Examinations and Boards

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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CHAIRMAN OF EXAMINERS

The Vice-Chancellor desires to call the attention of all examiners to the provisions of Ch. VI, Sect. ii.c, § 1, clauses 1--3, which require examiners in all university examinations to appoint one of their number to act as Chairman, to notify the appointment to the Vice-Chancellor, and to publish it in the University Gazette.

He desires that these appointments shall be notified to the Clerk of the Schools who will inform the Vice-Chancellor and see that notice of them is duly published in the University Gazette.

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EXAMINATION SCHOOLS

Accommodation for lectures

Professors, Readers, and University Lecturers who wish to lecture in the Schools next term are asked to make a booking by the end of the current term.

When booking, please indicate the number of students expected to attend the lecture; this information is essential if the total is expected to exceed 100.

All lectures should start on the hour, and afternoon lectures should finish by 6 p.m. To allow room for changeovers, lecturers should arrange to complete their lecture by five minutes to the hour.

Owing to examination requirements in Trinity Term, lecture rooms are only fully available in first, second, and third weeks.

Overhead and 35-mm projectors and a limited number of video and LCD projectors are available if booked twenty-four hours in advance. Microphones are provided in the Writing Schools.

Short equipment familiarisation sessions (of ten to fifteen minutes' duration) can be arranged at convenient times. Please contact the Schools (details below) if you wish to arrange a familiarisation session.

All enquiries in respect of lecture bookings, facilities, and equipment should be addressed in the first instance to Martin Batchan (telephone: (2)76901, e-mail: martin.batchan@admin.ox.ac.uk).

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BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF THEOLOGY

Honour School of Theology and Philosophy and Theology, Paper 11: Further Studies in History and Doctrine

Under the provisions of paper (11) of the Honour School of Theology (`Further Studies in History and Doctrine') (Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 531), the Board of the Faculty of Theology hereby publishes the list of theologians (with texts) on which questions will be set in the examination in 2002.

(a) Origen

Origen on First Principles, Book I, trans. G.W. Butterworth (Peter Smith, 1973).

Prayer, trans. Rowan Greer in An Exhortation to Martyrdom, etc. (Paulist Press: Classics of Western Spirituality series, 1979).

Prologue to the Commentary on the Song of Songs, trans. Rowan Greer, ibid.


(b) Augustine

Confessions, Book 10, trans. H. Chadwick (OUP, 1991).

Concerning The City of God against the Pagans, Book 14, trans. R.W. Dyson (CUP, 1998).

On the Trinity, Book 10, trans. John Burnaby, in Augustine, Later Works, Library of Christian Classics, vol. VIII (SCM Press, 1955).


(c) Aquinas

Summa Theologiae Ia, qq. 1–3, 13, 44–6; IaIIae, qq. 109–14; IIaIIae, qq. 1–2, 23–7; IIIa, qq. 2–6, 46–9 (Blackfriars edition, vols. 1, 2, 3, 8, 30, 31, 34, 48, 54).


(d) Luther 1500–1525

E. Gordon Rupp and B. Drewery, Martin Luther: Documents of Modern History (Edward Arnold, series, 1970), pp. 1–10, 15–41, 54–82, 100–2, 107–19, 121–9).

Three Treatises, second revised edition (Fortress Press, Philadelphia, 1970).


(e) Calvin

G.R. Potter and M. Greengrass, John Calvin: Documents of Modern History (Edward Arnold, 1983), pp. 1–109.

Institutes of the Christian Religion, trans. F.L. Battles: Library of Christian Classics, vols. XX, XXI (SCM Press, 1961), bk. 1, chs. i–v; bk. 3, chs. xxi, xxiii; bk. 4, chs. ii, ix, xii (Sections 1–13), xx.


(f) Schleiermacher

On Religion. Speeches to its Cultured Despisers, Speeches 1, 2, and 5 (CUP, 1988).

The Christian Faith, sectt. 13–19 and 92–105 (T. and T. Clark, 1968).


(g) Newman

Apologia Pro Vita Sua (Penguin, 1994).

Fifteen Sermons Preached before the University of Oxford (University of Notre Dame Press, 1997), x, xi, xiii, xv.

An Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine, 1878 edition (University of Notre Dame Press, 1989), chs. 1–5.

Newman the Theologian: A Reader, ed. I. Ker (Collins, 1990), pp. 66–122, 199–275.


( h) Barth

`The Strange New World Within the Bible' in The Word of God and the Word of Man (Hodder and Stoughton, London, 1928), pp. 28–50.

Church Dogmatics, I/1, § 1 (T. and T. Clark, Edinburgh, 1976), pp. 3–24.

Church Dogmatics, IV/1, § 59 (T. and T. Clark, Edinburgh, 1956), pp. 157–357.


(i) Tillich

Systematic Theology, vol. 1: Introduction, and vol. 2 (SCM Press, 1978), or (J. Nisbet and Co.), vol. 1, 1953, and vol. 2, 1957.


(j) Bonhoeffer

The Cost of Discipleship, SCM, 1959 (twentieth impression, 2000), 33--68.

Life Together, SCM, 1955 (nineteenth impression, 1998), 7--26.

Ethics, SCM, 1955 (seventh impression, 1998), 194--230.

Letters and Papers from Prison, SCM enlarged edition, 1971 (eighth impression, 1999): `After Ten Years' (pp. 3--17); letters to E. Bethge (pp. 278--87, 324-- 9, 343--7, 357--61).

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CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the Educational Policy and Standards Committee of Council, and where applicable, of the Humanities and Social Sciences Boards, the following changes in regulations made by divisional boards, boards of faculties, and the Standing Committee for Engineering, Economics, and Management and Related Schools will come into effect on 6 April.

1 Life and Environmental Sciences Board

(a) Master of Science: Biology (Integrative Bioscience)

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 760, l. 40, insert the following sentence at the end of 3(i):

`Candidates shall not deal with substantially the same material in their essays submitted for different topics'.

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(b) Master of Science by Coursework

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 784, l. 43, delete `Board of the Faculty of Anthropology and Geography' and substitute `Life and Environmental Sciences Divisional Board'.

2 Ibid., p. 785, l. 42, delete `Board of the Faculty of Anthropology and Geography' and substitute `Life and Environmental Sciences Divisional Board'.

3 Ibid., p. 796, l. 29, delete `Board of the Faculty of Anthropology and Geography' and substitute `Life and Environmental Sciences Divisional Board'.

4 Ibid., p. 807, after l. 7 insert:

`1. Candidates must follow a course of instruction in Medical Anthropology for at least three terms, and will, when entering for the examination, be required to produce a certificate from their supervisor to this effect.

2. Candidates will be required to present themselves for written and, where invited, oral examinations, and to submit three copies of a dissertation in prescribed form on an approved topic as defined below.

3. The written examination will consist of four papers on the syllabus described in the Schedule.

4. Each candidate will be required to submit a dissertation of approximately 10,000 words, on a subject selected in consultation with the supervisor and approved by the Chairman of Examiners. The proposed title of the dissertation together with a paragraph describing its scope and the supervisor's written endorsement, must be submitted to the Chairman of Examiners by Monday of the first week of Trinity Term.

5. Three typewritten copies of the dissertation must be delivered not later than noon on the second Monday in September in the year in which the examination is taken, to the Chairman of the Examiners, M.Sc. in Medical Anthropology, c/o Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford.

The examiners shall retain one copy of the dissertation of each candidate who passes the examination for deposit in the departmental library.

6. An oral examination, if held, may be on the candidate's written papers, or dissertation, or both.

7. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.

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Schedule

Every candidate will be required to satisfy the examiners in four papers as follows:

1. Concepts of disease, illness, health, and medicine in global perspective

The scope of this paper includes the following topics: epidemiology, global distribution of disease patterns, co-existence of alternative therapeutic or healing systems, phenomenology of the body, and cross-cultural concepts of health, pain, illness, disease causation, diagnosis, and cure. Topics analysed from conjoined biological and socio-cultural perspectives include human growth and personhood, adaptability, nutrition, health and social inequality, reproduction and fertility, disease identification, and epidemiology. Issues associated with informed consent; preparation of research proposals.

2. Theory and practice of bio-medicine and of other medical systems

The scope of this paper includes the impact of different medical systems on the health of populations, issues of public health and policy on a comparative and global basis, including specific campaigns (e.g. that eliminating smallpox in South Asia and attempts to characterise and treat AIDS). It draws on ethnographies of particular societies to illustrate and test theoretical claims in medical anthropology, covering different ways in which people manage fertility, reproduction, death and disease, patient–healer relations, the explanatory roles of divination, herbalism, alternative therapies, dramatherapy, religion, shamanism, sorcery, and culturally defined concepts of risk, vulnerabilty, fate, and evil.

3. Critical medical anthropology

The scope of this paper includes a critique of the assumptions and methods of this sub-field of anthropology and of its links with other fields and disciplines, including the place of material culture in medicine. Critique of the Cartesian mind–body dichotomy and methodological problems specially affecting medical anthropology; fieldwork and data collection methods; quantitative and qualitative techniques; cultural property and indigenous rights; preparing research proposals; ethical issues.

4. Ecological and bio-medical anthropology

The scope of this paper includes consideration of the concept of well-being as being broader than conventional concepts of health and comprising ecological, biological, and socio-cultural perspectives; relationships between bio- diversity, ecological change, and changing patterns of disease, diagnosis, and cure; the role of economic transformation in health and environmental issues; changing relationships between diet, nutrition, infection, human growth, and chronic disease; pharmacology and genomics in research and practice; health and ethics.'

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2 Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board

(a) Honour School of Metallurgy and Science of Materials

(i) With effect from October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 426, l. 27, delete `advanced'.

2 Ibid., ll. 41–2, delete `or who have completed an approved course of instruction in a foreign language'.

3 Ibid., p. 427, delete ll. 4–9 and substitute:

`Candidates shall be required to submit a portfolio of Engineering and Society coursework containing one essay or report on each of three approved topics specified by the sub-faculty of Materials, as follows: (a) a management case study, AND (b) a safety assessment, AND (c) EITHER `the engineering profession' OR an alternative approved topic; except that candidates who have completed an approved course of instruction in a foreign language shall be required to submit one essay or report on a safety assessment. Written work shall be typed and each essay or report shall have not more than 2,000 words. A list of alternative approved topics shall be'.

4 Ibid., p. 428, l. 3, delete `Advanced option' and substitute `Option'.

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(ii) With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 427, l. 7 [as amended by (a) above], delete `2,000' and substitute `3,000'.

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(iii) With effect from October 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 428, l. 26, delete `and' and substitute `,'.

2 Ibid., l. 29, after `investigation' insert `, and a description of the engineering context of the investigation'.

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(b) Honour School of Engineering Science

(i) With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 170, l. 30, delete `Cams and equivalent mechanisms' and substitute `Gear trains'.

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(ii) With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 168, l. 17, delete `2,000' and substitute `3,000'.

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3 Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board and Social Sciences Board

Honour School of Materials, Economics, and Management and Related Studies

With effect from October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 273, l. 22, delete `advanced'.

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4 Social Sciences Board

Final Honour School of Philosophy, Politics, and Economics

(i) With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 486, l. 38, after `show knowledge' insert `(in at least two answers)'.

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(ii) With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 485, delete ll. 22–9 and substitute:

`207. Russian Government and Politics

Candidates will be required to show knowledge of government and politics both in the Soviet Union (with particular reference to the period from the end of the Stalin era in 1953 to the end of the USSR in 1991) and in post-Soviet Russia. Major objects of study are the power structure and the changing relationships between political institutions under Communism and post-Communism, the process of political transformation of the Soviet system, and the post-Soviet transition. Specific attention is devoted to political leadership, the development of representative institutions, the national question and federalism, the relationship between economic and political power, political parties and interests, ideology, and political culture.'

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5 Board of the Faculty of Law

(a) Final Honour School of Jurisprudence

With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 243, delete ll. 11, 12.

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(b) Bachelor of Civil Law and Magister Juris

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 943, delete l. 16.

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6 Board of the Faculty of Literae Humaniores

Philosophy in all Honour Schools including Philosophy

With effect from October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 471, delete ll. 19–26 and substitute:

`130. Either (a) Plato, Republic.

Candidates will be expected to have read books I, IV–VII, X in Greek (Burnet, Oxford Classical Text), and books II–III, VIII–IX in translation (Grube, revised Reeve, Hackett). There will be a compulsory question containing passages for translation and comment from the books read in Greek; any passages for comment from the remaining books will be accompanied by a translation.

Or (b) Plato, Theaetetus and Sophist.

Candidates will be expected to have read both dialogues in Greek (Duke et al., Oxford Classical Text). There will be a compulsory question containing passages for translation and comment.

131. Either (a) Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics.

Candidates will be expected to have read books I–III, IV–VII, X in Greek (Bywater, Oxford Classical Text), and books IV–V, VIII–IX in translation (Irwin, Hackett second edition). There will be a compulsory question containing passages for translation and comment from the books read in Greek; any passages for comment from the remaining books will be accompanied by a translation.

Or (b) Aristotle, Physics.

Candidates will be expected to have read the work in Greek (Ross, Oxford Classical Text). There will be a compulsory question containing passages for translation and comment.

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7 Board of the Faculty of Management

(a) Preliminary Examination in Economics and Management

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 73, l. 10, after `management.' insert `Candidates may be charged for the provision of study packs.'

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(b) Honour School of Economics and Management

With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 162, l. 31, after `Schedule A.' insert `Candidates may be charged for the provision of study packs for these compulsory subjects.'

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8 Standing Committee for Engineering, Economics, and Management and Related Schools

Honour School of Engineering, Economics, and Management

With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first Part I examination in 2003)

In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 182, delete ll. 14–28, and renumber items 3 and 4 which follow as items 2 and 3.

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DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF MEDICINE

The Medical Sciences Board has granted leave to YUK-MING DENNIS LO, Christ Church, to supplicate for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.

The evidence submitted by the candidate was entitled: `Molecular analysis of non-host cell-free DNA in human plasma and serum'.

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EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

The examiners appointed by the following divisional board, faculty boards, and committees give notice of oral examination of their candidates as follows:

Medical Sciences

H. REDDY, Trinity: `Cortical reorganisation and plasticity: applying fMRI to study disease'.
Department of Physiology, Friday, 30 March, 11 a.m.
Examiners: J. Stein, A.J. Thompson.

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Biological Sciences

I. DUNAND-SAUTHIER, Keble: `Characterisation of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe sum 1+ gene'.
Brasenose, Tuesday, 27 March, 2 p.m.
Examiners: N.J. Proudfoot, S. Morley.

M. MARKOPOULOS, Green College: `The role of certification in supporting Community-based Forest Enterprise (CFE) in Latin America'.
Oxford Forestry Institute, Wednesday, 4 April, 10.30 a.m.
Examiners: J.E.M. Arnold, M. Simula.

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Medieval and Modern Languages

L. ASFOUR, New College: `The Sterne debate in France, 1760–1800'.
Trinity, Thursday, 5 April, 10 a.m.
Examiners: G.J. Mallinson, F. Ogée.

P.S. DARUKHANAWALA, St John's: `Communication and hope in Thomas Bernhard's later prose writings'.
Examination Schools, Wednesday, 11 April, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: K.M. Kohl, D. Horrocks.

D. HOLMES, New College: `Ignazio Silone and "das rote Zürich"—writing and internationalism in antifascist exile 1929–39'.
St Hugh's, Wednesday, 4 April, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: T. Kuhn, L. Parisi.

J. KEAT, St Hugh's: `Projections in black and white: cinematic construction/construction of a cinematic in Czech poetist prose of the 1920s'.
New College, Tuesday, 17 April, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: C.H.M. Kelly, R.B. Pynsent.

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Modern History

C. JANGBAHADOOR, Linacre: `Women and the emergence of the free Indian community in Trinidad, 1869–1945'.
St Antony's, Tuesday, 24 April, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: D. Washbrook, M. Chamberlain.

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Physical Sciences

M. BOOTH, Jesus: `Adaptive optics for confocal microscopy'.
Department of Engineering Science, Wednesday, 28 March, 2 p.m.
Examiners: L. Solymar, J. Walker.

J. TRANCIK, Magdalen: `Silk microstructures'.
St Catherine's, Tuesday, 27 March, 10 a.m.
Examiners: B.E. Juniper, B.L. Thiel.

C. VAN DER GAST, University: `Microbial dynamics of metal-working fluids'.
Department of Biochemistry, Friday, 27 April, 10.30 a.m.
Examiners: J.P. Armitage, T.P. Curtis.

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Physiological Sciences

M. SMITH, Linacre: `Neuronal cell cycle regulation and the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease and related dementias'.
Warneford Hospital, Thursday, 26 April, 2 p.m.
Examiners: P. Harrison, D.M.A. Mann.

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Social Studies

J. GARCIA DE POLAVIEJA, Nuffield: `Insiders and outsiders: structure and consciousness effects of labour market deregulation in Spain (1984–97)'.
Nuffield, Tuesday, 27 March, 2 p.m.
Examiners: A.F. Heath, S. Paugam.

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Theology

D. MARKS, St Hugh's: `Julius Müller's doctrine of sin'.
Examination Schools, Friday, 30 March, 2 p.m.
Examiners: G. Sauter, N. Adams.

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Committee for Archaeology

D.L. DAY, St Cross: `The evolution of an archaeological landscape: Dorset from the Iron Age to the Anglo-Saxon period'.
Institute of Archaeology, Tuesday, 27 March, 2 p.m.
Examiners: B. Cunliffe, K. Dark.

S. MARZINZIK, Somerville: `Early Anglo-Saxon belt buckles (late fifth to early eighth centuries): their classification and context'.
Ashmolean Museum, Monday, 14 May, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: A.G. MacGregor, H. Haerke.

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Committee for Educational Studies

J. MCGONIGLE, Jesus: `Towards a culture of peace: insight into the problems and processes of integrating segregated schools in Northern Ireland'.
Examination Schools, Wednesday, 18 April, 2 p.m.
Examiners: A. Pendry, D. Lawton.

AI-PHUONG TON-NU, Green College: `Commercial sexual exploitation of children: a study of child prostitution and the preventative roles of education in Vietnam'.
Examination Schools, Friday, 19 April, 11 a.m.
Examiners: A. Watson, A. Beatty.

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