University of
Oxford Homepage


Note. An asterisk against an entry in the Contents indicates a previously published notice.
University of Oxford Crest

Oxford University Gazette, 21 April 2005: Examinations and Boards

REAPPOINTMENTS

Social Sciences Division

UNIVERSITY LECTURERS

DR FIONA ANDERSON-GOUGH (PH.D. Leeds, B.SC., PGC.) , Fellow of Templeton. In Accounting. From 1 August 2005 to. 31 July 2010.

DR EAMONN MOLLOY (BA, PH.D. Lancaster) , Fellow of Green College. In Operations Management. From 1 August 2005 to 31 July 2010.

Return to Contents of this section


CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

The following changes in regulations made by the Educational Policy and Standards Committee of Council, and, with the approval of the Educational Policy and Standards Committee (and, where applicable, of divisional boards) , the following changes in regulations made by divisional and faculty boards will come into effect on 6 May.

1 Educational Policy and Standards Committee

Regulations for the Conduct of University Examinations

With immediate effect

In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 16, l. 37, p. 17, ll. 12 and 34, p. 18, ll. 15, 30 and 40, p. 19, l. 22, p. 20, ll. 2 and 30, p. 21, ll. 7, 11, 22, 24, 30 and 41–2, p. 22, ll. 5, 9 and 18, p. 23, ll. 20 and 39, p. 24, l. 20, p. 25, ll. 25–6, p. 43, l. 27, p. 44, l. 1, p. 48, ll. 32–3, delete 'Vice-Chancellor' and substitute 'Pro- Vice-Chancellor (Academic) '.

Return to Contents of this section

2 Life and Environmental Sciences Board

(a) Honour Moderations in Geography

With effect from 1 October 2005

1 In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 55, delete ll. 14–15.

2 Ibid., delete from l. 34 on p. 105 to l. 22 on p. 107.

Return to Contents of this section


(b) Preliminary Examination in Geography

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 56, l. 26, delete '*'.

2 Ibid., p. 134, delete ll. 21–33 and substitute:

'B

1. Each candidate shall offer four papers as follows:

(1) Earth Systems Processes;

(2) Human Geography;

(3) Critical Thinking for Geographers;

(4) Geographical Techniques.

Each paper will be of three hours' duration.

2. Candidates shall submit to the Examiners not later than noon on the Monday of the sixth week of Trinity Full Term:

(a) A practical work folder containing accounts of fieldwork and practical exercises completed for the Geographical Techniques paper. This folder will contribute to 25 per cent of the total mark for the Geographical Techniques paper.

(b) A folder completed as part of the Critical Thinking for Geographers paper. The folder will not contribute to the assessment of this paper, but failure to submit a satisfactory folder will result in failure of this part of the examination.

The requirements for these folders will be published in the course handbook by the Geography Undergraduate Teaching and Examining Committee at the beginning of the Michaelmas Full Term in the academic year of the examination.

3. Candidates shall be deemed to have passed if they have satisfied the Examiners in all four subjects and submitted a satisfactory folder for the Critical Thinking for Geographers paper.

4. A candidate who fails in one or more subjects may offer that subject or subjects at one, and only one, subsequent examination.

5. Candidates who fail to submit a satisfactory folder for the Critical Thinking for Geographers paper will be allowed to submit the folder for assessment by Monday of the week falling three weeks before First Week of the following Michaelmas Term.

6. Examiners may award a distinction to candidates of special merit who have passed all four subjects and submitted a satisfactory folder for the Critical Thinking for Geographers paper at a single examination. A distinction may not be awarded to a candidate who submits the folder for the Critical Thinking for Geographers paper under the provisions of regulation 5.

7. The Examiners will not provide calculators but will permit the use of any hand-held calculator subject to the conditions set out under the heading 'Use of calculators in examinations' in the Special Regulations concerning Examinations.

Subject (1) Earth Systems Processes

The paper will require an understanding of the physical geography of the Earth, based around core concepts and principles. Candidates should be able to display familiarity with mechanisms and processes under the headings of atmosphere, biosphere, and lithosphere, and a grasp of linkages between topics taught under these headings.

Subject (2) Human Geography

The paper will examine the following themes and the relationships between them at a variety of scales: cities, societies and migrants; ecologies, resources and economies; territories, states and identities.

Subject (3) Critical Thinking for Geographers

The paper will require an understanding of the practices of critical thinking, examined using the history of geography, its major debates and episodes as source material. Details of the materials to be covered for this course will be published in the course handbook by the Geography Undergraduate Teaching and Examining Committee at the beginning of the Michaelmas Full Term in the academic year of the examination.

Subject (4) Geographical Techniques

The subject will comprise theoretical and practical aspects of geographical techniques. Candidates will be expected to be conversant with problem–solving in both human and physical branches of the discipline. Details of the areas to be covered will be published in the course handbook by the Geography Undergraduate Teaching and Examining Committee at the beginning of the Michaelmas Full Term in the academic year of the examination.'

Return to Contents of this section

(c) Honour Moderations in Archaeology and Anthropology

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 69, ll. 18–19, delete 'under the following provisions:' and after 'ability' insert '.'

2 Ibid., l. 20, delete '(a) '.

3 Ibid., delete ll. 23–33.

Return to Contents of this section


(d) Honour School of Archaeology and Anthropology

(i) With immediate effect

In Examination Regulations, 2004, delete from l. 41 on p. 175 to l. 13 on p. 176.

(ii) With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

1 Ibid., p. 176, l. 47, delete 'Advanced topics in Archaeological Science' and substitute 'Science-based methods in Archaeology'.

2 Ibid., p. 177, after l. 2 insert 'w Biological Techniques in Environmental Archaeology'.

3 Ibid., l. 7, delete 'year' and substitute 'two years of study'.

Return to Contents of this section


(e) M.Phil. in Material Anthropology and Museum Ethnography

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 626, delete ll. 36–8 and substitute

'The Life and Environmental Sciences Board shall elect for the supervision of the course a Standing Committee, namely the Graduate Studies Committee of the School of Anthropology, which shall have power to arrange lectures and other instruction. The course director shall be responsible to that committee.'

2 Ibid., delete ll. 41–8 and substitute:

'Every candidate will be required to satisfy the examiners in an examination for which, if he or she passes at the appropriate level, he or she will be allowed to proceed to the second year of the M.Phil. Candidates must follow a course of instruction in Material Anthropology and Museum Ethnography for at least three terms, and will, when entering for the examinations, be required to produce a certificate from their supervisor to this effect. The Qualifying Examination shall be taken in the Trinity Term of the academic year in which the candidate's name is first entered on the Register of M.Phil. students or, with the approval of the divisional board, in a subsequent year. Each candidate will be required to satisfy the examiners in papers I–IV on the syllabus described in the Schedule for the M.Sc. in Material Anthropology and Museum Ethnography, and governed by regulation 4 for that degree.'

3 Ibid., p. 627, delete ll. 6–15 and substitute:

'(i) to present himself or herself for written examination in one of the optional areas or topics available for that year, other than those taken by the candidate in the M.Phil. Qualifying Examination the previous year;

(ii) to submit to the Chairman of Examiners not later than noon on Monday of the sixth week of Trinity Term an essay of 5,000 words (two copies) in the field of Material Anthropology and Museum Ethnography, on a topic to be selected from a list set by the examiners at the beginning of the second week of Trinity Term (candidates should not duplicate any material already used in their submission for paper II in the Qualifying Examination in the previous year) ;

(iii) to submit a thesis in accordance with the regulations below;

(iv) to present himself or herself for oral examination as required by the examiners.'

4 Ibid., p. 627, ll. 21–3, delete 'Secretary of Faculties. . . Geography' and substitute 'to the Graduate Studies Committee of the School of Anthropology, with the written approval of his or her supervisor, the proposed title of the thesis'.

5 Ibid., ll. 31–2, delete 'Board of the Faculty of Anthropology and Geography' and substitute 'Graduate Studies Committee of the School of Anthropology'.

6 Ibid., ll. 39–40, delete 'or of being granted permission to supplicate for the Diploma'.

(f) M.Phil. in Social Anthropology

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 659, delete ll. 7–8 and substitute:

'The Life and Environmental Sciences Divisional Board shall elect for the supervision of the course a Standing Committee, namely the Graduate Studies Committee of the School of Anthropology, which shall have power to arrange lectures and other instruction. The course director shall be responsible to that committee.'

2 Ibid., delete ll. 11–17 and substitute:

'Every candidate will be required to satisfy the examiners in an examination for which, if he or she passes at the appropriate level, he or she will be allowed to proceed to the second year of the M.Phil. Candidates must follow a course of instruction in Social Anthropology for at least three terms, and will, when entering for the examinations, be required to produce a certificate from their supervisor to this effect. The Qualifying Examination shall be taken in the Trinity Term of the academic year in which the candidate's name is first entered on the Register of M.Phil. students or, with the approval of the divisional board, in a subsequent year. Each candidate will be required to satisfy the examiners in papers I–IV on the syllabus described in the Schedule for the M.Sc. in Social Anthropology, and governed by regulation 4 for that degree.'

3 Ibid., delete ll. 23–32 and substitute:

'(i) to present himself or herself for written examination in one of the optional areas or topics available for that year, other than that taken by the candidate in the M.Phil. Qualifying Examination the previous year;

(ii) to submit to the Chairman of Examiners not later than noon on Monday of the sixth week of Trinity Term an essay of 5,000 words (two copies) in the field of general Social Anthropology, on a topic to be selected from a list set by the examiners at the beginning of the second week of Trinity Term;

(iii) to submit a thesis in accordance with the regulations below;

(iv) to present himself or herself for oral examination as required by the examiners.'

4 Ibid., p. 659, ll. 36–8 delete 'Secretary of Faculties. . . sciences' and substitute 'to the Graduate Studies Committee of the School of Anthropology, with the written approval of his or her supervisor, the proposed title of the thesis'.

5 Ibid., p. 660, ll. 6–7, delete 'Divisional Board of Life and Environmental Sciences' and substitute 'Graduate Studies Committee of the School of Anthropology'.

6 Ibid., p. 660, ll. 14–15, delete 'or of being granted permission to supplicate for the Diploma'.

Return to Contents of this section


(g) M.Sc. by coursework in Material Anthropology and Museum Ethnography

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 804, delete ll. 4–7 and substitute:

'1. The Life and Environmental Sciences Board shall elect for the supervision of the course a Standing Committee, namely the Graduate Studies Committee of the School of Anthropology, which shall have power to arrange lectures and other instruction. The course director shall be responsible to that committee.'

2 Ibid., l. 11, after 'written and' insert '(if requested) '.

3 Ibid., delete ll. 14–15 and substitute:

'4. The written examination will consist of four papers on the syllabus described in the Schedule, paper II being examined by means of the essay specified in that Schedule.'

4 Ibid., l. 29, after 'oral examination' insert '(if requested) '.

5 Ibid., delete ll. 32–7 and substitute:

'9. If it is the opinion of the examiners that the work done by a candidate is not of sufficient merit to qualify for the Degree of M.Sc., the candidate shall be given the option of resitting the M.Sc. examination.'

6 Ibid., delete from p. 804, l.40, to p. 805, l.17, and substitute:

'I. Fundamental Concepts in Social and Cultural Anthropology (as specified for the M.Phil. in Migration Studies, and shared with the M.Phil. and M.Sc. in Material Anthropology and Museum Ethnography, and in Social Anthropology) '. II. Core Topics in Material Anthropology and Museum Ethnography This paper will be assessed by means of an essay, of up to 5,000 words, on a topic within the scope of this paper as set out below, and chosen in consultation with the supervisor. Candidates shall submit their essay to the Chairman of the Examiners by 12 noon on Monday of the second week of Trinity Term, accompanied by a statement that it is the candidate's own work except where otherwise indicated. Topics central to this paper include the changing roles and meanings of artefacts over time; the legacies of anthropology's history in the present—with special reference to museums and material culture; issues of representation, politics and power; theoretical and methodological shifts in the analysis of material culture, museums and display; fieldwork, collecting, archival processes and other methodologies central to the production of anthropological knowledge. Case studies may focus on topics such as: visual culture (including photography, the internet, art and aesthetics) ; music and performance; museum ethics and relationships with 'source communities'; landscape and the built environment; dress and body modification; mass production and trade; debates concerning tradition, modernity and authenticity; transnational cultural flows and the wider issues of cross-cultural investigation.'

(h) M.Sc. by coursework in Material Anthropology and Museum Ethnography (Research Methods)

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 805, delete ll. 28–31 and substitute:

'1. The Life and Environmental Sciences Divisional Board shall elect for the supervision of the course a Standing Committee, namely the Graduate Studies Committee of the School of Anthropology, which shall have power to arrange lectures and other instruction. The course director shall be responsible to that committee.'

2 Ibid., p. 806, ll. 29–31, delete '(paper and syllabus shared with the M.Sc. and Diploma in Material Anthropology and Museum Ethnography) '

3 Ibid., p. 807, l. 7, delete 'Secretary of Faculties' and substitute 'Graduate Studies Committee of the School of Anthropology'.

Return to Contents of this section


(i) M.Sc. by coursework in Social Anthropology

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 827, delete ll. 8–11 and substitute:

'1. The Life and Environmental Sciences Board shall elect for the supervision of the course a Standing Committee, namely the Graduate Studies Committee of the School of Anthropology, which shall have power to arrange lectures and other instruction. The course director shall be responsible to that committee.'

2 Ibid., l. 15, after 'written and' insert '(if requested) '.

3 Ibid., l. 33, after 'oral examination' insert '(if requested) '.

4 Ibid., delete ll. 36–40 and substitute:

'9. If it is the opinion of the examiners that the work done by a candidate is not of sufficient merit to qualify for the Degree of M.Sc., the candidate shall be given the option of resitting the M.Sc. examination.'

5 Ibid., delete from p. 827, l. 43, to p. 828, l.29, and substitute:

'I. Fundamental Concepts in Social and Cultural Anthropology (as specified for the M.Phil. in Migration Studies, and shared with the M.Phil. and M.Sc. in Material Anthropology and Museum Ethnography, and in Social Anthropology) '.

II. The Social and Moral Order

The focus of this paper is on the social as a distinctive object of analysis. Attention will be paid to the subject's comparative heritage and to the perspective this allows on contemporary appeals to supposed common sense. Specific subjects to be explored through ethnographic cases include: kinship and marriage, including ideas of reproduction; institutionalized religion, ritual, and the place of doctrine; political systems and ideas of power; law and debates on justice; concepts of the good life; history and myth; understandings of continuity and change; the experience of disorder and the patterns of disruption and violence; the nature of historical agency and structure; holism versus individualism in local ideologies and practice; rank and hierarchy; modes of production, circulation, and consumption; concepts of labour and property; forms of communication, and modes of relatedness; the drawing of social boundaries; nationalism, ethnicity, and global interaction.

III. Perception and Experience

The focus of this paper is on experience of the lived world, and the issues that arise in its conceptualisation and analysis. Attention will be paid to the diversity of such experience and the means by which claims to human commonality are judged. Topics that may be examined include: comparative perceptions of the social; reason, emotion, and morality; memory; perception of time and space, and of the physical world; the role of language; non–linguistic forms of shared experience, such as body–techniques, etiquette, and dance; translation; orality, literacy, and modes of socialization; world–views and local philosophies; means of establishing and contesting claims to truth; comparative analysis of cause and agency; religious experience; magic, trance, and healing; aesthetics and poetics; concepts of the human personality, the self and of the body; gender and sexuality.

IV. Social Anthropology of a Selected Region

This paper includes several sections, each dealing with a specific region of the world. Candidates will declare their choice of one during Hilary Term, from a list made available at the start of the academic year, and will be examined on that section.'

Return to Contents of this section

(j) M.Sc. by coursework in Social Anthropology (Research Methods)

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 828, delete ll. 31–4 and substitute:

'1. The Life and Environmental Sciences Divisional Board shall elect for the supervision of the course a Standing Committee, namely the Graduate Studies Committee of the School of Anthropology, which shall have power to arrange lectures and other instruction. The course director shall be responsible to that committee.'

2 Ibid., p. 829, ll. 32–3, delete '(paper and syllabus shared with the M.Sc. and Diploma in Material Anthropology and Museum Ethnography) '.

3 Ibid., p. 830, l. 10, delete 'Secretary of Faculties' and substitute 'Graduate Studies Committee of the School of Anthropology'.

Return to Contents of this section


(k) Diploma in Material Anthropology and Museum Ethnography

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2004, pp. xvi (contents) , and 1029 (index) delete 'Material Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.. . 1015'

2 Ibid., delete from p. 1015, l. 10, to p.,1017, l. 42.

3 Ibid., p. 1127 (index) delete 'Diploma in 1015'.

Return to Contents of this section


(l) Diploma in Social Anthropology

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2004, pp. xvi (contents) , and 1029 (index) delete 'Social Anthropology.. . 1021'.

2 Ibid., delete from p. 1021, l. 17, to p. 1023, l. 45.

3 Ibid., p. 1127 (index) delete 'Diploma in 1021'.

Return to Contents of this section


3 Medical Sciences Board

Honour School of Medical Sciences

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 368, ll. 32–3, delete 'Each of the 5 exercises required of each candidate shall carry equal weight in the examination'.

Return to Contents of this section

4 Social Sciences Board

(a) M.Phil. in Development Studies

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 587, l. 25, delete 'two of the following three papers' and substitute 'both of the following papers'.

2 Ibid., p. 588, delete ll. 22–53 and substitute:

'Candidates selecting this option may offer one or two papers from the following three:

(i) The History and Politics of West Africa

The political history, political sociology, political institutions and political economy of West Africa since 1939: nationalism and transfers of power; forms of government, civilian and military; parties and elections; conditions for democracy; class, ethnicity, religion and gender; business, labour and peasantries; agricultural policies and economic reforms; West African regional politics and institutions and the influence of external agencies. Candidates will be required to show knowledge of Nigeria and of at least one Francophone country.

(ii) South Africa: Apartheid, African Politics and the Transition since 1948

This option explores the historiography of apartheid and the transition. Many of the central problems echo wider historiographical debates: how should scholars balance, and interweave, material and ideological factors in explaining apartheid and its demise; in which ways did race and ethnicity become such central organising concepts in a modern society and how were they challenged; should we see this late twentieth century revolution as stemming primarily from global forces, or from internal opposition; what is the character of the transition, and how has social transformation been constrained; how do we understand the newly emerging African ruling group and the patterns of cultural change in South Africa? How are understandings of South African history changing in the post-apartheid era?

(iii) Violence and Historical Memory in Eastern Africa

This course from the MPhil in Economic and Social History offers historical, theoretical and empirical perspectives on the impact of conflict on social and economic development in eastern Africa over the past century, covering Sudan, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Somalia, Kenya, Uganda, Rwanda, Tanzania, and eastern CDR (Zaire) —the Kasai and Kivu provinces. The purpose of the course is to give a comprehensive explanation of the historical origins of violence and war based upon case studies from the region.'

3 Ibid., p. 590, after l. 4 insert:

'(l) The Politics and Government of a Major State: The People's Republic of China

Candidates will be expected to show a thorough knowledge of the recent political development of the country chosen, of its political structure, and of the manner in which its system of government operates. They must be able to read the available literature in a language of the country selected, except in the case of Russia and China.'

Return to Contents of this section

(b) M.Phil. in International Relations

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 619, l. 9, delete 'on' and substitute 'by'.

2 Ibid., ll. 19–20, delete 'Successful candidates will be required to deposit one copy of their thesis in the Bodleian Library' and substitute:

'After the examination process is complete, one of the bound copies of the thesis of each successful candidate is sent by the Department to the Bodleian Library, and the other can be collected from the Department by the candidate.'

3 Ibid., p. 621, l. 9, delete 'for' and substitute 'for'.

4 Ibid., p. 622, l. 9, delete 'migrants', and substitute 'migrants' '.

5 Ibid., l. 37, delete 'and where available' and substitute 'and, if offered'.

6 Ibid., delete ll. 39–41 and substitute:

'5. Candidates must present themselves for viva voce examination when requested by the examiners. The examiners shall not normally fail any candidate without inviting him or her to attend such an examination. However, in the case of a failing mark in three or more of a candidate's final examination papers, the examiners shall not be obliged to ask the candidate for a viva.'

Return to Contents of this section


(c) M.Phil. in Russian and East European Studies

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2007)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 656, delete l. 43 and substitute '2. Soviet and Post-Soviet Regional Development (this course is interdisciplinary and is also relevant to Group C (Politics)). '

2 Ibid., p. 657, delete ll. 7, 15, 27, and 29 and renumber subsequent paragraphs accordingly.

Return to Contents of this section


(d) M.Phil. in Latin American Studies

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2007)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 625, l. 37, after 'extended essay' insert:

'and with the condition that they choose their two qualifying examination papers (taken in addition to the compulsory general paper) from two different disciplines'.

2 Ibid., l. 49 delete 'on a topic taken from their major discipline' and substitute 'which will be equal to two examination papers'.

3 Ibid., p. 626, l. 11, delete 'a further examination paper from any option in another discipline' and substitute 'another examination paper from the list'.

4 Ibid., l. 12, after 'with the' insert 'Latin American Centre Director of Graduate Studies and the'.

5 Ibid., l. 13 delete 'in the relevant discipline.'

(e) M.Sc. in Latin American Studies

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 801, l. 47 delete 'further'.

2 Ibid., l. 48 delete 'general and an optional paper but are permitted to take two general' and substitute: 'core and further paper but are permitted to take two core'.

3 Ibid., ll. 49–50, delete 'Candidates who choose an optional paper in Economics must also be taking the general paper in Economics.' and substitute: 'Candidates must take the core paper in Economics if they wish to take a further paper in that discipline.'

4 Ibid., p. 802, ll. 2,13 and 20, delete 'general' and substitute 'core paper'.

5 Ibid., ll. 3,4,5,14,15,16,17,21,22, and 23 delete 'optional' and substitute 'further paper'.

Return to Contents of this section


(f) M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 759, l. 9, and l. 13, delete 'Friday' and substitute 'Monday'.

Return to Contents of this section

(g) M.Sc. in Educational Studies

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 781, l. 6, after 'examination' delete '(as prescribed in cl. 4 below) ', and insert:

'for candidates in the subjects Comparative and International Education and Higher Education (as prescribed in cl. 4 below). Candidates in the subject E– learning will undertake a combination of written assignments and examination'.

2 Ibid., delete l. 14.

3 Ibid., l. 16, after 'and (iii) ' insert 'as set out in the Schedule below'.

4 Ibid., l. 18, after 'and (v) ' insert 'as set out in the Schedule below'.

5 Ibid., delete ll. 19–20 and substitute:

'Candidates in the subject E-learning will be required to complete three following elements of assessment successfully in order to pass Part I:

(i) Assignment 1. Candidates will produce a 5000 word essay exploring the functionality and appropriateness of an e-learning tool or leading example of educational software in relation to learning goals and context of their choosing. The e-learning tool will be selected from the range of tools investigated during a group project in Michaelmas Term. The essay will consist of the following three elements:

(a) A description of the chosen e-learning tool's intended functionality and application in relation to any relevant theories of learning underpinning the use of the tool, together with a discussion of the tool's actual performance during the group project, identifying strengths and weaknesses;

(b) A detailed plan for the application of the tool in a setting relevant to the candidate's own chosen professional or research field, including a full rationale in terms of relevant theory, and illustrated by hypothetical or actual examples of content;

(c) A detailed research plan for the evaluation of the tool in this proposed setting, establishing criteria that address potential benefits and risks in terms of both functionality and learning.

The essay should be supported by printed-out or digitally presented examples of the planned uses of the e-learning tool.

Two word-processed or printed copies of this assignment must be delivered to the M.Sc. examiners, c/o the Department of Educational Studies, 15 Norham Gardens, Oxford OX2 6PY, no later than noon on Friday of Week 3 of Hilary Full Term.

(ii) Assignment 2. A 5,000-word literature review of research, policy, curriculum or advisory literature relating to a broad field of e-learning (e.g. schools' ICT; vocational education and training; blended learning in HE; distance learning; digital divide, globalisation) in terms of:

(a) key issues and assertions about the role of digital technologies in that specified field;

(b) theoretical perspectives and empirical research which address and illuminate these key issues and assertions.

The exact wording and description of the chosen topic must be approved by course tutors by the end of week 6 in Hilary Term.

Two word-processed or printed copies of this assignment must be delivered to the M.Sc. examiners, c/o the Department of Educational Studies, 15 Norham Gardens, Oxford OX2 6PY, no later than noon on Friday of Week 1 of Trinity Full Term.

(iii) Written Examination. Candidates will be required to offer the written examination paper (i) Strategies for Educational Research as specified in the Schedule for the M.Sc. in Educational Studies.

Part II

A dissertation as described in cl. 5, p. 781. Candidates are reminded that they may not submit material already presented for assessment in Part I.'

Return to Contents of this section

(h) M.Sc. in Forced Migration

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 790, delete ll. 1–18 and substitute:

'Paper I: International Legal and Normative Framework

International legal and normative framework in relation to refugees and displaced persons. International and domestic application of individual and group rights to displaced persons and refugees. Activities and involvement of the relevant international organs, governments, and intergovernmental and non-governmental organisations relevant to forced migration. Concepts of intervention and their justifications. Evolution of humanitarian responses to forced migration. Organizational culture of assistance. Ethical issues raised by efforts to assist, control, prevent, and deter movements of forced migrants.

Paper II: Causes and Consequences of Forced Migration

Theories of the causes of forced migration and humanitarian crises. Historical dimensions and social dynamics of forced migration. Social and cultural constructions of place and space. Impact of forced migration on gender relations and age structures. Coercion and conflict. Implications of forced migrants for conceptualising the modern state and the international order. Security and stability of states. Environmental and development-induced displacement. Poverty and vulnerability. Impact of forced migrants on host populations and governments. Agency, coping mechanisms and survival strategies of affected populations. Nationalism, ethnicity and group identity. Consequences of resettlement programmes for livelihood and economic autonomy. Repatriation and local-level social reconstruction.'

Return to Contents of this section

(i) M.Sc. in Management Research

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

In Examination Regulations, 2004, delete from p. 802, l. 36 to p. 803, l. 23, and substitute:

'2. The examination will consist of two parts, the rubrics for which are set out in the schedule:

(a) Part One

(i) Research Methodology, as prescribed in the schedule. The Research Methodology Teachers will set either a written test to be taken in Week 10 of Hilary Term, or an assignment to be submitted by noon on Monday of Week 0 of Trinity Term. Students will be informed at the beginning of each element of the course whether the method of assessment will be a written test or an assignment.

The required number of copies of the assignment must be delivered to the Examination Schools and addressed to the Chairman of Examiners for the M.Sc. in Management Research, c/o Clerk of the Schools, High Street, Oxford, accompanied by a statement that it is the candidate's own work.

(ii) Core Course in Management Research, as prescribed in the schedule.

(b) Part Two

(i) Two specialist papers from the list of courses which may be offered. The list of subjects and the syllabuses from which the papers may be selected shall be approved by the M.Sc. Course Director and published in the Gazette not later than the end of the Trinity Term of the academic year preceding the year of the examination.

(ii) Dissertation. Candidates are required to submit a dissertation in a field of management research. The dissertation should demonstrate an ability to identify, formulate, implement and present a research project. Two typewritten copies of the dissertation, not exceeding 15,000 words in length, must be delivered to the Examination Schools and addressed to the Chairman of Examiners for the M.Sc. in Management Research, c/o Clerk of the Schools, High Street, Oxford, by noon on the first Monday of August in the calendar year in which the examination is taken.

3. Candidates who fail the Research Methodology assessment or the Core Course in Management Research paper, may resubmit, or resit the failed assessment only once, by Week 10 of the following term.

Candidates who fail an examination in Part II of the course, other than the dissertation, may enter again for the examination(s) in the following academic year.

Candidates who fail to satisfy the Examiners in the dissertation may resubmit it on one, but not more than one, subsequent occasion, which shall be no later than the first Monday of August of the following year.'

Return to Contents of this section


(j) Research degrees in Politics and International Relations

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 956, delete ll. 21–34 and substitute:

'2. Applications for transfer from PRS status to D.Phil. or M.Litt. status must be delivered to the Graduate Studies Assistant responsible for Politics and International Relations. Applicants in their sixth and final term of Probationer Status must submit their completed application not later than 5 p. m. on the Friday of fifth week of that term. In addition to satisfying the above requirements (i) and (ii) , the transfer of status application must include two copies of an outline of the proposed research topic and two copies of the written work—all as specified in the relevant Notes of Guidance for Graduate Students and Supervisors.

The relevant Graduate Studies Committee will appoint two assessors, one of whom will normally be a member of the committee, except in cases where neither of the two most appropriate assessors are members of the committee.'

Return to Contents of this section


5 Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies

(a) M.Phil. in Oriental Studies (xi) Modern Chinese Studies and (xii) Modern Chinese Art and Literature

With effect from October 2006 (for first examination in 2007)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 646, l. 24, delete 'Friday of the first week of the second term' and substitute 'Monday of the second week of the Michaelmas Term'.

2 Ibid., p. 647, l. 52, delete 'Friday of the first week of the second term' and substitute 'Monday of the second week of the Michaelmas Term'.

Return to Contents of this section


(b) M.Phil. in Oriental Studies (xii) Modern Chinese Art and Literature

With effect from October 2006 (for first examination in 2007)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 648, l. 10, delete '30,000' and substitute '20,000'.

2 Ibid., delete ll. 23–8.

3 Ibid., delete ll. 30–3.

4 Ibid., delete ll. 35–9.

Return to Contents of this section


(c) M.St. in Modern Jewish Studies

With effect from October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 721, l. 5, delete 'in the Hebrew language' and substitute 'in the Hebrew or Yiddish languages'.

2 Ibid., ll. 5–6, delete 'Those wishing to take option (9) must show evidence of their knowledge of Yiddish.'

3 Ibid., delete ll. 11–18 and substitute:

'There will be three papers and a dissertation. Paper I will be examined by a three- hour written examination, while Papers II–III will be examined either by written examination or by take-home essay examination.'

4 Ibid., l. 20, after 'in Hebrew' insert 'or Yiddish'.

5 Ibid. l. 22, delete 'II–IV Three papers from the following list' and substitute 'II–III Two papers from the following list'.

6 Ibid., ll. 29–32, delete '(7) Introduction to modern Jewish sociology.' and renumber subsequent lines.

7 Ibid., l. 33, after 'or any other subject approved by the Board.' insert 'Papers (3) , (4) , (5) , (7) and (9) will be examined by two take-home essays of not more than 2,500 words each. An essay examination will consist of the submission of two essays of not more than 2,500 words each, which must be submitted to the Clerk of the Schools, High Street, Oxford, by 12 noon on the Friday of Noughth Week of the term following that in which the paper was taught. Candidates will be notified of the essay topics on the Friday of eighth Week of the term in which the paper is taught.'

8 Ibid., after l. 35, insert new line:

'IV. Each candidate will be required to present two copies of a dissertation of not more than 15,000 words, on a subject approved by the Faculty Board of Oriental Studies at its first meeting in Hilary Term, to the Clerk of the Schools by 12 noon on Friday of the sixth week of Trinity Full Term.'

Return to Contents of this section


(d) M.Phil. in Oriental Studies (xiv) Tibetan and Himalayan Studies

With effect from October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 635, l. 28, after 'Classical Indian Religion' insert ', Tibetan and Himalayan Studies'.

Return to Contents of this section

(e) M.Phil. in Oriental Studies (iv) Modern Middle Eastern Studies

(f) M.St. in Modern Middle Eastern Studies

With effect from October 2006 (for first examination in 2007)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 640, l. 19, delete '(12) ' and substitute '(15) '.

2 Ibid., after l. 33, insert:

'(13) Mass Media and the Middle East.

(14) North African Politics.

(15) The Maghreb since 1830.'

3 Ibid., p. 722, l. 12, delete '(11) ' and substitute '(15) '.

4 Ibid., after l. 27, insert:

'(13) Mass Media and the Middle East.

(14) North African Politics.

(15) The Maghreb since 1830.'

Return to Contents of this section


(g) M.St. in Jewish Studies

With effect from October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 714, delete ll. 11–12 and substitute 'II. Four options from the following list, two to be taken in Michaelmas Term, two in Hilary Term.'

2 Ibid., l. 44, delete 'in the year in which he or she completes the course'.

Return to Contents of this section


( h) M.Phil. in Oriental Studies (vi) Modern Jewish Studies

With effect from October 2006 (for first examination in 2007)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 641, l. 28, delete 'in Hebrew' and substitute 'in the Hebrew or Yiddish languages'.

2 Ibid., l. 31, delete 'in Hebrew' and substitute 'in Hebrew or Yiddish'.

3 Ibid., l. 35, delete 'Candidates will present themselves for a written examination. The examination shall be taken in the Trinity Term of the academic year following that in which the candidate's name is first entered on the Register of M.Phil students.' and substitute:

'Candidates will present themselves for either written examination or take-home essay examination. Written examinations shall be taken in the Trinity Term of the academic year following that in which the candidate's name is first entered on the Register of M.Phil. students. An essay examination will consist of the submission of two essays of not more than 2,500 words each, which must be submitted to the Clerk of the Schools, High Street, Oxford, by 12 noon on the Friday of Noughth Week of the term following that in which the paper was taught. Candidates will be notified of the essay topics on the Friday of eighth Week of the term in which the paper is taught.'

4 In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 641, delete ll. 44–6 and renumber subsequent papers.

5 Ibid., p. 642, after l. 7, insert as new line 'Papers (1) , (2) , (3) , (5) , (8) and (9) will be examined by two take–home essays of not more than 2,500 words each.'

Return to Contents of this section


6 Board of the Faculty of Theology

Bachelor of Divinity

With effect from 1 October 2005

1 In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 1007, l. 6, insert:

'With effect from 1 October 2005 study for the Degree of Bachelor of Divinity will only be permissible for students already registered for the degree. No new applications will be accepted.'

2 Ibid., p. 1011, l. 28, insert:

'With effect from 1 October 2005 study for the Degree of Bachelor of Divinity will only be permissible for students already registered for the degree. No new applications will be accepted.'

Return to Contents of this section