Examinations and Boards

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[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the Educational Policy and Standards Committee of Council, and, where applicable, of the Humanities Board the following changes in regulations made by divisional and faculty boards will come into effect on 14 February.

1 Social Sciences Board

(a) Postgraduate Diploma in Diplomatic Studies

With Immediate effect

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 962, after l. 44, insert:

`Postgraduate Diploma in Diplomatic Studies

Ch.X, Sect XXII]

(i) General Regulations

1. The Area and Development Studies Committee shall have the power to grant Postgraduate Diplomas in Diplomatic Studies to candidates who have satisfied the conditions prescribed in this section and any further conditions which the committee may prescribe by regulation.

2. The examination for the Postgraduate Diploma shall be under the supervision of the Area and Development Studies Committee which shall have the power, subject to the approval of the Divisional Board, to make regulations governing the examination.

3. Candidates, whether members of the University or not, may be admitted as students for the Postgraduate Diploma under such conditions as the committee shall prescribe, provided that before admission to a course of study approved by the committee, candidates shall have satisfied the criteria laid down by the admitting body.

4. Any person who has been accepted as a candidate for the Postgraduate Diploma, and who has satisfactorily pursued the course prescribed by the committee, bay be admitted to the examination by the committee.

5. Every person who has been accepted as a candidate for the diploma shall be placed by the committee under the supervision of a member of the University or other competent person selected by the committee. It shall be the duty of the supervisor to direct and superintend the work of the candidate and to submit a report to the examiners on the candidate's work.

(ii) Special Regulations

1. Students for the diploma may hold that status for no more than six terms.

2. Each student will follow a course of study comprising four core courses. The four core courses are:

International Politics. Key concepts in international relations leading to central issues in world politics, with particular emphasis on change in the international system and the evolving role of diplomacy in consequence.

Economics. Basics of international trade theory and macroeconomics, focussing on such applied and political economy topics as trade liberalisation, globalisation, and international resource transfers.

International Law. Principles of international law and the processes of legal reasoning, and their application to current world problems ranging from the nature of international law to the use of force and conflict settlement.

Diplomatic Practice. Overview of different regions of the world, major international organisations, and current world problems as they affect diplomats. Review of practical aspects of diplomacy and their application to discussion of practical action by means of which governments can address these problems.

In addition, candidates will be required to submit a dissertation of between 10,000 and 12,000 words.

3. Examination for the diploma shall be under the supervision of the Area and Development Studies Committee, with the concurrence of the Social Sciences Board. The Area and Development Studies Committee shall have power to make regulations governing the examinations, which shall be by written examination and dissertation under such conditions as the committee may by regulation prescribe.

4. Examinations. Candidates will be required to take the same examinations as for the Certificate in Diplomatic Studies. However, for International Politics, International Law, and Economics, there will be two parts to the examination. Candidates for the Postgraduate Diploma are required to answer at least two questions from Part B. A candidate whose overall average falls below 60 shall be eligible to re-sit the failed elements during the following academic year. Compensation in one paper is allowed.

5. Candidates must follow, for at least two terms, a course of instruction in Diplomatic Studies.

6. Candidates are only eligible to be admitted to the Diploma in Diplomatic Studies if they have achieved a 2.1 standard. Admission to the Diploma will take place at the end of the first term in the year of study, on the basis of a transfer proposal and the first term's assessed written work, as approved by the admissions committee for the programme. The candidate must have achieved a 2.1 standard in the first term of study.

7. All material submitted for the dissertation shall be accompanied by a certificate signed by the candidate indicating that it is the candidate's own work.

8. Syllabus

I. Four core modules: International Politics, Economics, International Law, and Diplomatic Practice.

II. Each candidate will be required to present a dissertation of not more than 12,000 words, on a subject approved by the Area and Development Studies Graduate Studies Committee, to the Director of Studies, by 12 noon on Friday of sixth week of Trinity Term in the year in which he or she completes the course.

9. The examiners may award a distinction to candidates for the Diploma.

10. A candidate whose overall average mark falls below 60 shall be eligible to resit the failed elements on one occasion during the following academic year.

11. Candidates who fail to satisfy the examiners in the written examinations in all four of the core elements of the Certificate course, or who fail to submit a dissertation of the necessary standard will be eligible to resit on one occasion.'

2 Ibid., p. 1020, Conduct of Examinations, after entry relating to the Foundation Certificate in Modern History, insert:

`(xvii) Postgraduate Diploma in Diplomatic Studies

This is to certify that A. B. has pursued an approved course of study, and in [such a term and year] satisfied [or was adjudged worthy of distinction by] the examiners appointed by the University to examine in the subjects prescribed for the Postgraduate Diploma in Diplomatic Studies.

Signed on behalf of the Board of Examiners of the Area and Development Studies Committee.'

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(b) Certificate in Diplomatic Studies

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 2002, immediately following the entry relating to the Postgraduate Diploma in Diplomatic Studies, insert:

`Certificate in Diplomatic Studies

(i) General Regulations

Ch. X, Sect. V]

1. The Area and Development Studies Committee shall have power to grant Certificates in Diplomatic Studies to candidates who have satisfied the conditions prescribed in this section and any further conditions which the committee may prescribe by regulation.

2. The examination for the Certificate in Diplomatic Studies shall be under the supervision of the Area and Development Studies Committee.

3. Any person who has been admitted to a course of study approved for this purpose by the Area and Development Studies Committee and accepted as a candidate for the certificate and who has satisfactorily pursued the course, may be admitted to the examination.

(ii) Special Regulations

2. Students for the certificate may hold that status for no more than six terms.

3. Each student will follow a course of study comprising four core courses. The four core courses are:

International Politics.

Economics.

International Law.

Diplomatic Practice.

4. Examinations. The examination for the Certificate shall be under the supervision of the Area and Development Studies Committee, with the concurrence of the Social Sciences Board. The Area and Development Studies Committee shall have power to make regulations governing the examinations and arrange lectures and courses of instruction of candidates for the certificate.

All candidates will be required to satisfy the examiners in four separate three-hour written examinations covering each of the core areas listed in the preceding paragraph demonstrating that they have mastered the substance of the subjects listed and (where appropriate), that they are able to apply them in their continuing professional careers in the international field.

5. The examiners may award a distinction to candidates for the certificate.

6. A candidate whose overall average mark falls below 50 shall be eligible to resit the failed elements during the following academic year.

7. Candidates who fail to satisfy the examiners in the written examinations in all four of the core elements of the Certificate course, will not be eligible to qualify for the Certificate.'

2 Ibid., p. 981, Appointment of Examiners, after l. 31, insert:

`From 1 October 2002:

9. Examiners for the Postgraduate Diploma in Diplomatic Studies and the Certificate in Diplomatic Studies shall serve for three years.'

and renumber existing items 9–17 as 10–18 respectively.

3 Ibid., p. 1020, Conduct of Examinations, after the entry relating to the Diploma in Diplomatic Studies, insert:

`(xviii) Certificate in Diplomatic Studies

This is to certify that A. B. has pursued an approved course of study, and in [such a term and year] satisfied [or was adjudged worthy of distinction by] the examiners appointed by the University to examine in the subjects prescribed for the Certificate in Diplomatic Studies.

Signed on behalf of the Board of Examiners of the Area and Development Studies Committee.'

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(c) M.Sc. in Evidence-Based Social Work

With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 671, after l. 38 insert:
`Evidence-Based Social Work             Social Sciences'.
2 Ibid., p. 710, after l. 27 insert:

`Evidence-Based Social Work

1. Candidates may only be admitted to the course if they have successfully obtained an honours degree to First Class or good Upper Second Class standard.

2. Candidates must follow for at least three terms a course of instruction in Evidence-Based Social Work, and will, when entering for the examination, be required to produce a certificate from their supervisor to that effect.

3. Every candidate will be required to satisfy the examiners in the following:

i. A compulsory core paper, Evidence-based interventions;

ii. A compulsory Research Methods paper, for which students will be examined on the basis of a methods work book and an essay of up to 2,500 words;

iii. One Option paper;

iv. A thesis of not more than 10,000 words, describing the evaluation of a project on a topic decided jointly with, and approved by, the supervisor on behalf of the Department.

4. One copy of the Research Methods work book, and two printed or word-processed copies of the Research Methods essay must be delivered to the M.Sc. Examiners (Evidence-Based Social Work), c/o the Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford OX1 4BG, no later than 12 noon on Friday of Sixth Week of the Trinity Term in which the examination has been taken.

5. Two printed or word-processed copies of the thesis must be delivered to the M.Sc. examiners (Evidence-based Social work), c/o the Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford OX1 4BG, no later than noon on Monday of the second week in September of the year in which the examination has been taken.

6. A candidate who fails the examination may enter for one subsequent examination only, provided this is within six terms of his or her initial registration. A candidate who has attained a satisfactory mark in any one of the four components of the examination in 3 above will not be required to retake the component(s) concerned.

7. Each candidate must attend an oral examination when required to do so by the examiners.

8. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.

Schedule

(i) Evidence-Based Intervention (core course): Candidates will be expected to have a knowledge of major theories underlying evidence-based interventions. The course will introduce students to a comparative perspective and use exemplary intervention research studies to illustrate important theoretical, ethical, methodological, and practice issues.

(ii) Research Methods (core course): Candidates will be expected to have a knowledge of major quantitative and qualitative techniques, and research designs for understanding social problems and evaluating interventions. There will be a particular emphasis on the appraisal and design of randomised controlled trials for evaluating social interventions.

(iii) Option course: This will enable students to link evidence-based solutions to a range of social problems in their country of origin. Not every option will be offered in any one year, and applicants for admission will be advised of this. Areas from which options may be offered include: promoting the welfare of children and families; multi-cultural mental health interventions; substance misuse and offending; interventions in relation to HIV and AIDS; community work; refugees and asylum seekers; day care for young children and their families.'

3 Ibid., p. 980, after l. 14 insert `in Evidence-Based Social Work for three examinations;'.

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2 Boards of the Faculties of Classics and English Language and Literature

Honour School of Classics and English

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 135, delete l. 39.

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