Examinations and Boards

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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DIVISIONAL BOARD BY-ELECTION 19 July

On Thursday, 19 July, the following was duly elected to hold office for four years from the first day of Michaelmas Termn 2001:

Social Sciences Board

(from among the members of the Faculty of Social Studies)

D.F. HENDRY, MA, Fellow of Nuffield

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MATHEMATICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES BOARD

The Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board has conferred the title of University Research Lecturer upon DR MARK KENDALL, Associate Director, the PowderJect Centre for Gene and Drug Delivery Research, Department of Engineering Science, with effect from 1 July 2001 for a period of three years in the first instance.

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CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the Educational Policy and Standards Committee of Council, and, where applicable, of the Social Sciences Board, the following changes in regulations made by divisional boards and the Board of the Faculty of Law will come into effect on 10 August.

1 Medical Sciences Board

(a) Preliminary Examination in Physiological Sciences

With effect from October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 110, delete from ll. 15 to p. 111, l. 30 and substitute: `One three-hour paper will be set in each of subjects of the examination as specified in the above decree. The syllabus for each will be published by the Medical Sciences Board annually in Michaelmas Term. Candidates shall submit notebooks, initialled as satisfactory by the demonstrators, or other certified records of practical work, including work in statistics, carried out during their course of study.'

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(b) First Examination for the Degree of BM

With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 965, delete from l. 16 to p. 968, l. 15 and substitute: `A Core Syllabus and a Composite Syllabus (Core plus Extension) for both Parts I and II will be published annually at the start of Michaelmas Term by the Medical Sciences Board. Guidelines for the scope of these syllabuses are given below, but it shall be the syllabuses and not these guidelines that define the material to be examined. The syllabuses will make appropriate reference to related issues of clinical significance. In each subject, candidates will be expected to have a general understanding of the subjects specified in the syllabus, including methods of study and quantitative analysis of experimental results.

In subjects 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, and 7 two papers will be set. In each Paper A, one one- and-a-quarter-hour paper will be set in a format to examine breadth of knowledge and understanding of the Core Syllabus; and in each Paper B, one two-hour paper will be set to examine deeper knowledge and understanding of a choice of topics included in or closely relating to the Composite Syllabus.

Part I

1. Organisation of the body

Principles of the organisation and development of the human body at a gross and microscopic level, emphasising the relationship between structure and function. Principles of the endocrine system. Human reproduction. Cell biology and the differentiation of tissues, cell growth and multiplication, abnormal growth and neoplasia.

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2. Physiology and Pharmacology

The basic physiology and pharmacology of the human body excluding the brain and major sense organs, emphasising the application of basic physico-chemical principles to the understanding of the function of cells and organs of the body. The relationship of the structure of specific organs to their function. The principles of drug action on the body. The principles of pharmacokinetics.

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3. Biochemistry and Medical Genetics

Principles of mammalian biochemistry, including the structure and function of macromolecules, the major metabolic pathways and their regulation. Aspects of genetics emphasising eukaryotic systems: genes, the principles of their expression, and the effects of mutation. The principles of medical genetics.

4. Medical Sociology for Medical Students

One one-and-a-half-hour paper will be set on the syllabus specified in the Core Syllabus for Part I.

Part II

5. Integrative Systems of the Body

The integrative physiological and pharmacological control of systems and processes of the body, including the neuroendocrine system, and their action in normal and abnormal conditions.

6. The Nervous System

The central nervous system: principles of its structure at gross and microscopic levels, normal and abnormal function and development. The vascular system of the central nervous system; cerebrospinal fluid. Neuropharmacology and general anaesthesia. Sensory systems and the control of motor activity. Aspects of neuropsychology.

7. General Pathology and Microbiology

The basic molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying disease processes including microbial pathogenicity, non-specific and specific defence mechanisms, and healing. Antimicrobial chemotherapy. Cardiovascular pathology. Immunopathology. Emphasis will be placed on general principles rather than on specific diseases. Aspects of epidemiology and public health.

8. Psychology for Medicine

One one-and-a-half-hour paper will be set on the syllabus specified in the Core Syllabus for Part II.

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General Regulations of the First Examination

Candidates shall submit notebooks, initialled as satisfactory by the demonstrators, or other certified evidence of satisfactory practical work in the courses associated with each subject of the First Examination with the exception of Medical Sociology and Psychology for Medicine. The practical course for Subject 2 includes the course in elementary statistics defined in the Composite Syllabus for Part I. Each notebook shall be accompanied by a certificate signed by the candidate indicating that the notebook submitted is the candidate's own work. The notebooks or evidence shall be available to the examiners at a time prescribed by the examiners prior to the written examination and shall be taken into consideration by them. Candidates whose notebooks or other evidence are unsatisfactory may be required by the examiners to submit to further examination. Failure to submit an initialled notebook or certified evidence shall result in the candidate being failed in the relevant subject of the examination, unless the candidate has an adequate attendance record at the relevant practical classes and provided the examiners are satisfied, after taking account the candidate's examination script and any further examination as they shall deem necessary, that the candidate has a satisfactory knowledge and understanding of the practical course.

The Director of Pre-Clinical Studies or his or her deputy is required to make available to the examiners evidence (in the form of a list of names, signed by the Director or his or her deputy) to certify that each candidate has a satisfactory attendance record for each practical course defined in the preceding paragraph. Evidence of satisfactory practical work and of attendance at a practical course is normally admissible by the examiners for a period extending no longer than to the end of the academic year following the year in which the course was pursued.

The Director of Pre-Clinical Studies or his or her deputy is required to make available to the examiners evidence (in the form of a list of names, signed by Director or his or her deputy) to certify that each candidate has participated satisfactorily in the Patient and Doctor Course.

Candidates may be required to undergo oral examination.'

2 Ibid., p. 974, delete l. 39 to p. 975, l. 7.

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(c) Qualifying Examination in the Principles of Clinical Anatomy

With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 968, after l. 15 insert:

`3. Qualifying Examination in the Principles of Clinical Anatomy

The syllabus shall be published annually in Trinity Term by the Medical Sciences Board. Candidates shall be required to submit notebooks, initialled as satisfactory by the demonstrators, or other certified evidence of satisfactory practical work associated with the course. The examination will consist of in-course assessments of a form approved by the Medical Sciences Board. All of these constituent assessments must be passed for a candidate to pass the examination. Any candidate who fails an assessment may be reassessed during the course or at some duly advertised time during the Long Vacation by such means as may be deemed appropriate by the examiners.

The Director of Pre-Clinical Studies or his or her deputy is required to make available to the examiners evidence (in the form of a list of names, signed by Director or his or her deputy) to certify that each candidate has a satisfactory attendance record at the course in the Principles of Clinical Anatomy. Any candidate whose record of attendance is deemed unsatisfactory by the examiners shall be liable to additional examination by such means as may be deemed appropriate by the examiners, or he or she may be failed at the discretion of the examiners.

Candidates may be required to undergo oral examination.'

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(d) Preliminary Examination in Medicine

With effect from 1 October 2002 (for the first examination in 2003)

In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 968, after l. 15, insert new section 4 as follows and renumber sections 3 (p. 971, l. 22) and 5 (p. 975, ll. 8--9) as 5 and 6:

`4. Preliminary Examination in Medicine

The examination shall be divided in two parts as follows:

Part I

There will be three sections to the examination, respectively dealing with core knowledge, clinical skills, and supplementary material (used to assess critical-appraisal skills). Candidates must pass all three sections in order to pass the examination; but candidates who fail in any section or sections of the examination at the first attempt need resit only those sections that they have failed.

1. CORE KNOWLEDGE

Candidates will be required to demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of the basic principles of basic medical science as defined in the core syllabus, which will be published from time to time by the Medical Sciences Board. Two papers will assess factual knowledge and problem-solving skills based on the core material: one paper will contain simple tests of core knowledge (such as short answer questions), and the other will be problem-based. These papers will be marked pass--fail only. The marks from these papers will not contribute to the overall mark in the examination, nor to the award of a Distinction.

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2. CLINICAL SKILLS

Candidates will be required to demonstrate, in a practical examination at the bedside or in a skills centre, or in other practical assessment, basic skills in taking a clinical history, performing a simple clinical examination and applying such practical skills as may be defined in the core syllabus published by the Medical Sciences Board. The assessment will include an appraisal of the candidate's communication skills with patients, orally and in writing, and of his or her professional attitude. Those skills defined in the core syllabus as `essential' will be assessed during the course. Candidates will normally be required to produce a certificate, signed by the relevant clinical supervisor, to confirm that they have satisfactorily completed an assessment in these skills, before they are admitted to the examination.

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3. SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL

Candidates will be required to demonstrate their breadth of reading beyond the core syllabus, their ability to appraise and criticize experimental evidence, and their ability to interpret and draw conclusions from numerical data. Assessment of these features will be by three written papers (of which candidates must offer all three) and an extended essay. The three papers are: Paper 1 (`Systems of the Body') will require essays on subjects connected with the major organ systems, demonstrating their ability to integrate material from more than one system and from both basic science and clinical practice; Paper 2 (`Medicine, The Individual and Society') will require essays on aspects of psychology, behaviour, public health medicine, sociology and epidemiology (including statistics); Paper 3 (`Data Interpretation') will contain experimental, epidemiological or clinical data for interpretation but may also include descriptions of experimental methods and require candidates to offer criticism of the experimental method. Candidates will be required to submit one extended essay (maximum 4000 words), on a subject of their choice to be approved beforehand by the course's Education Committee. Submission must be made by the beginning of Trinity Term. The essay should illustrate an aspect of medical science or clinical practice, and should demonstrate breadth of reading, critical appraisal of evidence, and originality of thought. Candidates may be also required to present their project in a lecture or poster. Examiners may award Distinctions for outstanding performance in these papers by candidates sitting the examination for the first time.

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4. TIMING OF THE EXAMINATION

The examination will be set at the end of the extended Trinity Term and at the end of the long vacation.

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5. RESITS

Candidates may resit the examination not more than once except by dispensation from the Medical Sciences Board.

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Part II

The Examination will consist of the following components.

1. Essential clinical skills (defined in the curriculum) to be assessed in-course, signed up and with a certificate required as a qualification for entry to the examination. These skills may be resampled during the end-of-year clinical assessment (to ensure currency).

2. Laboratory medicine to be assessed in-course, at the end of the Laboratory Medicine block, signed up and with a certificate required as a qualification for entry to the examination. This knowledge may also be resampled in a different form (problems integrated with clinical material) during the end-of-year (Part II) examination.

3. Core knowledge (defined in the syllabus) to be assessed by two core papers: short- answer questions and problem-based questions, one paper for each type of question. This material will include clinical diagnostic information and both basic and applied science.

4. A clinical long case, followed by a viva: these are to assess clinical history and examination skills, and knowledge of basic differential diagnosis and simple first-line investigations.

5. An OSCE or similar problem-based clinical assessment.

6. Two essay papers and one data interpretation paper to assess the ``extension'' science and clinical knowledge, i.e., critical appraisal skills and reading beyond the core.

7. Two projects or clinical essays, to be completed during the year and handed in before the examination.

The Examiners may award Distinctions to candidates who are sitting the examination for the first time, on the basis of excellent performance in both the clinical and basic-science aspects of the assessment (except that the performance in the core knowledge papers should not contribute to the award of distinctions).

Candidates may resit the examination not more than once except by dispensation from the Medical Sciences Board.'

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2 Social Sciences Board

(a) M.Phil. in Comparative Social Policy

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 586, delete ll. 8--12 and substitute: `1. Two optional papers. These will be from a list published annually by Friday of the third week of Michaelmas Full Term in the Department of Social Policy and Social Work. Candidates may, after special permission of the Director of Studies for Social Policy, offer subjects outside this list. This may include subjects from the list published in conjunction with the M.Phil. or M.Sc. in Sociology with the permission of the Director of Graduate Studies for Sociology. This may also include papers offered in any other relevant master's degree in the University subject to the permission of the relevant Graduate Studies Committee as appropriate.'

2 Ibid., delete ll. 30--47.

3 Ibid., p. 587, delete ll. 1--47.

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(b) M.Sc. in Comparative Social Policy

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 762, delete ll. 22--7 and substitute: `C. One optional paper. This will be from a list published annually by Friday of the third week of Michaelmas Full Term in the Department of Social Policy and Social Work. Candidates may after special permission of the Director of Studies for Social Policy offer subjects outside this list. This may include subjects from the list published in conjunction with the M.Phil. or M.Sc. in Sociology with the permission of the Director of Graduate Studies for Sociology. This may also include papers offered in any other relevant master's degree in the University subject to the permission of the relevant Graduate Studies Committee as appropriate.'

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3 Board of the Faculty of Law

Bachelor of Civil Law and Magister Juris

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 942, delete ll. 23--9 and substitute: `Candidates for the BCL and M.Jur. must offer papers carrying a total credit value of at least twelve, and not more than fourteen, units, by taking a minimum of three, and a maximum of five, papers. A dissertation, which is valued at three credits, counts as one paper.'

2 Ibid., l. 40, delete `List IV' and substitute `List III'.

3 Ibid., p. 943, delete ll. 26--30.

4 Ibid., p. 944, after l. 46 insert as new l. 47 `Corporate Taxation'.

5 Ibid., p. 945, l. 7, delete `Advanced Criminal Law;'.

6 Ibid., l. 15, after `Employment' insert `and Equality'.

7 Ibid., l. 25, delete `Regulation'.

8 Ibid., after l. 25 insert as new l. 26 `Regulation'.

9 Ibid., delete l. 37.

10 Ibid., p. 946, after l. 12 insert as new l. 13 `3. Corporate Taxation'.

11 Ibid., p. 947, l. 8, after `the Criminal Law.' insert `All three areas will not necessarily be taught in any one year.'

12 Ibid., delete ll. 27--30 and renumber existing subjects 2--22 (pp. 947--950) as 1--21.

13 Ibid., p. 948, l. 46, after `Employment' insert `and Equality'.

14 Ibid., p. 951, l.31, delete `two units' and substitute `three units'.

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DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF MEDICINE

The Medical Sciences Board has granted leave to D. JOHNSON, Christ Church, to supplicate for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.

The evidence submitted by the candidate was entitled: `A comprehensive screen of genes implicated in craniosynostosis'.

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EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

The examiners appointed by the following divisional board and faculty boards give notice of oral examination of their candidates as follows:

Life and Environmental Sciences

S. DUDLEY, Jesus: `Displacement and identity: Karenni refugees in Thailand'.
Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Friday, 27 July, 11 a.m.
Examiners: M. Banks, A. Turton.

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Medical Sciences

N. BROWN, Balliol: `Thymidine phosphorylase and vascular endothelial growth factor-C in tumour angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis'.
Henry Wellcome Building for Genomic Medicine, Monday, 6 August, 12.30 p.m.
Examiners: C. Pugh, S. Keyse.

B. HJORTH-SORENSON, Wolfson: `Ancillary regulation of HSF activity'.
Institute of Molecular Medicine, Thursday, 2 August, 2 p.m.
Examiners: I.D. Hickson, A.B. Tomsett.

P. KIRK, St Cross: `Characterisation of the interactions of leucocyte surface glycoprotein CD147'.
Department of Human Anatomy and Genetics, Monday, 30 July, 2 p.m.
Examiners: R. Boyd, L. Partridge.

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Social Sciences

S. KHAN, Wadham: `Poverty in Pakistan: a nutritional, health, and social income perspective'.
Examination Schools, Monday, 8 October, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: G. Kingdon, A. Mckay.

C. LIST, Nuffield: `Mission impossible? The problem of democratic aggregation in the face of Arrow's theorem'.
Corpus Christi, Friday, 27 July, 2 p.m.
Examiners: J. Broome, A. Weale.

H. MORRIS, St Anne's: `External actors and the evolution of Latvian nationality policy, 1991–9'.
St Antony's, Tuesday, 2 October, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: A. Pravda, A. Wilson.

J. WALLAT, Merton: ` "Imagining a better Europe": the evolution of Czechoslovak/Czech foreign and security policy thinking from the Warsaw Pact to NATO, 1989–99'.
Examination Schools, Tuesday, 14 August, 10 a.m.
Examiners: A. Roberts, V. Handl.

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Mathematical Sciences

S. MA, St Cross: `An object-based algebraic specification environment'.
Computing Laboratory, Friday, 10 August, 2 p.m.
Examiners: C.A.R. Hoare, T. Bench-Capon.

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Medieval and Modern Languages

B. THURSTON, Brasenose: `Joseph de Maistre: logos and logomachy'.
Examination Schools, Wednesday, 19 September, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: N.E. Cronk, R. Griffiths.

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Oriental Studies

J.T.B. MAYER, St Cross: `On existence and its causes: the fourth Namat of Avicenna's Isharat and its main commentaries'.
Oriental Institute, Friday, 12 October, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: J.W. Morris, A. Street.

CHING-FEI SHIH, St Antony's: `Experiments and innovation: Jingdezhen blue-and-white porcelain of the Yuan Dynasty (1279–1368)'.
Twenty-four Portland Road, Oxford (by permission of the Proctors), Monday, 3 September, 3 p.m.
Examiners: M. Tregear, R. Kerr.

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Physical Sciences

D. SONG, Wolfson: `Manipulating quantum information and entanglement'.
Clarendon Laboratory, Monday, 30 July, 2 p.m.
Examiners: S. Bose, A. Kent.

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EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF SCIENCE

The examiners appointed by the following faculty board give notice of oral examination of their candidate as follows:

Physical Sciences

G. DIERKER, Jesus: `Studies of some alkyl oxo derivatives of rhenium'.
Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, Monday, 6 August, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: J.R. Dilworth, M.J. Almond.

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