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Oxford University Gazette, 13 October 2005: Examinations and Boards

REAPPOINTMENTS AND CONFERMENT OF TITLE

Medical Sciences Division

Reappointments

UNIVERSITY LECTURER

Clinical Pharmacology

LEONARD WILLIAM SEYMOUR (B.SC. Manchester, PH.D. Keele). In Gene Delivery. From 1 July 2007 until the retirement age.

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CLINICAL LECTURER

Psychiatry

MINA FAZEL, BM, B.CH. (BA Cambridge). In Child Psychiatry. From 1 June 2005 until 31 May 2008.

Primary Health Care

MATTHEW THOMPSON (B.SC., MB, CH.B. Glasgow). In Primary Health Care. From 1 March 2006 until 28 February 2009.


Social Sciences Division

UNIVERSITY LECTURER (CUF)

DR CATHERINE DONNELLY, BCL, D.PHIL. (LL.B. Dublin, LL.M . Harvard), Fellow of Wadham College. Conferment of title of CUF Lecturer in Law. From 1 October 2005 to 30 September 2010.

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CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the Educational Policy and Standards Committee of Council, the following changes in regulations made by divisional boards will come into effect on 28 October.

1 Humanities Board

D.Phil. in Fine Art

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Regulations, 2005, p. 896, l. 38, after 'thesis', insert '*'.

2 Ibid., p. 896, insert footnote:

'* Here and hereafter in these regulations, in the case of Fine Art candidates offering studio practice as part of their submission, and in the case of Music candidates offering a portfolio of musical compositions as part of their submission, 'thesis' shall be understood to include the totality of the candidate's submission.'

3 Ibid., p. 897, l. 8, after 'board.', insert:

'In the case of Fine Art candidates offering studio practice, and in the case of Music candidates offering a portfolio of musical compositions as part of their submissions, this will include such studio or compositional work as the board requires.'

4 Ibid., p. 903, after l. 9, insert:

'or (in the case of Fine Art candidates offering studio practice as part of their submission) two printed or typewritten copies of the written portion of the thesis, and a portfolio or exhibition of work, together with documentation of that work.'

5 Ibid., after l. 28, insert:

'(ii) (in the case of Fine Art candidates offering studio practice as part of their submission) to consider the portfolio or exhibition of work documented under section 4 (i) of these regulations, and presented or mounted by the candidate in partial satisfaction of the examination requirements;'

6 Ibid., renumber (ii)–(v) as (iii)–(vi).

7 Ibid., p. 910, l. 29, after 'not be accepted.', insert:

'Fine Art candidates offering studio practice as part of their submission must submit, together with the written portion of their thesis, documentation in appropriate form of the exhibition or portfolio of works to be examined. Wherever possible, this documentation should be bound with the written portion of the thesis.'

8 Ibid., p. 911, l. 11, after 'submission.', insert:

'Fine Art candidates offering studio practice as part of their submission must submit the written portion of their thesis together with documentation in appropriate form of their exhibition or portfolio of works. Wherever possible, this documentation should be bound with the written portion of the thesis.'

9 Ibid., l. 40, after 'some other place.', insert:

'In the case of Fine Art candidates offering studio practice as part of their submission, where it does not take place in the presence of the exhibition or portfolio of works, the candidate's supervisor must arrange for the examiners to view this part of the submission prior to the commencement of the oral examination.'

10 Ibid., p. 912, l. 45, after 'the examination.', insert:

'In the case of Fine Art candidates offering studio practice as part of their submission, where the oral examination is not taking place in the presence of the exhibition or portfolio of works, it is recommended they attend with the written portion of their thesis together with documentation of the work.'

11 Ibid., p. 926, after l. 17, insert:

'4. COMMITTEE FOR THE RUSKIN SCHOOL OF DRAWING AND FINE ART

1. Admission

Candidates may elect to pursue research by thesis alone, or by a combination of thesis and studio practice; where the latter course is proposed, the studio work produced must be original work developed and realised in respect of the stated aims of the research programme, exemplifying and locating the ideas that have been developed in conjunction with the written part of the thesis. Fine Art candidates are initially admitted as Probationer Research Students. Depending on whether they wish to pursue research by thesis alone, or through a combination of thesis and studio practice, candidates should support their application with:

EITHER

(a) 1. a sample of recent written work (4,000--6,000 words), preferably but not necessarily related to the proposed topic or area of research, such as an undergraduate or Master's dissertation (or part of it) or a substantial essay;

2. a proposal for a research topic or area (about 1,000 words), which should include a statement why this work should be carried out at Oxford.

OR

(b) (For those intending to offer studio practice as part of the final submission)

1. a sample of written work (2,000–3,000 words);

2. a portfolio of recently completed studio work with slides or other documentation of work not available for inclusion;

3. a plan of work to be completed in Oxford. All candidates should expect to attend for interview.

Part-time study

In assessing applications from candidates seeking to undertake a research degree through part-time study, the Committee for the Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art shall have regard to evidence that:

(i) the candidate is suitable to undertake research at doctoral level;

(ii) the candidate's personal and professional circumstances are such that it is both practicable for him or her to fulfil the requirements of the course, and necessary for him or her to study on a part-time basis;

(iii) if appropriate, the candidate has the written support of his or her present employer for his or her proposed course of study and its obligations;

(iv) the candidate's proposed topic of research is suitable for part-time study;

(v) the candidate can meet the attendance requirements relating to part-time study.

Attendance requirements for part-time study

Part-time students are required to attend for a minimum of thirty days of university-based work each year, to be arranged with the agreement of their supervisor, for the period that their names remain on the Register of Graduate Students unless individually dispensed by the committee.

2. Transfer of status to M.Litt. or D.Phil.

During the first year of study, Probationer Research Students are required to attend lectures, seminars, and classes within the University as directed by their supervisor(s). Students will also undertake foundation work related to their research area.

Applications for transfer to M.Litt. or D.Phil. status should normally be made by the end of the third term, and must be made by the end of the sixth term. Students must satisfy the committee that (a) they have followed and completed their prescribed courses of study, (b) they have undertaken preparatory research (and, where applicable, studio work) to the satisfaction of their supervisor(s), (c) the proposed research topic is acceptable, and that they are competent to undertake it, (d) (in the case of those intending to offer studio practice as part of the final submission) the proposed work to be undertaken is of sufficient substance.

In the case of part-time students, applications for transfer should normally be made by the end of the sixth term, and must be made by the end of the twelfth term.

Candidates for transfer should submit a brief statement (1,000 words) on the topic of their research and the manner in which they propose to treat it. This should be accompanied by:

EITHER

(a) an essay of about 5,000 words relevant to the topic proposed for the thesis.

OR

(b) (for those intending to offer studio practice as part of the final submission) a portfolio or exhibition of studio work with slides or other documentation of work not available for inclusion and a related essay of 3,000 words.

Application for transfer (including all the submitted material) should be submitted no later than the third week of the third term and accompanied by a report from the student's supervisor(s). (Upon the recommendation of the supervisor(s), a student may be permitted to submit no later than Monday of the week before full term in the fourth term). On receiving the submissions the committee shall appoint two assessors, both of whom shall consider the submitted material, and conduct the oral examination. Transfer to D.Phil. student status is dependent on satisfactory reports from assessors and confirmation of (a)–(d) above.

3. Confirmation of D.Phil. status

Applications for confirmation of D.Phil. status should normally be made by the end of the eighth term as a research student at Oxford, and must be made by the end of the ninth term; or, in the case of part-time students, normally by the end of the eighteenth term (and must be made by the end of the twenty-fourth term).

Every student seeking confirmation of status should make a submission consisting of:

EITHER

(a) 1. a thesis title, together with an outline of the thesis, and an essay of about 6,000 words on the current state of the student's research, or a portion of the thesis of comparable length.

OR

(b) 1. a portfolio or exhibition of studio work, accompanied by statement of future plans;

2. an essay on a related topic (3,000 words).

All candidates will be examined orally by two assessors. In the case of those intending to offer studio practice as part of the final submission, both assessors will view the portfolio or exhibition of studio work prior to the oral examination. Confirmation of status may take place only when the committee has received satisfactory reports from the assessors, and from the student's supervisor(s).

4. Final submission

EITHER

(a) For the Degree of M.Litt. a thesis not exceeding 40,000 words, or for the Degree of D.Phil. a thesis not exceeding 80,000 words, including notes, bibliography, glossary, appendices, etc.

OR

(b) For the Degree of M.Litt. an exhibition of studio work and a written thesis of up to 20,000 words. For the Degree of D.Phil. an exhibition of studio work and a written thesis of up to 40,000 words.

In the case of those offering studio practice as part of the final submission, both assessors will view the portfolio or exhibition of studio work prior to the oral examination. The supervisor will ensure that the assessors view the studio work. This may take place in a different venue from, and on a day prior to the oral examination. There should normally be no more than three months between the dates of the viewing and the oral examination. In conducting the oral examination, the assessors will be concerned to establish that the studio work has been clearly presented in relation to the argument of the written thesis, and that it has been set in its relevant theoretical, historical, or critical context.'

12 Ibid., renumber 4–9 as 5–10.

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2 Social Sciences Board

Doctoral programme in Information, Communication, and the Social Sciences

With immediate effect

In Examination Regulations, 2005, p. 974, after l.25 insert:

'6. OXFORD INTERNET INSTITUTE

1. Admissions

Applicants shall be required to satisfy the Graduate Studies Committee of the Oxford Internet Institute that they have:

(a) a Master's degree or other advanced degree, normally in one of the social sciences, and normally passed with a mark of at least 67 per cent or an equivalent level of distinction;

(b) achieved at least a 2.1 (or its equivalent) at first degree level;

(c) for students whose first language is not English, have met the higher level of the University's English language requirements; and that they are:

(d) well-fitted to undertake research at doctoral level.

2. Probationer Research Students

All students are normally admitted as Probationer Research Students. Unless granted a dispensation by the Graduate Studies Committee of the Oxford Internet Institute, Probationer Research Students during their first year shall:

(a) attend such lectures, seminars, and classes as his or her supervisor and/or the committee shall determine;

(b) attend and satisfactorily complete such courses or classes from the Institute's Research Methods Training Programme as directed by the committee.

3. Transfer to D.Phil. status

Students will normally be expected to transfer to D.Phil. status in their third or fourth term as a Probationer Research Student at the Oxford Internet Institute. Applications should be submitted to the Graduate Studies Committee of the Oxford Internet Institute and will comprise the following:

(a) a transfer of status form, signed by the candidate's supervisor and an appropriate officer of the candidate's college;

(b) confirmation from the candidate's supervisor that such courses as the candidate has been required to undertake have been satisfactorily completed;

(c) an outline of their research (one side of A4 paper);

(d) a detailed research proposal of no more than 6,000 words. This should: i. draw upon relevant literature to discuss the background to the research, theoretical perspectives, and possible outcomes to the research; ii. state key research questions iii. discuss the overall methodological approach, and specific strategies, to be employed in answering these research questions, paying particular attention to practical and ethical issues relevant to the research;

(e) a preliminary timetable for the research;

(f) a list of references. The application will be considered by a specially constituted panel of two assessors appointed by the Graduate Studies Committee of the Oxford Internet Institute. The panel will read the work, interview the candidate and make a recommendation to the committee in a reasoned written report.

Candidates will be expected during the interview to show evidence of their understanding of general theory and research methods in the social sciences applicable to their proposed study and specific research methods appropriate to the study of social aspects of the Internet and related ICTs.

The committee will make a decision on the application in the light of the assessors' report and may request additional written work or other evidence, or appoint an additional assessor, whenever it considers necessary.

4. Confirmation of status

Applications for confirmation of status as a Student for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy submitted to the Graduate Studies Committee of the Oxford Internet Institute shall comprise the following:

(a) a confirmation of status application form signed by the candidate's supervisor and an appropriate officer of the candidate's college;

(b) an abstract of the thesis (one side of A4 paper);

(c) an outline structure of the thesis, consisting of chapter headings, and a brief statement of the intended content;

(d) an outline timetable detailing what work has already been carried out and what activities are planned for the remaining stages;

(e) two completed draft chapters intended to form part of the final thesis.

The application will be considered by a specially constituted panel of two assessors appointed by the Graduate Studies Committee of the Oxford Internet Institute. The panel will read the work, interview the candidate and make a recommendation to the committee in a written report.

5. Thesis

The thesis must not exceed 100,000 words, the limit to include abstract, all notes and appendices but not the bibliography. Any thesis exceeding this limit is liable to be rejected on that ground unless prior dispensation has been granted by the Graduate Studies Committee on the advice of the candidate's supervisor.'

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