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Oxford University Gazette, 17 March 2005: Examinations and Boards

CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the Educational Policy and Standards Committee of Council, the following changes in regulations made by divisional boards will come into effect on 1 April.

1 Life and Environmental Sciences Board

(a) Degree of Master of Philosophy

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 568, l. 7, after 'Medical Anthropology' insert 'Migration Studies'.

2 Ibid., p. 569, after ll. 10 and 11 insert 'Migration Studies—Life and Environmental Sciences'.

3 Ibid., p. 631, l. 31, insert:

'Migration Studies

The Life and Environmental Sciences Divisional Board shall elect for the supervision of the course a Standing Committee, namely the Graduate Studies Committee of the School of Anthropology, which shall have power to arrange lectures and other instruction. The course director shall be responsible to that committee.

The examination shall consist of the following:

1. Qualifying Examination
Every candidate will be required to satisfy the examiners in an examination for which, if he or she passes at the appropriate level, he or she will be allowed to proceed to the second year of the M.Phil. Candidates must follow a course of instruction in Migration Studies for at least three terms, and will, when entering for the examinations, be required to produce a certificate from their supervisor to this effect. The final examination shall be taken in the Trinity Term of the academic year in which the candidate's name is first entered on the Register of M.Phil. students or, with the approval of the divisional board, in a subsequent year.

Each candidate will be required to satisfy the examiners in four papers in accordance with I, II, III and IV below. In the calculation of the final examination mark all four papers will be weighted equally (25 per cent each).

I. Fundamental Concepts in Social and Cultural Anthropology

(Paper and syllabus shared with the M.Sc. in Material Anthropology and Museum Ethnography, and in Migration Studies, and in Social Anthropology.)

This paper focuses on anthropology's distinctive contribution to understanding social and cultural form and process, and the role of human creativity within them. Attention will be paid to the subject's history and its place within broader concerns of politics, colonialism, and culture; issues of scale and power; the formation of museum collections; and also to the place of the socio-cultural in constituting such 'natural' phenomena as ecology, landscape, and population. Special attention will be given to key transitions in ethnographic practice and the writing of ethnography; and to the way that anthropology has approached fundamental themes such as the naturalness or otherwise of 'the family', and the relativities of persons, gender, and agency. Coverage of these themes may include such topics as: categories and comparison; non-market exchange; systems of knowledge; literary and visual representions; identity, place, and boundaries; technology, modernism, and material culture; models and measurement; structure, rules, and genre.

II. Methods of Anthropological and Social Research
This paper consists of the following components: The satisfactory completion of a course of practical work in (i) participant observation, in-depth interviewing, archival research and qualitative data analysis; (ii) basic principles of statistical inference, and statistical models for the analysis of quantitative social science data, (iii) methods of data collection, including questionnaire design, interviewing and coding, and (iv) basic principles of economic modelling, microeconomics and labour economics.

Candidates shall submit to the Graduate Studies Committee of the School of Anthropology by 12 noon on Monday of the fifth week of the third term of the course reports of the practical work completed, accompanied by a statement that they are the candidate's own work except where otherwise indicated. The Director of Graduate Studies of the Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, or a deputy, shall draw to the attention of the examiners the names of any candidates who have failed to complete to a satisfactory level of quality the course of practical work, and the examiners may require candidates to retake the course or a specified part thereof. The reports of practical work shall be available for inspection by the examiners.

III. Migration Studies: Theory and Development
This paper will be examined by means of a three-hour written examination to be taken at the end of Trinity Term of the first year of the course. The scope of this paper includes the following topics: Basic concepts in migration studies; types of human migration and mobility; migration and mobility in human history; migration and development; migration and the state; forced migration and displacement; migration and asylum; migration as a business; integration of migrants; migration and inequality; migration, ethnicity and racism; regional issues in migration; transnationalism and globalization; international and internal migration; history and development of migration studies; theories and approaches in migration studies; migration and policy; determinants of migration; consequences of migration for the host country, sending country and migrants themselves.

IV.

This paper will explore in depth theoretical and practical questions and issues that currently drive research in the field of migration studies. Topics will vary from year to year, depending on changes in focus of migration studies. They will be chosen from, but not be limited to, the following themes:

Migration, return investments and remittances; unskilled vs. skilled emigration, emigration policies and the production of migration; brain drain and brain gain; international cooperation and competition in migration management; migration in and from specific regions (East Asia, South Asia; Eastern Europe; North America; Latin America; Middle East); ethnic and national identity; community cohesion and diversity; criminality, terrorism and migration; migration in and from Africa; the migration and asylum nexus; the EU and migration; immigration and social services in the UK; immigration and the UK labour market; considerations in the design of labour immigration policies; international governance of international labour migration.

Assessment of this paper will take place in the form of three written essays of a maximum of 3,000 words (excluding notes and bibliography) each on topics taught in the seminar that year. Candidates shall submit their essays to the Clerk of Schools no later than 12 noon on Monday of the fifth week of the Trinity Term of the course, accompanied by a statement that the essays are the candidate's own work except where otherwise indicated.

2. Final Examination
Candidates must have passed the qualifying examination of the M.Phil. in Migration Studies, and subsequently must follow a course of instruction in Migration Studies for at least three terms. They will, when entering for the final examination, be required to produce a certificate from their supervisor to this effect.

The final examination shall be taken in the Trinity Term of the academic year following that in which the candidate's name is first entered on the register of M.Phil. students or, with the approval of the divisional board, in a subsequent year.

Each candidate shall be required:

(1) to submit written essays in accordance with I below;

(2) to fulfil the examination requirements of one elective paper in accordance with II below;

(3) to submit a thesis in accordance with III below;

(4) to present himself or herself for oral examination as required by the examiners. The oral examination may be on the candidate's written essays, or thesis, or both.

In the calculation of the final examination mark the thesis will count for half (50 per cent) of the mark, while the other two papers will count for 1/4 (25 per cent) each.

I. Advanced Themes and Issues in Migration Research
This paper explores in depth the methodological, theoretical and policy issues in migration research. Assessment of this paper will take place in the form of two written essays of 5,000 words (excluding notes and bibliography) on topics, chosen in consultation with the student's supervisor, that are not identical or similar to the student's thesis topic. The essays take the form of a detailed research proposal, covering the following aspects: general theoretical and policy considerations of the topic; operational questions or hypotheses; choice of methods, research population and research area; linguistic and other skills required, and indication how these will be acquired; cooperation with research partners; ethical and practical considerations; research design and techniques; dissemination strategy; budget and funding strategy; project bibliography and list of primary (inc. internet) sources.

Candidates shall submit their essays to the Clerk of Schools by 12 noon on Monday of the ninth week of the Hilary Term of the second year of the course, accompanied by a statement that the essays are the candidate's own work except where otherwise indicated.

II. Elective paper
Candidates must elect one examination paper offered as part of another Master's (M.Phil. M.Sc., or M.St.) degree programme in the University, and must do so by filling out the examination entry form. A list of papers approved for this purpose by the Graduate Studies Committee of the School of Anthropology will be available from the course director. Students are free to elect any one of these papers in consultation with their supervisor. The examiners may, at their discretion, either require candidates to sit the standard examination paper for this elective paper, or else set a paper specifically for students on the M.Phil. in Migration Studies.
III. Thesis
Each candidate shall be required to submit a thesis of not more than 30,000 words (excluding notes, bibliography and appendices) on a subject approved by the supervisor. He or she shall submit to the Graduate Studies Committee of the School of Anthropology, with the written approval of his or her supervisor, the proposed title of the thesis by noon on the Monday of fourth week of Michaelmas Term in the academic year following that in which his or her name was entered on the Register of M.Phil. students. The thesis (two copies) must be typewritten and delivered to the Clerk of the Schools, High Street, Oxford, not later than noon on Monday of the fifth week of Trinity Term in the academic year in which the Final Examination is taken.

The Examiners shall require a successful candidate to deposit a copy of his or her thesis in the Tylor Library. If the thesis is superseded by a D.Phil. thesis by the same student partly using the same material, the Graduate Studies Committee of the School of Anthropology may authorize the withdrawal of the M.Phil. thesis from the Tylor Library. Such candidates will be required to sign a form stating whether they give permission for their thesis to be consulted.

The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination. If it is the opinion of the examiners that the work which has been required from a candidate is not of sufficient merit to qualify him or her for the M.Phil., the candidate shall be given the option of resitting the M.Phil. examination under Ch.VI, Sect. VI, §2, cl. 4.'

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(b) Honour School of Natural Science (Biological Sciences)

With effect from 1 October 2006 (for first examination in 2007)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 433, l. 41, delete 'eighth' and substitute 'seventh'.

2 Ibid., p. 434, l. 50, delete 'and exercises in' and substitute 'in Part A and'.

3 Ibid., from l. 52 to l. 1 on p. 435, delete 'Such candidates will be named in a list posted by the day of the first written paper in Part C of the examination'.

4 Ibid., p. 435, l. 4, delete 'and exercises in' and substitute 'in Part A and'.

5 Ibid., l. 7, after 'practical work' insert 'in Part A and'.

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2 Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board

(a) Honour School of Engineering Science

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first Part I examination in 2006)

In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 215, l. 48, after 'design' insert ', bioprocessing'.

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(b) Honour School of Engineering and Computing Science

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first Part II examination in 2006)

In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 220, l. 20, after 'Computer Science ' insert 'and the Honour School of Engineering Science'.

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(c) Honour School of Physics

With effect from 1 October 2006 (for first examination in Part B in 2007)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 517, after l. 16 insert:

'8. With respect to cl. 4 (a) and 4 (b) a candidate may offer as an alternative four written papers as specified in the schedule below. A candidate proposing to take this alternative must have the proposal approved by the Chairman of the sub-faculty of Physics or deputy, by the end Michaelmas Full Term.'

2 Ibid., renumber cll. 8–13 as cll. 9–14.

3 Ibid., p. 518, after l. 4 insert:

'B4: Mathematical Physics'.

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(d) Honour School of Physics and Philosophy

With effect from 1 October 2006 (for first examination in Part B in 2007)

In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 523, after l. 16 insert:

'B4: Mathematical Physics'.

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