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Oxford University Gazette, 23 February 2006: Diary

Friday 24 February

TAYLOR INSTITUTION: Slavonic and Modern Greek Library closed to readers (today only).

LEARNING INSTITUTE seminars: 'Career review and planning for contract research staff', 9.15 a.m.; 'Time management for administrative, secretarial, and support staff', 9.30 a.m.; and 'Introduction to the Bodleian Library', 11 a.m. (for details, see the Learning Institute site).

PROFESSOR R. LITTLEWOOD: 'The voice of God: talking to God in prayer' (Ethnicity and Identity Seminars: 'A sense of identity'), Lecture Theatre, 61 Banbury Road, 11 a.m.

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: 'Hairstyles, wigs, and whiskers (men's fashions)', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £2. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

A. BEATTY: 'The Pope in Mexico: syncretism in public ritual' (Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology seminar, Pauling Centre for Human Sciences, 58a Banbury Road), 4.15 p.m.

PROFESSOR STEPHEN HAWKING: 'The origin of the Universe' (Dennis Sciama Memorial Lecture), Martin Wood Lecture Theatre, Clarendon Laboratory, 5 p.m. (Admission to the lecture, and to the video-link in the Lindemann Lecture Theatre, by ticket only: sb@astro.ox.ac.uk. Tickets for the original date are invalid.)

PROFESSOR JOHN MORRILL: 'Legacies' (Ford's Lectures in British History: 'Living with revolution: the peoples of Britain and Ireland and the Civil Wars'), Schools, 5 p.m.

WOLFGANG WESSELS: 'Crisis of confidence in "old Europe" after the peaceful revolutions in "new Europe" and why the EU succeeded with its biggest enlargement' (lecture series: 'European crises 1945–2005: challenge and response in European integration'), European Studies Centre, 5 p.m.

L. WISE: 'President and Parliament: the Egyptian elections of 2005' (seminar series: 'The politics of elections in the Middle East today'), the Buttery, St Antony's, 5 p.m. (enquiries: Oxford (2)84780 or mec@sant.ox.ac.uk).

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Saturday 25 February

STUDY-DAY: 'Durkheim and the French topic: reception of pragmatism', Maison Française, 10.45 a.m.–4 p.m.

RECITAL, with Alexander Campkin, the chapel, Queen's, 1.15 p.m. (admission free, with retiring collection).

EVENSONG, the Cathedral, 6.05 p.m.: includes a performance of a setting of the Nunc Dimittis by Hugh Brunt of New College, the winning work in the inaugural Orlando Composition Prize.

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Sunday 26 February

THE VERY REVD CHRISTOPHER LEWIS preaches the Sermon on the Grace of Humility, St Mary's, 10 a.m.

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Monday 27 February

LEARNING INSTITUTE seminar: 'Lecturing: purposes, approach, and performance (Humanities and Social Sciences)'—Session 2, 12 noon (for details, see the Learning Institute site).

ELISABETH HSU: 'The history of Qinghao in Chinese materia medica' (seminar series: 'Medicine in the modern non-Western world'), Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine, 2.15 p.m.

PROFESSOR J.P. CARLEY (Leverhulme Visiting Professor): 'Ex-religious and their books' (lecture series: 'The sixteenth-century English library: monastery and private collection'), St Cross Building, 4.30 p.m.

DR TOBY KELLY: 'Vigilantes and the execution of suspected Palestinian collaborators under Israeli occupation' (Centre for Socio-Legal Studies: public seminars), Seminar Room B, Manor Road Building, 4.30 p.m.

MATTHEW NIBLETT: 'The true science of human nature: Joseph Priestley and the moral thought of Enlightened Dissent in the 1770s' (Enlightenment Workshop), Voltaire Foundation, 99 Banbury Road, 5 p.m.

DR MATTHIAS MORYS: 'Adjustment under the classical Gold Standard: how costly did the external constraint become to the European periphery?' (Seminar in Economic and Social History), Seminar Room, European Studies Centre, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR JONATHAN ZITTRAIN: ' "Code is law": technological complements to copyright' (lecture), Oxford Internet Institute, 1 St Giles', 5.30 p.m.

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Tuesday 28 February

ROWENA JACOBS: 'Ranking and random variation in health care' (workshop series: 'Ranking public services: from local to global'), Oxford Internet Institute, 12.30 p.m.

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: 'Twentieth-century art', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £2. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

DR SAM JOHNSON: 'From Dreyfus to Dmowski: tracing the British intellectual narrative to Europe's "Jewish Question" in the early twentieth century' (Seminar in Modern European Jewish History), European Studies Centre, 2.15 p.m.

DR MARK HARRISON: 'Quarantine and international relations: an historical perspective' (James Martin Institute for Science and Civilisation seminar series: 'Humanities and the future of humanity'), Saïd Business School, 4 p.m.

DOMINIC GRIEVE, MP, TONY LLOYD, MP, and SHAMI CHAKRABARTI: 'Do civil rights hinder combating terrorism?' (St Antony's Visiting Parliamentary Fellows seminars: 'Terrorism: roots and responses'), Nissan Lecture Theatre, St Antony's, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR RUTH GAVISON: 'Rights discourse and the alleged Palestinian right of return' (Isaiah Berlin Public Lectures in Middle East Dialogue), Ian Skipper Room, St Cross, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR ROGER GOODMAN: 'The state of Japanese welfare—welfare and the Japanese state' (Current Issues in Social Policy seminars: 'Wefare state transformations'), Violet Butler Seminar Room, Department of Social Policy and Social Work, 5 p.m.

DR E. CHRISTIANSON: 'Why film noir is good for the mind' (Centre for Christianity and Culture public lectures: 'Flickering images: theology, film, and culture'), Regent's Park College, 5 p.m.

J. TAYLOR: 'Reading the Jardin de Plaisance: some thoughts' (Medieval French Seminar), Maison Française, 5.15 p.m.

L. AUSTERN: ' "For Musicke is the Handmaid of the Lord": women and the performance of psalms in early modern England' (Graduate Students' Colloquia), Denis Arnold Hall, Faculty of Music, 5.15 p.m.

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Wednesday 1 March

LEARNING INSTITUTE seminar: 'Presentation skills practice', 9.30 a.m. (see information above).

ORGAN RECITAL: Lewis Brito-Babapulle, the chapel, Queen's, 1.10 p.m. (admission free, with retiring collection).

AMIRA BENNISON: 'Language and power in the medieval Islamic west: the dialectics of rebellion' (interdisciplinary seminars: 'Language and history'), MacGregor Room, Oriel, 2.15 p.m.

PROFESSOR TOM PHILLIPS: 'The secret triumph of ornament: finding art in the neighbourhood (and neighbourhood art)' (Slade Lectures 2006: 'Making art work—the artist in the studio'), Lecture Theatre, University Museum of Natural History, 5 p.m. (open to the public).

PROFESSOR IAN GREEN: 'Reconciling virtue and grace in English school and parish instruction, c.1560–1760' (Waynflete Lectures: 'Humanism and Protestantism in early modern England'), Grove Auditorium, Magdalen, 5 p.m.

LEAH BASSELL: 'From refugee woman to citizen: the politics of integration in France and Canada' (Refugee Studies Centre: public seminars), Seminar Room 2, Department of International Development, Mansfield Road, 5 p.m. (check for late changes at www.rsc.ox.ac.uk).

DR ANTONI ÜÇERLER: ' "Warring states"—Japan meets Silicon Valley: creating electronic editions of the sources' (D'Arcy Lectures: 'Christianity "Made in Japan": the Jesuit enterprise, 1549--1640'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR GIULIANO AMATO: 'Italian Europeans and (more or less) European Brits' (lecture), Lecture Theatre, St Antony's, 5 p.m.

DR J.D. ANTHONY: 'The changing nature of American interests in the Gulf' (lecture), Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies, 5 p.m.

DR YOON-JE CHO (Korean Ambassador): 'Recent development of the Korean economy' (lecture), Charles Wellbeloved Room, Harris Manchester, 5.30 p.m.

DR WILLIAM WHYTE: 'The maker of modern Oxford: Sir T.G. Jackson and the rebuilding of the University' (lecture), Hertford, 5.30 p.m. (admission free but space limited: to reserve a ticket tel. (2)76172, or e-mail: picturegallery@chch.ox.ac.uk).

THE FRIENDS OF THE BODLEIAN presents a Literary Evening with the novelist and critic

DAVID LODGE, who will read from and discuss his work, Holywell Music Room, 7.30 p.m. (tickets £10, students £5, on application to the Administrator, Friends of the Bodleian: tel. (2)77234, e-mail fob@bodley.ox.ac.uk).

PROFESSOR H. CHERTOK: 'He also spoke as a Jew: the mystery of The Revd James Parkes' (David Patterson Seminars), Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Yarnton Manor, 8 p.m.

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Thursday 2 March

LEARNING INSTITUTE seminar: 'Lecturing: purposes, approach, and performance (LES, MPS, and Medical Sciences)'—Session 2, 12 noon (for details, see the Learning Institute site).

OLIVER COATES: cello recital, the chapel, Harris Manchester, 1.30 p.m. (admission free, with retiring collection).

PROFESSOR HENRY SHUE: 'Torture and exceptional circumstances' (seminar series: 'Normative theory and the use of force'), Schools, 2 p.m.

DR PATRICK SIMON: 'Shaping migration research strategies: the French experience' (COMPAS seminars—Centre on Migration, Policy and Society: 'Shaping migration research strategies: national research centres, government policies, and public attitudes'), Pauling Centre, 58a Banbury Road, 2 p.m.

SUE JERVIS: 'Moving experiences: responses to relocation among military wives' (International Gender Studies Centre lectures: 'Transnational people: globally mobile professional people'), Department for International Development, 2 p.m.

JONATHAN WYATT: 'Researching professional identities: autoethnography, performance, and narrative' (Learning Institute Research Seminars), Meeting Room, Learning Institute, Littlegate House, 4 p.m. (to attend, contact: rocio.garavito@learning.ox.ac.uk).

JAN SALICK: 'Global warming and tourism in Tibet and Chinese development' (Development Seminars), Seminar Room 2, Department of International Development, 5 p.m.

THE RT. HON. JOHN GUMMER, MP: 'Joining up environmental governance: the challenge of an holistic approach' (Linacre Lectures: 'Environmental Governance'), Martin Wood Lecture Theatre, Clarendon Laboratory, 5.15 p.m.

M. DI PALMA: 'Rousseau, Derrida and the reserve of Nature' (Early Modern French Seminar), Maison Française, 5.15 p.m.

DR FRANCESCA GALLIGAN: 'The library of Samuel Harsnett: a preliminary report' (Oxford Bibliographical Society Lecture), Taylor Institution, 5.15 p.m.

DOM HENRY WANSBROUGH, OSB: 'The roots of pilgrimage' (Lent course: 'The heart in pilgrimage'), Priory Room, Christ Church, 7 p.m. (further details from: nicholas.coulton@chch.ox.ac.uk).

THE CHOIR OF QUEEN'S COLLEGE and THE QUEEN'S CONSORT perform Handel's Dixit Dominus, and Scarlatti's Stabat Mater, Queen's, 8.15 p.m. (Admission £12/£8/£6. Details at www.queens.ox.ac.uk/choir.)

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Friday 3 March

DR G. ALEX: ' "Touchability" and "untouchability" in India: the body as a site for social values' (Ethnicity and Identity Seminars: 'A sense of identity'), Lecture Theatre, 61 Banbury Road, 11 a.m.

PROFESSOR J.-F. SCHAUB: 'The early modern world and the feeling of the ubiquity of barbarism' (workshop), Seminar Room, Modern History Research Unit, Radcliffe Infirmary, 3–6 p.m. (to attend, contact: teena.stabler@history.ox.ac.uk).

P. FROERER: 'Disciplining the Saffron Way: moral education and the Hindu Rashtra' (Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology seminar, Pauling Centre for Human Sciences, 58a Banbury Road), 4.15 p.m.

MATTHIAS JOPP: 'The Balkan crisis as engine for the evolution of European security and defence policy' (lecture series: 'European crises 1945–2005: challenge and response in European integration'), European Studies Centre, 5 p.m.

M. RABBANI: 'Palestinian elections: consolidation through change?' (seminar series: 'The politics of elections in the Middle East today'), the Buttery, St Antony's, 5 p.m. (enquiries: Oxford (2)84780 or mec@sant.ox.ac.uk).

PROFESSOR TIMOTHY GARTON ASH: `How can a freer journalism be developed and supported in un-free countries?' (`Media and Politics' series), Nuffield, 5 p.m.

H.E. MR KAMALESH SHARMA (High Commissioner of India): 'India in a globalising world' (lecture), Seminar Room 2, Queen Elizabeth House, Mansfield Road, 5 p.m.