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Oxford University Gazette, 28 April 2005: Examinations and Boards

PLANNING AND RESOURCE ALLOCATION COMMITTEE

Changes in Regulations

The Planning and Resource Allocation Committee of Council has made the following changes in regulations, to come into effect on 13 May.

Regulations on Financial Matters

With effect from 1 September 2005

[To revise fee rates for 2005–6]

1 In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 1099, l. 13 , delete '2004–5' and substitute '2005–6'.

2 Ibid., l. 18, delete '£1,150' and substitute '£1,175'.

3 Ibid., l. 23, delete '£560' and substitute '£570'.

4 Ibid., ll. 27–29, delete '(c) for part-time students' rate, £200;' and reletter (d) to (g).

5 Ibid., l. 30, delete '£4,085;†' and footnote † and substitute 'fees shall be payable at 50 per cent of the fee rate specified for the relevant subject area in the Schedule below; in cases where a Recognised or Visiting Student is studying across subject areas in different categories of the Schedule, the applicable fee rate shall be that which applies to the larger portion of their studies;'.

6 Ibid., l. 32, delete '£10,890' and substitute '£11,380'.

7 Ibid., l. 39, delete '2004–5' and substitute '2005–6'.

8 Ibid., l. 42, delete '£3,010' and substitute '£3,085'.

9 Ibid., l. 44, delete 'and (l) ' and substitute 'to (m) '.

10 Ibid., p. 1100, l. 2, delete '£23,000' and substitute '£26,000'.

11 Ibid., l. 4, after 'accommodation) ;' insert 'for the Degree of M.Sc. in Financial Economics, £19,500;' and delete footnote *.

12 Ibid., l. 15, after 'Economics for Development,' insert 'or the first year of the Degrees of'; and at l. 18 delete '£3,010' and insert '£6,520'; and delete footnote †.

13 Ibid., l. 20, delete '£5,720' and insert '£5,950'.

14 Ibid., l. 22, delete '£5,250' and insert '£4,250'.

15 Ibid., l. 24, delete '£7,500' and insert '£6,500'.

16 Ibid., l. 32, delete '£4,000' and insert '£3,600' and at l. 33, delete '£7,600' and insert '£6,600'.

17 Ibid., l. 41, after 'Athletic Performance,' insert 'or the Degree of M.Sc. in Pharmacology,'.

18 Ibid., l. 43, insert '(m) for members of the University working for the Degree of M.Sc. in Global Health Science: a fee equivalent to that payable under Category A in the Schedule below for those entitled to be charged fees at the 'home' rate; or a fee equivalent to that payable under Category D for overseas students;'.

19 Ibid., l. 43, reletter '(m)' as '(n)'.


[To revise the Fee Schedule for 2005–6, incorporating phased introduction of fee category changes]

20 Ibid., p. 1101, footnote *, delete '2005–6' and substitute '2006–7'; delete 'the reassignment of a number of courses.. . Council has also approved'; delete '4.5' and substitute '4.0 per cent'; and delete '2004–05' and substitute '2005–6'.


[Category A]

21 Ibid., p. 1101, l. 2, delete '£8,170' and substitute '£8,540'.

22 Ibid., p. 1101, l. 3 to p. 1102, l. 12, delete all text and substitute:

'(i) those liable to pay a composition fee under the provisions of §6 cl. 1 above, who are studying for an undergraduate Degree in:

Literae Humaniores;
Mathematics and Philosophy;
Philosophy and Theology;
Physics and Philosophy;
Theology (B.Th.);

(ii) those liable to pay a composition fee under the provisions of §6 cl. 1 above, who commenced the programme of study before 1 September 2005*, and who are studying for an undergraduate Degree in:

Ancient and Modern History;
Archaeology and Anthropology;
Classical Archaeology and Ancient History;
Classics and English;
Classics and Modern Languages;
Classics and Oriental Studies;
Economics and Management;
English Language and Literature;
English and Modern Languages;
European and Middle Eastern Languages;
Geography;
History of Art;
Human Sciences;
Jurisprudence;
Mathematics;
Mathematics and Statistics;
Modern History;
Modern History and Economics;
Modern History and English;
Modern History and Modern Languages;
Modern History and Politics;
Modern Languages;
Oriental Studies;
Philosophy and Modern Languages;
Philosophy, Politics and Economics;
Theology (BA);

(iii) those liable to pay a composition fee under the provision of §6 cl. 1 above, who commenced the programme of study before 1 September 2005*, and who are studying for the Postgraduate Diploma in Educational Studies;

(iv) those liable to pay a composition fee under the provisions of §6 cl. 3 above, who are admitted as students by:

(a) the Humanities Board to work within the Faculty of Philosophy or to work towards to M.Th. or Postgraduate Diploma in Applied Theology;

(b) the Social Sciences Board, and who are in their second or subsequent year of study towards a graduate research Degree;

(v) those liable to pay a composition fee under the provisions of §6 cl. 3 above, who commenced the programme of study prior to 1 September 2004*, and who are admitted as students by the Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board to work within the Computing Laboratory, Mathematical Institute or Department of Statistics;

(vi) those liable to pay a composition fee under the provisions of §6 cl. 3 above, who commenced the programme of study prior to 1 September 2005*, and who are admitted as students by:

(a) the Humanities Board;

(b) the Life and Environmental Sciences Board to work within the Schools of Anthropology, Archaeology or Geography and the Environment;

(c) the Social Sciences Board;

(d) the Continuing Education Board;

(vii) those liable to pay a composition fee under the provisions of §6 cl. 6 above, and who are studying a subject listed in (i) or (iv) (a) above.'

23 Ibid., p. 1102, footnote *, after 'D.Phil.' insert 'or M.Phil'; and delete 'a programme which qualifies.. . §6 cl. 4' and substitute 'a graduate taught programme in the same subject area'.


[Category B]

24 In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 1101, l. 13, delete '£9,530' and substitute '£9,960'.

25 Ibid., ll. 14–20, delete all text and substitute:

'(i) those liable to pay a composition under the provisions of §6 cl. 1 above, who commenced the programme of study on or after 1 September 2005, and who are studying for an undergraduate Degree in:
Ancient and Modern History;
Archaeology and Anthropology;
Classical Archaeology and Ancient History;
Classics and English;
Classics and Modern Languages;
Classics and Oriental Studies;
Economics and Management;
English Language and Literature;
English and Modern Languages;
European and Middle Eastern Languages;
Geography;
History of Art;
Human Sciences;
Jurisprudence;
Mathematics;
Mathematics and Statistics;
Modern History;
Modern History and Economics;
Modern History and English;
Modern History and Modern Languages;
Modern History and Politics;
Modern Languages;
Oriental Studies;
Philosophy and Modern Languages;
Philosophy, Politics and Economics;
Theology (BA);

(ii) those liable to pay a composition fee under the provision of §6 cl. 1 above, who commenced the programme of study on or after 1 September 2005, and who are studying for the:
Degree of BCL or Magister Juris;
Diploma in Theology;
Diploma in Legal Studies;
Postgraduate Diploma in Educational Studies;
Postgraduate Certificate in Education;

(iii) those liable to pay a composition fee under the provisions of §6 cl. 3 above, who commenced the programme of study on or after 1 September 2004*, and who are admitted as students by the Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board to work within the Computing Laboratory, Mathematical Institute or Department of Statistics (other than for the M.Sc. in Computer Science or the M.Sc./Postgraduate Diploma in Applied Statistics) ;

(iv) those liable to pay a composition fee under the provisions of §6 cl. 3 above, who commenced the programme of study on or after 1 September 2005*, and who are admitted as students by:
(a) the Humanities Board to work within any Faculty or Department (other than the Faculty Philosophy, the Faculty of Music or the Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art, or for the M.Th. or Postgraduate Diploma in Applied Theology) ;

(b) the Life and Environmental Sciences Board to work within the Schools of Anthropology, Archaeology or Geography and the Environment;

(c) the Social Sciences Board (other than those in their second and subsequent year of study towards a graduate research Degree) ;

(d) the Continuing Education Board;

(v) those liable to pay a composition fee under the provisions of §6 cl. 6 above, and who are studying a subject listed in (i) or (ii) above, or which falls within the scope of any board of any division as specified in (iii) and (iv) above.'


[Category C]

26 Ibid., p. 1102, l. 21, delete '£10,890' and substitute '£11,380'.

27 Ibid., p. 1103, ll. 5–19, delete all text and substitute.

'(iii) those liable to pay a composition fee under the provisions of §6 cl. 3 above, who are admitted as students by:

(a) the Life and Environmental Sciences Board to work within the Departments of Biochemistry, Plant Sciences or Zoology;

(b) the Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board to work within the Departments of Chemistry, Earth Sciences, Engineering Science, Materials, Physics or the Life Sciences Interface Doctoral Training Centre, or to work towards to M.Sc. in Computing Science or the M.Sc./Postgraduate Diploma in Applied Statistics;

(c) the Medical Sciences Board to work within the Department of Experimental Psychology;

(iv) those liable to pay a composition fee under the provisions of §6 cl. 3 above, who commenced the programme of study on or after 1 September 2005, and who are admitted as students by the Humanities Board to work within the Faculty of Music or the Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art;

(v) those liable to pay a composition fee under the provisions of §6 cl. 3 above, who commenced the programme of study prior to 1 September 2005, and who are admitted as students by the Medical Sciences Board to work within the Departments of Human Anatomy and Genetics, Pathology, Pharmacology or Physiology;

(vi) those liable to pay a composition fee under the provisions of §6 cl. 6 above, and who are studying a subject listed in (i) or (ii) above, or which falls within the scope of any board of any division as specified in (iii) or (iv) above.'


[Category D]

28 In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 1103, l. 20, delete '£19,970' and substitute '£20,870'.

29 Ibid., p. 1103, ll. 28–29, delete all text and substitute:

'(iii) those liable to pay a composition fee under the provisions of §6 cl. 3 above, who commenced the programme of study on or after 1 September 2005, and who are admitted as students by the Medical Sciences Board to work within the Departments of Human Anatomy and Genetics, Pathology, Pharmacology or Physiology;

(iv) those liable to pay a composition fee under the provisions of §6 cl. 6 above, and who are studying a subject listed in (i) above, or which falls within the scope of any board of any division as specified in (ii) or (iii) above.'

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CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the Educational Policy and Standards Committee of Council, the following changes in regulations made by divisional boards will come into effect on 13 May.

1 Humanities Board and Social Sciences Board

Honour School of Philosophy, Politics, and Economics

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 498, delete ll. 27–34 and substitute:

'Candidates may be expected to show knowledge of the following topics: political parties and party systems; electoral systems; political executives; legislatures; bureaucracies; federalism and other forms of territorial decentralisation; judiciaries; interest groups; forms of government and the constitutional allocation of power between institutions; democratisation. Questions may be set regarding the nature, origins, and political effects of the individual institutions in the preceding list. Candidates should answer all questions comparatively. They should show knowledge of relevant empirical material, and use evidence, comparative methods, and theoretical perspectives appropriately.'

2 Ibid., p. 502, ll. 20–1, delete 'of some later Marxists' and substitute 'knowledge of some later Marxists and critics of Marx'.

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2 Life and Environmental Sciences Board

(a) Honour School of Natural Science (Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry)

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 443, l. 23, after 'concerned.' insert:

'Candidates will be required to present a brief oral report of their research project in the first half of Trinity Full Term to a group of two examiners (or examiner(s) and assessor appointed to ensure an adequate representation of expertise), after which the candidate shall be examined viva voce on the project. The form of the presentation to examiners shall be specified in guidelines published by the Department of Biochemistry in week 8 of Trinity Full Term in the academic year preceding the examination.'


(b) M.Sc. by Coursework in Biodiversity, Conservation, and Management

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

1 In Examination Regulations, p. 762, l. 15, delete 'based on eight core options'.

2 Ibid., p. 763, Schedule, delete ll. 6–47 and substitute

'The core courses will be examined under the following heads.

(i) Biodiversity science. Candidates will be expected to have knowledge of and a critical understanding of the major contemporary themes in biodiversity science and conservation including an appreciation of the various research methods used to collect scientific data.

(ii) Conservation ethics and values. Candidates will be expected to have knowledge of the various ethical frameworks and value systems adopted by conservationists and how differing value systems can influence the development of effective conservation practice and policy.

(iii) Biodiversity policy and management. Candidates will be expected to have knowledge of the techniques and conceptual basis of contemporary conservation planning and the international and national legal frameworks for implementing conservation policy.'

3 Ibid., p. 763 l. 50, to p. 764, l. 2, delete 'The topics on offer.. . are to be taken.'

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3 Social Sciences Board

(a) M.Phil. in Politics (Comparative Government, Political Theory, European Politics and Society)

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006 for the Qualifying Test, and for first examination in 2007 for the final examination)

In Examination Regulations, 2004, delete from p. 650, l. 29, to p. 655, l. 34, and substitute:

'Each candidate must pass a Qualifying Test at the end of the third term from the beginning of the course in the two compulsory papers specified for their course unless given exemption by the Politics Graduate Studies Committee. The qualifying test shall be set and administered by the examiners appointed to examine for the M.Phil. degrees in Politics. In Comparative Government the two compulsory papers are Comparative Government and Research Methods in Political Science. In European Politics and Society the two compulsory papers are European Government and Integration, and Research Methods in Political Science. In Political Theory the two compulsory papers are Theory of Politics, and Research Methods in Political Theory. Candidates who fail the Qualifying Test will normally be allowed to retake the test before the beginning of the first week of the next academic year.

Compulsory papers:

(a) Research Methods

(i) Research Methods in Political Science is a compulsory paper for candidates in Comparative Government and European Politics and Society. Candidates will satisfactorily complete a course of lectures, classes and practical work in Statistical Methods in Political Science, as set out in the Notes of Guidance for Graduate Students and Supervisors in Politics. Each candidate must also complete a full course in Research Methods in Hilary Term of the first year, from the options described in the Notes of Guidance for Graduate Students and Supervisors in Politics, together with two short–course options in Hilary or Trinity Term, as detailed in the Notes of Guidance. Each student must also attend the courses in each term on research design and are required to produce a formally assessed Research Design Essay of between 4,000 and 6,000 words on research design as it bears on some aspect of politics. The essay will normally be related to the subject of the student's proposed M.Phil. thesis. The date of submission and the format are as stated in the Notes of Guidance for Graduate Students and Supervisors in Politics as published annually by the Department of Politics and International Relations. The Director of Graduate Studies in Politics shall draw the attention of the examiners to the names of any candidates who have failed to complete to a satisfactory level of quality their work in Statistical Methods and in the research methods options, and examiners may require candidates to retake the course or a specified part thereof. The reports of practical work and the work submitted for the research methods options shall be available for inspection by the examiners. The Research Design Essay is assessed directly by the Board of Examiners.

(ii) Research Methods in Political Theory is a compulsory paper for candidates in Political Theory. Candidates will satisfactorily complete the lectures, classes and practical work as set out in the Notes for Graduate Students and Supervisors in Politics for two core courses in Ethics and Text and Interpretation in Political Theory, together with two short–course options in Hilary or Trinity Term, as detailed in the Notes of Guidance. Each student must also attend the courses in each term on research design and are required to produce a formally assessed Research Design Essay of between 4,000 and 6,000 words on research design as it bears on some aspect of politics. The essay will normally be related to the subject of the student's proposed M.Phil. thesis. The date of submission and the format are as stated in the Notes of Guidance for Graduate Students and Supervisors in Politics as published annually by the Department of Politics and International Relations. The Director of Graduate Studies in Politics shall draw the attention of the examiners attention the names of any candidates who have failed to complete to a satisfactory level of quality their work in their research methods options, and examiners may require candidates to retake the course or a specified part thereof. The reports of practical work and the work submitted for the research methods options shall be available for inspection by the examiners. The Research Design Essay is assessed directly by the Board of Examiners. Candidates in European Politics and Society will be required to have a working (i.e. good reading) knowledge of two of the following languages of the European Union: viz. English, and one of French, German, Italian, and Spanish. Unless exempted by the Politics Graduate Studies Committee, candidates will be tested in the language or languages they propose to offer by the end of their third term. Candidates who fail the test will normally be allowed to retake the test before the beginning of the first week of the next academic year.


(b) Comparative Government

(Compulsory paper for Comparative Government students only)

The theory and practice of government in modern states.


(c) Theory of Politics

(Compulsory paper for Political Theory students only)

A critical examination of political concepts and theories, including social concepts and theories with political relevance.


(d) European Government and Integration

(Compulsory paper for European Politics and Society Students only)

The constitutions and formal structure of governments in European states, including the UK, and the theory and practice of integration in Europe.


Final Examination

No candidate shall enter the final examination unless he has already passed the Qualifying Test or has been granted exemption by the Graduate Studies Committee as stated above. In the final examination every candidate must offer:

(1) A thesis* of not more than 30,000 words, excluding bibliography, two copies to be delivered to the Clerk of the Schools, High Street, Oxford by noon on Monday in the first week of the Trinity Full Term in which the examination is to be taken. The thesis must be accompanied by a statement that it is the candidate's own work except where otherwise indicated. After the examination process is complete, one of the bound copies of the thesis of each successful candidate is sent by the Department to the Bodleian Library, and the other can be collected from the Department by the candidate.

(2) Two subject papers. Candidates sitting for the M.Phil. (Comparative Politics) may select two papers from the following list: (c), (e)–(s), subject to the following constraints.

Candidates who take (c) may also take one paper from (t)–(z), (aa), (ae).

Candidates sitting for the M.Phil. (Political Theory) may select two papers from the following list: (b), (r)–(z), (aa).

Candidates sitting for the M.Phil. (European Politics and Society) may select two papers from the list: (c), (e)–(af).

Candidates may, with the special permission of the Graduate Studies Committee in Politics, offer subjects outside this list. Applications must be made by the last Friday of the Trinity Term preceding that in which the examination is to be taken, and must be supported by the student's supervisor. Supervisors should ensure that applications are submitted as early as possible so that if approval is not given, the candidate has sufficient time to choose an alternative.

Teaching in some options may not be available each year: students are normally advised at the beginning of the course of the teaching arrangements for these options.


(e) The History and Politics of South Asia

The political history, political sociology, political institutions, and political economy of South Asia (India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and Bangladesh) since 1947; the state, political institutions, party politics, and 'movement' politics; conditions for democracy; the politics of gender, class, caste, religion, and ethnicity; the evolution of political ideologies; social organisation, culture and identities as they bear on politics; the politics of 'development'.


(f) Politics in Africa

Political action, representation, and institutions in African countries through comparative perspectives: generalisations and exceptionalisms; analytic approaches; forms of colonial rule; African nationalisms; one–party systems; military regimes; multi–party systems; politics of democracy; parties and elections; conditions of democracy; politics of economic reforms; politics of health and HIV/AIDS; land reform and agricultural policies; politics of elites; workers and trade unions; rural societies and politics; ethnicities and politics; religions and politics; gender and politics.


(g) Eastern Europe under Communist Rule 1945–90

The history and politics of Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Romania, and Bulgaria since 1945, and of the German Democratic Republic (1949–90). The relations between these states, and the influence of Soviet and Western (especially German) policies upon them. Candidates will be expected to show detailed knowledge of at least two countries. A knowledge of an East European language and/or German is highly desirable.


(h) Political Sociology

As specified for the M.Phil. in Sociology.


(i)–(o) The Politics and Government of major States

(i) The Politics and Government of the UK;

(j) The Politics and Government of the USA;

(k) The Politics and Government of France;

(l) The Politics and Government of Russia;

(m) The Politics and Government of Germany;

(n) The Politics and Government of Italy;

(o) The Politics and Government of China.

Candidates will be expected to show a thorough knowledge of the recent political development of the country chosen, of its political structure, and of the manner in which its system of government operates. They must be able to read the available literature in a language of the country selected, except in the cases of Russia and China.


(p) The Politics of Democracy in Latin America

Definitions of democracy in Latin America; the conditions for stable democratic regimes; the breakdown of democratic regimes; transitions from authoritarian regimes; parties and electoral systems; political participation; political ideologies; the role of constitutions in theory and practice; public administration; policy making in democratic systems; civil–military relations; the international context of democracy.


(q) Executive Government

Candidates will explore generic and comparative themes in executive government and bureaucracy using a range of analytical perspectives. Candidates are expected to be familiar with the politics of bureaucracy in at least one country and to show awareness of the basic literature in the comparative study of bureaucracy.


(r) Theory of Voting

The properties of majority rule; the Condorcet and Borda rules; the main modern results on majority rule (including the median voter theorem, Arrow's, May's, Sen's, and Gibbard's Theorems); the relationship between majority rule and proportional representation, and between proportional representation and apportionment; normative consequences of the formal results on voting.


(s) Democratisation: Theory and Practice

Theory. Democratic theory and democratisation; theories of regime change; the establishment, stabilisation, and breakdown of democratic regimes; interactionist, structuralist, and discourse–based interpretations; economic and sociological correlates; issues of comparative methodology; definitions, concepts, and cultural relativism; constitutions, institutional design, and party organisation; democratisation and international politics.

Practice. Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the main analytical issues arising from contemporary democratisation experiences in at least two of the following clusters of countries: China (including Hong Kong, Singapore, and Taiwan); East–Central Europe (post-Communist countries excluding the former USSR); Middle America (i.e. Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean); South America; South Asia; Southern Africa (Angola, Botswana, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa); Southern Europe (Greece, Italy, Portugal, Spain, Turkey); Sub-Saharan Africa (other than Southern Africa); ex-USSR states Note. Candidates taking options to study the politics of any of these areas, in addition to this paper, will be required to show knowledge of at least one other region.


(t) Plato and Aristotle

Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the major writings on ethics and politics in the work of Plato and Aristotle. Questions may also be asked on the ethical and political thought of the Pre-Socratics.


(u) Political Theories from Machiavelli to Burke

The authors to be studied will include: Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Hume, Montesquieu, Rousseau, and Burke.


(v) Political Theories of Hegel and Marx

In addition to a knowledge of the original text, candidates will be expected to show some knowledge of later developments in Hegelian and Marxist ideas, and to be able to discuss the theories of Hegel and Marx in the context of contemporary political thought. Candidates are required to show knowledge of the work of both of these authors.


(w) European Nationalist Doctrines

Ideas of nationality, its criteria and claims, from the late eighteenth to the early twentieth century; cultural, political and ethnic versions of the nation; the idea of the nation state; liberal nationalism and the nationalism of the anti-democratic and anti-parliamentary right; modern theories of nationalism. The paper will include the study of some of the relevant writings of some of the following authors: J.-J. Rousseau, Abbe Sieyes, Edmund Burke, J.G. Herder, J.G. Fichte, S.T. Coleridge, Joseph de Maistre, G.W.F. Hegel, Thomas Carlyle, J.G. Mazzini, J.A. de Gobineau, J. Michelet, E. Renan, E.A. Freeman, H. von Treitschke, H.S. Chamberlain, M. Barres, F. Meinecke, S. Schmitt.


(x) The History of Liberal Thought in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries

The development of liberal thought in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, including the study of key thinkers and significant liberal traditions. The paper will include the study of some of the following authors and topics: Bentham and the philosophical radicals, J.S. Mill, the new liberalism, German liberalism (Weber and national liberalism), French solidarism and republicanism, American liberalism (Croly and Dewey), social democracy, Berlin and pluralism, Hayek, and the Rawlsians.


(y) Issues in Contemporary Continental European Social and Political Thought

A critical examination of the issues in contemporary European social and political thought: politics and power, state and society, the political subject, ideology and language—as specified by the bibliography issued by the Sub-faculty of Politics.


(z) Ideologies and Political Traditions in Modern Europe

The conceptual and historical analysis of the principal political ideologies of Europe from the late nineteenth century; theories of ideologies and political traditions; conservatism, liberalism; socialism, communism; anarchism; nationalism; fascism; republicanism.


(aa) Contemporary Political Philosophy

Recent developments in political philosophy. Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the work of selected authors working within the analytical tradition of political philosophy, as well as critical ability in dealing with political concepts and theories.


(ab) European Community Law

As specified for the M.Juris in European and Comparative Law.


(ac) The Economics of European Integration

Major common policies and the EU budget; theory and practice of economic integration; trade, customs unions, non-tariff barriers; monetary integration, the European Monetary System, monetary union; external economic relations of the EU; trade policy, relations with US and Japan, trade relations with Less Developed Countries; economic integration of central and Eastern Europe.


(ad) The International History of West Europe since 1945

The Cold War in Europe; West European international politics, the Atlantic Alliance and European unity; Germany, France, and Britain in European international history; European détente; causes and consequences of the end of the Cold War in Europe.


(ae) E-government: Comparative Analysis

The implications of e-government—the use of the internet and information technologies by government—for public policy making, and the nature of executive government.

Candidates may also opt to take the following paper as specified for the M.Phil. in International Relations:


(af) Strategic Studies

Candidates must present themselves for viva voce examination when requested by the examiners. The examiners shall not normally fail any candidate without inviting him or her to attend such an examination. However, in the case of a failing mark in the thesis and both examination papers, the examiners shall not be obliged to ask the candidate for a viva.

The Examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination on the basis of the work submitted to them in both the Qualifying Test and the Final Examination.'

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(b) M.Sc. in Political Theory Research

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 817, delete ll. 18–48 and substitute:

'(a) attend, and satisfactorily complete the designated coursework for assessment according to the Department's timetable, the following courses of lectures and classes from the Department's research methods programme:

(i) The Compulsory Course in Theory of Politics from the M.Phil. in Politics (Political Theory) as directed by the Politics Graduate Studies Committee.

(ii) The Compulsory Course in Research methods in Political Theory as outlined in Decrees for the M.Phil in Politics and detailed in the Notes of Guidance for Graduate Students and Supervisors in Politics. Candidates who fail an assessed piece of work within the Research Methods Course must successfully resubmit the coursework by the end of the eighth week of Trinity Term.

(b) Sit a written examination paper. The examination paper shall consist of the Theory of Politics paper as set for the M.Phil. in Politics (Political Theory). Candidates who fail the written examination part of the Qualifying Examination may retake the examination at a date stipulated in the Regulations for the relevant M.Phil.

(c) Submit two copies of a thesis of not more than 15,000 words. The thesis must be typed or printed on one side of A4 sheets. It must be handed to the Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, by noon on the last Friday of August following the end of Trinity Full Term. The thesis must be clearly marked with the candidate's examination number and the words 'M.Sc. in Political Theory Research'.

3. The examiners may also examine any candidate viva voce; they shall not fail any candidate without inviting him or her to attend such an examination. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.'

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(c) M.Sc. in Politics and International Relations Research

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

In Examination Regulations, 2004 delete from p. 818, l. 5, to p. 819, l. 7, and substitute:

'2. Candidates must:

(a) attend and satisfactorily complete the Introduction Programme and the designated coursework for assessment according to the Department's timetable, the following courses of lectures and classes from the Department's research methods training programme:

(i) An approved core course from the M.Phil. in Politics (Comparative Government or European Politics and Society), or M.Phil. in International Relations as directed by the Politics Graduate Studies Committee and the International Relations Graduate Studies Committee. Candidates will be examined using the written examination part of the Qualifying Test as for the M.Phil. in Politics, the M.Phil. in International Relations (Contemporary Debates in International Relations Theory). In exceptional circumstances the Politics Graduate Studies Committee and the International Relations Graduate Studies Committee may grant permission for a candidate to follow the course from a different M.Phil. and take all or part of the Qualifying Test from that M.Phil. Candidates who fail the written examination part of the Qualifying Test will normally be allowed to resit the examination at a date stipulated in the Regulations for the relevant M.Phil.

(ii) The compulsory paper in Research Design in Political Science as specified in the Examination Regulations for the M.Phil. in Politics (Comparative Government) or the compulsory paper in Research Design in International Relations as specified in the Examination Regulations for the M.Phil. in International Relations as directed by the relevant Director of Graduate Studies. Candidates who fail an assessed piece of work within the Research Methods Course must successfully resubmit the coursework by the end of the eighth week of Trinity Term.

(b) Where necessitated by a candidate's choice of subject the Politics Graduate Studies Committee and the International Relations Graduate Studies Committee may require a candidate to pass a test of proficiency in a language other than English, as approved by the Politics Graduate Studies Committee and the International Relations Graduate Studies Committee. Candidates who fail the test will normally be allowed to retake the test before the beginning of the first week of the next academic year.

(c) Submit two copies of a thesis of not more than 15,000 words. The thesis must be typed or printed on one side of A4 Sheets. It must be handed to the Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, by noon on the last Friday of August following the end of Trinity Full Term. The thesis must be clearly marked with the candidate's examination number and the words 'M.Sc. in Politics and International Relations Research'.

3. The examiners may also examine any candidate viva voce; they shall not fail any candidate without entitling him or her to attend such an examination. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.'

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(d) M.Phil. in Comparative Social Policy

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 584, ll. 22 and 24, delete 'Sociology and Social Policy' and substitute 'Social Policy and Social Work'.

2 Ibid., ll. 40–1, delete 'library of the Department of Social Policy and Social Work' and substitute ' Social Science Library'.

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(e) M.Sc. in Comparative Social Policy

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 767, ll. 18–19, delete 'Sociology and Social Policy' and substitute 'Social Policy and Social Work'.

2 Ibid., ll. 28–9, delete 'library of the Department of Social Policy and Social Work' and substitute ' Social Science Library'.

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(f) M.Phil. in Evidence-Based Social Work

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 605, ll. 43–4, delete 'Sociology and Social Policy' and substitute 'Social Policy and Social Work'.

2 Ibid., p. 606, ll. 4–5, delete 'library of the Department of Social Policy and Social Work' and substitute ' Social Science Library'.

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(g) M.Sc. in Evidence-Based Social Work

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 789, ll. 8–10, delete 'Monday of the second week.. . has been taken.' and substitute '15 August or the weekday nearest to 15 August of the year in which the examination has been taken. Successful candidates will be required to deposit a copy of their thesis in the Social Science Library.' * See the general regulations on p. 508 concerning the preparation and dispatch of theses. Candidates are reminded that if after completing the M.Phil. they are accepted by the Politics Graduate Studies Committee for registration for the D.Phil., work submitted for the Degree of M.Phil. may subsequently be incorporated in a thesis submitted for the Degree of D.Phil..

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