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Oxford University Gazette, 24 February 2005: Diary


Friday 25 February

THE ALLEGRI String Quartet with Oxford University Student Guest Performers: Mozart, Horn Quintet, K.407, Laetitia Stott (horn); Brahms, Sextet in B flat, Op. 18, Yuki Imoto (viola), Verity Evanson (cello). (Tickets £8/£4 from the Oxford Playhouse (Oxford 305305), or on the door.) 1 p.m., Holywell Music Room.

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: 'Mathematics and measurement', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £2. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

CONFERENCE: 'Knowledge and society: regimes of production and regulation in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries' Maison Française, 2–6 p.m. (continues tomorrow, 9.30 a.m.–1.10 p.m.).

PROFESSOR M. ELLIOTT: 'The confused name of "Irishman" ' (Ford's Lectures in British History: 'Religion and identity in modern Irish history'), Schools, 5 p.m.

A. MILLER: 'Promoting democratic values in transitional societies through foreign aid' (Political Science Seminar Series), Clay Room, Nuffield, 5 p.m.

OXFORD CHAMBER Orchestra: Britten, King Arthur; Fauré, Pelleas and Mélisande; Dvorák, Symphony No 9 ('From the New World') (tickets £8/£5 from The Oxford Playhouse (Oxford 305305) or available on the door). 8 p.m., Sheldonian Theatre.

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Saturday 26 February

BATE COLLECTION Family Fun Day: a day of special events for families and children; including live music and a chance to play some of the instruments in the Bate handling collection (free of charge and open to the public), 10 a.m.–2 p.m., Bate Collection, Faculty of Music.

MEMBERS OF THE EGLESFIELD MUSICAL SOCIETY perform music by Gershwin, the chapel, Queen's, 1.15 p.m. (admission free; retiring collection).

MUSEUM OF THE HISTORY OF SCIENCE gallery talk: 'Drug trade' (a tour of the current exhibition 'Drug trade: therapy, pharmacy, and commerce in early modern Europe', with Dr Jim Bennett), 2 p.m. (admission free).

ORGAN RECITAL, the chapel, Magdalen, 5.25 (admission free).

OXFORD UNIVERSITY Sinfonietta: works by Samuel Barber, Rohan Stevenson, Mozart, Paul Patterson, and Mahler (tickets £6/£4, concessions £3, available from 07763 122458 and on the door). 7.30 p.m., Jacqueline du Pré Music Building.

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Sunday 27 February

THE REVD PROFESSOR PAUL S. FIDDES: 'Hidden wisdom: a theology of presence and place' (third in series of three Bampton Lectures: 'Seeing the world and knowing God: ancient wisdom and modern doctrine'), St Mary's, 10 a.m.

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Monday 28 February

L. BROCKLISS: 'War, medicine and the making of myth: William Beatty and the death of Lord Nelson' (seminar series: 'War and medicine since the eighteenth century', Wellcome Unit (47 Banbury Road), 2.15 p.m.

PROFESSOR P. EVANS: 'The "institutional" turn: new multidisciplinary approaches to development' (inaugural lecture series in the Programme of Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences: 'Tools for the social sciences in the twenty-first century'), Lecture Theatre, Manor Road Building, 4.30 p.m.

EDWARD GARNIER, QC, MP: 'Why opposition since 1997 has been difficult' (seminar series: 'Are Labour's constitutional changes working?'), Summer Common Room, Magdalen, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR L. HANNAH: 'The fables of successful giants: Japan, Europe, and America' (Clarendon Lectures in Management Studies: 'The tales business professors tell'), Saïd Business School, 5 p.m. (Admission free, and open to the public. For further information e-mail: liz.buckle@sbs.ox.ac.uk, or sophie.austin@oup.com.)

DR R. OKEY: 'Wales and eastern Europe: small nations in comparison' (lecture series: 'Wales, Oxford, and beyond'), Schools, 5 p.m.

LORD PATTEN (Chancellor of the University): 'International administrations and institution-building in historical perspective' (lecture series: 'State-building: governance and development under international administrations'), Schools, 5 p.m.

DR S. THOGERSEN: 'Ideology and perception of governance of township cadres' (Contemporary China Seminar), Seminar Room C, Social Sciences Building, 5 p.m.

THE MARTINU STRING QUARTET performs works by Dvorák, Janácek, and Smetana, the Auditorium, St John's, 8.30 p.m. (admission by free programme, available in advance from the Porters' Lodge).

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Tuesday 1 March

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminars: 'Introductory Certificate in First-line Management', 9.30 a.m., and 'Introduction to the Bodleian Library', 2.30 p.m. (for details see the IAUL site).

SIR CHRISTOPHER FOSTER: 'Targets before targets: the experience of controlling nationalised industries in the old public management era' (seminar series: 'Playing the targets game: results-driven government?'), Seminar Room, Oxford Internet Institute, 12.30 p.m.

DR T. BARKAWI and DR M. LAFFEY: 'The post-colonial moment in security studies' (discussion series: 'The changing character of war'), Seminar Room A, Manor Road Building, 1 p.m.

BATE COLLECTION: Music for two spinets, with Dr Ng Kah-Ming and Rebecca Maurer. A short presentation using examples from the Bate collection of early keyboard instruments (free of charge and open to the public, no booking necessary). 1–1.45 p.m., Bate Collection, Faculty of Music.

OPEN MEETING for members of Congregation, with presentation of governance proposals by the Vice-Chancellor, Lindemann Lecture Theatre, Department of Physics, 4 p.m.

THE REVD DR L. CAVANAGH,: 'Who do you say that I am? Identity and meaning in a divided church' (seminar), Graham Room, Ripon College, Cuddesdon, 4.15 p.m. (to attend, e-mail: admin@ripon-cuddesdon.ac.uk).

PROFESSOR L. HANNAH: 'National champions: a European obsession or a true story?' (Clarendon Lectures in Management Studies: 'The tales business professors tell'), Saïd Business School, 5 p.m. (Admission free, and open to the public. For further information e-mail: liz.buckle@sbs.ox.ac.uk, or sophie.austin@oup.com.)

PROFESSOR V. BROWN: 'Across the Adriatic: Beneventan scriptoria in Dalmatia' (Lowe Lectures in Palaeography: 'Beneventan script and the culture of medieval southern Italy'), Schools, 5 p.m.

DR G. D'COSTA: 'Fostering vocation in a university context' (Centre for Christianity and Culture lectures: 'Christian vocation and public life in the twenty-first century'), Regent's Park, 5 p.m.

DR M. IACOVOU: 'The dynamics of social change in Europe' (seminar series: 'Current issues in social policy: exploring dimensions of space and time'), Violet Butler Seminar Room, Department of Social Policy and Social Work, 5 p.m.

WILL HUTTON, DENZIL DAVIES, MP, and G. FITCHEW: 'The euro: for and against the single currency' (seminar series: 'Conflict resolution'), Lecture Theatre, St Antony's, 5 p.m.

ALAIN SCHNAPP: 'The idea of ruins in Western and Eastern cultures' (lecture), Maison Française, 5.15 p.m.

GRADUATE STUDENTS' Colloquia: 'Hardly Heroes: The Composer as a Subject in National Socialist Cinema', Guido Heldt (free of charge and open to the public), 5.15 p.m., Denis Arnold Hall, Faculty of Music.

PROFESSOR J. FABIAN: 'The "Other" revisited: critical afterthoughts' (Wolfson College Lectures: 'Speaking of others'), Wolfson, 6 p.m. (open to the public).

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Wednesday 2 March

ORGAN RECITAL, the chapel, Queen's, 1.10 p.m. (admission free; retiring collection).

OPEN MEETING for members of Congregation, with presentation of Academic Strategy proposals by the Vice-Chancellor, Lindemann Lecture Theatre, Department of Physics, 2 p.m.

OPUS! ALEXANDER Technique Workshop (closed event: for university members only), 2 p.m., Denis Arnold Hall, Faculty of Music.

PROFESSOR DAVID MARQUAND speaks in seminar series 'The British General Election of 2005', Seminar Room, Nuffield, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR P. GARNSEY: 'Paradise lost: the state of nature and the origins of private property' (Carlyle Lectures: 'Ideas of property: antiquity and after'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR LARRY SCHAAF: 'Photography and the printed page' (Slade Lectures: 'The pencil of nature—creating the art of of photography'), Lecture Theatre, University Museum of Natural History, 5 p.m. (open to the public).

PROFESSOR L. HANNAH: 'Ato-ji-e (hindsight—in Japanese): the Whig misinterpretation of business' (Clarendon Lectures in Management Studies: 'The tales business professors tell'), Saïd Business School, 5 p.m. (Admission free, and open to the public. For further information e-mail: liz.buckle@sbs.ox.ac.uk, or sophie.austin@oup.com.)

ANNE SIMONIN: ' "Everybody has something to say about him": the Marquis de Sade at the Liberation of France' (Modern French History Seminar), Modern European History Research Centre, Radcliffe Infirmary, 5 p.m.

DR P. STATHAM: 'The contested politics of asylum' (Refugee Studies Centre seminars: 'The ethics and politics of migration and displacement'), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 5 p.m.

J. BARNARD: 'Keats and posterity: manuscript, print, and readers' (D.F. McKenzie Lecture), Lecture Theatre 2, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

PETER HESKETH: 'Two men and a tent', and DANIEL KONDZIELA: 'Slowly down the Ganges' (Wallace Watson Award Lectures), Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, St Catherine's, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR H. MONDRY: 'Russian politics of the Jew's body: the case of Vasily Rozanov' (David Patterson Seminars), Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Yarnton Manor, 8 p.m.

DR N. MANSON: 'Is an epistemology of psychoanalysis possible?' (lecture series: 'The academic face of psychoanalysis'), New Seminar Room, St John's, 8.15 p.m. (to attend, e-mail: research.centre@sjc.ox.ac.uk).

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Thursday 3 March

DR C. LLOYD: 'From taboo to transnational political issue: violence against women in Algeria and the diaspora' (International Gender Studies Centre seminar: 'Domestic abuse: culture of violence, violations, and women's rights'), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

L. SCHUSTER: 'Asylum policy and trends' (Centre on Migration, Policy, and Society seminars: 'Contemporary international migration—key issues'), Seminar Room, Pauling Centre (58a Banbury Road), 2 p.m.

P. GILES: 'The poetics of television: David Foster Wallace' (lecture series: 'Posthumanism'), Rothermere American Institute, 5 p.m. (Admission free and open to the public. Further information at www.rai.ox.ac.uk.)

C. TOULMIN: 'Only one earth—the highs and lows of promoting sustainable development' (Development seminar: 'Frontiers of development studies'), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 5 p.m.

DR C. RÜMELIN: 'Contemporary prints' (Young Friends of the Ashmolean lecture: admission free to members, £2 for non-members), Ashmolean, 5 p.m. (details: young.friends@ashmus.ox.ac.uk).

LORD BEST: 'Will new housing destroy England's countryside?' (Linacre Lectures: 'The unmaking of the English landscape'), Main Hall Lecture Theatre, School of Geography, 5.15 p.m.

PAUL COHEN: 'L'invention d'une politique linguistique française; histoire, politique et cultures linguistiques en France aux XVIe et XVIIe siècles" (Early Modern French Seminar), Maison Française, 5.15 p.m.

QUEEN'S COLLEGE CHOIR and the London Handel Orchestra perform Monteverdi's Vespers of 1610, the chapel, Queen's, 8.15 p.m. (tickets £12/£9/£6 at the door or in advance from the college—e-mail: rosemary.rey@queens.ox.ac.uk).

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Friday 4 March

EUROPAEUM SYMPOSIUM: 'Restructuring corporate governance: the new European agenda', with A. Ross Goobey, G. Jubb, Sir Ronald Grierson, A. Borges, and Profesor Colin Mayer, Saïd Business School, 9.15 a.m.–5.45 p.m. (register at www.Europaeum.org).

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminar: 'Career review and planning for contract research staff', 9.30 a.m. (for details see the IAUL site).

STUDY-DAY: 'Lire Le Traité des Sensations de Condillac', Maison Française, 9.30 a.m.–6 p.m.

SIR ANTHONY ATKINSON: 'How could we better finance development?' (Global Economic Governance Programme: 'Making globalisation work for developing countries'), Goodhart Seminar Room, University College, 2 p.m.

PROFESSOR DAVID MACDONALD: 'A brush with foxes and some other carnivore tales' (Dawkins Prize Lecture), University Museum of Natural History, 5 p.m.

N. LETKI: 'Investigating the roots of civic morality: trust, social capital, and institutional performance' (Political Science Seminar Series), Clay Room, Nuffield, 5 p.m.

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