Examinations and Boards

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the Educational Policy and Standards Committee of Council, the following changes in regulations made by the Social Sciences Board will come into effect on 9 February.

Social Sciences Board

M.Sc. in Criminology and Criminal Justice (for first examination in 2002)

In Examination Decrees, 2000, p.764, after l. 41 insert:

`Criminology and Criminal Justice

1. Every candidate must follow, for at least three terms, a course of instruction in Criminology and Criminal Justice.

2. There shall be a board of studies for the course, to be chaired by the Director of the Centre for Criminological Research and comprising the director of studies and such other members of the Centre for Criminological Research and of the Faculty of Law as provide teaching for the course, plus one student representative.

3. The course will consist of three elements: core course, options, and thesis. The core course will run for two hours a week for the first two terms (Michaelmas and Hilary) . Options will run for six weeks in each term (Michaelmas, Hilary and Trinity) . Candidates will be required to choose two options in each of the first two terms and one for the final term. The dissertation will be 12,000–15,000 words long on a topic to be agreed by the board of studies.

4. The syllabus outlines will be as follows:

Core Course: Analytical Criminology and Criminal Justice

(a) constructing knowledge of crime, offenders and victims

(b) justifications and principles of social control

(c) prevention, risk and effectiveness

(d) discretion and accountability

(e) the impacts of race, gender and class

(f) organised and white-collar crime

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Option 1: Policing, Surveillance, and Actuarial Justice

(a) the emergence of professional policing

(b) the development of knowledge about the police

(c) police culture, its consequences and organisational responses

(d) policing professional and organised crime

(e) police corruption and miscarriages of justice

(f) the politics of the police

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Option 2: Sentencing

(a) the structure of sentencing practice

(b) law and politics in sentencing

(c) sentencing repeat offenders

(d) aggravating and mitigating factors

(e) defendants' rights, victims' rights, and procedural justice

(f) comparative perspectives on sentencing structures

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Option 3: Dilemmas of Custody

(a) a just measure of pain: the historical emergence of the use of imprisonment

(b) understanding the forces shaping the use of imprisonment

(c) fundamental dilemmas and conflicts in prison organisation and regimes

(d) serving short time: providing for remand and short-term prisoners

(e) young offenders behind bars

(f) the problem of security, order and control of long-term prisoners

(g) releasing long-term prisoners: the mechanics and politics of parole

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Option 4: The Design and Evaluation of Research

This course will be run as a "research workshop", with students being expected to play a part at each session in the design of a criminological project. This method will be used to illustrate the following themes:

(a) understanding the relationship between theory and research in criminology

(b) the politics of the research enterprise: the relationship between the researcher, the research subject and the funding body

(c) designing research: balancing ambitions with constraints

(d) different methodological approaches, ranging across surveys, ethnographical fieldwork, and controlled experiments

(e) spotting the flaws: a critical approach to research findings

(f) vulnerable subjects: ethical issues in criminological research

Option 5: Community Penalties

(a) the history of non-custodial disposals

(b) the expansion of community penalties: is the net of social control widening?

(c) the changing rationale of community penalties

(d) the effectiveness of community penalties: "Nothing Works" versus "What Works"

(e) problems of assessing the effectiveness of community penalties

(f) the new language of risk, rationality and choice: probation in the 21st Century

Option 6: Human Rights and Criminal Justice

(a) human rights in theory and practice

(b) the Human Rights Act and the European Convention

(c) human rights and pre-trial procedure

(d) human rights and fair trials

(e) human rights, sentencing, and release

(f) human rights and the administration of sanctions

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Option 7: Restorative Justice in International Perspective

(a) history and definition of restorative justice

(b) models of restorative justice

(c) victims, criminological theory and restorative justice

(d) the community and restorative justice

(e) offenders, offences and forms of restorative justice

(f) sociological critiques

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Option 8: Comparative Criminal Justice

(a) the meanings of crime in different jurisdictions

(b) the politics of criminal justice

(c) differences of institutional structure

(d) comparative sentencing and penal sanctions

(e) the place of the victim in different jurisdictions

(f) the effects of harmonisation and globalisation on criminal justice policies

5. The course shall be assessed as follows:

(i) Core course: There shall be a three-hour examination for the core course, to be taken in week one of Trinity Term. Candidates shall be required to pass at least three of the four assessed essays submitted in Michaelmas and Hilary Terms as a condition of admission to the core course examination.

(ii) Options: Options other than "Design and Evaluation of Research" shall be examined by means of an assessed essay of 3,500–5,000 words, for which time will be set aside during the last two weeks of each term. A title, or choice of titles (as determined by the course leader for the option), shall be posted on the designated noticeboard at the Centre for Criminological Research by noon on the Friday of week four of the relevant term. Candidates shall be required to submit the essay to the Clerk of the Schools, Examinations Schools, High Street, Oxford not later than five weeks after this date, by noon. For "Design and Evaluation of Research", there shall be a special ongoing assessment exercise, the nature of which will be explained to students at the beginning of the option; precise details of the assessment will be posted on the designated noticeboard at the Centre for Criminological Research by noon on the Friday of week four of the relevant term.

(iii) Dissertation: Two typewritten copies of the dissertation shall be submitted to the Clerk of the Schools by noon on Friday of week nine of Trinity Term. One bound copy of the dissertation of each candidate who passes the examination shall be deposited in the library at the Centre for Criminological Research.

6. The degree of M.Sc. shall be awarded to any candidate who achieves at least 60 per cent in all papers and the dissertation. The examiners may award a distinction to any candidate who achieves marks of at least 70 per cent on at least half of the papers: in this calculation, both the core course and the dissertation shall count as two papers and each option shall count as one.

7. Arrangements for reassessments shall be as follows:

(i) Core course: Candidates who fail the core-course examination may resit the examination in the Trinity Term of the following academic year. Such candidates who have completed successfully either or both of (a) the options (i.e. all five assessed essays) and (b) the dissertation may carry forward the marks gained for those part or parts of the course.

(ii) Options: Candidates who fail up to two of the four assessed essays submitted in Michaelmas and Hilary Terms shall resubmit that essay or essays to the Clerk of the Schools by noon on Friday four weeks after week nine of the term in which the essay or essays were first submitted. Candidates who fail more than two of the four essays, or one or more resubmitted essays, or who fail the fifth essay submitted in Trinity Term, may resubmit all five essays to the Clerk of the Schools according to the standard timetable for submitting essays in the following academic year. Such candidates who have completed successfully either or both of (a) the core course examination and (b) the dissertation may carry forward the marks gained for those part or parts of the course.

(iii) Dissertation: Candidates who fail the dissertation may resubmit the dissertation by the required date in the Trinity Term of the following academic year. Such candidates who have completed successfully either or both of (a) the core course and (b) the options may carry forward the marks gained for those part or parts of the course.'

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EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

The examiners appointed by the following divisional boards, faculty boards, and committee give notice of oral examination of their candidates as follows:

Medical Sciences

C. TUFARELLI, Wolfson: `Activation and silencing of a globin expression'.
Brasenose, Friday, 2 February, 2 p.m.
Examiners: N.J. Proudfoot, N. Brockdorff.

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Social Sciences

S. ALLEN, Nuffield: `Male rape as a threat to masculine identity'.
Centre for Criminological Research, Wednesday, 14 February, 2 p.m.
Examiners: R.P. Young, E.M.W. Maguire.

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Biological Sciences

S.C. HOWARD, New College: `Statistical estimation of epidemiological parameters relating to infectious disease'.
Department of Zoology, Friday, 2 February, 11 a.m.
Examiners: A.C.H. Ghani, M.E.J. Woolhouse.

CHUNG-SHENG BRIAN LEE, Wolfson: `Studies of SPOIIA, the anti-anti-6F factor of Bacillus subtilis'.
Department of Biochemistry, Monday, 29 January, 10.30 a.m.
Examiners: K.G.H. Dyke, M.J. Buttner.

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Clinical Medicine

J. JOHN, Balliol: `Increasing fruit and vegetable consumption in primary care: a randomised controlled trial and qualitative study'.
Green College, Wednesday, 21 March, 2 p.m.
Examiners: T.J. Key, R. Pill.

R. WHITE, Jesus: `Developing an infectious Epstein– Barr virus-based vector for the delivery of genomic transgenes'.
Department of Biochemistry, Monday, 19 February, 2 p.m.
Examiners: C. Tyler-Smith, P. Farrell.

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English Language and Literature

J.E. GRIFFITHS, Magdalen: `"The Liberty to Speak": authority in the poetry of John Skelton'.
St Anne's, Monday, 29 January, 2 p.m.
Examiners: P. Strohm, C.J. Burrow.

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Law

J. NEWTON, St Edmund Hall: `The uniform interpretation of the Brussels and Lugano Conventions'.
Keble, Monday, 29 January, 11.30 a.m.
Examiners: W.E. Peel, W.A. Kennett.

M. SU LIN OOI, Merton: `Shares in the conflict of laws'.
Examination Schools, Monday, 26 March, 2 p.m.
Examiners: R.M. Goode, R. Fentiman.

T.R. TOLLEY, St Anne's: `Understanding children's rights'.
All Souls, Wednesday, 31 January, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: S.M. Cretney, D. Archard.

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Mathematical Sciences

A.F.M. PENAUD, Somerville: `Optimal decisions in finance: passport options and the bonus problem'.
Dartington House, Friday, 26 January, 10.45 a.m.
Examiners: B.M. Hambly, C. Atkinson.

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Modern History

S. KING, Oriel: `Parties, issues, and personalities: the structural determinants of Irish voting behaviour from 1885 to 2000'.
Hertford, Thursday, 8 February, 2 p.m.
Examiners: R.F. Foster, R. Sinnott.

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Social Studies

J.A. CUESTA, Hertford: `Social transfers, the household, and the distribution of incomes in Chile'.
Nuffield, Friday, 9 March, 2 p.m.
Examiners: A. Atkinson, R. Vos.

A. ZASLAVSKY, Nuffield: `The Anglo-Russian Entente: alliance formation and management, 1907–14'.
Nuffield, Friday, 2 February, 11.30 a.m.
Examiners: K. Nabulsi, P.J.S. Duncan.

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Committee for Archaeology

E. VARDAKI, St Antony's: `Consuming pastoralism. An anthropological insight in the archaeology of animal husbandry'.
Institute of Archaeology, Tuesday, 20 February, 2 p.m.
Examiners: D.J.L. Bennet, H.A. Forbes.

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EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF LETTERS

The examiners appointed by the following faculty board give notice of oral examination of their candidate as follows:

Anthropology and Geography

K. MARTINDALE, St Catherine's: `To what extent are the modern Olympic Games a catalyst for urban redevelopment? Case study: the 2000 summer Olympic Games, Sydney, Australia'.
School of Geography and the Environment, Thursday, 29 March, 2 p.m.
Examiners: G.L. Clark, K. Anderson.

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