Examinations and Boards

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

Annual elections

Notice is hereby given of impending vacancies for members of the Modern Languages as set out below. Those entitled to nominate and to vote in these elections are the members of the relevant sub-faculty holding posts on the establishment or under the aegis of the faculty board.

Nominations in writing by two electors will be received by the Secretary of the Modern Languages Board, Modern Languages Administration, 37 Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JF, up to noon on Monday, 28 May. There is no special form.

Vacancies

One member will be elected from each of the following sub-faculties:

French
German
Italian
Russian and other Slavonic Languages

Those elected will serve for three years from Michaelmas Term 2001.

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APPOINTMENTS, REAPPOINTMENTS, AND CONFERMENTS OF TITLE

With the approval of the relevant divisional board or the appropriate body, the following appointments and reappointments have been made and titles conferred for the periods stated. Where appropriate the relevant faculty board is given above the name(s) of the person(s) concerned.

HUMANITIES DIVISION

Reappointments

UNIVERSITY LECTURERS (CUF)

English

PETER D. MCDONALD, MA, D.Phil. (BA, MA Rhodes), Fellow of St
Hugh's. In English. from 1 October 2001 until the retiring age.
HELEN D. MOORE, MA, D.Phil., Fellow of Corpus Christi. In English. From
1 October 2001 until the retiring age. 



Literae Humaniores

GRAMMATIKOS

ANDREW HOBSON, MA, Fellow of Magdalen.  From 1 October 2001 until
30 September 2006

GROCYN LECTURER

JAMES H.W. MORWOOD, MA (MA Cambridge), Fellow of Wadham. From
1 October 2001 until 30 September 2006. 



TUTOR IN FINE ART

Ruskin School

J. BASEMAN, MA status (BFA Temple, USA, MA London). In Fine Art

(Sculpture). From 1 October 2001 until 30 September 2004.

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LIFE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES DIVISION

Appointments

UNIVERSITY LECTURER

ELISABETH L. HSU (M.Sc. Zurich, Ph.D. Cambridge), Fellow-elect of Green
College. In Medical Anthropology. From 19 March 2001 to 18 March 2006.

TEMPORARY UNIVERSITY LECTURERS

(From 1 January 2001 until 30 June 2001) EDWARD C. HOLMES, MA (B.Sc. London, Ph.D. Cambridge), Fellow of New College. In Zoology. ADRIAN L.R. THOMAS, MA (Ph.D. Lund), Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall. In Zoology.

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MATHEMATICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES DIVISION

Appointments

READER

RICHARD C. DARTON, (B.Sc. Birmingham, Ph.D. Cambridge) FR.Eng.,
Fellow of Keble. In Chemical Engineering. From 1 January 2001 until the
retiring age. 



TEMPORARY UNIVERSITY LECTURERS

STEPHEN R. LEWIS, MA, D.Phil. (MA Cambridge), Fellow-elect of
Wolfson. In Physics. From 1 October 2001 until 30 September 2004.

SUKYOUNG K. YI (BS, MS, Ph.D. Yale). In Astrophysics. From 1 August
2001 to 31 July 2006. 



FACULTY LECTURER

PETER D. HOWELL, BA, Fellow-elect of University College. In
Mathematics. From 1 October 2001 until 30 September 2006. 



Reappointments

UNIVERSITY LECTURERS

STEPHEN J. ELSTON, MA status (B.Sc., Ph.D. Exeter), Fellow of St John's.
In Engineering Science. From 1 October 2001 until the retiring age.

ANTHONY J. FAIRBANKS, MA, D.Phil., Fellow of Jesus College. In
Organic Chemistry.  From 1 October 2001 until the retiring age.

LANCE MILLER, MA (B.Sc. Leics., Ph.D. Cambridge), Fellow of St
Catherine's. In Physics (Astrophysics). From 1 March 2001 until the retiring
age.

AMY B. ZAVATSKY, MA, D.Phil. (B.Sc. Pennsylvania), Fellow of St
Edmund Hall. In Engineering Science. From 1 September 2001 until the
retiring age. 



Conferment of title

JULIA M. YEOMANS, MA, D.Phil., Fellow of St Hilda's as University
Lecturer in Physics. From 1 October 2000 until the retiring age.

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MATHEMATICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES DIVISION AND CONTINUING EDUCATION


Appointment

TEMPORARY UNIVERSITY LECTURER

ANDREW P. MARTIN, MA, D.Phil., Fellow of Kellogg. In Software
Engineering and Continuing Education. From 5 March 2001 to 30 September
2002. 



Reappointment

UNIVERSITY LECTURER

JAMES W. DAVIES, MA, , Fellow of Kellogg. In Computer Science and
Continuing Education. From 1 September 2001 until the retiring age.

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MEDICAL SCIENCES DIVISION


Appointments

UNIVERSITY LECTURERS

KEITH J. BUCKLER, MA status (B.Sc. London, Ph.D. Newcastle ), Fellow-
elect of Trinity. In Physiology. From 1 October 2003 until 30 September 2008.

HELEN C. CHRISTIAN (B.Sc. Edinburgh, Ph.D. London), Fellow of St
Anne's. In Biomedical Sciences. From 1 December 2000 until 30 November
2005.

WILLIAM JAMES, MA, D.Phil. (B.Sc. Birmingham), Fellow of Brasenose. In
Experimental Pathology. From 1 January 2001 until 31 December 2003.

BINA SANTORO (MS, Ph.D. Rome), Fellow-elect of Worcester. In Molecular
Pharmacology. From 31 March 2001 until 30 March 2006.

CLIVE WILSON (BA Cambridge, Ph.D. Warwick), Fellow-elect of St Hugh's.
In Biomedical Science. From 1 April 2001 until 31 March 2006. 



UNIVERSITY LECTURERS (part-time) IN GENERAL PRACTICE

(From 1 April 2001 to 31 March 2006) ANTHONY R. HARNDEN, MA status (MB, Ch.B. Birmingham, M.Sc. London) MRCGP, MRCP, Fellow of Kellogg ANN MCPHERSON, CBE, MA (MB BS London) FRCGP, Fellow of Green College. PETER W. ROSE (MA Cambridge, MB., B.Chir London) FRCGP. CLINICAL TUTORS BRIAN J. ANGUS (B.Sc., MB, Ch.B. Glasgow) MRCP. In Clinical Medicine. From 13 November 2000 until 12 November 2005. JONATHAN R. PRICE, BA, BM,

(MA Cambridge) MRCPsych. In Psychiatry. From 1 June 2001 to 31 May 2004. CLINICAL LECTURERS ANDREA H. NÉMETH, D.Phil. (B.Sc., MBBS London). In Clinical Laboratory Sciences. From 1 February 2001 until 31 January 2004. GARETH D.H. TURNER, BM, MA, D.Phil. (BA Cambridge). In Clinical Laboratory Science. From 1 January 2001 until 31 December 2003 Reappointments UNIVERSITY LECTURER ANNA C. DE OZāRIO NOBRE, MA, D.Phil. (Ph.D. Yale), Fellow of New College. In Experimental Psychology. From 1 October 2001 until the retiring age. CLINICAL LECTURERS DEBORAH J. PHILLIPS, MA status (BMS, BS Nottingham). In Surgery. From 1 October 2001 until 30 September 2004. PART-TIME TUTORS IN GENERAL PRACTICE RICKMAN J.P. GODLEE, MA status (MB BS London, MA Cambridge). From 1 March 2001 until 28 February 2006. ANTHONY A.S. RANDALL, MA (MB BS London). From 1 July 2001 until 30 June 2006. Conferment of title HONORARY SENIOR CLINICAL LECTURERS

(From 1 November 2000 until 31 October 2005) MARTIN DAWES (MB BS, MD London) MRCGP. In Evidence Based Medicine. ROBIN GOODMAN (M.Sc. Dundee, MB, B.Chir. Cambridge). In Radiology. PETER HAMBLY (MB, Ch.B. Bristol). In Anaesthetics. KOKI L. LAKHOO (MB, Ch.B. Natal, Ph.D. Wits, South Africa) FRCS. In Paediatric Surgery. MARTIN MCNALLY (BM, Ch.B, Belfast). In Orthopaedic Surgery. SHEILA POWELL (MB BS London) MRCS, LRCP. In Dermatology. IAN S.D. ROBERTS (B.SC., MB, Ch.B. Manchester). In Clinical Laboratory Sciences. PAUL ROSEN (MB, Ch.B., B.Sc. Manchester). In Ophthalmology.

(From 1 December 2000 to 30 November 2005) ZAFRA COOPER, D.Phil. (BA Cape Town). In Psychiatry. ANDREW J. FARMER, BA, BM. In General Practice. SUSAN HAGUE (BM Southampton) FRCSm FRCOphth. In Ophthalmology. ANTHONY R. HARNDEN (MB, Ch.B. Birmingham, M.Sc. London) MRCP In General Practice. ALISON HILL (B.Sc., MB, Ch.B. Bristol) FRCP. In Public Health. ROSAMUND L. SHAFRAN, BA (Ph.D. London). In Psychiatry.

(From 1 February 2001 to 31 January 2004) PATRICK P. DAVEY, DM (BA Cambridge) MRCP. In Cardiology.

(From 1 February 2001 to 31 January 2006) ROGER GUNDLE, BM, MA, D.Phil., FRCS. In Orthopaedic Surgery.

(From 1 March 2001 until 28 February 2006) DAVID J. ROBERTS, MA status, D.Phil (BA Cambridge, MB, Ch.B. Liverpool), In Haematology. DEREK E. ROSKELL, BM, MA (MA Cambridge) In Pathology. PREMILA N. WEBSTER, MA status (MB BS Vellone, India, M.Sc. London), In Public Health Medicine. Reconferment of title HONORARY SENIOR CLINICAL LECTURERS

(all to the retiring age or resignation from the substantive post) MARY Y. ANTHONY, MA status (MB BS, D.Ch. London, MD Leeds) MRCP, FRCPCh. In Paediatrics. From 10 November 2001. PAUL L.F. GIANGRANDE, MA status (B.Sc., MD Manchester) FRCP, FRCPath. In Haematology. From 1 July 2001. DAVID M. KEELING, MA status (B.Sc., MD London). In Haematology. From 1 July 2001.

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SOCIAL SCIENCES DIVISION


Appointments

UNIVERSITY LECTURER

Management

NIR VULKAN (B.Sc. Tel Aviv, Ph.D. London), Fellow of Worcester. In
Management Studies (Business Economics), From 1 January 2001 until 31
December 2005.

JUNIOR LECTURER

MARIA BIRBILI, M.Sc., D.Phil. (BA Greece, MA Boston). In Educational
Studies (Research Methodology). From 1 January 2001 until 31 March 2002. 



Reappointments

UNIVERSITY LECTURERS

CHRISTOPHER S. CHAPMAN, MA (B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D. London), Fellow of
Linacre. In Management Studies. From 1 August 2001 to the retiring age.

OWEN R. DARBISHIRE, MA (MS, Ph.D. Cornell), Fellow of Pembroke. In
Management Studies. From 1 October 2001 to the retiring age.

STEPHEN J. NEW, MA (B.Sc. Southampton, Ph.D. Manchester) Fellow of
Hertford. In Management Studies. From 10 June 2001 to the retiring age.

RICHARD C.L. WHITTINGTON, MA (MBA Aston, Ph.D. Manchester),
Fellow of New College. In Management Studies. From 1 April 2001 to the
retiring age. 



Conferment of title

FACULTY LECTURER

MARGARET J. STEVENS, MA, M.Phil., D.Phil., Fellow of Lincoln. In
Economics. From 1 January 2001 until 31 December 2005.

Reconferment of title

ISLAMIC CENTRE LECTURER

JAMES P. PISCATORI, MA (AB Boston, Ph.D. Virginia), Fellow of
Wadham. In International Relations. From 1 October 2001 until 30 September
2006.

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CONTINUING EDUCATION


Appointment

STAFF TUTOR (part-time/fixed term)

ALAN HUDSON, BA (M.Sc. London). In Social and Political Science  From
1 March 2001 until 29 February 2004. 



Reappointments

DIRECTOR OF HEALTH SERVICES AND HEALTH CARE

JANET L. HARRIS, MA (BA Toronto, MA Boston), Fellow of Kellogg. From
1 January 2001 until 31 December 2005.

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INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING

M. FIONA SPENSLEY (BA Warwick, Ph.D. Open). In Professional
Education. From 1 January 2001 to 31 December 2003.

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LECTURE LISTS: MICHAELMAS TERM 2001

Timetabling arrangements

Faculties and departments are asked to forward their lecture-list files as soon as possible after the finalisation of their arrangements. Details of the dates by which the files are expected to be supplied will be circulated to faculties and departments.

The printed lecture lists will be distributed shortly before the start of term.

Disks, copy, and proofs relating to the Lecture Lists should be forwarded to Val Wood, Assistant Editor, University Gazette, Public Relations Office, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD (telephone: (2)80548, fax: (2)80522, e-mail: lecture.lists@admin.ox.ac.uk).

For arrangements concerning the Special Lecture List, see below.


Entries shared between lists

Any faculty member who wishes to place an entry in the lecture list of another faculty or department is asked to forward the information as soon as possible, and directly to the other faculty.


Special Lecture List

Michaelmas Term 2001

The Special Lecture List for Michaelmas Term 2001 will appear shortly before term, at the same time as the other Lecture Lists. It will include all appropriate lectures for Trinity Term published in the Gazette during Hilary Term, and also lectures of which details are received by Monday, 20 August.

Those wishing to contribute to the Special Lecture List are asked to note that this is a firm deadline, and that items received after it are unlikely to be included.

Items for the Special Lecture List should be forwarded to Val Wood, Assistant Editor, University Gazette, Public Relations Office, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD (telephone: (2)80548, fax: (2)80522, e-mail: lecture.lists@admin.ox.ac.uk).


Enquiries concerning proposed dates for special lectures

Those responsible for arranging lectures intended to be of interest to a wide university audience may wish to consult the Editor or Assistant Editor of the Gazette (fax: (2)80522, e-mail: gazette@admin.ox.ac.uk or lecture.lists@admin.ox.ac.uk), for information on any other similar lectures, of which details have been received, due to be given on the proposed date or dates.


Distribution: Standing Orders

Undergraduate colleges will be contacted in due course with regard to the quantities of the lecture lists to be supplied to them in the next academic year.

Any faculty, department, or individual Senior Member wishing to check or amend a standing order for the lecture lists should contact the Assistant Editor, Gazette (details as above), before the end of the present term.


Board of the Faculty of Literae Humaniores

The Board of the Faculty recommends that lectures should be given at the following hours:
Monday       9      Greek History/Latin Literature
            10      Philosophy
            11      Roman History/Greek Literature
            12      Archaeology/Philosophy
            5–7    Free

Tuesday      9      Archaeology
            10      Philosophy
            11      Literature
            12      History
            5–7    Free

Wednesday    9      Roman History/Greek Literature
            10      Philosophy
            11      Latin Literature/Greek History
            12      Archaeology/Philosophy
            5–7    Free

Thursday     9      Literature
            10      Philosophy
            11      Greek History/Latin Literature
            12      Archaeology
            5–7    Free

Friday       9      History
            10      Philosophy
            11      Roman History/Greek Literature
            12      Archaeology/Philosophy
            5–7    Free

Sub-faculty of Languages and Literature

It is recommended that lectures for Honour Moderations should be given at the following hours whenever possible:
Homer               11 (Wednesdays, Fridays)
Virgil              11 (Tuesdays, Thursdays)
Greek Authors       12 (Mondays, Wednesdays)
Latin Authors       11 (Tuesdays, Thursdays)
Language Papers     10 (Fridays)
A                   11 (Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, TT;                                        
    
Mondays, Wednesdays, MT, HT)
C                   10 (Mondays, Wednesdays)
D                   10 (Tuesdays, Thursdays)
E                   12
F                   12 (Tuesdays, Thursdays, HT, TT);
                    11 and 12 (Tuesdays, Thursdays, MT)


Board of the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages

Timetable of introductory or survey lectures

The Board of the Faculty recommends that lectures should be given at the following hours:
Monday      10      French
            11      German
            12      German
Tuesday      9      Italian
            10      Spanish
            11      Italian 
            12      Spanish
Wednesday    9      Russian
            10      French
            11      Linguistics
            12      Linguistics
Thursday     9      Spanish
            10      Russian
            11      Russian
            12      Italian
Friday      10      French
            11      German
            12      Linguistics


Board of the Division of Social Sciences

The Divisional Board recommends that:

(a) lectures for the Preliminary Examination for Philosophy, Politics, and Economics should be given at the following times:

Politics    10
Economics   11
Philosophy  12 noon (or a 10 o'clock period not occupied by                 Politics);

(b) courses of introductory lectures and lectures on compulsory subjects for undergraduates in their first three or four terms of work for the Honour School of Philosophy, Politics, and Economics should normally be given at the following times:

Politics    12 
Economics   11
Philosophy  10


Board of the Faculty of Theology

To avoid clashes with Philosophy lectures members of the faculty are asked not to offer Theology lectures of interest to those reading for the Joint Honour School of Philosophy and Theology at the following times:

Preliminary Examination

Monday–Saturday 12

Honour School

Monday 10 and 12
Tuesday 10
Wednesday 10 and 12
Thursday 10
Friday 10 and 12
Saturday 10

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CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the Educational Policy and Standards Committee of Council, and, where applicable, of divisional boards, the following changes in regulations made by divisional and faculty boards will come into effect on 11 May.

1 Life and Environmental Sciences Board

(a) Preliminary Examination in Molecular Cellular Biochemistry

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 92, delete ll. 36–8 and substitute:

`The Moderators will permit the use of hand-held pocket calculators subject to the conditions set out under the heading `Use of Calculators in examinations' in the Special regulations concerning Examinations. Candidates are restricted to models of calculators included in a list provided by the Chairman of the Moderators not later than the Wednesday of the fourth week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examination. The use of calculators may not be permitted in certain papers.'

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(b) Honour School of Natural Science (Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry)

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 419, l. 30, after `Metallurgy and Science of Materials' insert `, Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry'.

2 Ibid., p. 429, delete from `the examiners', ll. 25–6, to `Examinations', l. 28.

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(c) Honour School of Human Sciences

With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 235, delete ll. 19–23 and substitute:

`not earlier than the first day and not later than Friday of the seventh week of Trinity Full Term of the year before that in which the candidate is to be examined. The Chairman of the Teaching Committee, after consultation with course co-ordinators, if necessary, shall as soon as possible decide whether or not to approve the title and shall advise the candidate through his or her college. No decision shall normally be deferred beyond the end of eighth week of Trinity Full Term.'

2 Ibid., p. 236, delete ll. 37–40 and substitute:

`The subject examines the relationship between spatial pattern and social process in the formation and modification of ethnic and social identity in Britain, Western Europe, the USA, Canada, Australia, and South Africa. Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the conceptualisation and measurement of segregation in urban areas. They will be expected to show knowledge of the concepts of "ghetto", "ethnic enclave", "ethnic village", the "barrio", "Chinatowns", and "the gay ghetto". They will be expected to show knowledge of the behavioural consequences of social segregation (for example in marriage patterns and language modification). Topics to be covered will also include models of assimilation, plurality, and multiculturalism.'

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2 Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board

(a) Honour School of Earth Sciences

With immediate effect

In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 425, l. 40, delete `week 6' and substitute `week 4'.

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(b) Honour School of [Computation] Computer Science

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 159, ll. 39–40, delete `Operations of matrix algebra. Fast Fourier transform.'

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(c) Honour School of Mathematics and [Computation] Computer Science

With immediate effect

In Examination Decrees, 2000, p.294, l.38, delete `Papers b8 and b9' and substitute `Paper b8'.

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(d) Honour School of Mathematics

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p.287, l.27, delete `, and Paper O1'.

2 Ibid, l.28, delete `and Paper O1'.

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(e) Honour School of Mathematical Sciences

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 277, ll. 17–18 and 30, in each case delete `Projects Committee of the Board of the Faculty of Mathematical Sciences' and substitute `Projects Committee of the Teaching Committee of the Department of Mathematics'.

2 Ibid., p. 285, l. 7, after `Honour Schools).' insert `No candidate will be permitted this option who is not offering paper b1.'

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(f) Honour School of Mathematics

(i) With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in Part I in 2003)

1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 287, l. 37, delete `take three' and substitute `take two, three'.

2 Ibid., p. 288, l. 1, delete `two or three' and substitute `two, three, or four'.

(ii) With immediate effect

In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 289, l. 38, and p. 290, ll. 1–2, in each case delete `Projects Committee of the Board of the Faculty of Mathematical Sciences' and substitute `Projects Committee of the Teaching Committee of the Department of Mathematics'.

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(g) M.Sc. in Computer Science

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 762, delete ll. 45–6 and substitute:

`2. Candidates must follow a course of instruction in Computer Science for at least three terms and a substantial part of the three subsequent vacations, as determined by the course timetable, and will be required to produce a certificate from their supervisors to that effect.'

2 Ibid., p. 763, after l. 47 insert:

`No candidate shall attend classes or receive any form of individual tuition in the subject of an assignment between the time when the assignment is made available to the candidates and the time fixed for the delivery of the assignment to the examiners.'

3 Ibid., p. 764, delete ll. 1–4 and substitute:

`To satisfy the examiners a candidate must attain a minimum standard in seven of the assignments under clause 3(i) and pass five of them (including at least two from Schedule B or assignments on alternative topics approved under clause 8), pursue an adequate course of practical work, and attain an adequate level of achievement in all three parts of the examination.'

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3 Mathematical and Physical Sciences and Humanities Boards

(a) Honour School of Mathematics and Philosophy

(i) With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first Part I examination in 2002 and first Part II examination in 2003)

In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 474, ll. 9–10, delete `A candidate who takes only three subjects in Philosophy in Part I cannot offer Option (i) Mathematics in Part II.'

(ii) With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 299, ll. 38–9, and p. 300, ll. 5–6, delete `Projects Committee of the Board of the Faculty of Mathematical Sciences' and substitute `Projects Committee of the Teaching Committee of the Department of Mathematics'.

2 Ibid., p. 300, l. 44, delete `University Offices, Wellington Square' and substitute `Mathematical Institute, St Giles''.

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(b) Philosophy in all Honour Schools including Philosophy

With immediate effect

In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 474, ll. 20–1, delete `University Offices, Wellington Square' and substitute `Mathematical institute, St Giles''.

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4 Social Sciences Board

(a) Master of Business Administration

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, as amended by the changes in regulations published on 5 October 2000 (Gazette No. 4560, 5 October 2000, p. 113), p. 826, delete ll. 19–46.

2 Ibid., p. 827, delete ll. 1–36 and substitute:

`1. Candidates must follow for at least three terms a course of instruction in Management Studies. Candidates must complete

(a) all courses from the schedule of required courses, and satisfy the examiners in the assignment and/or examination associated with each course;

(b) four electives, and satisfy the examiners in the assignment and/or examination associated with each course, the list of electives to be published annually by the MBA Director before the first Monday of Hilary Term;

(c) a written report on a new business development project of not more than 8,000 words. Such projects must be undertaken in groups and approved by the MBA Director;

(d) a written report on a business project of not more than 15,000 words. Such projects must be undertaken in groups and approved by the MBA Director;

(e) a case study examination, on which questions may be set relevant to all the required courses held throughout the year (details of which are set out in the schedule);

(f) candidates may be required to attend an oral examination on any of the above.

2. Assignments and written reports on projects must be presented not later than the time and date stipulated for each exercise; these will be published before the first Monday of each term by the MBA Director in which the assignment or project must be undertaken. The required number of copies must be delivered to the Examination Schools, and addressed to the Chairman of Examiners for the MBA, c/o Clerk of the Schools, High Street, Oxford. In cases where such work contains material of a commercially sensitive nature, access to such work may be restricted for a length of time to be decided by the Chairman of Examiners.

3. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination to candidates for the Degree.

4. In exceptional circumstances, a candidate wishing to take an examination later than the one to which he or she has been admitted may do so by application to the Chairman of Examiners.'

3 Ibid., p. 827, delete ll. 40–4 and substitute:

`(a) Financial Reporting Financial reporting and its regulation; sources of company information; structure and interpretation of financial statements.'

4 Ibid., p. 827, delete ll. 45–9 and substitute:

`(b) Finance 1:

Sources of finance and financial systems, valuation and risk, portfolio theory, market efficiency, investment appraisal, options and derivatives.

(c) Finance 2:

Capital structure, dividends, equity and debt finance, risk management, financial management, mergers and corporate control.' and renumber items (c)–(j) which follow as (d)–(k).

5 Ibid., p. 828, delete ll. 32–4 and substitute:

`Globalisation and global governance; politics and regulations over international investment and trade; strategies and structures of multinational enterprises; government– industry relations; diversity of modern capitalism and comparative business systems.'

6 Ibid., p. 829, delete ll. 1–3 (note: (l) Industrial Organisation remains as item (l) in the renumbered sequence).

7 Ibid., p. 829, delete ll. 9-18.

8 Ibid., p. 829, delete ll. 19–23 (note: (o) Economic Environment becomes item (m) in the renumbered sequence).

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(b) M.St. in Forced Migration

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 701, delete ll. 2–3 insert:

`Every candidate will be required to satisfy the examiners in two papers and three essays as follows:'.

2 Ibid, p. 701, delete ll. 23–39 and substitute:

`Essay I: Regional Essay

Each student will be required to undertake a course of study and write an essay of not more than 5,000 words on forced migration in a particular region. This essay must be submitted by week eight of Hilary Full Term.

Essay II: Extended Essay

Each student will be required to write an essay of not more than 8,000 words on a topic relevant to forced migration. The purpose of this essay is to ensure that the students have engaged in a multidisciplinary analysis of a single issue to gain an awareness of the complex inter-relations in the field. Students must submit their essays at least fourteen days before the first day of the examination in week nine of Trinity Term.

Essay III: Research Methods Group Essay

Each student must display an understanding of research methods relevant to forced migration. This will be in the form of a group essay based on directed field research conducted during a four-week period in Hilary Term. The essay will present findings and engage with topics which include: epistemology of social science; social science paradigms; ethics and values; quantitative, qualitative, and participatory methods of data collection; the presentation of statistical information; research design; sampling theory; hypothesis testing; questionnaire design; participant observation; participatory learning and action; and evaluative research.'

3 Ibid, p. 702, delete ll. 3–9 and substitute:

`A candidate who fails the examination will be permitted to retake it on one further occasion only, not later than one year after the initial attempt. A candidate who has reached a satisfactory standard on any of the three components of the examination: (i) the thesis; (ii) the two written papers; (iii) the two essays; will not be required to retake that part of the examination. Candidates may also be required to attend an oral examination, which may be on one or more of the candidate's written examinations, thesis, or group essay.

Any candidate who fails a group assignment may be considered for a pass on the basis of an oral examination.'

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(c) M.Sc. in Forced Migration

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2003)

In Examination Decrees, 2000, p 790, after l. 32, insert:

`Forced Migration

1. Candidates will be expected to attend such lectures and seminars as their supervisor/course director shall recommend.

2. Candidates will, when they enter for their examination, be required to produce a certificate from their society that they are following a course of study in the field which they have pursued in Oxford for at least three terms.

3. A multidisciplinary thesis topic to be offered by each candidate, duly approved by the candidate's supervisor, must be submitted for approval to the chairman of the examiners by the third week of Hilary Term. Students must submit their theses in week seven in Trinity Term at least 14 days before the first day of the examinations in week nine.

4. Candidates must present themselves for an oral examination unless exempted by the examiners.

5. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination. Every candidate will be required to satisfy the examiners in two papers and two essay papers as follows:

Paper I: International Legal and Normative Framework

The international legal and normative framework in relation to refugees and displaced persons. International and domestic application of individual and group rights to displaced persons and refugees. Implications of displaced populations for international order and for the security and stability of states. Activities and involvement of the relevant international organs, governments, and inter-governmental and non-governmental organisations regarding forced migration. The creation and dissolution of states. Concepts of intervention and their justifications. The evolution of humanitarian responses to forced migration. The organisational culture of assistance.

Paper II: Causes and consequences of forced migration

Theories of the causes of forced migration and humanitarian crises. Historical dimensions and social dynamics of forced migration. Coercion and conflict. Poverty and vulnerability. The impact of forced migrants on host populations and governments. Coping mechanisms, survival strategies, and psychological adaptation of affected populations. Nationalism, ethnicity, and group identity. Integration in rural and urban settings. The impact of resettlement programmes on the livelihood and economic autonomy of affected populations. Repatriation and social reconstruction.

Multidisciplinary Thesis

Each student will be required to write a thesis of not less than 10,000 and not more than 15,0000 words on a topic relevant to forced migration. The purpose of this thesis is to ensure that the students have engaged in a multi- disciplinary analysis of a single issue to gain an awareness of the complex inter-relations in the field.

The topic of the thesis will require approval by the chairman of examiners. This thesis must be the work of the candidate alone and aid from others must be limited to prior discussion as to the subject and advice on presentation. The thesis must be presented in proper scholarly form, in two copies typed, in double-spacing on one side only of quarto or A4 paper, each copy bound or held firmly in a stiff cover, and must be delivered to the Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, no later than Friday noon of ninth week in Trinity Term.

Research Methods Group Essay

Each student must display an understanding of research methods relevant to forced migration. This will be in the form of a group essay based on directed field research conducted during a four-week period in Hilary Term. The essay will present findings and engage with topics which include: epistemology of social science; social science paradigms; ethics and values; quantitative, qualitative, and participatory methods of data collection; the presentation of statistical information; research design; sampling theory; hypothesis testing; questionnaire design; participant observation; participatory learning and action; and evaluative research.

The essay must be presented in a proper scholarly form and delivered to the Clerk of Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, no later than Friday noon in third week of Trinity Term.

A candidate who fails the examination will be permitted to retake it on one further occasion only, not later than one year after the initial attempt. A candidate who has reached a satisfactory standard on any of the three components of the examination: (i) the thesis; (ii) the two written papers; (iii) the two essay; will not be required to retake that part of the examination. Candidates may also be required to attend an oral examination, which may be on one or more of the candidate's written examinations, thesis or group essay. Any candidate who fails a group assignment may be considered for a pass on the basis of an oral examination.'

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(d) M.Phil. in Economics

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 599, ll. 1 and l.7, delete `during' and substitute `at the same time as'.

2 Ibid., p. 599, l. 14, after `examination.' insert `No candidate will be permitted to resit any of the compulsory papers more than once.'

3 Ibid., p. 600, delete ll. 40–2 and renumber existing paragraphs (j)–(m) as (i)–(l) respectively.

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5 Board of the Faculty of Literae Humaniores

(a) Honour Moderations in Classics

(i) With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 36, l. 18, delete `24' and substitute `34'.

(ii) With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 37, l. 28; p. 39, l. 33 and p. 41, l. 12, in each case delete `III' and substitute `IV'.

2 Ibid., p. 37, delete ll. 30–1 and substitute:

`There will be a compulsory question containing passages for translation and comment from the prescribed book. The paper will also include questions on the philosophical topics examined in that book, together with some questions of a more general character on Epicurean philosophy as expressed in De Rerum Natura as a whole.'

3 Ibid., p. 39, l. 21, and p. 40, l. 41, in each case delete

`Cicero, Pro Murena;' and substitute `Cicero, In Catilinam I, Pro Archia.'

4 Ibid., p. 41, delete ll. 38–44 and substitute:

`The prescribed texts, from which compulsory passages for comment will be set, are Sallust, Catiline; Cicero, In Catilinam I–IV, Pro Sulla; Asconius, In orationem in toga candida. Compulsory passages for translation will be set only from Sallust, Catiline and Cicero, In Catilinam IV. Passages for comment from Cicero, In Catilinam I–III and Pro Sulla will be accompanied by the English translation of C. Macdonald (Loeb, 1977) and from Asconius, In orationem in toga candida by the English translation of S. Squires

(Bristol, 1990).'

5 Ibid., p. 44, l. 26, delete `*Bailey' and substitute `Rouse-Smith (Loeb, 1975 edn. or later)'.

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(b) Honour School of Literae Humaniores

(i) With immediate effect

In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 263, l. 36, delete `Sophocles, Ajax, 1–1184' and substitute `Aristophanes, Peace 1–1126'.

(ii) With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 248, delete l. 31.

2 Ibid., delete from p. 260, l. 49 to p. 261, l. 5.

3 Ibid., p. 261, delete l. 42.

4 Ibid., p. 263, l. 36, delete `Aristophanes, Peace 1–1126' and substitute `Sophocles, Ajax, 1–1184'.

5 Ibid., p. 268, l. 4, delete `*Bailey' and substitute `Rouse-Smith (Loeb, 1975 edn. or later)'.

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(c) Pass School of Literae Humaniores

With immediate effect

In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 269, delete `Valerius, Argonautica: Ehlers (Teubner).'

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(d) Honour School of Literae Humaniores

(i) With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 253, delete ll. 28–33.

2 Ibid., p. 253, l. 34, delete `I.9' and substitute `I.8'.

3 Ibid., p. 254, l. 14, delete `I.10' and substitute `I.9'.

4 Ibid., p. 254, l. 30, delete `I.11' and substitute `I.10'.

5 Ibid., p. 255, l. 34, delete `I.12' and substitute `I.11'.

6 Ibid., p. 255, l. 49, delete `I.13' and substitute `I.12'.

7 Ibid., p. 256, l. 18, delete `I.14' and substitute `I.13'.

8 Ibid., p. 256, l. 45, delete `I.15' and substitute `I.14'.

(ii) With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in Trinity Term 2004)

1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 265, delete ll. 10–15 and substitute:

`IV. 3 Art under the Roman Empire, ad 14–337

The art and visual culture of the Roman empire is studied in its physical, social, and historical contexts. Candidates will be expected to be familiar with major monuments in Rome and Italy and other leading centres of the empire (such as Aphrodisias, Athens, Ephesus, and Lepcis Magna) and with the main strands and contexts of representation in the eastern and western provinces. They will be expected to show knowledge of written evidence where relevant as well as of the main media and categories of surviving images—statues, portrait busts, historical reliefs, funerary monuments, cameos, wallpaintings, mosaics, silverware, and coins.'

(iii) With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 265, delete ll. 16–21 and substitute:

`IV.4 Roman Archaeology: Cities and Settlement under the Empire

The subject comprises the study of the Roman city from Augustus to the Tetrarchy placed in the broader context of patterns of rural settlement, agricultural production, transport, and trade. Areas of emphasis include selected key sites (Corinth, Caesarea Maritima, Palmyra, Lepcis Magna, Verulamium [St Albans], and Silchester) and major landscape studies in Italy, Greece, and North Africa. Particular attention is paid to problems and biases in assessing the character of the surviving evidence and in testing theoretical models against physical data. Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of written evidence where relevant as well as of the main categories of surviving ancient material evidence. The subject may not be combined with subject I.12, `Civic Life of the Roman Empire from the Flavian to the Severan Period'.'

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(e) M.Phil. in Greek and/or Latin Languages and Literature

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 621, delete l. 16 and substitute:

`Term of the second year of the course (except that the titles of essays to be examined at the end of the first year of study in accordance with cl. 7 below should be submitted no later than the Tuesday of first week in the Hilary Full Term of the first year of the course)'.

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(f) M.Phil. in Greek and/or Latin Literature

With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 621, delete ll. 17–23 and substitute:

`5. Examination. Each option in section A will be examined by (i) a written paper (three hours) of passages for translation and comment, in which the passages for comment will be set only from the books listed under a in each case, while passages for translation will be set from the books listed under both a and b in each case, and (ii) by three presubmitted essays (see §6 below) which between them display knowledge of more than a narrow range of the topic. For the examinations to be set in the options under Section B, see the detailed schedule.'

2 Ibid., p. 621, ll. 30–1, delete `in the Trinity Full Term in which the examination is to be taken' and substitute `in the appropriate Trinity Full Term'.

3 Ibid., p. 621, after l. 31 insert:

`7. One of the two options taken from A and B must be completed by the end of the first year of study. If it is an option to be examined by presubmitted essays, these must be delivered as in §6 above, but to arrive by noon on the Thursday of Sixth Week in the Trinity Full Term of the first year of study for the M.Phil.'

4 Ibid., p. 621, l. 32, delete `7' and substitute `8'; l. 34, delete `8' and substitute `9'; l. 36, delete `9' and substitute `10'.

5 Ibid., p. 623, after l. 30 insert:

`6. Intermediate Greek. There will be one three-hour paper. Candidates will be expected to be familiar with An Anthology of Greek Prose, ed. D.A. Russell (OUP 1991), nos. 17, 18, 23, 24, 33, 40, 44, 66, 78, from which a selection of passages will be set for translation.

Candidates will also be expected to translate from two of the following texts: (i) Herodotus I. 1–93 [ed. Hude, OCT]; (ii) Plutarch, Life of Antony 1–9, 23–36, 71–87 [ed. Pelling, CUP]; (iii) Euripides, Bacchae [ed. Diggle, OCT]. Alternative texts for translation under this head may be offered by agreement with the Graduate Studies Committee.

7. Intermediate Latin. There will be one three-hour paper. Candidates will be expected to be familiar with An Anthology of Latin Prose, ed. D.A. Russell (OUP 1990), nos. 7, 12, 22, 23, 34, 52, 63, from which a selection of passages will be set for translation.

Candidates will also be expected to translate from two of the following texts: (i) Cicero, Pro Caelio [ed. OCT]; (ii) Pliny, Letters I.6, 9, 13, 19; VII.21, 24, 26, 29; VIII.16, 17; IX.6, 12, 15, 27, 33, 39; X.31, 32, 96, 97 [ed. M.B. Fisher and M.R. Griffin, CUP 1973]; (iii) Ovid, Metamorphoses 8 [ed. A.S. Hollis, OUP 1970]. Alternative texts for translation under this head may be offered by agreement with the Graduate Studies Committee.'

7 Ibid., p. 623, l. 31, delete `6' and substitute `8'.

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(g) M.St. in Greek and/or Latin Languages and Literature

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 704, ll. 14–15, delete `The title of any dissertation, if not already approved, should be submitted not later than the Friday of the fifth week of Michaelmas Full Term' and substitute `The title of any dissertation, if not already approved, should be submitted not later than the Friday of first week of Hilary Full Term. The final confirmation of the title of the dissertation should be submitted not later than the Monday of the week before the first week of Trinity Full Term'.

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6 Board of the Faculty of Literae Humaniores and Life and Environmental Sciences Board

(a) Honour Moderations in Classical Archaeology and Ancient History

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 30, l.34, delete `the countryside, demes, and cemeteries of Attica;'.

2 Ibid., p. 31, delete ll. 2-20, and substitute:

`1. Homeric archaeology and early Greece, 1550–700 BC

Evidence on the composition and history of the poems provided by extant archaeological remains, with special emphasis on burial practices, architecture, metals, and the world outside the Aegean. An overall knowledge will be required of the archaeological evidence for the Late Bronze Age and Early Iron Age of the Aegean from 1550 bc to 700 BC.

2. Greek vases

The study of the general history of Greek decorated pottery from c.800 bc to c.300 bc, including study of the Attic black-figure and red-figure styles and of South Italian Greek vase painting. Knowledge will be required of the techniques used in making Greek pottery and in drawing on vases, also of the ancient names for vases and the shapes to which they refer. Candidates should in addition study the subjects of the paintings and their treatment by painters as compared with their treatment by writers and should be familiar with actual vases, for example those in the Ashmolean Museum.

3. Greek sculpture, c.600–300 BC

The major monuments of archaic and classical Greek sculpture—their context and purpose as well as their subjects, styles, and techniques. Candidates will be expected to show some knowledge of the external documentary evidence, such as literary and epigraphic texts, on which the framework of the subject depends, and to be acquainted with the major sculptures of the period represented in the Ashmolean Cast Gallery. The examination will consist of one picture question and three essay questions.

4. Roman architecture

The subject comprises the study of Roman architecture from the Republic to the Tetrarchy in Italy and in the provinces, looking at public buildings, private housing, and imperial palaces. Particular attention is paid to developments in building materials and techniques, the evolution of architectural styles and ideas, and the ways in which different provinces show variations on a common theme as Roman influences interacted with local culture.

B. Special subjects in Ancient History:

Note: All texts are studied in translation. Except as otherwise indicated, passages for comment will be set from the most recent Penguin Classics edition; see Course Handbook for details.
1. Thucydides and the west
The prescribed text is Thucydides VI. Compulsory passages for comment will be set from this book. Candidates will also be expected to be familiar with Thucydides VII and Plutarch, Nicias.
2. Aristophanes' political comedy
The prescribed plays are Acharnians and Lysistrata. Compulsory passages for comment will be set from these. Candidates will also be expected to be familiar with Frogs.
3. Cicero and Catiline
The prescribed texts are Sallust, Catiline; Cicero, Against Catiline I–IV; Asconius, In orationem in toga candida (in Asconius, Commentaries on Five Speeches of Cicero, ed. S. Squires, Bristol Classical Press, 1990). Compulsory passages for comment will be set from these.
4. Tacitus and Tiberius
The prescribed text is Tacitus, Annals I and III. Compul- sory passages for comment will be set from these books. Candidates will also be expected to be familiar with Annals II and IV–VI.
5. The ancient city
The prescribed texts are Aristotle, Politics I and III.1-13; Polybius VI. Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of ancient and modern views of relevant aspects of both Greek and Roman civic life.'

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(b) Honour School of Classical Archaeology and Ancient History

(i) With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 136, delete ll. 12–19 and substitute:

`F. Roman Archaeology: Cities and Settlement under the Empire

The subject comprises the study of the Roman city from Augustus to the Tetrarchy placed in the broader context of patterns of rural settlement, agricultural production, transport, and trade. Areas of emphasis include selected key sites (Corinth, Caesarea Maritima, Palmyra, Lepcis Magna, Verulamium [St Albans], and Silchester) and major landscape studies in Italy, Greece, and North Africa. Particular attention is paid to problems and biases in assessing the character of the surviving evidence and in testing theoretical models against physical data. Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of written evidence where relevant as well as of the main categories of surviving ancient material evidence. The subject may not be combined with subject I.12, `Civic Life of the Roman Empire from the Flavian to the Severan Period'.'

(ii) With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in Trinity Term 2004)

1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 136, after l. 37 insert:

`4. Art under the Roman Empire, ad 14–337 The art and visual culture of the Roman empire is studied in its physical, social, and historical contexts. Candidates will be expected to be familiar with major monuments in Rome and Italy and other leading centres of the empire (such as Aphrodisias, Athens, Ephesus, and Lepcis Magna) and with the main strands and contexts of representation in the eastern and western provinces. They will be expected to show knowledge of written evidence where relevant as well as of the main media and categories of surviving images—statues, portrait busts, historical reliefs, funerary monuments, cameos, wallpaintings, mosaics, silverware, and coins.'

2 Ibid., p. 136, l. 38, delete `4' and substitute `5'; p. 136, l. 45, delete `5' and substitute `6'; p.137, l. 8, delete `6' and substitute `7'.

3 Ibid., p. 137, delete ll. 13–15.

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7 Boards of the Faculties of Literae Humaniores and English Language and Literature

Honour Moderations in Classics and English Paper II

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 46, delete ll. 16–19 and substitute:

`(1) Greek or Latin texts. Candidates must offer either (a) or (b):

(a) Homer, Iliad I. 1–336; Sophocles, Antigone 1023–1114, 1155–1620; Lysias I

(b) Virgil, Aeneid I. 1–367; Horace, Odes III.5, 7, 9, 13, 14, 18, 21, 26, 30; Seneca, Epistles'.

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8 Boards of the Faculties of Literae Humaniores and Medieval and Modern Languages

(a) Preliminary Examination in Philosophy and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 95, delete ll. 7–9 and substitute:

`Provided that a candidate who fails one only of the papers in 2(l) above may offer, in a subsequent examination or subsequent examinations, the paper in which he or she has failed.'

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(b) Honour School of Classics and Modern Languages

(i) With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 152, delete ll. 36–7.

(ii) With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 153, l. 25, insert `*' before `(d)'.

2 Ibid., p. 153, insert footnote:

`* Paper (xii) (d) on Procopius may not be offered after October 2003 by candidates following Course I.'

(iii) With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 153, delete ll. 25–7.

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9 Board of the Faculty of Modern History

(a) Honour School of Modern History

With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 304, ll. 39–40, delete

`A thesis may be offered in place of I, a paper in the History of the British Isles, in accordance with the detailed regulations stated below under VI. THESES.'

2 Ibid., p. 305, delete ll. 33–4.

3 Ibid., p. 307, after l. 6 insert:

`10. Court Culture and Art in Early Modern Europe' and renumber all subsequent numbers from 10 to 23.

4 Ibid., delete ll. 19–21 and renumber paragraphs 21–3 as 20–2.

5 Ibid., after l.24 insert:

`23. Scholasticism and Humanism.

24. The Science of Society.

25. Political Theory and Social Science.'

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(b) Honour School of Modern History and Politics

With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 380, ll. 16–21, delete `Candidates who `Parts II or III).' and substitute:

`Candidates who choose Politics Further Subject 215 (Classical Political Thought) cannot also take Modern History Further Subject 23 and 24 (Scholasticism and Humanism and The Science of Society). Candidates who choose Politics Further Subject 216 (Foundations of Modern Social and Political Thought) cannot also take Modern History Further Subject 25 (Political Theory and Social Science).'

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(c) M.Phil. in Economic and Social History

With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 596, l. 6, delete `.'.

2 Ibid., after l. 6 insert:

`or A paper from another established course within the University where this would provide a more appropriate training for the candidate's dissertation focus. Such a choice will need formal approval from both the Course Director and the Chairman of the Graduate Studies Committee of the Board of the Faculty of Modern History.'

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(d) M.Phil. in Byzantine Studies

With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 578, l. 10, delete `I, IV, or V' and substitute `I, III, IV, or V'.

2 Ibid., delete ll. 11–19.

3 Ibid., l. 20, delete `II' and substitute `I'.

4 Ibid., l. 27, delete `III' and substitute `II'.

5 Ibid., after l. 32 insert:

`(5) Old Church Slavonic.

(6) Medieval Latin.'

6 Ibid., delete ll. 33–5 and substitute:

`III, IV, and V. Candidates will be required to offer three options which they must take from three different sections in the schedule A–G below, except that candidates may take two options from either Section D or Section E.

A. GENERAL BYZANTINE HISTORY

Candidates will be required to offer a paper which focuses on either early Byzantine history (to 717) or later Byzantine history (to 1453). Candidates will be given a wide choice of questions on the history of Byzantium and its neighbours. Approximately a quarter of the questions will deal with cultural history.'

7 Ibid., l. 36, delete `A' and substitute `B'.

8 Ibid., p. 579, l. 39, delete `B' and substitute `C'.

9 Ibid., p. 580, l. 8, delete `C' and substitute `D'.

10 Ibid., l. 23, delete `D' and substitute `E'.

11 Ibid., l. 26, delete `Peter of Atroa' and substitute `Andreas Salos'.

12 Ibid., l. 36, delete `E' and substitute `F'.

13 Ibid., p. 581, l. 1, delete `F' and substitute `G'.

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(e) M.Sc. in Economic and Social History

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 771, l. 10, delete `.'.

2 Ibid., after l.10 insert:

`or A paper from another established course within the University where this would provide a more appropriate training for the candidate's dissertation focus. Such a choice will need formal approval from both the Course Director and the Chairman of the Graduate Studies Committee of the Board of the Faculty of Modern History.'

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10 Board of the Faculty of Theology

(a) Honour School of Philosophy and Theology

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 498, delete ll. 4–16 and substitute:

`All candidates must take papers (i) (unless they intend to offer both papers 3 and 7 as prescribed for the Honour School of Theology) and (ii) below. In addition they must take either (iii) or (iv) below. Candidates may select their remaining papers from the paper not selected from (iii) and (iv), paper (v) below, and any other papers prescribed for the Honour School of Theology.'

2 Ibid., ll. 31–2, delete `(1) Christian Moral Concepts É (5) Sexual Ethics.' and substitute:

`(1) Christian Moral Concepts; (2) Government and its tasks; (3) Medical Ethics; (4) Sexual Ethics.'

3 Ibid., p. 499, l. 12, delete `(17)' and substitute `(25)'.

4 Ibid., l. 13, delete `(20)' and substitute `(29)'.

5 Ibid., l. 17, delete `(12)' and substitute `(11)'.

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(b) Honour School of Theology

(i) With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 541, after l. 7 insert:

`The provisions of cll. 2–4 and clause 6 of the regulations concerning essays will apply to the submission of the short essay, save that in cl. 2, approval must be sought not later than Friday in the fourth week of Michaelmas Term in the year of the examination.'

2 Ibid., p. 533, delete ll. 24–6.

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(ii) With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 533, delete ll. 3–18 and substitute:

`(17) Islam I: the Classical Period of Islam

This paper examines the historical development of theological thought in Islam, from the Prophet Muhammad to the end of the classical period (seventh to the fifteenth century CE). Particular attention is paid to (i) the interaction between the theology of Kalëm and the other major religious disciplines—exegesis (tafsör), Tradition (hadöth), Law (fiqh), sects (firaq)-, mysticism (tasawwuf), and philosophy (falsafa); (ii) the structuring of the doctrinal debate in respect of theodicy, prophetology, and humanism. Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of such texts (in English translation) as are prescribed by the Board of the Faculty of Theology in the Michaelmas Term of the academic year preceding the examination.

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(18) Islam II: Islam in the Modern World

This paper examines the development of Islam as a world religion since 1500, paying special attention to Islamic religious thought in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Topics include: the historical, political, and ideological contexts; new interpretations of traditional sources; Islamic movements; Islamic modernism. Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of such primary texts and secondary sources (in English translation) as are prescribed by the Board of the Faculty of Theology in the Michaelmas Term of the academic year preceding the examination. This paper may only be offered by candidastes also offering paper (17).'

2 Ibid., p. 533, delete from l. 34 to p. 534, l. 6, and substitute:

`(21) Hinduism I

Vedism, monism, traditional (smarta) ritual. This paper will be concerned with the main components of brahminical tradition; they are of ancient origin but still relevant today. The subject will be mainly studied with reference to the following concepts: brahman, karman, moksa, samskara, samnyasa, yajûa, asruti, smrti, dharma, varna, asrama, asauca (impurity), dana, tapas (austerity), bhakti, yoga, mantra, adhikara, dksa (initiation).

(22) Hinduism II

Hindu theism. The principal sects/denominations. Theistic ritual and theology, including, in addition to the concepts mentioned under Hinduism I, the concepts of puja, prapatti, prasada, seva, nyasa, sakti. The main teachings of Rammohan Roy and Dayananda Sarasvat.'

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(c) M.St. in Philosophical Theology

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 725, l.44, delete `at least fourteen days before the first day of the examination' and substitute `EITHER at least fourteen days before the first day of the examination, OR at least twenty-eight days before the first day of Michaelmas Full Term following the examination. Candidates must notify examiners of their intention to submit early or late when seeking approval of their essay topic.'

(d) M.St. in Theology

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 734, after l.46 insert:

`Candidates must notify examiners of their intention to submit early or late when seeking approval of their essay topic.'

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(e) M.St. in Theology (Research)

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 741, l. 22, delete `at least fourteen days before the first day of the examination' and substitute `at least twenty-eight days before the first day of Michaelmas Full Term following the examination'.

2 Ibid., p. 742, after l. 45 insert:

`(c) A qualifying examination will normally be required in a major research language to be proposed by the candidate.'

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EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

The examiners appointed by the following divisional board, faculty boards, and committee give notice of oral examination of their candidates as follows:

Medical Sciences

L. DAVIES, Hertford: `The electrical manipulation of bio-formulations for delivery to the lung'.
Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, Friday, 11 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: G. Brownlee, S. Eastman.

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Anthropology and Geography

F. GRAHAM, Oriel: `Ideology and practice: an ethnographic study of a Japanese company in the 1990s'.
Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Tuesday, 8 May, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: N.J. Allen, J. Clammer.

A.C. JIMENEZ, St Antony's: `The becoming of space: a geography of liminal practices of the city of Antofagasta, Chile'.
Institute of Social and Cultural Anthopology, Friday, 4 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: M. Banks, E. Hirsch.

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Biological Sciences

SUET MIEN TAN, Trinity: `The domain organisation and function of the integration of the integrin b2 subunit (CD18)'.
Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, Wednesday, 2 May, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: N. Barclay, C. Buckley.

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English Language and Literature

G. PUGIN, Campion Hall: `The Ormulum: the manuscript, its uses, and its users'.
Lady Margaret Hall, Friday, 25 May, 10 a.m.
Examiners: A.M. Hudson, M. Laing.

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Law

J. EDELMAN, Magdalen: `Gain-based awards for wrongs'.
St Hugh's, Wednesday, 2 May, 10.45 a.m.
Examiners: A.S. Burrows, C. Mitchell.

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Literae Humaniores

T. NELSON, Corpus Christi: `Deception in archaic Greek poetry from Homer to Pindar'.
Magdalen, Tuesday, 8 May, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: O.P. Taplin, R.G.A. Buxton.

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Management

TOMOHIDE SUZUKI, Balliol: `Accounting and economics: epistemology of economic reality from an accounting point of view'.
Said Business School, Radcliffe Infirmary, Wednesday, 2 May, 10.30 a.m.
Examiners: G. Jones, I. Lapsley.

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Physical Sciences

S. TAFFLER, Hertford: `The use of the Hilbert spectrum in the analysis of electromyographic signals and its application in the development of myoelectric prosthesis controllers'.
Department of Engineering Science, Thursday, 3 May, 10 a.m.
Examiners: I. Reid, B. Hudgins.

M. YAM, Balliol: `Detection and analysis of microcalcification clusters in X-ray mammograms using the hint representation'.
Department of Engineering Science, Monday, 14 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: J.A. Noble, S. Astley.

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Theology

A. ATHERSTONE, Wycliffe Hall: `Charles Golightly (1807– 85), church parties, and university politics in Victorian Oxford'.
Wadham, Monday, 30 April, 10 a.m.
Examiners: E.J. Garnett, P. Nockles.

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Committee for Educational Studies

R. BERKELEY, Corpus Christi: `Exclusions from school: market forces or disciplinary structures?' Examination Schools, Tuesday, 15 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: A. Watson, C. Parsons.

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