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Oxford University Gazette, 23 February 2006: Examinations and Boards

By-election to Divisional Board 9 March 2006

Mathematical and Physical Sciences

The following nomination has been duly received:

PROFESSOR D.J. GAVAGHAN, M.SC., D.PHIL. (B.SC Durham), Fellow of New College

Nominated by:

Professor A.W. Roscoe, University

Professor S. Abramsky, Wolfson

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Appointments, Reappointments, and Conferments of Title

Medical Sciences Division

Appointments

CLINICAL LECTURER

Obstetrics and Gynaecology

BRENDA ANN KELLY (MB, CH.B., Edinburgh, PH.D. London). In Obstetrics and Gynaecology. From 8 March 2006 until 7 March 2012.

Paediatrics

JULIAN FORTON (MB, B.CHIR.. Cambridge). In Paediatrics. From 1 March 2006 until 29 February 2012.

KIRSTEN PRISCILLA PERRETT (MB, BS Melbourne). In Paediatric Infectious Diseases. From 1 April 2006 until 31 March 2012.

SENIOR CLINICAL LECTURER

Clinical Medicine

ROBERT JOHN ORIEL DAVIES (MD Southampton). In Respiratory Medicine. From 1 April 2006 until 31 March 2011.

Reappointments

UNIVERSITY LECTURER

Paediatrics

ANDREW JOHN POLLARD (B.SC., MB, BS, PH.D. London). In Infectious Diseases. From 1 July 2006 until the retirement age.'

Conferment of title

TITLE OF UNIVERSITY RESEARCH LECTURER

DR MARK BAXTER, Wellcome Trust Senior Research Fellow, Department of Experimental Psychology

DR ARIEL BLOCKER, Guy Newton Senior Research Fellow, Sir William Dunn School of Pathology

DR MARK BUCKLEY, Royal Society University Research Fellow, Department of Experimental Psychology

DR ALISON CHAPPLE, Senior Research Fellow, Department of Primary Health Care

DR STEPHANIE CRAGG, Paton Fellow, Department of Pharmacology

DR ARJEN DONDORP, Clinical Researcher, Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine

DR MICHAEL GINGER, Royal Society University Resarch Fellow, Sir William Dunn School of Pathology

DR DEBORAH GOBERDHAN, Group Leader, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics

DR ASTRID IVERSEN, Investigator Scientist, Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine

DR LOUISE LOCOCK, Senior Qualitative Researcher, Department of Primary Health Care

DR PETER MCHUGH, Head DNA Damage and Repair Group, Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine

DR ANDREW NESBIT, Research Scientist, Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine

DR PAUL NEWTON, Director, Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Collaboration, Laos Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine

DR MATTHEW ROBSON, Chief MR Physicist, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine

DR AFSIE SABOKBAR, Senior Research Fellow, Nuffield Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

DR JOSEPH SELVANAYAGAM, Research Senior Group Leader, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine

DR KATJA SIMON, Research Fellow, Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine

DR PHILIP TAYLOR, Wellcome Trust Research Career Development Fellow, Sir William Dunn School of Pathology

DR EILA WATSON, Senior Research Officer, Department of Primary Health Care

DR RICHARD WISE, Research Scientist, Department of Clinical Neurology

DR MARK WOOLRICH, EPSRC Advanced Research Fellow, Department of Clinical Neurology

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Changes in Regulations

With the approval of the Educational Policy and Standards Committee of Council, the following changes in regulations made by the Medical Sciences Board will come into effect on 10 March.

Medical Sciences Board

(a) M.Sc. in Diagnostic Imaging

With effect from 1 October 2006 (for first examination in 2007)

In Examination Regulations, 2005, p. 782, delete from l.6, to p.784, l.43 and substitute:

'1. The Medical Sciences Board shall elect for the supervision of the course an organising committee which shall have the power to arrange lectures and other instruction.

2. Every candidate must follow for at least three terms, or, in the case of part-time students, for at least six terms, a course of instruction in Diagnostic Imaging.

3. Candidates will be required to present themselves for written and oral examination and to submit two written assignments and a dissertation in prescribed form on an approved topic.

4. Candidates will be required to take three papers of three hours each:

Paper 1 X-Rays, Radiological Procedures and Radiography

Paper 2 Nuclear Medicine and Ultrasonography

Paper 3 Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Examination questions will reflect aspects of the subject as described in the schedule.

5. Candidates will normally hold a first degree or equivalent qualification in the physical, biological or medical sciences.

6. Each candidate will be required to submit, for assessment of their progress, a written assignment of no more than 5,000 words by the end of each of their first two terms, or, in the case of part-time students, by the end of their second and fourth terms. The assignments will be on separate topics agreed with the candidate's supervisor and approved by the organising committee. The assignments must be word-processed and will subsequently be submitted to the examiners as part of the candidate's whole examination.

7. Each candidate will be required to submit a dissertation of no more than 15,000 words on a subject selected in consultation with the candidate's supervisor and approved by the organising committee. The dissertation may vary from an account of original research work to a survey of the literature. Dissertations which reproduce substantially work submitted in the other written assignments will not be admissible.

8. Three word-processed and appropriately bound copies of a dissertation must be delivered to the Course Director by a date prescribed by the examiners, together with the two written assignments described above. The examiners shall retain two copies of the dissertation of each candidate who passes the examination, for deposit in the departmental library.

9. An oral examination will be held and this may include questions on the candidate's dissertation, assignments, or written papers.

10. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.

Schedule

Paper 1: X-Rays, Radiological Procedures and Radiography

Atomic and nuclear physics, ionising radiation and interactions with matter, biological effects of ionising radiation. Production of x-rays, formation of radiographic images, design of equipment for generating x-rays. Measurement of quantity and quality of ionising radiation. Imaging receptors: photographic film, intensifying screens, fluoroscopy, image intensification and television systems. Computed imaging and digital systems.

Radiological contrast media: pharmacology, indications, contraindications and complications.

Technique of radiological contrast media examinations in the demonstration of gastrointestinal, hepatobiliary and urogenital tracts. Angiography and cardiovascular examination. Recognition of anatomy displayed by these techniques, especially pertaining to the gastrointestinal, genitourinary, cardiovascular and musculoskeletal systems. Advantages and disadvantages of these techniques in practice. Radiological protection; instrumentation, national and international legislation.

General principles of interventional radiology: guided drainage, biopsy, and interventional angiography.

Positioning and care of the patient in radiography, standard radiographic projections. General principles of microradiography, macroradiography and soft-tissue radiography. High voltage techniques and influence of exposure factors. General principles and methods of application of tomography. Film quality control and faults.

Paper 2: Nuclear Medicine and Ultrasonography

Radioactivity and radioactive sources. Radiation detectors and scintigraphic equipment. Measurement of radioactivity. Gamma-ray spectroscopy. Radioisotope generators and radio-pharmaceuticals.

Imaging devices; system performance and analysis. Static and dynamic imaging. Emission tomography. Protection of the patient in nuclear medicine.

Biological distribution of radionucleides. Recognition of anatomy and function demonstrated by scintigraphy.

Production, nature propagation and detection of ultrasound. Imaging methods and date display. Doppler effect and flow-sensitive imaging. Safety of ultrasound.

Tissue characterisation by ultrasonography. Recognition of normal anatomy displayed by ultrasonography, especially the contents of the abdomen and pelvis and musculoskeletal system. Applications in the chest and face and neck. Ultrasound contrast agents. Interventional uses of ultrasonography. Clinical applications of ultrasonography. Advantages and disadvantages of ultrasonography.

Paper 3: Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Design of computed tomographic equipment; production of x-rays, detection, data collection, image reconstruction and display, helical and multislice technology. Characteristics of CT images: matrix, pixels, voxels. Dynamic imaging. Radiation dosimetry in CT and patient protection.

Contrast media and other drugs used in computed tomography. Patient positioning and care. Advantages and disadvantages of computed tomography.

Physical principles of magnetic resonance. Equipment design, magnets and coils. Image production and array processing. Characteristics of magnetic resonance images: matrix, pixels, voxels, image contrast considerations. Effects of flow and flow-related imaging. Dynamic imaging.

Hazard of magnetic fields and patient protection.

General principles of magnetic resonance spectroscopy and functional magnetic imaging.

Normal anatomy displayed by computed, tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, especially pertaining to the head and neck, trunk and limbs. Clinical applications of both techniques, including relationship to other techniques. Advantages and disadvantages of both techniques in practice. Interventional uses of both techniques.'

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(b) M.Sc. in Endovascular Neurosurgery (Interventional Neuroradiology)

With effect from 1 September 2006 (for first examination in 2007)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2005, p. 761, after l. 32 insert:
 'Endovascular
Neurosurgery (Interventional Neuroradiology)       Medical Sciences'. 

2 Ibid., p. 794, after l. 6 insert:

'Endovascular Neurosurgery (Interventional Neuroradiology)

1. The Medical Sciences Board shall elect for the supervision of the course an organising committee which shall have the power to arrange lectures and other instruction.

2. Every candidate must follow for at least three terms or, in the case for part-time students, for at least six terms, a course of instruction in Endovascular Neurosurgery (Interventional Neuroradiology).

3. Candidates will be required to present themselves for written and oral examination and to submit a logbook and a dissertation in prescribed form on an approved topic.

4. Candidates will be required

To take three papers of three hours each:

Paper 1 Pathology, Physiology and Anatomy relevant to Endovascular Neurosurgery and Interventional Neuroradiology

Paper 2 Diagnosis in Endovascular Neurosurgery and Interventional Neuroradiology

Paper 3 Interventional Neuroradiological Techniques

Examination questions will reflect aspects of the subject as described in the schedule.

5. Candidates must be registered with the General Medical Council, hold an appropriate contract with the National Health Service, and have had appropriate experience in Diagnostic Radiology and/or Neurosurgery.

6. Each candidate will be required to submit a logbook to the Course Director by the end of their second term, or, in the case of part-time students, by the end of their fourth term. The logbook will subsequently be submitted to the examiners as part of the candidate's whole examination.

7. Each candidate will be required to submit a dissertation of no more than 15,000 words on a subject selected in consultation with the candidate's supervisor and approved by the organising committee. The dissertation may vary from an account of original research work to a survey of the literature. Dissertations which reproduce substantially work submitted in the other written assignments will not be admissible.

8. Three word-processed and appropriately bound copies of the dissertation must be delivered to the Course Director by a date prescribed by the examiners, together with the logbook as described above. The examiners shall retain two copies of the dissertation of each candidate who passes the examination, for deposit in the departmental library.

9. An oral examination will be held and this may include questions on the candidate's dissertation, logbook, or written papers.

10. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.

Schedule

Paper 1: Pathology, Physiology, and Anatomy relevant to Endovascular Neurosurgery and Interventional Radiology

Pathology of lesions amenable to interventional neuroradiological techniques. The natural history of such conditions and the indications for interventional measures. Anatomy of the central nervous system with special reference to vascular anatomy including common variations to the normal pattern. The embryology and phylogeny of the blood supply of the head and spine. Vascular physiology with special reference to the cerebral and spinal circulations. Normal and potential sites of collateral circulation. Endovascular routes to lesion of the head and spine.

Paper 2: Diagnosis in Endovascular Neurosurgery and Interventional Neuroradiology

The clinical and radiological diagnosis of conditions amenable to interventional neuroradiological techniques including recognition of common symptoms and signs associated with such conditions.

Radiological and other imaging techniques for localisation and evaluation of cerebral and spinal lesion, including angiography, myelography, CT and MR scanning, Doppler ultrasound (tanscranial and intra-operative), and the use of radio-pharmaceuticals. Electrophysiological and cerebral blood flow measurement techniques as well as neurological and cardiovascular monitoring pertinent to interventional neuroradiological procedures.

Paper 3: Interventional Neuroradiological Techniques

Interventional techniques for biopsy, embolisation, thrombolysis, and angioplasty. Delivery systems: their construction and applications. Embolisation materials including balloons, coils, stents, particulate and liquid embolic agents and their advantages and disadvantages for different applications. Pre- and post-procedural precautions, including indications for treatment, informed consent, and the recognition and management of complications.

The official name, constitution pharmacology, modes of administration, clinical agents used in interventional neuroradiological techniques. Sedation and the provision of analgesia during procedures. In particular, the use of anticoagulation, fibrinolytic, and anticonvulsant agents.'

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