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Oxford University Gazette, 12 May 2005: Examinations and Boards

PLANNING AND RESOURCE ALLOCATION COMMITTEE

Change in Regulations

The following change in regulations made by the Planning and Resource Allocation Committee of Council will come into effect on 27 May.

Regulations on Financial Matters

With effect from 1 September 2005

[To revise the registration fee payable for the degree of Doctor of Clinical Psychology]

In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 1093, l. 5, delete '1,045.00' and substitute '1,185.00'.

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CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

The following changes in regulations made by the Educational Policy and Standards Committee of Council, and, with the approval of the Educational Policy and Standards Committee, the following changes in regulations made by the divisional boards will come into effect on 27 May.

1 Educational Policy and Standards Committee

Abolition of the Pass Schools

With effect from 1 October 2007 (for first examination in 2008)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 11, ll. 3–4, delete ': (a) '.

2 Ibid., delete from '; or' on l. 10 to 'regulations.' on l. 12, and substitute '.'.

3 Ibid., p. 17, l. 7 delete 'or Pass School'.

4 Ibid., p. 23, delete from 'for the' on l. 7 to 'and' on l. 8.

5 Ibid., p. 45, delete from 'is deemed' on l. 38 to 'Degree.' on l. 41 and substitute: 'has satisfied the examiners at 'pass' standard shall be awarded a pass.'.

6 Ibid., p. 46, delete ll. 1–6.

7 Ibid., p. 47, l. 22, delete 'Pass Examinations,' and substitute 'Preliminary or Qualifying'.

8 Ibid., l. 24, delete 'Pass or'.

9 Ibid, p. 61, l. 1, delete 'or Pass Schools'.

10 Ibid., delete ll. 3–5.

11 Ibid., l. 9, delete 'AND PASS SCHOOLS'.

12 Ibid., p. 63, l. 9, delete 'AND PASS SCHOOLS'.

13 Ibid., p. 64, l. 20, delete 'or Pass School'.

14 Ibid., p. 66, delete ll. 31–33.

15 Ibid., delete from ', or have satisfied' on l. 38 to 'in those tables' on l. 39.

16 Ibid., p. 67, l. 27, delete 'or have satisfied the examiners in any Pass School,'.

17 Ibid., delete ll. 13–30 on p. 173, ll. 13–34 on p. 178, from l. 35 on p. 184 to l. 9 on p. 185, ll. 19–34 on p. 194, ll. 3–29 on p. 202, ll. 16–28 on p. 205, ll. 24–31 on p. 210, ll. 4–20 on p. 216, from l. 46 on p. 220 to l. 12 on p. 221, ll. 18–36 on p. 233, ll. 8–23 on p. 239, ll. 4–19 on p. 245, ll. 11–36 on p. 258, from l. 30 on p. 264 to l. 6 on p. 265, ll. 13–25 on p. 271, ll. 8–16 on p. 279, ll. 6–15 on p. 284, ll. 23–26 on p. 288, ll. 23–28 on p. 296, ll. 17–28 on p. 321, ll. 25–40 on p. 340, p. 344, ll. 15–31 on p. 351, p. 356, ll. 26–37 on p. 365, ll. 19–30 on p. 371, ll. 8–25 on p. 379, ll. 20–37 on p. 383, ll. 7–21 on p. 387, p. 393, from l. 40 on p. 397 to l. 46 on p. 398, ll. 16–34 on p. 422, ll. 16–26 on p. 427, from l. 23 on p. 447 to l. 7 on p. 449, from l. 37 on p. 479 to l. 22 on p. 480, from l. 36 on p. 493 to l. 11 on p. 494, ll. 7–20 on p. 510, ll. 25–36 on p. 513, p. 519, ll. 12–32 on p. 524, p. 536, ll. 26–45 on p. 552, and ll. 28–38 on p. 1126.

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2 Life and Environmental Sciences Board

(a) Honour School and Pass School of Biological Sciences

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

In Examination Regulations, 2004, after p. 178, insert:

'SPECIAL REGULATIONS FOR THE HONOUR SCHOOL OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

A

1. The subject of the Honour School of Biological Sciences shall be the study of Biological Sciences.

2. No candidate shall be admitted to examination in this school unless he or she has either passed or been exempted from the First Public Examination.

3. The examination in this school shall be under the supervision of the Life and Environmental Sciences Board, which shall prescribe the necessary regulations.

4. The examination in Biological Sciences shall consist of Part A (taken at a time not less than three terms after passing the First Public Examination) and Parts B, C and D (taken at a time not less than six terms after passing the First Public Examination).

5. The name of a candidate shall not be published in a class list until he or she has completed all parts of the examination. The examiners shall give due consideration to the performance in all parts of the respective examinations.

6. Candidates will be expected to show knowledge based on practical work. This requirement shall normally be satisfied by the examiners' assessment of the practical work done by candidates [Until 1 October 2006 : during their course of study] [From 1 October 2006 : in Part A and Quantitative Methods], based on attendance records and/or marks awarded. Exceptionally, the examiners may require a candidate to submit a practical notebook.

B

1. In the following, 'the Course Handbook' refers to the Biological Sciences Undergraduate Course Handbook, published annually at the start of Michaelmas Term.

2. The examiners will permit the use of any hand-held calculator subject to the conditions set out under the heading 'Use of calculators in examinations' in the Regulations for the Conduct of University Examinations.

3. Supplementary Subjects

(a) Candidates may, in addition to any one or more of the below- mentioned subjects, offer themselves for examination in one or more Supplementary Subjects.

(b) Candidates for Supplementary Subjects may offer themselves for examination in the academic year preceding that in which they take the Final Honour School.

(c) The Supplementary Subjects available in any year will be published, together with the term in which each subject will be examined, in the University Gazette not later than the end of the Trinity Term of the academic year prior to delivery of the courses. Regulations governing the use of calculators in individual Supplementary Subjects will be notified when the availability of these subjects is published in the Gazette.

(d) In determining the place of candidates in the Class List the examiners shall take account of distinction in any Supplementary Subjects which have been offered.

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

1. Candidates will be required to offer themselves for examination in five subjects chosen from the following

1. Evolution and Systematics

2. Quantitative Methods

3. Animal Biology

4. Plant and Microbial Biology

5. Environmental Biology

6. Cell and Developmental Biology

7. The Biology of Animal and Plant Disease

All candidates will be required to offer subjects 1 and 2 and three out of subjects 3–7. In all subjects knowledge of first year coursework will be assumed.

2. The examination shall be conducted as follows.

(a) Part A

Each candidate will be required to offer

(i) Subject 1: One three-hour written paper, to be taken on a date to be specified in the ninth week of Trinity Term of the academic year preceding the examination.

(ii) Subjects 3–7: One three-hour written paper in one of the five subjects, to be taken on a date to be specified in the ninth week of Trinity Term of the academic year preceding the examination. Candidates may not offer themselves for examination in Part A in a subject which they also intend to offer in Parts B and C. After completion of these two papers, the examiners will issue a list of candidates deemed to have completed Part A of the examination

(b) Part B

Each candidate must complete a course assignment on each of the two major subjects, from within 3–7, which they intend to offer in Part C. The assignment will be in a format specified by the course convener on a topic proposed by the student and approved by the Chairman of the Biological Sciences Steering Committee. The approval of assignments shall be given not later than Friday of the [Until 1 October 2006 : eighth] [From 1 October 2006 : seventh] week of the Michaelmas Full Term of the academic year in which the examination is taken. Course assignments in Part B must be the candidate's own work. Candidates may discuss the proposed topic, the sources available, and the method of presentation with an adviser. This adviser must also read and comment on a first draft.

Assignments shall be of not more than 3,000 words, excluding any tables, figures, or references, and must be prefaced by an Abstract of not more than 250 words, to be included within the word limit.

Assignments (two copies) must be legibly typed or wordprocessed on one side only of A4 paper, held firmly in a stiff cover, and submitted by noon on Friday of the noughth week of the Trinity Term of the academic year in which the examination is taken, addressed to The Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford for the Chairman of the Examiners in the Final Honour School of Biological Sciences.

Candidates shall not deal with substantially the same material in their Part B assignments as is covered in their project report. Candidates must sign a certificate stating that the assignment is their own work. This certificate must be submitted at the same time as the assignment in a sealed envelope addressed to the Chairman of Examiners. Each assignment, and the envelope containing the certificate, must be clearly labelled with the candidate's number. The name and college of the candidate must not appear on the assignment or on the envelope. Assignments previously submitted for the Honour School of Biological Sciences may be resubmitted. No assignment will be accepted if it has already been submitted, wholly or substantially, for another degree in the University or elsewhere; and the certificate must also contain a confirmation that the assignment has not already been so submitted. An assignment remains eligible even if it has been submitted, in whole or in part, for any scholarship or prize in this University. All sources used in the assignments must be fully documented. Each assignment shall clearly indicate on the first page the part of the examination and the subject under which the assignment is submitted.

(c) Part C

Each candidate will be required to offer written papers in three subjects, as follows.

(i) One paper in subject 2.

(ii) Two papers in each of two subjects chosen from subjects 3-7. Each written paper shall be of three hours' duration. For subjects 3-7, one paper shall consist of short answer questions, problems and questions based on the interpretation of observations, and data analysis; the other will consist of essay questions.

No candidate may take the written papers in the same subject offered in Part A.

(d) Part D

(i) Candidates will be required to offer a written report on a project in any area of biology. The project report shall be of not more than 7,000 words, excluding any tables, figures, or references, and must be prefaced by an Abstract of not more than 250 words, to be included within the word limit. The project report (two copies) must be legibly typed or wordprocessed (double line spacing to be used throughout) on one side only of A4 paper, held firmly in a stiff cover, and submitted on or before 12 noon on the Friday of week 6 of Hilary Full Term of the academic year in which Part C of the examination is taken. It must be addressed to The Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, for the Chairman of Examiners for the Final Honour School of Biological Sciences. Each project report shall be accompanied by a certificate signed by the candidate indicating that the project report is the candidate's own work. This certificate shall be submitted separately in a sealed envelope addressed to the Chairman of Examiners. No report will be accepted if it has already been submitted, wholly or substantially, for another Honour School or degree of this University, or for a degree of any other institution.

(ii) All candidates shall be assessed as to their practical ability in coursework under the following provisions:

(a) The Chairman of the Steering Committee, or a deputy, shall make available to the examiners, at the end of the first week of the term in which the examinations in Part C are held, records showing the extent to which each candidate has completed the prescribed practical work [Until 1 October 2006 : and exercises in] [From 1 October 2006 : in Part A and] Quantitative Methods to a satisfactory standard.

(b) The examiners may request coursework from any candidate. Such candidates will be named in a list posted by the day of the first written paper in Part C of the examination. Each notebook submitted shall be accompanied by a certificate signed by the candidate indicating that the notebook is the candidate's own work.

(c) In assessing the record of practical work [Until 1 October 2006 : and exercises in] [From 1 October 2006 : in Part A and] Quantitative Methods, the examiners shall have regard to the attendance record of the candidates at the classes provided, and to the marks awarded for the classes provided. Candidates whose overall performance in practical work [From 1 October 2006 : in Part A] and Quantitative Methods is judged by the examiners to be insufficient to warrant the award of Honours may either be deemed to have failed the examination, or may, at the discretion of the examiners, be awarded a Pass.

3. Field Work

Candidates may be required to carry out field work and attend such vacation courses as are approved from time to time by the Biological Sciences Steering Committee

4. Viva voce Examinations

All candidates will be examined on their project viva voce.

Schedule of Subjects

1. Evolution and Systematics

Evolution as the central theme of biology. Methods and data of phylogeny reconstruction. Biogeography. Macro-evolutionary change; origin of the major groups, extinction, punctuated equilibrium. Adaptation. Comparative Method. Natural selection. Units of selection. Molecular evolution. Evolution of sex. The modern synthesis.

2. Quantitative Methods

Principles and practice of the application to biology of statistics.

3. Animal Biology

The structure, function, evolution and behaviour of animals. Control and information systems, homeostasis and biomechanics of movement. Life history strategies and evolution of mammals. Evolutionary, causal and developmental aspects of animal behaviour. The biology of social behaviour including the evolution of aggression, co- operation and communication. Mate choice and kin selection. Behavioural ecology. Perception, learning and decision-making in animals. The genetics of behaviour. Neuro-biological bases of behaviour.

4. Plant and Microbial Biology

The biological diversity of plants and micro-organisms, including aspects of their ecology and evolution, structural and functional characteristics, life histories, reproduction, taxonomy and systematics, physiology and biochemistry, genetics and molecular biology, biotechnology, and also the importance of interactions between plants and micro-organisms.

5. Environmental Biology

Methods in ecology including the description and analysis of plant and animal communities. Ecology and conservation biology examining the genetic and population consequences and possible remedies for biodiversity loss. The ecology of forest and agricultural systems. Studies of major causes and biological consequences of global environmental change. The theory and practice of wild-life resource management

6. Cell and Developmental Biology

Mechanisms operating to co-ordinate cellular changes in the development of tissues and organs and complete animal and plant forms. Regulation of cell division and differentiation. Environmental signals coordinating and modulating development. Regulation of gene expression. Techniques of genetic modification used in the study of cellular and developmental processes.

7. Biology of Animal and Plant Disease

The biology, epidemiology and control of animal and plant disease. The biology of macro- and micro-parasites, host genetics and disease resistance. Molecular genetics of plant and animal parasites, epidemiology and control of disease. Modelling disease and vector-borne disease. Pass School of Biological Sciences

The candidate will be required to satisfy the examiners in

(i) Parts A and B of the examination for the Honour School of Biological Sciences;

(ii) Subject 2 of the Honour School of Biological Sciences; and

(iii) One subject (two papers) chosen from subjects 3–7 of the Honour School of Biological Sciences. All candidates must pursue a course of practical work and exercises in Quantitative Methods as specified for the Honour School of Biological Sciences and must satisfy the examiners therein. They may also be required to carry out field work and attend such vacation courses as are approved from time to time by the Biological Sciences Steering Committee.'

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(b) Honour School and Pass School of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

In Examination Regulations, 2004, after p. 422, insert:

SPECIAL REGULATIONS FOR THE HONOUR SCHOOL OF MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR BIOCHEMISTRY

A

1. The subject of the Honour School of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry shall be the study of Molecular and Cellular aspects of the structure and behaviour of biological molecules.

2. No candidate shall be admitted to examination in this school unless he or she has either passed or been exempted from the First Public Examination.

3. The examination in this school shall be under the supervision of the Life and Environmental Sciences Board, which shall prescribe the necessary regulations.

4. The examination in Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry shall consist of two parts: Part I and Part II.

5. No candidate may present him or herself for examination in Part II unless he or she has been adjudged worthy of Honours by the examiners in Part I.

6. The name of a candidate shall not be published in a class list until he or she has completed all parts of the examination and has been adjudged worthy of Honours by the examiners in Part I and Part II of the examination in consecutive years. The examiners shall give due consideration to the performance in all parts of the respective examinations.

7. A candidate who obtains only a pass, or fails to satisfy the examiners, may enter again for Part I of the examination on one, but no more than one, subsequent occasion. Part II shall be entered on one occasion only.

8. A candidate adjudged worthy of Honours in Part I and Part II may supplicate for the Degree of Master of Biochemistry, provided he or she has fulfilled all the conditions for admission to a degree of the University.

9. A candidate who passes Part I or who is adjudged worthy of Honours in Part I of the examination, but who does not enter Part II of the examination, or who fails to obtain honours in Part II, may be allowed to supplicate for the degree of Bachelor of Arts (pass or unclassified Honours as appropriate), provided he or she has fulfilled all the conditions for admission to a degree of the University; but such a candidate may not later enter or re-enter Part II or supplicate for the degree of Master of Biochemistry.

10. Candidates will be expected to show knowledge based on practical work. The examination shall be partly practical: this requirement shall normally be satisfied by the examiners' assessment of the practical work done by candidates during their course of study.

B

1. The examiners will permit the use of any hand-held calculator subject to the conditions set out under the heading 'Use of calculators in examinations' in the

Regulations for the Conduct of University Examinations.

2. Supplementary Subjects

(a) Candidates may, in addition to any one or more of the below- mentioned subjects, offer themselves for examination in one or more Supplementary Subjects.

(b) Candidates for Supplementary Subjects may offer themselves for examination in the academic year preceding that in which they take the Final Honour School; they may also offer themselves for examination in the year in which they take the Final Honour School, Part I or Part II. No more than one Supplementary Subject may be offered in any one year.

(c) The Supplementary Subjects available in any year will be published, together with the term in which each subject will be examined, in the University Gazette not later than the end of the Trinity Term of the academic year prior to delivery of the courses Regulations governing the use of calculators in individual Supplementary Subjects will be notified when the availability of these subjects is published in the Gazette.

(d) In determining the place of candidates in the Class List the examiners shall take account of good performance in any Supplementary Subjects which have been offered.

MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR BIOCHEMISTRY

PART I

Six written papers will be set:

Paper I Structure and Function of Macromolecules;

Paper II Energetics and Metabolic Processes;

Paper III Genetics and Molecular Biology;

Paper IV Cell Biology and the Integration of Function;

Paper V General Paper.

Paper VI Data Analysis and Interpretation

Candidates will be required to show knowledge of the fundamental biochemistry of animals, plants, and micro-organisms. This will include the chemical and physical basis of the subject, its relevance to living systems; structure, function, and metabolism of viruses, cells and subcellular components, organs and organisms; biochemical aspects of nutrition, differentiation, genetics, absorption, secretion, biosynthesis, and maintenance of a dynamic state. In the general paper, candidates will be expected to bring together a knowledge of these disparate areas of Biochemistry. The data analysis and interpretation paper will consist of questions designed to examine candidates' skills in data handling and the interpretation of experimental data; relevant tables and formulae will be supplied.

Except with the express permission of the Head of the Department of Biochemistry, no one shall be admitted to the Final Honour School of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry course of practical work and exercises in biochemical reasoning who has not passed, or been exempted from, the First Public Examination.

Heads of laboratories, or their deputies, shall make available to the examiners records showing the extent to which each candidate has adequately pursued a course of laboratory work and exercises in biochemical reasoning. In assessing the record of practical work and exercises in data handling, the examiners shall have regard to the attendance record of the candidates at each and every class provided, and to the marks recorded for each and every class provided. Candidates whose overall performance in either the written papers or in practical work and data handling is judged by the examiners to be insufficient to warrant the award of Honours may either be deemed to have failed the examination, or may be awarded a Pass. Candidates in either category will not be allowed to proceed to Part II. The examiners will issue a list of candidates who are allowed to proceed to Part II.

If requested by the examiners, candidates shall submit notebooks containing reports, initialled by the demonstrators, of practical work and exercises in biochemical reasoning completed during their course of study for Part I. These notebooks shall be available to the examiners at any time after the end of the first week of the term in which the examination is held. Each notebook shall be accompanied by a certificate signed by the candidate indicating that the notebook submitted is the candidate's own work.

Candidates may be examined viva voce.

PART II

Part II will consist of project work, an extended essay, and two written papers, each of three hours' duration.

Candidates will be required to keep statutory residence and pursue their investigations at Oxford during a period of twenty-eight weeks including an extended Michaelmas Term which will begin on the fourth Friday before the stated Full Term and extend until the first Saturday following it, provided that the divisional board shall have power to permit candidates to vary the dates of their residence so long as the overall requirement is met.

Project work: The project will normally be carried out in the extended Michaelmas Term.

Candidates will be required to do project work under the supervision of one of the following:

(i) any member of the Faculty of Biological Sciences;

(ii) any other person approved by the Biochemistry Steering Committee provided that such approval shall be applied for not later than Friday in the second week of Trinity Full Term in the year preceding the Part II examination.

Candidates will be required to present an account of such work in the form of a dissertation (not more than 5,000 words excluding tables, figures, references, and summary). Dissertations (two copies) must be legibly typed on one side only of A4 paper and must be held firmly in a stiff cover. Each dissertation must begin with an abstract of not more than 300 words, which should include a brief statement of the aims of the project and a summary of its important findings. The two copies of the dissertation must be submitted by noon on Friday of the week immediately following the Hilary Full Term preceding the examination, addressed to The Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, for the Chairman of the Examiners in the Final Honour School of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, Part II. Each candidate must submit, together with his or her project, a statement to the effect that the project is the candidate's own work or indicating where the work of others has been used, save that supervisors should give advice on the choice and scope of the project, provide a reading list, and comment on the first draft. This statement must be submitted at the same time as the project in a sealed envelope addressed to the Chairman of Examiners. Each project, and the envelope containing the statement, must be clearly labelled with the candidate's number. The name and college of the candidate must not appear on the project or on the envelope. The examiners may obtain a written report on the work of each candidate from the supervisor concerned.

Candidates will be required to present a brief oral report of their research project in the first half of Trinity Full Term to a group of two examiners (or examiner(s) and assessor appointed to ensure an adequate representation of expertise), after which the candidate shall be examined viva voce on the project. The form of the presentation to examiners shall be specified in guidelines published by the Department of Biochemistry in week 8 of Trinity Full Term in the academic year preceding the examination.

Dissertations previously submitted for the Honour School of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry may be resubmitted. No dissertation will be accepted if it has already been submitted, wholly or substantially, for an Honour School other than Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, or for another degree of this University, or for a degree of any other institution.

Extended essay and written papers: Each candidate will be examined on three areas of Biochemistry by means of (1) an extended essay and (2) and (3) two written papers. At least two of these will be on topics studied by candidates within options selected from a list of eight options approved by the Biochemistry Steering Committee and published by the Department of Biochemistry. The list of options will be posted in the Department of Biochemistry and sent to Senior Tutors of all colleges not later than noon on Friday of the seventh week of Trinity Term in the year preceding that in which the examination is taken. Studies will be guided by an adviser who will be a member of the Faculty of Biological Sciences or a person approved by the Biochemistry Steering Committee as under (ii) above.

(1) Extended Essay

Candidates will be required to write an essay of not more than 3,000 words excluding any tables, figures, or references. The extended essay should be a critical review based on independent reading. It should attempt to evaluate the primary literature, making a critical appraisal. Except as provided below, the essay shall be on a subject that falls within a topic selected from a list of three topics for each of the eight options, which will be published by the examiners in the Final Honour School of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, Part II not later than 12 noon on Friday of the eighth week of Michaelmas Term in the academic year in which the examination is to be taken.

Candidates are free to choose their own title provided that it falls clearly under the topics published by the examiners. A candidate wishing to offer an essay on a topic other than one of those published by the examiners must, not later than noon on Friday of the first week of Hilary Term in the academic year in which the examination is to be taken, give notice to the Secretary of the Biochemistry Steering Committee, on a form to be obtained from the teaching office in the Department of Biochemistry, of the proposed title of the essay and a brief outline of the subject matter. It shall be the duty of the Secretary of the Steering Committee to submit this proposal to the Chairman of the Steering Committee and the Chairman of the Examiners for approval. The Chairman of the Steering Committee and the Chairman of the Examiners shall determine the option (if any) in which the proposed essay falls. In the event of the two Chairmen not giving their joint approval, the candidate shall write the essay on a topic from the list published by the examiners. It shall be the duty of the Secretary of the Steering Committee to communicate the outcome of the submission to the candidate, stating the option in which the essay is to be written, not later than 12 noon on Friday of the third week of Hilary Term in the academic year in which the examination is to be taken.

No candidate may take the written examination in the option in which his or her essay has been written.

The essay must be the candidate's own work. Tutors and advisers may, however, discuss with candidates the proposed field of study, the sources available, and the method of presentation. They may also read and comment on a first draft.

The essay (two copies) must be legibly typed on one side only of A4 paper, held firmly in a stiff cover, and submitted by 12 noon on Friday of the fourth week of the Full Term in which the examination is held, addressed The Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, Oxford, for the Chairman of the Examiners in the Final Honour School of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, Part II.

Candidates shall not deal with substantially the same material in their essay as was covered in their dissertation. Candidates must sign a certificate stating that the essay is their own work and their advisers shall countersign the certificate confirming that, to the best of their knowledge and belief, this is so. This certificate must be submitted at the same time as the essay in a sealed envelope addressed to the Chairman of Examiners. Each essay, and the envelope containing the certificate, must be clearly labelled with the candidate's number. The name and college of the candidate must not appear on the essay or on the envelope. No essay will be accepted if it has already been submitted, wholly or substantially, for a degree in this University or elsewhere; and the certificate must also contain a confirmation that the essay has not already been so submitted. An essay remains eligible even if it has been submitted, in whole or in part, for any scholarship or prize in this University. All sources used in the essay must be fully documented. Each essay shall clearly indicate on the first page the option or the approved subject under which the essay is submitted.

Candidates shall notify the Registrar, not later than Friday of the first week of the Trinity Term in which the examination is taken, on a form to be obtained from the Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, which options they intend to offer in the examinations and, if approval has not already been obtained, the option in which they offer their essay.

(2) and

(3) Written Papers

One paper of three hours' duration will be set for each option and candidates will be required to take two papers.

Each candidate may be examined viva voce.

Pass School of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry

The candidate will be required:

(i) to satisfy the examiners in four written papers of his or her choice from among Papers I–VI for Part I of the Honour School of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry;

(ii) to pursue a course of laboratory work as specified in Part I of the Honour School of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry and to satisfy the examiners therein.

No candidate for the Pass School will be eligible to continue to Part II.'

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3 Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board

(a) Honour School and Pass School of Computer Science

(i) With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in Part A in 2006, Part B in 2007, Part C in 2008)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 10, ll. 30 and 36, after 'Chemistry' insert 'or Computer Science'.

2 Ibid., p. 53, after l. 13, insert:

'Master of Computer Science'.

3 Ibid., p. 68, after l. 4, insert:

'Master of Computer Science Computer Science (four-year course) '

4 Ibid., after p. 202, insert:

'SPECIAL REGULATIONS FOR THE HONOUR SCHOOL OF COMPUTER SCIENCE

[for candidates embarking on the Honour School in or after October 2005]

A

In the following, 'the Course Handbook' refers to the Computer Science Undergraduate Course Handbook and supplements to this published by the Computer Science Teaching Committee and also posted on the web-site at http://web.comlab.ox.ac.uk/oucl/courses/synopses/

1. The subject of the Honour School of Computer Science shall be the theory and practice of Computer Science.

2. No candidate shall be admitted to examination in this School unless he or she has either passed or been exempted from the First Public Examination.

3. The Examination in Computer Science shall be under the supervision of the Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board. The Board shall have the power from time to time to frame and vary regulations for the different parts and subjects of the examination. 4.

(a) The examination in Computer Science shall consist of three parts (A, B, C) for the four-year course, and of two parts (A, B) for the three-year course.

(b) Parts A, B, and C shall be taken at times not less than three, six, and nine terms, respectively, after passing or being exempted from the First Public Examination.

5. The name of a candidate on either the three-year course or the four-year course shall not be published in a Class List until he or she has completed all parts of the respective examination. 6.

(a) Part A shall be taken on one occasion only.

(a) In order to proceed to Part C, a candidate must achieve Honours standard in Part A and Part B together. A list of candidates satisfying this requirement shall be published by the examiners.

(b) A candidate on the three-year course who obtains only a Pass or fails to satisfy the Examiners in Part B may retake Part B on at most one subsequent occasion; a candidate on the four-year course who obtains only a Pass or fails to satisfy the Examiners in Part C may retake Part C on at most one subsequent occasion. A candidate on the four-year course shall take Part B on one occasion only.

7. A candidate adjudged worthy of Honours on both Parts A and B together, and on Part C may supplicate for the degree of Master of Computer Science if he or she has fulfilled all the conditions in the General Regulations for Admission to Degrees awarded on Passing the Second Public Examination.

8. All candidates will be assessed as to their practical ability under the following provisions:

(a) The Director of the Computing laboratory, or a deputy, shall make available to the examiners evidence showing the extent to which each candidate has pursued an adequate course of practical work.

(b) Candidates for each part of the examination shall submit to the Chairman of the Examiners, Honour School of Computer Science, c/o the Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, Oxford, by noon on Monday of the fifth week of the Trinity Term in which the examination is being held, their reports of practical exercises completed during their course of study. For a report on a practical exercise to be considered by the examiners, it must have been marked by a demonstrator and must be accompanied by a statement that it is the candidate's own work except where otherwise indicated.

(c) The examiners shall take the evidence (a) and the report (b) into account in assessing a candidate's performance.

B

The syllabus for each of Parts A, B, and C will be published by the Computing Laboratory in a handbook for candidates by the beginning of Michaelmas Full Term in the academic year of the examination concerned.

The use of calculators is generally not permitted but certain kinds may be allowed for certain papers. Specifications of which papers and which types of calculators are permitted for those exceptional papers will be announced by the examiners in the Hilary Term preceding the examination.

1. In Part A of the examination, candidates shall be required to offer two papers as follows, each of three hours' duration.

CS4 Object-oriented programming,

CS5 Concurrency, networks and operating systems.

In addition, each candidate shall be required to offer four optional subjects from Schedule A in the Course Handbook, each to be examined by a paper of one and a half hours' duration.

2. In Part B of the examination, each candidate shall be required to offer six optional subjects from Schedules B1, B2, and B4 in the Course Handbook, subject to the conditions that (a) no candidate shall offer any subject from Schedule B1 that he or she has already offered in Part A of the examination.

(b) each candidate shall offer no more than two subjects from Schedule B1.

(c) each candidate shall offer no more than two subjects from Schedule B4.

Each optional subject shall be examined by a paper of one and a half hours' duration. In addition, each candidate in Part B of the examination shall submit a project report.

3. In Part C of the examination, each candidate shall be required to offer four optional subjects from Schedule C1 in the Course Handbook, subject to the condition that no candidate shall offer any subject that he or she has already offered in Part B of the examination. Each optional subject shall be examined by a paper of one and a half hours' duration or by a mini-project. In addition, each candidate in Part C of the examination shall submit a project report.

4. The schedules of optional subjects for Parts A, B, and C of the examination shall be approved by the Sub-faculty of Computation, and shall be published in the Course Handbook.

5. The examiners shall have power to combine two papers on related optional subjects into a single paper of three hours' duration for those candidates who offer both the optional subjects concerned.

6. In Part B and in Part C of the examination, each candidate shall carry out a project on a topic in Computer Science approved by the Teaching Committee of the Computing Laboratory. Each project will be supervised by a member of the Sub-faculty of Computation, the Sub-faculty of Mathematics or the Sub-faculty of Engineering Science, or by some other person of equivalent seniority approved by the Teaching Committee. Two copies of a report of the project shall be submitted to the Chairman of the Examiners, Honour School of Computer Science, c/o the Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, Oxford, by noon on Monday of the fifth week of the Trinity Term in which the relevant Part of the examination is held. The Part B report must not exceed 6,000 words plus twenty-five pages of additional material (e.g. diagrams, program text). The Part C report must not exceed 10,000 words plus forty pages of additional material (e.g. diagrams, program text).

In retaking Part of an examination, projects previously submitted for Part B or for Part C of the examination may be resubmitted, but for that Part only. No project may be resubmitted if it has already been submitted, wholly or substantially, for another honour school or degree of the University, or of any other institution.

PASS SCHOOL OF COMPUTER SCIENCE

1. Candidates shall be required to offer the following parts of the examination for the Honour School of Computer Science:

For Part A,

(a) Papers CS4 and CS5.

(b) Two optional subjects chosen from Schedule A in the Course Handbook.

For Part B,

(c) Two optional subjects chosen from Schedules B1 and B2 in the Course Handbook.

(d) A project, governed by the regulations prescribed for the Honour School of Computer Science.

2. Candidates shall be assessed as to their practical ability under the regulations set out for the Honour School of Computer Science.'

6 Ibid., p. 203, l. 4, delete 'in or after October 2003 ' and substitute 'in October 2003 or October 2004'.

7 Ibid., p. 1093, l. 26, after 'M.Chem.' insert 'or M.Comp. Sci'.

8 Ibid., l. 42, after 'M.Chem.' insert 'or the Degree of M.Comp. Sci'.

(ii) With effect from 1 October 2006

In Examination Regulations, 2004, delete pp. 203 to 205.

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(b) Honour School and Pass School of Mathematics and Computer Science

(i) With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in Part A in 2006, Part B in 2007, Part C in 2008)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 10, ll. 31 and 37, after 'Mathematics' insert 'or Mathematics and Computer Science'.

2 Ibid., p. 53, l. 12, after 'Master of Mathematics' insert:

'Master of Mathematics and Computer Science'.

3 Ibid., p. 68, after l. 21, insert:

'Master of Mathematics and              Computer Science 
Computer Science (four-year course)'. 
4 Ibid., after p. 348, insert:

'SPECIAL REGULATIONS FOR THE HONOUR SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE

[for candidates embarking on the Honour School in or after October 2005]

A

In the following, 'the Course Handbook' refers to the Mathematics and Computer Science Undergraduate Course Handbook and supplements to this published by the Teaching Committee and also posted on the web-site at http://web.comlab.ox.ac.uk/oucl/courses/synopses/

1. The subject of the Honour School of Mathematics and Computer Science shall be Mathematics and the theory and practice of Computer Science.

2. No candidate shall be admitted to examination in this School unless he or she has either passed or been exempted from the First Public Examination.

3. The Examination in Mathematics and Computer Science shall be under the supervision of the Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board. The Board shall have the power from time to time to frame and vary regulations for the different parts and subjects of the examination. 4.

(a) The examination in Mathematics and Computer Science shall consist of three parts (A,B,C) for the four-year course, and of two parts (A,B) for the three-year course.

(b) Parts A,B, and C shall be taken at times not less than three, six, and nine terms, respectively, after passing or being exempted from the First Public Examination.

5. The name of a candidate on either the three-year course or the four-year course shall not be published in a Class List until he or she has completed all parts of the respective examination.

6.

(a) Part A shall be taken on one occasion only.

(b) In order to proceed to Part C, a candidate must achieve Honours standard in Part A and Part B together. A list of candidates satisfying this requirement shall be published by the examiners.

(c) A candidate on the three-year course who obtains only a Pass or fails to satisfy the Examiners in Part B may retake Part B on at most one subsequent occasion; a candidate on the four-year course who obtains only a Pass or fails to satisfy the Examiners in Part C may retake Part C on at most one subsequent occasion. A candidate on the four-year course shall take Part B on one occasion only.

7. A candidate adjudged worthy of Honours on both Parts A and B together, and on Part C may supplicate for the degree of Master of Mathematics and Computer Science if he or she has fulfilled all the conditions in the General Regulations for Admission to Degrees awarded on Passing the Second Public Examination.

8. All candidates will be assessed as to their practical ability under the following provisions:

(a) The Director of the Computing laboratory, or a deputy, shall make available to the examiners evidence showing the extent to which each candidate has pursued an adequate course of practical work.

(b) Candidates for each part of the examination shall submit to the Chairman of the Examiners, Honour School of Mathematics and Computer Science, c/o the Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, Oxford, by noon on Monday of the fifth week of the Trinity Term in which the examination is being held, their reports of practical exercises completed during their course of study. For a report on a practical exercise to be considered by the examiners, it must have been marked by a demonstrator and must be accompanied by a statement that it is the candidate's own work except where otherwise indicated.

(c) The examiners shall take the evidence (a) and the report (b) into account in assessing a candidate's performance.

B

The syllabus for each of Parts A, B, and C will be published by the Computing Laboratory in a handbook for candidates by the beginning of Michaelmas Full Term in the academic year of the examination concerned.

The use of calculators is generally not permitted but certain kinds may be allowed for certain papers. Specifications of which papers and which types of calculators are permitted for those exceptional papers will be announced by the examiners in the Hilary Term preceding the examination.

1. In Part A of the examination, candidates shall be required to offer three papers as follows, each of two and a quarters hours' duration.

AC1(MC) Algebra, analysis and differential equations

AC2(MC) Algebra, analysis and differential equations

AO(MC) Mathematics options

In papers AC1(MC) and AC2(MC), candidates will be permitted to answer questions on two of the three subjects of the paper.

Candidates shall also be required to offer one of the following two papers, each of three hours' duration.

CS4 Object-oriented programming,

CS5 Concurrency, networks and operating systems.

In addition, each candidate shall be required to offer two optional subjects in Computer Science from Schedule A in the Course Handbook, each to be examined by a paper of one and a half hours' duration.

2. In Part B of the examination, each candidate shall be required to offer eight optional subjects from Schedules B1-B5 in the Course Handbook, subject to the conditions that

(a) no candidate shall offer any subject from Schedule B1 that he or she has already offered in Part A of the examination.

(b) each candidate shall offer no more than two subjects from Schedule B1.

(c) each candidate shall offer no more than two subjects from Schedules B4 and B5.

(d) each candidate shall offer at least two subjects from Schedules B1 and B2.

(e) each candidate shall offer at least two subjects from Schedule B3.

Each optional subject in Schedules B1, B2 and B4 shall be examined by a paper of one and a half hours' duration. The manner of examining each subject in Schedules B3 and B5 shall be the same as that prescribed for the same subject in the Honour School of Mathematics. Each 'whole unit' in schedules B3 and B5 shall be regarded as equivalent to two subjects in the examination, and each 'half unit' shall be regarded as equivalent to one subject.

3. In Part C of the examination, each candidate shall be required to offer six optional subjects from Schedules C1 and C2 in the Course Handbook, subject to the condition that no candidate shall offer any subject that he or she has already offered in Part B of the examination. Each optional subject in Schedule C1 shall be examined by a paper of one and a half hours' duration or by a mini-project. The manner of examining each subject in Schedule C2 shall be the same as that prescribed for the same subject in the Honour School of Mathematics. Each 'whole unit' in schedule C2 shall be regarded as equivalent to two subjects in the examination, and each 'half unit' shall be regarded as equivalent to one subject. As an alternative to offering six optional subjects, candidates in Part C of the examination may offer four optional subjects and submit a project report.

4. The schedules of optional subjects for Parts A, B, and C of the examination shall be approved by the Sub-faculty of Mathematics and the Sub-faculty of Computation, and shall be published in the Course Handbook.

5. The examiners shall have power to combine two papers on related optional subjects into a single paper of three hours' duration for those candidates who offer both the optional subjects concerned.

6. In Part C of the examination, candidates may carry out a project on a topic approved by the Teaching Committee. The project will carry a weight equivalent to two optional subjects. Each project will be supervised by a member of the Sub-faculty of Computation, the Sub-faculty of Mathematics or the Sub-faculty of Engineering Science, or by some other person of equivalent seniority approved by the Teaching Committee. Two copies of a report of the project shall be submitted to the Chairman of the Examiners, Honour School of Computer Science, c/o the Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, Oxford, by noon on Monday of the fifth week of the Trinity Term in which the relevant Part of the examination is held. The report must not exceed 6,000 words plus twenty-five pages of additional material (e.g. diagrams, program text).

In retaking Part C of the examination, projects previously submitted for the examination may be resubmitted. No project may be resubmitted if it has already been submitted, wholly or substantially, for another honour school or degree of the University, or of any other institution.

PASS SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE

1. Candidates shall be required to offer the following parts of the examination for the Honour School of Mathematics and Computer Science:

For Part A,

(a) Papers AC1(MC) and AC2(MC).

(b) Either Paper CS4 or Paper CS5.

(c) Either Paper AO(MC) or two optional subjects in Computer Science chosen from Schedule A in the Course Handbook.

For Part B,

(d) Two optional subjects chosen from Schedules B1 and B2 in the Course Handbook, with the restriction that no subject from Schedule B1 shall be offered by any candidate who has offered the same subject in Part A of the examination.

(e) Two optional subjects chosen from Schedule B3 in the Course Handbook.

2. Candidates shall be assessed as to their practical ability under the regulations set out for the Honour School of Mathematics and Computer Science.'

5 Ibid., p. 349, l. 5, delete 'in or after October 2003 ' and substitute 'in October 2003 or October 2004'.

6 Ibid., p. 1093, l. 27, after 'M.Math.' insert 'or M.Math.Comp. Sci.'.

7 Ibid., l. 43, after 'M.Math' insert 'or the Degree of M.Math.Comp. Sci.'.

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(ii) With effect from 1 October 2006

In Examination Regulations, 2004, delete from p. 349 to p. 351.

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(c) Preliminary Examinations in Mathematics (for first examination in 2006)

With effect from 1 October 2005

In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 139, l. 16, delete 'ten' and substitute 'eight'.

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(d) Honour School of Mathematics

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in Part A in 2006)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 341, delete ll. 30-31, and substitute:

'6. (a) Part A shall be taken on one occasion only.'

2 Ibid., p. 342, l. 2, after 'occasion.' insert, 'A candidate on the four-year course shall take Part B on one occasion only.'.

3 Ibid., p. 343, delete ll. 45–47.

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(e) Honour School of Computer Science

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in Part A in 2006)

In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 204, delete ll. 4-5 and substitute:

'5 Part A shall be taken on one occasion only.'

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(f) Honour School of Mathematics and Computer Science

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in Part A in 2006) In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 350, delete ll. 6-7 and substitute:

'5 Part A shall be taken on one occasion only.'

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(g) Honour School of Mathematics and Statistics

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in Part A in 2006)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 363, delete ll. 27–8 and substitute:

'6 (a) Part A shall be taken on one occasion only.'

2 Ibid., l. 38, after 'occasion.' insert, 'A candidate on the four- year course shall take Part B on one occasion only.'

3 Ibid., p. 364, delete lines 12–16 and substitute:

'(b) Each candidate shall offer a total of at least one unit from the units and half-units BS2, BS3.

(c) Each candidate may offer a total of at most one unit from BS4 and the schedule of 'Other units and half-units'.'

4 Ibid, p. 365, delete lines 17–25 and substitute:

'2. Mathematics units and half units

Units and half units from the list of 'Approved units and half units' for Part B of the Honour School of Mathematics.

3. Other units and half units

Some units or half units from the lists of 'Other mathematics units and half units' and 'Non- mathematical units and half units' for Part B of the Honour School of Mathematics,

except for those listed under 'Statistics units and half units' above, may be available.'

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( h) Preliminary Examination in Computer Science

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 125, delete l. 7, and re-number cll. 5 and 6 as cll. 4 and 5.

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(i) Preliminary Examination in Mathematics and Computer Science

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 139, delete l. 37, and re-number cll. 5 and 6 as cll. 4 and 5.

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(j) Honour School and Pass School of Chemistry

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2004, after p. 178, after the Special Regulations for the Honour School of Biological Sciences, insert:

'SPECIAL REGULATIONS FOR THE HONOUR SCHOOL OF CHEMISTRY

A

1. The subject of the Honour School of Chemistry shall be the study of Chemistry.

2. No candidate shall be admitted to examination in this school unless he or she has either passed or been exempted from the First Public Examination.

3. The examination in this school shall be under the supervision of the Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board, which shall prescribe the necessary regulations.

4. The examination in Chemistry shall consist of three parts: IA, IB, II.

5. No candidate may present him or herself for examination in Part II unless he or she has been adjudged worthy of honours by the examiners in Part I (Part IA and Part IB).

6. The name of a candidate shall not be published in a class list until he or she has completed all parts of the examination, and has been adjudged worthy of honours by the examiners in Part I (Part IA and Part IB) and Part II of the examination in consecutive years. The Examiners shall give due consideration to the performance in all parts of the respective examinations.

7. The examiners shall be entitled to award a Pass to candidates in Part I (Part IA and Part IB) who have reached a standard considered adequate but who have not been adjudged worthy of honours.

8. A candidate who obtains only a pass, or fails to satisfy the examiners, may enter again for Part IB of the examination on one, but no more than one, subsequent occasion. Part IA and Part II shall be entered on one occasion only.

9. A candidate adjudged worthy of Honours in Part I (Parts IA and IB) and worthy of classified Honours in Part II may supplicate for the Degree of Master of Chemistry, provided he or she has fulfilled all the conditions for admission to a degree of the University.

10. A candidate who passes Part I (Parts IA and IB) or who is adjudged worthy of Honours in Part I (Parts IA and IB), but who does not enter Part II, or fails to obtain classified Honours in Part II, may be permitted to supplicate for the degree of Bachelor of Arts (pass or unclassified Honours, as appropriate) ; provided that no such candidate may later enter or re-enter the Part II year or supplicate for the degree of Master of Chemistry; and provided in each case that the candidate has fulfilled all the conditions for admission to a degree of the University.

11. Candidates will be expected to show knowledge based on practical work. The examination shall be partly practical: this requirement shall normally be satisfied by the examiners' assessment of the practical work done by candidates during their course of study: provided that this requirement may be satisfied, in the case of a supplementary subject for which the sub-faculty has so prescribed in the Course Handbook, by the assessment by the examiners of the practical work done by candidates during their course of study. Exceptionally, the examiners may require a candidate to take a practical examination.

B

1. In the following, 'the Course Handbook' refers to the Chemistry Undergraduate Course Handbook, published annually at the start of Michaelmas Term by the Sub-faculty of Chemistry and also posted on the Web site at http://www.chem.ox.ac.uk/t eaching/UndergradHandbook

2. The examiners will permit the use of any hand-held calculator subject to the conditions set out under the heading 'Use of calculators in examinations' in the 'Regulations for the Conduct of University Examinations' and further elaborated in the Course Handbook.

3. Supplementary subjects

(a) Candidates may offer themselves for examination in one or more

Supplementary Subjects.

(b) Supplementary Subjects may be offered in all or any of the years in which candidates take any Part of the Second Public Examination, provided that no more than one Supplementary Subject may be offered in any one year.

(c) The Supplementary Subjects available in any year will be published, together with the term in which each subject will be examined, in the Course Handbook in the academic year in which the courses are delivered. Regulations governing the use of calculators in individual Supplementary Subjects will be notified in the Course Handbook.

(d) Entry of candidates for examination in Language Supplementary Subjects shall require the approval of the Chairman of the Chemistry Academic Committee and the Director of the Language Centre or their deputies

(e) In determining the place of candidates in the Class List the examiners shall take account of distinction in any Supplementary Subjects which have been offered.

(For candidates embarking on the Honour School in or after October 2003)

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PARTS IA AND IB

In the Part IA examination, one compulsory three-hour paper will be set in each of Inorganic, Organic, and Physical Chemistry, covering the fundamental aspects of Year 2 material, but knowledge of Year 1 material will also be required; each paper will offer a choice of five from at least eight questions.

In the Part IB examination, there will be one compulsory three-hour paper in each of Inorganic, Organic, and Physical Chemistry, covering material in the core courses of Years 1--3; each of the papers will offer a choice of five from at least eight questions. In addition, there will be at least six two-hour Option Papers: candidates must sit three of these, in any combination from those advertised; the papers will examine the content of the Option courses, but will also require knowledge of core course material. The Option Papers will offer a choice of two questions from at least five, and ten minutes' reading time will be allowed.

Heads of the three main Sub-departments of Chemistry, or their deputies, and the IT Training Officer, shall make available to the Examiners records showing the extent to which each candidate has pursued an adequate course in laboratory work and in IT. Only that work completed and marked by 5 p. m. of the Friday of the fourth week of the Trinity Term in which the candidate takes Part IB shall be included in these records. The Examiners will require evidence of satisfactory laboratory work during the course over a period of three years in respect of two of the three divisions, Inorganic, Organic, and Physical Chemistry, and in IT, and over a period of two years in respect of the remaining division, with the following exception: in the case of candidates who have passed an examination in a Supplementary Subject before they take Part IB of the Final Honour School, evidence of satisfactory laboratory work during the course over a period of three years will be required in respect of only one division, and in IT, and over a period of two years in the other two divisions. Only one Supplementary Subject may be set against laboratory work in this way.

Satisfactory completion of laboratory work (allowing for a Supplementary Subject where taken) is an absolute requirement for passing Part IB.

Candidates may be examined viva voce at the examiners' discretion in Part IB, but not in Part IA.

Candidates are not permitted to enter their names for examination in Part IA until they have entered upon the fifth term from their matriculation.

Candidates are not permitted to enter their names for examination in Part IB until they have entered upon the eighth term from their matriculation, or before sitting all the papers set for Part IA in a previous year.

PART II

Candidates, who must have been judged worthy of Honours by the examiners in Part I (Part IA and Part IB) in a previous year, must present a record of investigations carried out under the supervision of one of the following:

(i) any professor, reader, university lecturer, departmental demonstrator, or senior research officer who is also an official member of the Sub-faculty of Chemistry;

(ii) any other person approved by the Chemistry Academic Committee In case (ii), a co-supervisor as defined under (i) must also be approved, and so must the proposed project. Applications for project approval, including the names of the supervisor and a co-supervisor and a short project summary (not more than 250 words), should be sent by the student to the Chemistry Academic Committee, c/o Chemistry Sub- faculty Office, Central Chemistry Laboratory, South Parks Road, by Friday of the first week of Hilary Full Term preceding the intended Part II year. Students who are uncertain whether their intended Part II supervision is in category (ii) above should consult their College Tutor or the Chemistry Sub-faculty Office.

Candidates shall be examined viva voce, and, if the examiners think fit, in writing, on their investigations and matters relevant thereto. The examiners may obtain a report on the work of each candidate from the supervisor concerned.

A candidate intending to offer Part II shall give notice to the Registrar not later than the Friday of the fourth week of the Hilary Full Term. The candidate shall at the same time give notice of the subject of his or her investigations together with evidence (a) that it has been approved by his or her supervisor and (b), if it is to be carried out in a laboratory, that the person in charge of the laboratory considers that it is suitable for investigation in that laboratory.

A candidate for Part II is required to send in, not later than noon on the Friday of the seventh week of the Trinity Full Term, a record of the investigations which he or she has carried out under the direction of his or her supervisor. Such record, which should conform in length and format with guidance which the examiners may give, should be addressed 'The Clerk of the Schools, Oxford, for the Chairman of the Examiners in Part II of the Final Honour School of Chemistry' and should be accompanied by a signed statement by the candidate that it is his or her own work.

Candidates for Part II are required to keep statutory residence and pursue their investigations in Oxford during a period of at least thirty-eight weeks between the third Thursday before Michaelmas Full Term and the first Saturday following Trinity Full Term.

Pass School of Chemistry

Candidates shall:

(i) satisfy the examiners in the six General Papers specified for Part I or Parts IA and IB of the Honour School of Chemistry;

(ii) pursue a course of laboratory work as specified in Part I or Parts IA and IB of the Honour School of Chemistry.

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(k) Honour School and Pass School of Geology/Earth Sciences

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

In Examination Regulations, 2004, after p. 279, insert:

'SPECIAL REGULATIONS FOR THE HONOUR SCHOOL OF GEOLOGY/EARTH SCIENCES

A

1. The subject of the Honour School of Geology/Earth Sciences shall be the study of the natural science of the Earth in space and time.

2. No candidate shall be admitted to examination in this school unless he or she has either passed or been exempted from the First Public Examination.

3. The examination in this school shall be under the supervision of the Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board, which shall prescribe the necessary regulations.

4. The examination shall consist of one part for the three-year course in Geology (Part A) and two parts for the four-year course in Earth Sciences (A,B). Part A shall be sub- divided into Part A1 (examinations taking place three terms after the candidate has passed the First Public Examination) and Part A2 (examinations taking place six terms after the candidate has passed the First Public Examination).

5. No candidate may present him or herself for examination in Part B unless he or she has been adjudged worthy of at least second class honours by the examiners in Part A.

6. The name of a candidate in either the three-year course or the four-year course shall not be published in a class list until he or she has completed all parts of the respective examination; and in the case of the four-year course, has been adjudged worthy of honours by the examiners in Part A and Part B of the examination. The Examiners shall give due consideration to the performance in all parts of the respective examinations.

7. Part A1 may only be taken once, but no candidate shall be deemed to have failed. The second year mapping project should be submitted at the beginning of the fifth term after the candidate has passed the First Public Examination, and may not subsequently be modified. A candidate who obtains only a pass, or fails to satisfy the examiners, may enter again for Part A2 of the examination on one, but no more than one, subsequent occasion. The third year essay may be resubmitted. A candidate who fails to satisfy the examiners in Part A who subsequently enters a second time may not proceed to the fourth year. The fourth year project should be submitted in the ninth term after the candidate has passed the First Public Examination, and may not subsequently be modified. The rules for handling the fourth year project are to be found in the departmental undergraduate handbook. A candidate who obtains only a pass, or fails to satisfy the examiners, may enter again for Part B.

8. A candidate adjudged worthy of Honours in the Second Public Examination for the four-year course may supplicate for the Degree of Master of Earth Sciences, provided he or she has fulfilled all the conditions for admission to a degree of the University.

9. A candidate in the final year of the four-year course, adjudged worthy of honours in Part A of the final examination, but who does not enter part B, or who fails to obtain honours in Part B, may be allowed to supplicate for the degree of Bachelor of Arts (classified or unclassified, as appropriate) ; provided that no such candidate may later enter or re-enter the Part B year or supplicate for the degree of Master of Earth Sciences; and provided he or she has fulfilled all the conditions for admission to a degree of the University.

10. Candidates will be expected to show skills and knowledge based upon practical work. The examiners will assess practical skills and knowledge by means of practical examinations, and by assessment of practical work done by candidates during their course of study.

B

1. In the following, 'the Course Handbook' refers to the Geology/Earth Sciences Undergraduate Course Handbook, published annually at the start of Michaelmas Term by the Sub-faculty of Earth Sciences and also posted on the Web site at http://teachserv.earth.ox.ac.uk/handbook/

2. The examiners will permit the use of any hand-held calculator, subject to the conditions set out under the heading 'Use of calculators in examinations' in the 'Regulations for the Conduct of University Examinations' and further elaborated in the Course Handbook.

GEOLOGY (THREE-YEAR COURSE)

A candidate shall be required to offer:

(i) two practical papers (Part A1) on observational and interpretational techniques, to be taken in week 8 of Trinity Term three terms after the candidate has passed the First Public Examination; and

(ii) a report on an individual mapping or practical project, the report to be submitted by Monday of week 1 of Hilary Term five terms after the candidate has passed the First Public Examination; and

(iii) an extended essay, the work to be undertaken in Hilary Term five terms after the candidate has passed the First Public Examination, and the essay to be submitted by the Monday of week 1 of Trinity Term six terms after the candidate has passed the First Public Examination. The subject of the essay must have been approved by the Chairman of the Sub- faculty of Earth Sciences or deputy no later than the end of Michaelmas Full Term four terms after the candidate has passed the First Public Examination; and

(iv) six papers (Part A2) on the fundamental principles of Geology, to be taken in week 5 of Trinity Term six terms after the candidate has passed the First Public Examination.

The list of subjects and syllabuses available will be published in the Course Handbook.

The Head of Department of Earth Sciences or deputy shall provide the examiners with information showing the extent to which each candidate has satisfactorily completed the practicals and field courses. In addition, practical notebooks containing records of both field and laboratory courses must also be made available to the examiners. Such evidence will be taken into consideration by the examiners in awarding classes.

Candidates may be examined viva voce at the examiners' discretion.

EARTH SCIENCES (FOUR-YEAR COURSE)

1. The examination shall be in two parts.

2. Part A of the examination shall be the same as the requirements for the three-year course in Geology, and the same conditions, arrangements and examination timings shall apply.

3. Part B of the examination shall be taken at a time not less than three terms after Part A. In Part B a candidate shall be required to offer:

(i) written papers on four subjects chosen from a list published by the Sub-faculty of Earth Sciences for examination in Trinity Term nine terms after the candidate has passed the First Public Examination, and

(ii) either an extended essay, or a report on an advanced practical project or other advanced work, the work to be undertaken in Michaelmas, Hilary, and Trinity Terms seven, eight and nine terms respectively after the candidate has passed the First Public Examination, and the essay or report to be submitted by Friday of week 4 of Trinity Term nine terms after the candidate has passed the First Public Examination. The proposed nature and duration of the practical or other advanced work shall be submitted for approval to the Chairman of the Sub-faculty of Earth Sciences or deputy with the agreement of the Head of the Department of Earth Sciences or deputy not later than the end of Trinity Full Term six terms after the candidate has passed the First Public Examination.

4. The list of subjects and syllabuses for the written papers in 3(i) will be published in the Course Handbook for the academic year in which they are examined. The subjects and syllabuses shall be approved by the Sub-faculty of Earth Sciences with the agreement of the Head of the Department of Earth Sciences or deputy

5. Candidates may be examined viva voce at the examiners' discretion.

Pass School of Geology (Three-year course)

1. Candidates shall be required to satisfy the examiners in six papers on the fundamentals of Geology as specified in the requirements for the three-year course for the Honour School of Natural Science (Geology) and also in practical examinations at the discretion of the examiners.

2. Candidates are required to attend such field courses during each year of study as are approved annually by the Sub-faculty of Earth Sciences.

3. Practical notebooks containing records of both field and laboratory courses must also be made available to the examiners.

Pass School of Earth Sciences (Four-year course)

Candidates shall be required to satisfy the examiners:

(a) as prescribed in sections (1), (2), and (3) of the Pass School of Natural Sciences (Geology: Three-Year Course);

(b) in two of the written papers prescribed under section (3) (i) of Part B of the four- year course for the Honour School of Natural Science (Earth Sciences);

(c) in an extended essay or report on practical work

or project as prescribed in section (3) (ii) of Part B of the four-year course for the Honour School of Natural Science (Earth Sciences)

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(l) Honour School of Materials Science

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2004, after p. 321, insert:

'SPECIAL REGULATIONS FOR THE HONOUR SCHOOL OF MATERIALS SCIENCE

A

1. The subject of the Honour School of Materials Science shall be the study of Materials Science.

2. No candidate shall be admitted to examination in this school unless he or she has either passed or been exempted from the First Public Examination.

3. The examination in this school shall be under the supervision of the Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board, which shall prescribe the necessary regulations.

4. The examination in Materials Science shall consist of Part I and Part II, and shall be partly of a practical nature. Candidates will be expected to show knowledge based on practical work: this requirement shall normally be satisfied by the Examiners' assessment of the practical work done by candidates during their course of study.

5. No candidate may present him or herself for examination in Part II unless he or she has been adjudged worthy of Honours by the examiners in Part I.

6. The name of a candidate shall not be published in a class list until he or she has completed all parts of the examination and has been adjudged worthy of Honours by the examiners in Part I and Part II of the examination in consecutive years. The examiners shall give due consideration to the performance in all parts of the respective examinations.

7. The examiners shall be entitled to award a pass to candidates in Part I who have reached a standard considered adequate but who have not been adjudged worthy of Honours.

8. A candidate who obtains only a pass, or fails to satisfy the examiners, may enter again for Part I of the examination on one, but no more than one, subsequent occasion. Part II shall be entered on one occasion only.

9. A candidate adjudged worthy of Honours in Part I and worthy of classified Honours in Part II may supplicate for the Degree of Master of Engineering, provided he or she has fulfilled all the conditions for admission to a degree of the University.

10. A candidate who passes Part I or who is adjudged worthy of Honours in Part I, but who does not enter Part II, or fails to obtain Honours in Part II, may be permitted to supplicate for the degree of Bachelor of Arts (pass or unclassified Honours, as appropriate) ; provided that no such candidate may later enter or re-enter the Part II year or supplicate for the degree of Master of Engineering; and provided in each case that the candidate has fulfilled all the conditions for admission to a degree of the University.

B

1. In the following, 'the Course Handbook' refers to the Materials Science Undergraduate Course Handbook, published annually at the start of Michaelmas Term by the Sub-faculty of Materials and also posted on the Web site at http://www.materials.ox.ac .uk/teaching/ughandbooks.html

2. Candidates are restricted to models of calculators included in the Course Handbook published in the academic year preceding the Part I examination.

3. Supplementary subjects or the completion of an approved course of instruction in a foreign language

(a) Candidates may offer themselves for examination in a Supplementary Subject or the completion of an approved course of instruction in a foreign language. A candidate offering a Supplementary Subject must have the proposal approved by the Chairman of the Sub-faculty of Materials or deputy. A candidate proposing to be assessed on competence in a foreign language must have the proposal approved by the Chairman of the Sub-faculty of Materials or deputy, and by the Director of the Language Centre or deputy.

(b) Candidates for Supplementary Subjects may offer themselves for examination in the academic year preceding that in which they take Part I.

(c) The Supplementary Subjects available in any year will be published, together with the term in which each subject will be examined, in the Course Handbook in the academic year in which the courses are delivered. Regulations governing the use of calculators in individual Supplementary Subjects will be notified when the availability of these subjects is published in the Course Handbook.

(d) In determining the place of candidates in the Class List the examiners shall take account of distinction in any Supplementary Subject or approved course of instruction in a foreign language which has been offered.

MATERIALS SCIENCE

PART I (MATERIALS SCIENCE)

The examination will consist of:

1. Four general papers of three hours each on the fundamental principles and engineering applications of the subject in accordance with the schedule below. The questions set in these papers will normally be such that candidates may reasonably be expected to answer a high proportion of them.

2. Two option papers, each of three hours, containing a wide choice of questions in accordance with the schedule below

3. In addition to the written papers, candidates shall submit detailed reports of the practical work completed during their course of study and carried out before the beginning of Trinity Full Term in which the Part I examination is held. Such reports should be handed in to the Chairman of the Examiners in the Honour School of Materials Science, Part I, c/o Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, not later than 5 p. m. in the Friday of the seventh week of Trinity Full Term. The Head of the Department of Materials, or deputy, shall make available to the examiners evidence showing the extent to which each candidate has pursued an adequate course of practical work.

The examiners shall require evidence of satisfactory practical work (including a team design project and reports on a number of industrial visits) in Materials over a period of five terms subsequent to the sitting of the First Public Examination. The details of both the team design project, and the number and definition of industrial visits and the nature of the subsequent reports, will be specified in the Course Handbook. The examiners shall take this evidence and the reports of the candidates into consideration as part of the Part I examination and they shall have the power to require a practical examination of any candidate.

4. Candidates shall be required to submit one piece of Engineering and Society Coursework, the details of which shall be stated in the Course Handbook. The coursework shall be submitted to the Chairman of Examiners in Materials, c/o Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, not later than noon on the Monday following the end of Hilary Full Term in the year preceding the Part I examination. The work must be the candidate's own and the candidate shall sign and present with the work a detachable certificate to this effect.

Essays or reports previously submitted for the Honour School of Materials Science may be resubmitted. No essay or report will be accepted if it has already been submitted wholly or substantially for another honour school or degree of this University, or for a degree at any other institution. Resubmitted work must be physically presented at the time and in the manner prescribed for submission.

Candidates may be examined viva voce at the examiners' discretion.

5. A candidate may, as an alternative to offering Engineering and Society Coursework, offer either a Supplementary Subject or the completion of an approved course of instruction in a foreign language. A candidate proposing to be assessed on competence in a foreign language must have the proposal approved by the Chairman of the Sub- faculty of Materials or deputy, and by the Director of the Language Centre or deputy.

Schedule

(a) General papers

All candidates will be expected to have such knowledge of mathematics as is required for the study of the subjects of the examination.

Structure and Transformations: Ternary phase diagrams. Diffusion laws and mechanisms. Surfaces and interfaces. Phase transformations; nucleation, solidification, diffusion, martensite and growth mechanisms. Reaction kinetics. Extraction. Powder processing. Corrosion. Polymer synthesis.

Electronic Properties of Materials: Quantum Mechanics and Statistical Mechanics. Free electron theory. Band theory in both nearly-free electron and tight binding approximations. Physics of Semiconductors. Electrical, optical, and magnetic properties. Tensor properties of materials.

Mechanical Properties: Elasticity. Macroplasticity. Microplasticity; principles of deformation mechanisms. Creep and Superplasticity. Strengthening mechanisms. Fracture. Mechanical properties of polymers and of composites.

Engineering Applications of Materials: Engineering alloys; plain carbon-, stainless and alloy-steels. Cast irons. Aluminium-, copper-, titanium-, and nickel-based alloys. Ceramics and Glasses; manufacture, thermal and mechanical properties, dielectric properties, Polymers. Semiconductor materials. Design and fabrication routes for different materials classes. Characterisation techniques.

(b) Option papers

The subjects for these papers will be published annually by the Chairman of the Sub-faculty of Materials, who will put up a notice in the Department of Materials not later than Monday of the last week of Trinity Term in the year preceding the examination. The Chairman will also indicate suitable courses of lectures.

PART II

Candidates offering Part II of the examination will be expected to carry out investigations in Materials Science or in related subjects under the supervision of one of the following:

(i) any professor who is a member of the Faculty of Physical Sciences;

(ii) a reader or university lecturer or senior research officer who is a member of the Faculty of Physical Sciences;

(iii) a tutor or lecturer in any Society who is a member of the Faculty of Physical Sciences;

(iv) any other person listed in a Register of Part II Supervisors to be maintained by the Sub-faculty of Materials.

Each candidate shall be examined viva voce, and, if the examiners think fit, in writing, on the subject of his work and on matters relevant thereto. The examiners may obtain a report on the work of each candidate from the supervisor concerned.

A candidate intending to offer Part II shall give notice to the Registrar not later than Friday in the fourth week of Michaelmas Full Term in the year in which he or she satisfied the examiners in Part I. Such notice must be given on a form to be obtained from the Clerk of the Schools, University Offices.

Every candidate for Part II is required to submit three copies of a record of investigations which he or she has carried out under the direction of his or her supervisor. The record of investigation shall include a literature survey, a brief account of the project management aspects of the investigation, and a description of the engineering context of the investigation and should be accompanied by a signed statement by the candidate that it is his or her own work. The copies should be handed in to the Chairman of the Examiners in the Honour School of Materials Science, Part II, c/o Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, not later than noon on the Friday of the seventh week of Trinity Full Term. This record shall be typewritten on one side of A4 paper and presented in a loose-leaf binder. The text should not normally exceed 15,000 words (A4 size, double-spaced type), including written appendices, but there is no limit on graphs, diagrams, photographs, tables, references, computer programs, etc., and must be accompanied by a signed declaration to this effect. Candidates seeking exemption from this rule (e.g. for non-experimental projects) should apply to the chairman of examiners at an early stage.

Candidates for Part II will be required to keep statutory residence and pursue their investigations at Oxford during a period of thirty-six weeks between the dates specified below, except that the Divisional Board of Mathematical and Physical Sciences shall have power to permit candidates to vary the dates of their residence so long as the overall requirement is met. The divisional board may, on the recommendation of the Department of Materials, permit candidates to carry out their investigations for the required period at an approved institution outside Oxford; the board shall determine the conditions upon which applications for such permission may be approved and will require to be satisfied in each case (a) that adequate arrangements are made for the candidate's supervision and (b) that the proposals for the investigations are agreed in advance between the Department of Materials and the host institution.

Periods of required residence

From the fifth Friday before to the first Saturday following Michaelmas Full Term.

From the second Friday before Hilary Full Term to the Saturday before Palm Sunday.

From the Friday following Easter to the first Saturday following Trinity Full Term.

Pass School of Materials Science

Candidates shall satisfy the examiners in five out of (i) to (vi) below:

(i)–(iv) the four general papers as specified in Part I (1) of the Honour School of Materials Science;

(v) the Engineering and Society specified in Part I of the Honour School of Materials Science;

(vi) the detailed reports of practical work as specified in Part I of the Honour School of Materials Science.

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4 Mathematical and Physical Sciences and Life and Environmental Sciences Boards

Honour School and Pass School of Natural Science

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 22, delete ll. 16–17.

2 Ibid., p. 25, delete ll. 8–14.

3 Ibid., p. 62, delete l. 34.

4 Ibid., p. 63, delete ll. 9–10 and incorporate Table 8 into preceding table.

5 Ibid., p. 65, l. 4, delete 'in the Honour School of Natural Science'.

6 Ibid., p. 66, l. 13, delete ', Natural Science,'.

7 Ibid., p. 68, l. 2, delete 'Natural Science ('.

8 Ibid., l. 3, delete ') '.

9 Ibid., l. 4, delete 'Natural Science (' and ') '.

10 Ibid., l. 5, delete 'Natural Science (' and ') '.

11 Ibid., l. 14, delete 'Natural Science (' and ') '.

12 Ibid., delete from p. 429, l. 1 to p. 449, l. 7.

13 Ibid., p. 1094, l. 3, delete 'in the Honour School of Natural Science'.

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