer than 4 years.

4. Candidates must take 4 modules as set out in section A of the schedule for the M.Sc in Bioinformatics and 4 modules as set out in section B of the schedule for the M.Sc in Bioinformatics.

5. Every candidate will be required to satisfy the examiners in the following:

(a) attendance at eight modules chosen from those in the Schedule for the M.Sc in Bioinformatics, comprising a programme of study approved by the Programme Director;

(b) eight written assignments, one on each of the modules chosen from the Schedule for the M.Sc in Bioinformatics;

The assessed work set out in clause 5(b) shall be forwarded to the examiners c/o Registry, Department for Continuing Education, 1 Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JA, for consideration by such date as the examiners shall determine and of which they shall notify candidates.

6. Candidates may be required to attend a viva voce examination at the end of the course of studies at the discretion of the examiners.

7. The examiners may award a distinction to candidates for the Diploma.

8. Any candidate who has successfully completed the Postgraduate Certificate in Bioinformatics may on admission to the Postgraduate Diploma be exempted from the requirement to submit, for the examination for the Postgraduate Diploma, four of the written assignments under 5(a) and 5(b) above. Any such candidate may be allowed to count not more than three terms completed in the study of the Postgraduate Certificate in Bioinformatics towards the minimum period of study for the Postgraduate Diploma, but the actual number of terms, if greater than three, completed in the study of the Postgraduate Certificate shall be counted towards the maximum period of study for the Postgraduate Diploma. The Postgraduate Diploma in Bioinformatics, if successfully completed, will subsume a candidate's previously completed Postgraduate Certificate.

9. Any candidates who has been exempt, under clause 2 above, from completing the Postgraduate Certificate in Bioinformatics, must follow for at least 3 at most 6 terms a part-time course of instruction in the theory and practice of Bioinformatics. Such candidates may on admission to the Postgraduate Diploma be exempted from the requirement to submit, for the examination for this degree, four written assignments under 5(b) above.

10. The standing committee shall have the discretion to permit any candidate to be exempted from submitting up to two of the total of eight written assignments required under 5(b) above, provided that the standing committee is satisfied that such a candidate has undertaken equivalent study, or have appropriate work experience to an equivalent standard.

11. Candidates who fail to satisfy the examiners in any part of the examination may be permitted to resubmit work in respect of the part or parts of the examination which they have failed for examination on not more than one occasion which shall normally be within one year of the original failure.'


(c) M.Sc in Nanotechnology: withdrawal of published regulations

The Continuing Education Board gives notice that the regulations for the M.Sc in Nanotechnology, published as Changes in Regulations no. 3 in the Gazette of 12 July, pp. 1370–1, are hereby withdrawn.

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7 Board of the Faculty of Classics

(a) M.Phil in Greek and/or Roman History

With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first examination in 2008)

In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 597, l. 9, delete 'about 2,000 words', and substitute 'not more than 5,000 words'.


(b) M.St in Greek and/or Roman History

With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first examination in 2008)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 690, l. 17, after 'translation', insert: ',in addition to a passage for unseen translation'.

2 Ibid., l. 28, after 'translation', insert: ',in addition to a passage for unseen translation'.

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8 Boards of the Faculties of Classics and English Language and Literature

(a) Honour School of Classics and English

(i) With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first examination in 2008)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 192, ll. 5–7, delete:

'Their tutors shall countersign the certificate affirming that they have assisted the candidate no more than the regulations allow.'

2 Ibid., delete l. 24, and substitute:

'approval for the thesis as stipulated in clause I (iii) above). Two copies of the thesis itself, identified'.

(ii) With effect from 1 October 2008 (for first examination in 2009)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 185, ll. 32–33, delete from 'All candidates' to 'both sides of the school' and substitute:

'With the exception of those taking Paper 4. (xvii), all candidates must take seven papers: A, two in English, B, two in Classics; and C, three linking both sides of the school. Candidates taking Paper 4. (xvii) must take two papers in English, two in Classics and two linking both sides of the School.'

2 Ibid., p. 189, after l. 36, insert:

'(xvii) Second Classical Language

As specified for the Honour School of Literae Humaniores (VI)

Candidates who offer a Second Classical Language must offer either both subjects in Greek or both subjects in Latin, and may not offer either subject in the same language as that in which they satisfied the Moderators in Honour Moderations in Classics and English or the Preliminary Examination in Classics and English.'

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9 Board of the Faculty of English Language and Literature

(a) Honour School of English Language and Literature

(i) With effect from 1 October 2006 (for first examination in 2007)

In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 246, l. 44, delete 'Fielding, or (iii) Hazlitt' and substitute 'Austen, or (iii) Byron'.

(ii) With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first examination in 2008)

In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 246, l. 3, after 'feedback.', insert:

'Essays previously submitted for the Honour School of English Language and Literature may be resubmitted.'

(iii) With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first examination in 2008)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 247, l. 13, delete 'except for certain of the syndicated Special Topics offered under (i).' and substitute 'except for certain of the centrally-taught Special Topics referred to under (j).'

2 Ibid., l. 40, delete 'centrally-organised' and substitute 'centrally taught'.

(iv) With effect from 1 October 2008 (for first examination in 2009)

In Examination Regulations, 2006, delete p. 253, l. 38, to p. 254, l. 3, inclusive, and renumber 26 and 27 as 24 and 25.


(b) M.Phil in English (Medieval Studies)

With effect from 1 October 2007(for first examination in 2008)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 583, l. 2, after 'papers', insert: 'of 2,000 to 3,000 words'.

2 Ibid., delete l. 9, and substitute: 'week. For subjects 2 (Dante) and 7–14, there will also be a one-hour translation'.

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10 Board of the Faculty of History

(a) Preliminary Examination in History

With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first examination in 2008)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 129, after l. 25 insert

'12. Women, Gender and the Nation: Britain, 1789–1825'.

2 Ibid., renumber 12–16 as 13–17.


(b) Honour School of History

With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first examination in 2008)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 370, as amended by Gazette July 27 2006, Supplement (1) to no. 4778, after l. 3, insert:

'7. England in Crisis, 1374–1388'.

2 Ibid., renumber 7–25 as 8–26.


(c) Honour School of History of Art

With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first examination in 2008)

In Examination Regulations, 2006, p, 283, l. 17, delete '(no more than 500 words)' and substitute '(no more than 250 words)'.


(d) M.Phil in Late Antique and Byzantine Studies

With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first examination in 2008)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 550, delete l. 24.

2 Ibid., p. 551, after l. 5, insert:

 `Late Antique and Byzantine Studies                Classics and
                                                   History'. 

3 Ibid., delete from p. 557, l. 40, to p. 561, l. 26.

4 Ibid., p. 610, after l. 19, insert:

'Late Antique and Byzantine Studies

(See also the general notice at the commencement of these regulations.)

1. Each candidate will be required to:

(a) follow for at least six terms a course of instruction in Late Antique and Byzantine Studies. Candidates will, when they enter for the examination, be required to produce from their society a certificate that they are following such a course.

(b) present a dissertation of not more than 30,000 words on a subject approved by his/her supervisor; the dissertation (two copies) must be typewritten and delivered to the Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, Monday of Seventh Week of Trinity Term of the candidate's second year at the latest.

(c) present himself/herself for a viva voce examination when required to do so by the examiners.

2. Candidates must take four of the following six papers. All candidates take the core paper on History, Art and Archaeology. For the remainder of their course they choose either the two Language and Literature papers and one other paper, or, if they already have considerable competence in their chosen language and their principal interests lie in History, Art and Archaeology, or Religion, they choose Auxiliary Disciplines and two Special Subjects.

I. Compulsory core paper on History, Art and Archaeology:

Either

(a) Late Antiquity (covering the Roman Empire and adjoining regions)

or

(b) Byzantium The core paper will be taught in classes in Michaelmas and Hilary Terms. Examination will be by two 5,000-word essays, to be submitted by Monday of First Week of Trinity Term of the candidate's first year.

II. and III. Language and Literature (teaching in Greek, Latin, Slavonic, Armenian, Syriac, and Arabic will normally be available)

These papers are taught over three terms in classes, with reference to a selection of texts and/or extracts from texts which may vary from year to year according to the interests of candidates. Examination is by two three-hour papers:

(a) translation, and

(b) set texts (with passages for comment and essay questions). Candidates who are embarking on the study of one of the above languages will normally be expected to take both examinations in that language, but the Committee for Byzantine Studies may in special circumstances permit them to substitute another paper for one of these examination papers.

IV. Auxiliary Discipline(s):

Either

(a) any two of the following: epigraphy, palaeography, numismatics, sigillography

or

(b) papyrology: Greek, Coptic or Arabic or

(c) artefact studies: ceramics, metalware, ivories, codices, carved marbles.

Paper IV will be taught by lectures/classes/tutorials. Examination will be by a three-hour paper.

V. A Special Subject selected from the subject areas listed under 3. below.

Special Subjects will be taught by lectures/classes/tutorials. Examination will be either by two 5,000-word essays or by a 10,000- word dissertation (to be submitted by Monday of Seventh Week of Trinity Term of the candidate's first year).

VI. A second Special Subject selected from the subject areas listed under 3. below.

Special Subjects will be taught by lectures/classes/tutorials. Examination will be either by two 5,000-word essays or by a 10,000-word dissertation (to be submitted by Monday of Seventh Week of Trinity Term of the candidate's second year).

Note: both Special Subjects may be taken from the same section of the list below.

3. Overview of Special Subject areas (for details of papers and prescribed texts please consult the current Course Handbook)

(a) History

History Special Subject papers cover the Roman Empire from the fourth to the seventh centuries, the Byzantine Empire, and their northern, eastern, and southern neighbours.

(b) Art and Archaeology The papers cover sculpture, portraiture, monumental art and architecture of the late Roman, Byzantine, and Islamic spheres of influence; archaeological evidence of lifestyles and economies of the people in the Mediterranean area.

(c) Literature (texts prescribed in translation) Topics range through historiography, hagiography, courtly and vernacular literature, and scholarship in the languages available for the degree programme.

(d) Religion Papers in this area cover theological debates and practical spirituality in the fields of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

(e) Such other subjects as may be approved on application to the Committee for Byzantine Studies.

4. Teaching in all the options may not be available each year, and applicants for admission will be advised whether teaching will be available in the options of their choice.

5. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.

6. If it is the opinion of the examiners that the work done by a candidate, while not of sufficient merit to qualify for the degree of Master of Philosophy, is nevertheless of sufficient merit to qualify for the degree of Master of Studies in Late Antique and Byzantine Studies, the candidate shall be given the option of resitting the Master of Philosophy (as provided by Ch. VI. Sect. VI, §2, paragraph 4) or of being granted leave to supplicate for the degree of Master of Studies.


(e) M.St in Late Antique and Byzantine Studies

With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first examination in 2008)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 661, delete l. 23.

2 Ibid., p. 662, after l. 24, insert:

 `Late Antique and Byzantine Studies                Classics and
                                                 History'. 

3 Ibid., delete p. 667, l. 43 to p. 671, l. 22.

4 Ibid., p. 702, after l. 26, insert:

'Late Antique and Byzantine Studies

(See also the general notice at the commencement of these regulations.)

1. Candidates must satisfy the Committee for Byzantine Studies and the appropriate Faculty Boards that they possess the necessary qualifications in Greek (ancient or modern) and/or Latin to profit by the course.

2. Every candidate must follow for at least three terms a course of instruction in Late Antique and Byzantine Studies. Candidates will, when they enter for the examination, be required to produce from their society a certificate that they are following such a course.

3. Candidates must take three of the following five papers. All candidates take the core paper on History, Art and Archaeology. For the remainder of their course they choose either the two Language and Literature papers, or, Auxiliary Disciplines and one Special Subject. I. Core paper on History, Art and Archaeology:

Either

(a) Late Antiquity (covering the Roman Empire and adjoining regions)

or

(b) Byzantium

The core paper will be taught in classes in Michaelmas and Hilary Terms. Examination will be by two 5,000-word essays, to be submitted by Monday of First Week of Trinity Term.

II. and III. Language and Literature (teaching in Greek, Latin, Slavonic, Armenian, Syriac, and Arabic will normally be available)

These papers are taught over three terms in classes, with reference to a selection of texts and/or extracts from texts which may vary from year to year according to the interests of candidates. Examination is by two three-hour papers:

(a) translation, and

(b) set texts (with passages for comment and essay questions).

Candidates who are embarking on the study of one of the above languages will normally be expected to take both examinations in that language, but the Committee for Byzantine Studies may in special circumstances permit them to substitute another paper for one of these examination papers. Candidates cannot normally offer an examination in the language which qualified them for admission to the degree programme in the first instance. IV. Auxiliary Discipline(s):

Either

(a) any two of the following: epigraphy, palaeography, numismatics, sigillography

or

(b) papyrology: Greek or Coptic or Arabic

or

(c) artefact studies: ceramics or metalware or ivories or codices or carved marbles.

Paper IV will be taught by lectures/classes/tutorials. Examination will be by a three-hour paper.

V. A Special Subject selected from the subject areas listed under 4. below.

Special Subjects will be taught by lectures/classes/tutorials. Examination will be either by two 5,000-word essays or by a 10,000-word dissertation (to be submitted by Monday of Seventh Week of Trinity Term).

4. Overview of Special Subject areas (for details of papers and prescribed texts please consult the current Course Handbook)

(a) History

History Special Subject papers cover the Roman Empire from the fourth to the seventh centuries, the Byzantine Empire, and their northern, eastern, and southern neighbours.

(b) Art and Archaeology

The papers cover sculpture, portraiture, monumental art and architecture of the late Roman, Byzantine, and Islamic spheres of influence; archaeological evidence of lifestyles and economies of the people in the Mediterranean area.

(c) Literature (texts prescribed in translation)

Topics range through historiography, hagiography, courtly and vernacular literature, and scholarship in the languages available for the degree programme.

(d) Religion

Papers in this area cover theological debates and practical spirituality in the fields of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

(e) Such other subjects as may be approved on application to the Committee for Byzantine Studies.

5. Teaching in all the options may not be available each year, and applicants for admission will be advised whether teaching will be available in the options of their choice.

6. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.


(f) M.Phil in the History of Science, Medicine, and Technology

With effect from 1 October 2008 (for first examination in 2009)

In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 599, delete ll. 33–38, and substitute:

'1. Methods and themes in the history of science and technology.

2. Methods and themes in the history of medicine.

Candidates may be advised on the basis of their prospective individual research to substitute one of the following courses from the Master of Philosophy in Economic and Social History for (1) or (2) above:

(i) Methodological introduction to research in the social sciences and history.

(ii) Quantitative Methods and Computer Applications for Historians.'


(g) M.Sc in the History of Science, Medicine, and Technology

With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first examination in 2008)

In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 785, delete ll. 28–32, and substitute:

'1. Methods and themes in the history of science and technology.

2. Methods and themes in the history of medicine.

Candidates may be advised on the basis of their prospective individual research to substitute one of the following courses from the Master of Science in Economic and Social History for (1) or (2) above:

(i) Methodological introduction to research in the social sciences and history.

(ii) Quantitative Methods and Computer Applications for Historians.'

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11 Board of the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages

(a) Preliminary Examination for Modern Languages

(i) With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first examination in 2008)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 136, l. 4, delete 'an Oral Test' and substitute 'BIV Oral Test'.

2 Ibid. p. 143, l. 41, delete 'Oral Test' and substitute 'B IV Oral Test'.

(ii) With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first examination in 2008)

1 In Examinations Regulations, 2006, p. 143, delete ll. 4–6, delete and substitute:

'Candidates must write three essays, each on a different film. There will be a choice of two questions on each film.

Jean Vigo: L'Atalante (1934)

Jacques Becker: Casque d'Or (1952)

Jean-Luc Godard: A bout de souffle (1960)

Bertrand Blier: Les valseuses (1974)'.

2 Ibid., delete ll. l6–18, and substitute:

'Candidates must write three essays, each on a different author. There will be a choice of two questions on each author.

Valéry, 'Questions de poésie' and 'Poésie et pensée abstraite', in Théorie poétique et esthétique, in Oeuvres, I, ed. J. Hytier, Bibliothèque de la Pléiade (Gallimard, 1957), pp. 1280–94; pp. 1314–39

Sartre, Qu'est-ce que la littérature? (Folio) [Sections I and II only]

Barthes, Critique et vérité (Seuil)

Genette, 'Critique et poétique', 'Poétique et histoire', 'La rhétorique restreinte', 'Métonymie chez Proust', in Figures III (Seuil)'.

3 Ibid., ll. 25–27, delete 'Four texts as prescribed from time to time by the sub-faculty of French. Texts chosen will be publicised in the University Gazette in Week Nought of Michaelmas Term immediately preceding the examination' and substitute 'Candidates must answer three questions (one commentary and two essays), each on a different text. There will be a choice of one commentary passage and one essay question on each text.

Descartes, Discours de la méthode (Garnier-Flammarion)

Rousseau, Discours sur l'inégalité (Folio)

Bergson, Essai sur les données immédiates de la conscience (PUF) [Chapters I and II only]

Beauvoir, Le Deuxième Sexe (Folio). I: Introduction', 'Mythes'; II: 'La femme mariée', 'La mère'.'


(b) M.Phil in Medieval and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2007 2007 (for first examination in 200892008)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 550, l. 36, delete 'European Literature Modern Languages'.

2 Ibid., p. 551, l. 10, insert:

 `Medieval and Modern Languages                     Modern Languages'.
3 Ibid., delete from p. 585, l. 28 to p. 589, l. 14.

4 Ibid., 614, l. 4, insert:

'Medieval and Modern Languages

1. Candidates must follow a Programme chosen from those listed in the 'Graduate Studies in Modern Languages' handbook.

In order to gain admission to the course, applicants must show evidence of linguistic ability compatible with advanced literary study in the language(s) chosen to study. Comparative Literature candidates shall not be required to have reading fluency in more than two languages other than English. Unless otherwise stated, candidates will be expected to write in English unless explicit permission is obtained to write in the language (or one of the languages) studied. In the case of Comparative Literature candidates, writing in more than one language in addition to English will not be authorised.

All candidates must follow a course of instruction in Medieval and Modern Languages at Oxford for a period of six terms. In exceptional circumstances, the Board of the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages may permit an extension of time. Candidates shall, when entering their name for the examination, be required to produce from their society a certificate stating that they are following the course of instruction for the period prescribed.

2. All candidates shall be required:

(a) To offer A, B, C, D, and E as defined in 3 below.

(b) To present themselves for viva voce examination at the time appointed by the examiners.

3. The examination shall consist of the following:

(a) Either

(i) Methods of Criticism and the Theory of Literature. All candidates must attend such lectures, seminars, and classes as the course convener shall determine. All candidates must present one seminar paper during their course, and submit a written essay based on some aspect of the work done for the seminar. This essay shall be written in English and must be no more than 5,000 words in length, inclusive of a bibliography of works consulted. Candidates must submit two typed copies of the essay to the Modern Languages Graduate Office, 41 Wellington Square, by Friday of ninth week of Hilary Term of their first year. Each copy must have a cover sheet giving the candidate's name, college, the title of the essay, the name of the candidate's supervisor, and the words 'Methods of Criticism and the Theory of Literature, submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements of the M.Phil in Medieval and Modern Languages'.

Or

(ii) Methods of Criticism and History of Ideas in Germany from the Eighteenth to the Twentieth Centuries. Methods of Criticism and History of Ideas in Germany from the Eighteenth to the Twentieth Centuries. All candidates must attend such lectures, seminars, and classes as the course convener shall determine. All candidates must present one seminar paper during their course, and submit a written essay based on some aspect of the work done for the seminar. This essay may be written in English or German and must be no more than 5,000 words in length, inclusive of a bibliography of works. Candidates must submit two typed copies of the essay to the Modern Languages Graduate Office, 41 Wellington Square, by Friday of ninth week of Hilary Term of their first year. Each copy must have a cover sheet giving the candidate's name, college, the title of the essay, the name of the candidate's course convener, and the words 'Methods of Criticism and History of Ideas in Germany, submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements of the M.Phil in Medieval and Modern Languages'.

Or

(iii) Methods of Scholarship. Each candidate shall be required to offer either, (1) the History of the Book, or (2) Palaeography with Textual Criticism. Candidates will be examined on three essays on topics agreed by them with their course convener relating either to the history of the book (for (1)) or to palaeography with textual criticism (for (2)). The essays, which shall amount to an aggregate of between 5,000 and 8,000 words, shall be submitted to the course convener by the end of ninth week of the Hilary Term of their first year. For (2), candidates will in addition be required to undertake a practical transcription test, made without reference to dictionaries or handbooks, on a short manuscript text selected by the course convener, who will also mark, sign, and date the candidate's work. The test should take place by the end of the fourth week of the Trinity Term in which the examination is to be taken. The mark should be sent by the course convener to the Chairman of the Examiners.

Or

(iv) A methodological essay of approximately 5,000 words on a topic or issue related to the candidate's Special Subject or dissertation. It might consist, for example, of a theoretical discussion of the candidate's approach to the material being studied, or a detailed analysis of existing approaches. If candidates choose this option, they will be expected to also attend a set of seminars in (i) or (ii) above, or a set of tutorials in (iii), and to make a presentation. The essay must be typed, and include a bibliography. Candidates must submit two copies to the Modern Languages Graduate Office, 41 Wellington Square, by Friday of ninth week of Hilary Term of their first year. Each copy must have a cover sheet giving the candidate's name, college, the title of the essay, the name of the candidate's supervisor, and the words 'Essay on Method, submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements of the M.Phil in Medieval and Modern Languages'.

The work submitted under (i) must be written in English; the work submitted under (ii) may be written in English or German; the work submitted under (iii) may be written in English or, subject to the approval of the Medieval and Modern Languages Faculty Board, in a language appropriate to the literature concerned.

Approval must be sought for the choice of options in (a) by the end of the fourth week of Michaelmas Term in the first year.

(b) A thesis, which may be written in English or, with the approval of the Medieval and Modern Languages Faculty Board, in the language appropriate to the literature concerned, of approximately 20,000 words and not more than 25,000 words, on a subject approved by the Board or by a person or persons to whom the Board may delegate this function. The subject of the thesis shall be related either to the fields of study represented by (a) (i), (ii) or (iii) above or to one or more of the candidate's Special Subjects (c). When seeking approval for the subject of the thesis, every candidate shall submit with the proposed title a written statement of not more than 500 words explaining the scope of the topic and the manner in which it is proposed to treat it. Candidates shall seek approval (by application to the Modern Languages Graduate Office, 41Wellington Square, Oxford) for the proposed topic of their thesis by the end of the fourth week of Trinity Term of the first year. The thesis must be presented in proper scholarly form. Two copies typed in double-spacing on one side only of quarto or A4 paper, each copy bound or held firmly in a stiff cover, must be delivered to the Head of Examinations and Assessments, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, by noon on Thursday of the sixth week of Trinity Term of the second year.

Successful candidates will be required to deposit one copy of their thesis in the Bodleian Library.

(c) Three Special Subjects.

(i) and (ii) Candidates must select two Special Subjects from those listed in the 'Graduate Studies in Modern Languages' prospectus associated with the programme which they are following; candidates may select a special subject from a different programme with approval from their supervisor; (iii) the third Special Subject must be of the candidate's own devising, worked out under supervisory guidance.

Candidates will normally offer two Special Subjects from the same language and area, or from different areas in the same language. The Comparative Literature Programme will contain Special Subjects from two different languages, or one at least of the special subjects (C, D and E) is comparative in scope

Approval of Special Subjects (i) and (ii) must be sought, by application to the Modern Language Graduate Office, 41 Wellington Square, Oxford by the end of the fourth week of Michaelmas Term of the first year. Approval of Special Subject (iii) and proposed title of the Dissertation must be sought, by application to the Modern Language Graduate Office, 41 Wellington Square, Oxford by the end of the fourth week of Trinity Term of the first year.

The Special Subjects must have the written support of the candidate's supervisor and be approved by or on behalf of the Medieval and Modern Languages Faculty Board. A proposal for a Special Subject of the candidate's own devising shall be accompanied by a statement (of approximately 100 words) of the character and scope of the subject proposed.

Candidates will be examined on a portfolio of work (which may be written in English, or, with the approval of the Medieval and Modern Languages Faculty Board, in the language appropriate to the literature concerned) on the topics they have agreed with their supervisor within each Special Subject.

The essay or essays contained within the portfolio for each Special Subject should be of approximately 5,000 and 6,000 words in total, though where the subject or approach requires greater length, candidates shall not be penalised for exceeding this guideline.

Students are required to submit work for assessment on three of the non- dissertation components (A, C D and E). They must satisfactorily complete the fourth component and be able to provide formal evidence of having done so. e. g. in the form of a report from the supervisor OR attendance at and participation in a series of seminars.

The Special Subjects portfolio shall be submitted to the supervisor for that special subject by Friday of the first week of Hilary Term of the candidate's second year as a student for the examination. However, candidates are strongly advised to complete their portfolios for the first two Special Subjects by the end of Hilary Term of their first year.

4. Candidates for comparative Literature should ensure that EITHER at least one of the special subjects (C, D and E) is comparative in scope OR the three special subjects are concerned with different languages. The dissertation must deal explicitly with comparative issues.

5. If it is the opinion of the examiners that the work done by a candidate, while not of sufficient merit to qualify for the degree of M.Phil, is nevertheless of sufficient merit to qualify for the Degree of Master of Studies in Medieval and Modern Languages, the candidate shall be given the option of re-sitting the M.Phil examination under Ch. VI, Sect. vi, § 2, cl. 4, or of being granted permission to supplicate for the Degree of Master of Studies.

6. In the case of resubmission, candidates shall be required to submit all the material by noon on Thursday of the sixth week of the first Trinity Term following their first examination. Candidates may resubmit on one occasion only.

7. The examiners may award a Distinction for excellence in the whole examination.'

5 Ibid., 908, l. 18, delete: 'European Literature', and substitute: 'Medieval and Modern Languages'.


(c) M.St in Medieval and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first examination in 2008)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 662, l. 1, delete 'European Literature Modern Languages'.

2 Ibid., l. 26, insert:

 `Medieval and Modern Languages                     Modern Languages'.

3 Ibid., delete from p. 680, l. 24 to p. 681, l. 38.

4 Ibid., p. 704, l. 13, insert:

'Medieval and Modern Languages

1. Candidates must follow a Programme chosen from those listed in the 'Graduate Studies in Modern Languages' handbook.

In order to gain admission to the course, applicants must show evidence of linguistic ability compatible with advanced literary study in the language(s) chosen to study. Comparative Literature candidates shall not be required to have reading fluency in more than two languages other than English. Unless otherwise stated, candidates will be expected to write in English unless explicit permission is obtained to write in the language (or one of the languages) studied. In the case of Comparative Literature candidates, writing in more than one language in addition to English will not be authorised.

All candidates must follow a course of instruction in Medieval and Modern Languages at Oxford for a period of three terms, unless the Board of the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages in exceptional circumstances shall permit an extension of time, and candidates shall, when entering their name for the examination, be required to produce from their society a certificate stating that they are following the course of instruction for the period prescribed.

2. All candidates shall be required:

(a) To offer A, B C and D as defined in 3 below. \(b) To present themselves for viva voce examination at the time appointed by the examiners.

3. The examination shall consist of the following:

(a) Either

(i) Methods of Criticism and the Theory of Literature. All candidates must attend such lectures, seminars, and classes as their course convener shall determine. All candidates must present one seminar paper during their course, and submit a written essay based on some aspect of the work done for the seminar. This essay shall be written in English and must be no more than 5,000 words in length, inclusive of a bibliography of works consulted. Candidates must submit two typed copies of their essay to the Modern Languages Graduate Office, 41 Wellington Square, by Friday of ninth week of Hilary Term. Each copy must have a cover sheet giving the candidate's name, college, the title of the essay, the name of the candidate's supervisor, and the words 'Methods of Criticism and the Theory of Literature, submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements of the M.St in Medieval and Modern Languages'.

Or

(ii) Methods of Criticism and History of Ideas in Germany from the Eighteenth to the Twentieth Centuries. All candidates must attend such lectures, seminars, and classes as their course convener shall determine. All candidates must present one seminar paper during their course, and submit a written essay based on some aspect of the work done for the seminar. This essay may be written in English or German and must be no more than 5,000 words in length, inclusive of a bibliography of works consulted. Candidates must submit two typed copies to the Modern Languages Graduate Office, 41 Wellington Square, by Friday of ninth week of Hilary Term. Each copy must have a cover sheet giving the candidate's name, college, the title of the essay, the name of the candidate's supervisor, and the words 'Methods of Criticism and History of Ideas in Germany, submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements of the M.St in Medieval and Modern Languages'.

Or

(iii) Methods of Scholarship. Each candidate shall be required to offer either, (1) the History of the Book, or (2) Palaeography with Textual Criticism. Candidates will be examined on three essays on topics agreed by them with the course convener relating either to the history of the book (for (1)) or to palaeography with textual criticism (for (2)). The essays, which shall amount to an aggregate of between 5,000 and 8,000 words, shall be submitted to the course convener by the end of ninth week of Hilary Term. For (2), candidates will in addition be required to undertake a practical transcription test, made without reference to dictionaries or handbooks, on a short manuscript text selected by the course convener, who will also mark, sign, and date the candidate's work. The test should take place by the end of the fourth week of the Trinity Term in which the examination is to be taken.

Or

(iv) A methodological essay of approximately 5,000 words on a topic or issue related to one of the candidate's Special Subjects or dissertation. It might consist, for example, of a theoretical discussion of the candidate's approach to the material being studied, or a detailed analysis of existing approaches. If candidates choose this option, they will also be expected to attend a set of seminars in (i) or (ii) above, or a set of tutorials in (iii), and to make a presentation. The essay should be typed, and include a bibliography. Candidates must submit two copies to the Modern Languages Graduate Office, 41 Wellington Square, by Friday of ninth week of Hilary Term. Each copy must have a cover sheet giving the candidate's name, college, the title of the essay, the name of the candidate's supervisor, and the words 'Essay on Method, submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements of the M.St in Medieval and Modern Languages'.

The work submitted under (i) must be written in English; the work submitted under (ii) may be written in English or German; the work submitted under (iii) may be written in English or, subject to the approval of the Medieval and Modern Languages Faculty Board, in a language appropriate to the literature concerned.

Approval must be sought for the choice of options in (a) by the end of the fourth week of Michaelmas Term.

(b) A dissertation of between 8,000 and 10,000 words written in English, or, with the approval of the Medieval and Modern Languages Faculty Board, in the language appropriate to the literature concerned, on a topic connected with those offered in (a) (i), (ii) or (iii) above or (c) below, but distinct from those covered by the essays submitted under (a) or (c), and approved by the Modern Languages Board. Candidates shall seek approval (by application to the Modern Languages Graduate Office, 41Wellington Square, Oxford) for the proposed topic of their dissertation by the end of the fourth week of Hilary Term.

The dissertation must be presented in proper scholarly form. Two copies typed in double-spacing on one side only of quarto or A4 paper, each copy bound or held firmly in a cover, must be delivered to the Head of Examinations and Assessments, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, by noon on Thursday of the sixth week of Trinity Term.

(C and D) Two Special Subjects

Candidates may select two Special Subjects from those listed in the 'Graduate Studies in Modern Languages' prospectus as associated with the programme which they are following; candidates may select a special subject from a different programme with the approval of their supervisor; OR candidates may propose Special Subjects of their own devising, provided that each subject has the written support of the candidate's supervisor and is approved by or on behalf of the Medieval and Modern Languages Faculty Board. A proposal for a Special Subject of the candidate's own devising shall be accompanied by a statement (of approximately 100 words) of the character and scope of the subject proposed. Approval of all Special Subjects must be sought, by application to the Modern Languages Graduate Office, 41 Wellington Square, Oxford by end of the fourth week of Michaelmas Term. Approval of Special Subjects proposed will be dependent on the availability of teaching and examining resources at the relevant time.

Candidates will normally offer two Special Subjects from the same language and area or from different areas in the same language. The Comparative Literature Programme will contain Special Subjects from two different languages.

Candidates will be examined on a portfolio of work (which may be written in English, or, with the approval of the Medieval and Modern Languages Faculty Board, in the language appropriate to the literature concerned) on the topics they have agreed with the supervisor of each Special Subject.

The length of the work submitted for each Special Subject should be between 5,000 and 6,000 words in total.

4. Candidates for Comparative Literature should ensure that EITHER at least one of the special subjects (C and D) is comparative in scope OR the two special subjects are concerned with different languages. The dissertation must deal explicitly with comparative issues

5. In addition to submitting the dissertation (b), students are required to submit work for assessment on two of the non-dissertation components (A C and D). They must satisfactorily complete the third non-dissertation component and be able to provide formal evidence of having done so, e. g. in the form of a report from the supervisor OR attendance at, and participation in, a series of seminars. Submitted work must be handed in at the end of week 10 of Hilary Term, although students are advised to complete the Michaelmas Term elements (normally one or both Special Subjects) before the beginning of Hilary Term.

In the case of resubmission, candidates shall be required to resubmit all the material by noon on Thursday of the sixth week of the first Trinity Term following their first examination. Candidates may resubmit on one occasion only.

6. The examiners may award a Distinction for excellence in the whole examination.'

5 Ibid., p. 714, l. 11, delete: 'European Literature', and substitute: 'Medieval and Modern Languages'.

6 Ibid., l. 43, delete 'European Literature', and substitute: 'Medieval and Modern Languages'.

7 Ibid., p. 908, l. 20, delete: 'European Literature', and substitute: 'Medieval and Modern Languages'.

8 Ibid., ll. 26–27, delete: 'European Literature', and substitute: 'Medieval and Modern Languages'.

9 Ibid., l. 40, delete: 'European Literature', and substitute: 'Medieval and Modern Languages'.

10 Ibid., l. 42, delete: 'European Literature', and substitute: 'Medieval and Modern Languages'.

11 Ibid., p. 909, l. 9, delete 'European Literature', and substitute: 'Medieval and Modern Languages'.

12 Ibid., p. 910, l. 12, delete 'European Literature', and substitute: 'Medieval and Modern Languages'.

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12 Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies

(a) Preliminary Examination in Oriental Studies

With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first examination in 2008)

In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 62, l. 16, after 'Japanese' insert ', Turkish'.


(b) Honour School in European and Middle Eastern Languages: Arabic

With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first examination in 2008)

In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 256, after l. 34, insert new line:

'Arabic'.


(c) Honour School of Oriental Studies

With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first examination in 2008)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 430, l. 3, before 'to be sent' insert 'two copies of which are'.

2 Ibid., l. 6, after 'examination.' insert 'The dissertation must not bear the candidate's name, but only the examination number.'

3 Ibid., p. 448, footnote, delete from 'The oral examination will consist of the following parts:' to ''(Approximate duration ten to fifteen minutes.)' and replace with '* See footnote on page 432.'


(d) Honour School of Oriental Studies

With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first examination in 2008)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 431, l. 39, after 'Applications for the approval of' insert 'all'.

2 Ibid., l. 40, delete 'Subjects. Theses' and substitute 'Subjects, Theses'.

3 Ibid., ll. 40–41, delete '(including optional Further Subjects and Theses)'.


(e) Honour School of Oriental Studies (Chinese for candidates offering Japanese as main subject)

With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first examination in 2008)

In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 451, ll. 28–29, delete 'Unprepared translation, Prose Composition, and Grammatical Questions' and replace with 'Unprepared translation and prose composition'.


(f) Honour School of Oriental Studies (Chinese only)

With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first examination in 2008)

In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 434, l. 36, after 'Unprepared translation in the field chosen for Paper 6' add 'except for (d)'.


(g) Honour School of Oriental Studies (Hebrew)

With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first examination in 2008)

In Examination Regulations, 2006, footnote on pp. 441–442, delete from '* The oral examination' to '4. Reading aloud of a passage of text.' and substitute:

'* See footnote on page 432.'


( h) Honour School of Oriental Studies (Japanese)

With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first examination in 2008)

In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 442, footnote, delete from '* The oral examination' to 'on any subject previously introduced under (i), (ii), or (iii) above.' and substitute:

'* See footnote on page 432.'


(i) Honour School of Oriental Studies (Persian)

With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first examination in 2008)

In Examination Regulations, 2006, pp. 445–6, delete entire footnote '* The oral examination will be held in the week before Trinity Full Term... a person speaking Persian and a person speaking English (approximate duration 10 minutes).' and replace with '* See footnote on page 432.'


(j) Honour School of Oriental Studies)Persian with Islamic Art and Archaeology)

With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first examination in 2008)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 447, l. 2, delete '600' and replace with '550'.

2 Ibid., l. 6, delete '600' and replace with '550'.


(k) M.Phil in Oriental Studies: Modern South Asian Studies

With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first examination in 2008)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 620, l. 41, as amended by Gazette, 22 February 2007, p. 794, delete '(xiv)' and replace with '(xv)'.

2 Ibid, p. 634, after l. 24, as amended by Gazette, 22 February 2007, p. 794, delete '(xiv)' and replace with '(xv)'.

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13 Board of the Faculty of Philosophy

M.St in Ancient Philosophy

With effect from 1 October 2008 (for first examination in 2009)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 661, before l. 22, insert:
 `Ancient Philosophy                                Philosophy'. 

2 Ibid, p. 666, after l. 30, insert:

'Ancient Philosophy

1. Every candidate must follow for at least three terms a course of instruction in Ancient Philosophy. Candidates will, when they enter for the examination, be required to produce from their society a certificate that they are following such a course.

2. Every candidate shall be required to offer: (i) two subjects in Ancient Philosophy, and (ii) a thesis in Ancient Philosophy of 15,000 words.

3. The choice of subjects must be notified on the entry form for the examination, to be submitted by [date to be confirmed].

4. The first subject shall be chosen from the list of undergraduate papers in ancient philosophy 0130–0135, as specified in the special regulations for Philosophy in all Honour Schools including Philosophy. The subject will be assessed by one 4,000 word essay on a topic (relevant to the subject) to be chosen by the candidate and approved by the Course Director [or Chairman of Examiners] no later than Friday of Eighth Week of Michaelmas Term. Two copies of the essay must be submitted to the Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford OX1 4BG, by 10 a.m. on Friday of Ninth Week of Hilary Term in the year in which the examination is taken. Essays must be typed or printed.

5. The second subject shall be chosen from a list of subject options published in the University Gazette during Hilary or Trinity term of the year preceding the year of examination. The subject will be assessed by two 4,000 word essays on two topics (relevant to the subject) to be chosen by the candidate and approved by the Course Director [or Chairman of Examiners] no later than Friday of Eighth Week of Michaelmas Term. Two copies of each essay must be submitted to the Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford OX1 4BG, by 10. 00 am on Friday of Ninth Week of Hilary Term in the year in which the examination is taken. Essays must be typed or printed.

6. Candidates may not be permitted to offer certain combinations of subjects. Details will be published alongside the list of available subject options in the University Gazette during Hilary or Trinity term of the year preceding the year of examination.

7. Candidates must offer a thesis of no more than 15,000 words, exclusive of bibliographical references, on a subject proposed by the candidate in consultation with his or her supervisor and approved by the Graduate Studies Committee in Philosophy. A subject and thesis title must be submitted to the Committee not later than the Fifth Week of the Hilary Term of the year in which the examination is to be taken. Requests for permission to make later changes to the thesis title should be submitted, with the support of the candidate's supervisor, to the Director of Graduate Studies in Philosophy as soon as the candidate has decided to seek permission. Two copies of the thesis must be submitted to the Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford OX1 4BG, by 10. 00 am on Friday of Eighth Week of Trinity Term in the year in which the examination is taken. The thesis shall be accompanied by a brief abstract and statement of the number of words it contains (exclusive of bibliographical references). Successful candidates will be required to deposit one copy of the thesis in the Bodleian Library (candidates will also be required to sign a form stating that they give permission for the thesis to be consulted).

8. Candidates who have not delivered the essays or the thesis as prescribed by the due date shall, unless they show exceptional cause to the examiners, be deemed to have withdrawn from the examination.

9. Candidates will not be permitted to seek or accept any help, including bibliographical, from supervisors or anyone else, with the preparation of essays.

10. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.'

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14 Boards of the Faculties of Philosophy and Theology

Honour School of Philosophy and Theology

(i) With immediate effect

In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 492, delete ll. 16–44 and substitute:

'(iv) Christian Moral Reasoning (Paper (12) in the Honour School of Theology).'

(ii) With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first examination in 2008)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 492, l. 13, delete '(6)' and substitute '(5)';

2 Ibid., l. 14, delete '(5)' and substitute '(4)';

3 Ibid., p. 493, l. 1, delete '(25)' and substitute '(24)';

4 Ibid., l. 3, delete '(29)' and substitute '(28)';

5 Ibid., l. 6, delete 'the Aquinas part of ';

6 Ibid., l. 7, delete '11' and substitute '10'.

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15 Board of the Faculty of Theology

(a) Honour School of Theology

(i) With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first examination in 2008)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 517, l. 30, delete '(25)' and substitute '(24)';

2 Ibid., l. 33, delete '(8) to (39)' and substitute '(7) to (39)';

3 Ibid., l. 37, delete '(3)' and substitute '(2)';

4 Ibid., p. 518, delete ll. 3–30 and substitute:

'TRACK I

(i) Paper (1)

(ii) Paper (2)

(iii) Paper (3)

(iv) Paper (4)

(v) Paper (5)

(vi) One paper chosen from Papers (22), (23), (24), (25), (26) or (29)

(vii) One further paper

(viii) One further paper.


TRACK II

(i) Paper (1)

(ii) Paper (2)

(iii) Paper (4)

(iv) Paper (5)

(v) One paper chosen from Papers (7), (8) or (9)

(vi) Paper (10)

(vii) EITHER Paper (11) or Paper (12) OR a further option from Paper (10)

(viii) One further paper.


TRACK III

(i) Paper (1)

(ii) Paper (2)

(iii) Paper (4)

(iv) Paper (5)

(v) Paper (13)

(vi) and (vii) EITHER Papers (14) and (15) OR Papers (16) and (17) OR Papers (18) and (19) OR Papers (20) and (21)

(viii) One further paper.'

5 Ibid., p. 520, ll. 32–3, delete 'paper 6 (New Testament Greek) or paper 7 (Biblical Hebrew)' and substitute 'paper 7 (New Testament Greek) or paper 8 (Biblical Hebrew)'.

6 Ibid., p. 522, l. 42, delete '11' and substitute '10'.

7 Ibid., l. 43, delete '(11 (a), 11 (b) etc.)' and substitute '(10 (a), 10 (b) etc.)'.

8 Ibid., p. 524, l. 2, delete '15' and substitute '14'.

9 Ibid., l. 21, delete '17' and substitute '16'.

10 Ibid., l. 34, delete '19' and substitute '18'.

11 Ibid., p. 532, l. 6, delete '(25)' and substitute '(24)'.

11 Ibid., l. 8, delete '(29)' and substitute '(28)'.

(iii) With effect from 1 October 2008 (for first examination in 2009)

In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 524, after l. 12, insert 'Credit will be given to candidates demonstrating competence in Classical Arabic.'


(b) B.Th

(i) With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first examination in 2008)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 537, delete ll. 17–22 and substitute:

'Candidates will study the Historical Books (Joshua, Judges, 1 and 2 Samuel, 1 and 2 Kings, 1 and 2 Chronicles, Ezra, Nehemiah) and the other Writings (Psalms, Proverbs, Job, Ecclesiastes, Song of Songs, Lamentations, Ruth, Esther, Daniel).

They will also study:

either (i) in English, Psalms 42–49 and 84–89, AND either 2 Samuel 1–12 or 2 Kings 18–25,;

or (ii) in Hebrew, 2 Kings 21–23.

Candidates who wish to prepare for assessment in Hebrew must enter for the written examination with texts in Hebrew. However, in the examination itself they may transfer to texts in English without penalty.'

(ii) With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first examination in 2008)

In Examination Regulations, 2006, p. 537, l. 26, delete 'John, Romans, Hebrews' and substitute 'John 1–6, 9–12, 17–20, Romans 1–12, and Hebrews'.

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