Lectures

Contents of this section:

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INAUGURAL LECTURES

Action Research Professor of Clinical Neurology

PROFESSOR G.C. EBERS will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 9 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Multiple sclerosis—a complex trait paradigm.'

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Harold Vyvyan Harmsworth Professor of American History

PROFESSOR R.W. WINKS will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 18 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `To stimulate to some action: the Harmsworth Professorship, 1920–2000.'

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Reuters Professor of Intellectual Property and Information Technology Law

PROFESSOR D. VAVER will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5.30 p.m. on Wednesday, 17 May, in the Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, the St Cross Building.

Subject: `Intellectual property: the state of the art.'

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WEIDENFELD VISITING PROFESSOR OF EUROPEAN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 1999–2000

Literature and the gods

PROFESSOR ROBERTO CALASSO will lecture at 5 p.m. on the following days in the Examination Schools.

Wed. 3 May: `The pagan school.'

Thur. 4 May: `Mental waters.'

Wed. 10 May: `Incipit parodia.'

Thur. 11 May: `Musings of a serial killer.'

Wed. 17 May: `An abandoned room.'

Thur. 18 May: `Mallarmé in Oxford.'

Wed. 24 May: ` "Metres are the cattle of the gods" .'

Thur. 25 May: `Absolute literature.'

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HALLEY LECTURE 2000

PROFESSOR SIR ALAN COOK, FRS, formerly Master of Selwyn College and Emeritus Professor of Natural Philosophy, Cambridge, will deliver the Halley Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 16 May, in the Lecture Theatre, the University Museum.

Subject: `Edmond Halley and the magnetic field of the Earth.'

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CHERWELL–SIMON LECTURE 2000

PROFESSOR FRANCIS HALZEN, Director, Institute for Elementary Particle Physics Research, University of Wisconsin—Madison, will deliver the Cherwell–Simon Lecture at 4.30 p.m. on Friday, 9 June, in the Martin Wood Lecture Theatre, the Clarendon Laboratory.

Subject: `Neutrino astronomy: Antarctic dreams.'

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HENSLEY HENSON LECTURES IN THEOLOGY 1999–2000

Sacraments, Ceremonies, and Stuart Divines: sacramental theology and liturgy in England and Scotland, 1603–62

THE REVD DR BRYAN SPINKS, Professor of Liturgical Studies, Yale University, will deliver the Hensley Henson Lectures at 5 p.m. on the following Mondays in the Examination Schools.

1 May: `Lex ritualis, lex credendi? From Hampton Court to the Five Articles of Perth.'

8 May: `Calvinist consensus and Patristic Reformed Sacramentalism, and the débâcle of the 1637 Book of Common Prayer.'

15 May: `Baptismal controversy, the Westminster Assembly, and the Royal Episcopal Divines.'

22 May: `Keeping the mean and ignoring the theologians? Sacraments and the 1662 Book of Common Prayer.'

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WILDE LECTURES IN NATURAL AND COMPARATIVE RELIGION

Evil and superfluity: two arguments against the existence of God

PROFESSOR P. VAN INWAGEN, John Cardinal O'Hara Professor of Philosophy, University of Notre Dame, Indiana, will deliver the Wilde Lectures in Natural and Comparative Religion at 5 p.m. on the following days in the Examination Schools.

Tue. 2 May: `Two arguments for the non-existence of God.'

Thur. 4 May: `The idea of God.'

Fri. 5 May: `God and science.'

Tue. 9 May: `God and evil.'

Thur. 11 May: `The vast amount of evil.'

Fri. 12 May: `Horrors.'

Tue. 16 May: `Belief and evidence.'

Thur. 18 May: `The presumption of atheism.'

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O'DONNELL LECTURES IN CELTIC STUDIES 2000

DR N. EDWARDS, School of History and Welsh History, University of Wales, Bangor, will deliver two O'Donnell Lectures on the following subject, at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 11 May, and Friday, 12 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Early medieval stones and stone sculpture in Wales: context and connections.'

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JAMES P.R. LYELL LECTURES IN BIBLIOGRAPHY

Set in print: the fortunes of an idea, .1450–1800

DR D. MCKITTERICK, Cambridge, will deliver the Lyell Lectures in Bibliography at 5 p.m. on the following days in Lecture Theatre 2, the St Cross Building.

Thur. 4 May: `The printed word and the modern bibliographer.'

Wed. 10 May: `Dependent skills.'

Thur. 11 May: `A house of errors.'

Wed. 17 May: `Perfect and imperfect.'

Thur. 18 May: `Re-evaluations.'

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SIR JOHN HICKS LECTURE ON ECONOMIC HISTORY

PROFESSOR R. ALLEN, University of British Columbia, will deliver the Sir John Hicks Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 19 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Russia's first capitalist economy: economic growth and income distribution under the tsars.'

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SIMONYI LECTURE

PROFESSOR R. GREGORY will deliver the second annual Simonyi Lecture at 6 p.m. on Thursday, 18 May, in the Department of Zoology. The lecture will be introduced by Professor Richard Dawkins, Simonyi Professor of the Public Understanding of Science, and Dr Charles Simonyi is expected to be present.

Subject: `Shaking hands with the Universe.'

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CLARENDON LECTURES IN MANAGEMENT STUDIES

The Internet galaxy: reflections on the Internet, business, and society

PROFESSOR M. CASTELLS, Professor of Sociology, University of California, Berkeley, will deliver the Clarendon Lectures in Management Studies at 5 p.m. on the following days in the Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, the St Cross Building. The lectures are open to the public, and admission is free.

The Clarendon Lectures in Management Studies are sponsored by the Oxford University Press and the Saïd Business School.

Mon. 12 June: `Internet and the network society.'

Tue. 13 June: `Internet and the new economy.'

Wed. 14 June: `The Internet as the socio-technical medium of the information age.' (Followed by discussion)

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SOCIO-LEGAL STUDIES ANNUAL LECTURE

PROFESSOR H.W. PERRY, University of Texas at Austin, will deliver the sixth annual lecture in Socio-Legal Studies at 5.30 p.m. on Friday, 12 May, in the Examination Schools. The meeting will be chaired by Professor Denis Galligan.

Subject: `Law and politics in America's Constitutional Court.'

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CARLYLE CLASSES IN CLASSICAL POLITICAL THOUGHT

The politics of Plato's Republic

DR M. SCHOFIELD, Cambridge, will give the following lecture and seminars at 2 p.m. on the days shown in All Souls College. The series will end with a general discussion session, at 2 p.m. on Monday, 22 May.

Mon. 1 May: `The noble lie.' (Lecture)

Tue. 2 May: `Utopia and the idea of community.' (Seminar)

Mon. 8 May: `Rule by philosophers: knowledge, virtue, and power.' (Seminar)

Tue. 9 May: `Economic man: property and human nature.' (Seminar)

Mon. 15 May: `Plato the feminist?' (Seminar)

Tue. 16 May: `A city fit for Socrates: the politics of Quietism.' (Seminar)

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ANTHROPOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY

School of Geography and the Environment: research seminars

The following seminars will be given at 4.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Senior Common Room, the School of Geography and the Environment.

Conveners: C.G. Clarke, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Urban and Social Geography, G.L. Clark, MA, Halford Mackinder Professor of Geography, and A.S. Goudie, MA, Professor of Geography.

Tuesday, 2 May

C. MCCULLOCH: `Risk and blame: engineers, large dams, and reservoirs.'

S. HENDERSON: `Alien plants in the Galapagos Islands; are they all unwelcome.'

Tuesday, 9 May

D. PEDYNOWSKI: `The evolution and effectiveness of a transboundary biosphere reserve: a case study of the Glacier Waterton lakes biosphere reserves.'

C. BROOKE: `Climate change, regional vulnerability, and conservation in Cost Rica.'

Tuesday, 16 May

E. WRIGHT: `Timing and conditions of dune formation in Ras al Khaimah (UAE).'

M. CHOI: `Future rainfall intensity and soil erosion by water.'

Tuesday, 23 May

G. ZIERVOGEL: `Seasonal forecasts and small-scale farmers in Zimbabwe.'

Z. MORRISON: `Britain's shameful places: examining constructions of "social exclusion"—towards spaces beyond social divisions.'

Tuesday, 30 May

J. MATHEWS: `Gum Arabic and sustainable forestry in North Africa.'

J. BATTERSBY: `Between home, street, and school: the impact of education(s) on coloured identities in South Africa.'

Tuesday, 6 June

S. DARBY: `Out of sight, out of mind? Making energy consumption visible.'

C. FLUTTER: `The social market and regional unemployment: the thirty- five-hour week and the French problem.'

Tuesday, 13 June

D. WOJCIK: `The footprint of capital: the geographical consequences of the European capital market integration.'

C. VON DER HEYDEN: `Mine drainage and passive treatment systems.'

Tuesday, 20 June

T. PLANT: `Prospects for international free trade: the WTO, beef, and US hegemony.'

T. WHITEHEAD: `The economic impact of urban road pricing on central city areas: approaches to inform policy-makers.'

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Oxford Seminars in Cartography

RALPH HYDE, London Guildhall Library, will give a seminar at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 25 May, in the School of Geography.

Subject: `Parish maps of London, 1686–1900: recording an overlooked source.'

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ESRC Transnational Communities Research Programme: economic sociology of transnationalism

With the exception of the 15 June lecture (in the Linacre Lectures series), the following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Thursdays in the Clay Room, Nuffield College.

The 15 June lecture will be given at 5.30 p.m. in Lecture Theatre A, the Zoology/Psychology Building, South Parks Road.

Conveners: Dr Steven Vertovec, Oxford University, and Professor Alejandro Portes, Princeton University.

DR A. CAGLAR, Free University, Berlin
4 May: `Media corporatism and cosmopolitanism.'

PROFESSOR D. MILLER, University College, London
11 May: `Ethnographyh, the Internet, and diaspora nationalism.'

PROFESSOR A. BRYMAN, Loughborough
18 May: `The Disneyisation of society—continuities and discontinuities with McDonaldisation.'

PROFESSOR S. FRITH, Stirling
25 May: `World music—globalisation from above and below.'

DR R. BALLARD, Manchester
1 June: `The dynamcis of transnational process: some reflections on South Asian developments.'

DR C. DWYER, DR P. CRANG, University College, London, and PROFESSOR P. JACKSON, Sheffield
8 June: `Tracing transnationalities through commodity culture.'

PROFESSOR M. CASTELLS, Berkeley
15 June: `Global networks and local societies: cities in the information age.'

PROFESSOR PORTES
22 June: `Not anyone is chosen: segmented assimilation in the second generation.'

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BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

The Genome Revolutions

The following seminars will be held at 12.30 p.m. on Thursdays in the Large Lecture Theatre, the Department of Biochemistry.

Conveners: J.A. Hodgkin (Ph.D. Cambridge), Professor of Genetics, and D.B. Roberts, MA, Reader in Genetics.

PROFESSOR M. ASHBURNER, Cambridge
4 May: `The Drosophila genome.'

PROFESSOR M. BEVAN, John Innes Institute, Norwich
18 May: `A flourishing weed: sequencing the Arabidopsis genome.'

DR I. JACKSON, Edinburgh
25 May: `The genome of the mouse.'

DR D. BENTLEY, Sanger Centre
15 June: `The human genome.'

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Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics

The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Fridays in Lecture Theatre 1, the Department of Biochemistry.

Convener: L.N. Johnson, MA, David Phillips Professor of Molecular Biophysics.

PROFESSOR J. THORNTON, University College, London
19 May: `The evolution of protein function within homologous families.'

PROFESSOR M. KARPLUS, Eastman Visiting Professor
2 June: `Molecular recognition: free energy simulations and combinatorial ligand design.'

DR C. NORBURY
9 June: `Cell cycle checkpoint-overriding drugs and drug resistance; novel mechanisms conserved from fission yeast to human cells.'

DR S. CURRY, Imperial College, London
16 June: `Any which way you can: adventures in cryo-electron microscopy, NMR, and X-ray crystallography.'

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CLINICAL MEDICINE

Oxford Clinical Neurosciences Lectures

The following lectures will be given at 11.30 a.m. on Fridays in the Witts Lecture Theatre, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

DR A. ZEMAN, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh
12 May: `Consciousness.'

PROFESSOR A.J. THOMPSON, Institute of Neurology
9 June: `Neurorehabilitation in MS: does it work?'

DR R. KNIGHT, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh
14 July: `Update on CJD.'

DR J. MORROW, Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast
15 Sept.: `Epilepsy, drugs, and pregnancy.'

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Uterine Contractility Symposium

This symposium will be held from 9.30 a.m. on Wednesday, 3 May, in the Nuffield Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, the John Radcliffe Hospital. Further information may be be obtained from Dr Andrés López Bernal (telephone: Oxford 220982, e-mail: alb@ermine.ox.ac.uk).

PROFESSOR S. THORNTON, Warwick
10 a.m.: `Oxytocin antagonists for tocolysis: clinical and scientific considerations.'

PROFESSOR S. WRAY, Liverpool
10.30 a.m.: `Physiological basis of contractility.'

DR E. LINTON
11.30 a.m.: `CRH and parturition.'

DR N. EUROPE-FINER, Newcastle
12 noon: `Expression of CREB, CREM, and AFT Cyclic AMP Transcription Factors in the human myometrium during pregnancy and labour.'

DR R. TRIBE, St Thomas's Hospital, London
2 p.m.: `Calcium signalling in myometrial cells.'

DR M. TAGGART, Manchester
2.30 p.m.: `Caves, stores, and asphyxiation: E–C coupling in the myometrium.'

DR R. KHAN, Nottingham
3 p.m.: `Potassium channels in the human myometrium.'

PROFESSOR R. IVELL, Hamburg
3.30 p.m.: Oxytocin receptor gene regulation.'

PROFESSOR B. SANBORN, Texas at Houston
5 p.m.: `Hormones and calcium; mechanisms controlling uterine contractile activity.' (Litchfield Lecture)

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CLINICAL MEDICINE, PHYSIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Unless otherwise indicated, the following research seminars will be given at 4.30 p.m. on Thursdays in the Sir William Dunn School of Pathology.

Convener: H. Waldmann, BM, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Pathology.

PROFESSOR S.A. PORCELLI, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York
27 Apr.: `Specialised roles of CD1 proteins in antigen presentation.'

PROFESSOR J.L. BRESLOW, Rockefeller University, New York
4 May: `Genetic risk factors for atherosclerosis; studies in humans and mice.'

DR M. WHITBY
Tue. 9 May: `Processing Holliday junctions in fission yeast.'

DR R.L. FERRERO, Institut Pasteur, Paris
18 May: `Host–bacterium interactions in gastric Helicobacter infection.'

PROFESSOR P. DONNELLY
25 May: `Some statistical challenges in modern genetics.'

PROFESSOR G. DOVER, Leicester
1 June: `Evolution beyond Darwin.'

DR S. MUNRO, Cambridge
8 June: `Targeting of proteins to the Golgi Apparatus.'

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LITERAE HUMANIORES

PROFESSOR PETER BING, Emory University, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 3 May, in the Seminar Room, Corpus Christi College

Convener: E.L. Bowie, MA, Reader in Classical Languages and Literature.

Subject: `The unruly tongue: Philetas of Cos and the early history of the gloss.'

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Philosophy of Physics seminars

The following seminars will be held at 4 p.m. on Thursdays in the Wharton Room, All Souls College.

Conveners: G. Bacciagaluppi, J.N. Butterfield, and S.W. Saunders.

DR M. LOCKWOOD
4 May: `Are black holes potential time machines?'

PROFESSOR A. SOKAL, New York
18 May: `Chromatic polynomials, Potts models, and all that: entertainment from mathematical physics.'

DR M. APPLEBY, Queen Mary and Westfield College, London
25 May: `The contextuality of approximate measurements.'

DR F. MARKOPOULOU, Imperial College, London
1 June: `Quantum causal histories.'

DR BACCIAGALUPPI
8 June: `Pilot-wave theory and the thermodynamic analogy in quantum mechanics and special relativity.'

PROFESSOR J. ANANDAN, South Carolina
15 June: `Laws, symmetries, and geometry.'

DR S. FRENCH, Leeds
22 June: `A phenomological approach to the measurement problem: Husserl and the foundations of quantum mechanics.'

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David Lewis Lecture

PROFESSOR P.J. RHODES, Professor of Ancient History, University of Durham, will deliver the David Lewis Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 31 May, in the Garden Quadrangle Auditorium, St John's College. The lecture will be followed by a reception.

Convener: Dr A.K. Bowman, Christ Church.

Subject: `Making and breaking treaties in the Greek world.'

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MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES

Russian Graduate Seminar

The following seminars will be given at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in Room S7, 47 Wellington Square.

Conveners: Professor G.S. Smith, New College (11 May and 25 May); Dr G. Tihanov, Merton College (8 June).

DR G. ROBERTS, Surrey
11 May: `Drink up, Comrades! The uses and abuses of alcohol in Soviet film.'

M. GAMSA
25 May: `California on the Amur: the Zheltuga Republic in Manchuria, 1883–6.'

PROFESSOR C. LOCK, Helsinki
8 June: `Bakhtin among the poets: theories of the word in revolutionary Russia.'

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The Greek novel on film

MS S. PANAYIOTOPOULOS will lecture as follows at 4 p.m. on Thursdays in 47 Wellington Square. Each session will consist of a lecture followed by a film.

Convener: P.A. Mackridge, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Modern Greek.

4 May: Vios kai politeia tou Alexi Zorba (N. Kazantzakis); Zorba the Greek (M. Cacoyannis).

11 May: I timi kai to chrima (K. Theotokis); I timi tis agapis (T. Marketaki).

18 May: O teleftaios peirasmos (N. Kazantzakis); The Last Temptation of Christ (M. Scorsese).

25 May: I fanela me to 9 (M. Koumandareas; P. Voulgaris) .

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Graduate seminar in Spanish studies

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Taylor Institution.

Conveners: I.D.L. Michael, MA, King Alfonso XIII Professor of Spanish Studies, and C.H. Griffin, MA, University Lecturer in Latin American Literature.

DR D. FLITTER, Birmingham
2 May: `Imagining Spain: Romantic aesthetics and casticista ideology in the construction of nation.'

SR. F. TORRENT, Valencian writer
9 May: `Las condiciones sociales en la narrativa catalana contemporánea: una visión de autor.' (Public lecture)

DR D. MORAN, London
23 May: `Carpentier's Stravinsky: rites and wrongs.'

J.L. BELLÓN
30 May: `Libro de buen amor.'

DR S. HART, London
6 June: `Changing images of Simón Bolívar.'

PROFESSOR T.N. CORDO, Puerto Rico
13 June: `Solidaridad entre morisco y conversos de judío: el Mancebo de Arévalo y La Celestina.'

C. PATTERSON
20 June: `North and south and "The Decline of the West": the Faustian landscape of an imagined Galicia.'

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MODERN HISTORY

Special Faculty Lecture

PROFESSOR I. KERSHAW, Sheffield, will deliver the annual Special Faculty Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 5 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Why did Nazi radicalism not subside?'

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Commonwealth History Seminar: Representations of empire

This seminar will be held on 18 and 19 May in Rhodes House.

Thursday, 18 May

PROFESSOR P. GREENHALGH, Victoria and Albert Museum, London
2 p.m.: `The object of exhibitions in late Victorian and Edwardian England.'

DR I. PHIMISTER
2.45 p.m.: `Commonwealth, colonialism, and the Central African Exhibition of 1953.' (Followed by discussion at 3.30 p.m.)

DR C. HARRIS
4.30 p.m.: ` "Compelled to purchase": colonial officers, materiality, and the representation of Tibet.' (Followed by discussion at 5.15 p.m.)

Friday, 19 May

PROFESSOR J.M. MACKENZIE, Lancaster
9.15 a.m.: `Representations and empire: from high art to the humble postcard.'

DR S. CONSTANTINE, Lancaster
10 a.m.: `Advertising posters and the selling of Empire, .1900–60.' (Followed by discussion at 10.45 a.m.)

PROFESSOR J. RICHARDS, Lancaster
11.40 a.m.: `Films and the British Empire.'

DR J. RYAN, Belfast
2.15 p.m.: `Picturing Empire: photography and the visualisation of the British Empire.'

J. PINFOLD, Rhodes House
3 p.m.: `The Transvaal War: a contemporary magic lantern slide show and commentary.'

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MODERN HISTORY, SOCIAL STUDIES

East and East–Central Europe Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Fridays in Oriel College.

Conveners: R.J. Crampton, MA, Professor of East European History, R.J.W. Evans, MA, D.Phil., Regius Professor of Modern History, and D. Rechter (Ph.D. Jerusalem), Research Fellow, St Antony's College.

J. BERKOWITZ
5 May: `Avrom Goldfaden and the roots of modern Yiddish theatre in Eastern Europe.'

E. DAVIDOVA
12 May: `Nineteenth-century Bulgarian merchants.'

M. PROKOPOVYCH
19 May: `Architecture and legitimation of the state: municipal projects in Central European capitals around 1900—developing methodology.'

J. MILLER
26 May: `Urbanisation, redistribution, deurbanisation, and the problem of multifunctionality of the early modern city in East–Central Europe.'

K. KOCOUREK
2 June: `The definition of Czech nationality; lines of continuity from Hussite times to the Masarykian era.'

E. SCHMIDT
9 June: `Emancipation and culture: the modernisation of synagogue music in Austia-Hungary.'

M. FRANK
16 June: `Mid-twentieth-century population transfers: the Greco-Turkish model and the transfer of the Germans.'

J. ELLINGER
23 June: `Chamberlain, appeasement, and East–Central Europe.'

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Graduate seminar in economic and social history

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Wharton Room, All Souls College.

Conveners: P.A. David, MA, Professor of Economic and Social History, N.H. Dimsdale, MA, University Lecturer (CUF) in Economics, K.J. Humphries, MA, Reader in Economic History, and A. Offer, MA, D.Phil., Reader in Recent Social and Economic History.

J. METZER, Hebrew University
2 May: `From the Jewish National Home to the State of Israel: some aspects of nation- and state-building.'

R. ALLEN, University of British Columbia
9 May: `Poverty and progress in early modern Britain.'

L. BRUNT
16 May: `Rethinking the Agricultural Revolution.'

A. SYME
23 May: `La France aux Français! Displacing the foreign worker during the Depression of the 1930s.'

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MUSIC

Music of the Far East

The following public lectures will be given on Fridays in the Denis Arnold Hall, the Music Faculty. Unless otherwise indicated they will begin at 5 p.m.

DR C. HUEHNS
19 May, 4.30 p.m.: `Great composers for Erhu (the Chinese "violin"): Lin Tian-hua, A. Bing, and Jin Wei.'

19 May, 6 p.m: an Erhu recital, with music by Lin Tian- hua, A. Bing, and Jin Wei.

DR KAWORI IGUCHI
26 May: `Tradition and notation of Kyoto Gion Festival Music.'

DR C. HUMPHRIES
2 June: `Japanese music, neuroscience, and the semiotics of live performance.'

DR H.M. JOHNSON
9 June: `Japanese music notation and nationalism.'

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Other public lectures

PROFESSOR R. HACOHEN will deliver a public lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 8 May, in the Holywell Music Room.

Subject: `Arnold Schoenberg's Moses und Aaron: a theological-political-aesthetic tractate.'

DR X. HASCHER will deliver a public lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 15 May, in the Denis Arnold Hall, the Music Faculty.

Subject: `A propos of the slow movement of Schubert's C major quintet, D.956.'

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National Museums Month: lecture

PROFESSOR E. SWENSON will lecture at 5.30 p.m. on Thursday, 11 May, in the Bate Collection, the Music Faculty. This lecture is a National Museums Month event presented by the Friends of the Bate Collection of Musical Instruments.

Subject: `Piano manufacturing in mid-nineteenth-century America: a tour through the factories of Steinway & Sons, Chickering, and Boardman and Grey.'

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Graduate Students' Colloquia

The following colloquia will be held at 5.15 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Denis Arnold Hall, the Music Faculty.

A. FAUSER, City University
2 May: `Rheinsirenen: Lorelei and other Rhinemaidens.'

E. SENICI
9 May: `Verdi's Falstaff and the Italian fin-de-siècle.'

S. RICE
16 May: `The relationship between Zarlino's modal theory and Willaert's compositional practice in the motets of the Music Nova.'

P. FINE, Buckingham
23 May: `Mozart in the mind: a tour of music through the brain.'

B. EARLE
30 May: `Dallapiccola's early synthesis: no. 1, "Vespro, tutto riporti", from Cinque frammenti di Saffo (1942).'

C. TROELSGAARD, Copenhagen
6 June: `From Palaeobyzantine to diastematic notation: a crucial process in the music-writing of Byzantium.'

H. POLLACK, Houston
13 June: `Aaron Copland the American landscape.'

P. BOHLMAN, Chicago
20 June: `On the new Europeanness of music.'

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ORIENTAL STUDIES

Seminar on Jewish History and Literature in the Graeco-Roman Period

The following seminars will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in Wolfson College.

Convener: M.D. Goodman, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Jewish Studies.

S. BERRIN, London School of Jewish Studies
2 May: `Another look at consecutive testimony at Qumran.'

DR E. HABAS, Beer-Shava
9 May: `The Qumranic nasi: linguistic and historical implications.'

DR J. CAMPBELL, Bristol
16 May: `4QMMTd and the scriptural canon.'

DR A. SHEMESH, Bar-Ilan
23 May: `King Manasseh and the halakha of the Sadducees.'

A. TROPPER
30 May: `The purpose of the Mishnaic tractate Aboth.'

E. PAPOUTSAKIS
6 June: `Jewish–Christian polemics on the use of leaven.'

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PHYSICAL SCIENCES

Theoretical Physics Seminars

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Fridays in the Nuclear Physics Lecture Theatre.

Convener: D. Sherrington, MA, Wykeham Professor of Physics.

PROFESSOR D. PINES, Los Alamos
5 May: `Quantum protectorates in the cuprate superconductors.'

DR J. CHRISTIAN
19 May: `Why the quantum must yield to gravity.'

PROFESSOR P. BAK, Imperial College
2 June: `Forest fires, measles, and the structure of the universe.'

PROFESSOR W. KOHN, California, Santa Barbara
Mon. 19 June: `A broader view of Van der Waals Energies.'

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Theoretical Chemistry Group Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the PTCL Lecture Theatre.

Convener: M.S. Child, MA, Coulson Professor of Theoretical Chemistry.

PROFESSOR G. CICCOTTI, Rome
1 May: `Wigner approach to mixed quantum-classical dynamics.'

PROFESSOR D. CHANDLER, Berkeley
8 May: `Finding transition pathways in complex systems: throwing ropes over rugged mountain passes.'

DR T. TODOROV, Belfast
15 May: `Spatial distribution of the electric current and field in atomic-scale conductors.'

PROFESSOR R.S. BERRY, Chicago
22 May: To be announced.

PROFESSOR H.S. TAYLOR, Southern California
29 May: `States of excited CHBrCIF with apparent Cs, C2v, and C symmetry.'

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Oxford Physics Colloquia

The following lectures will be given at 4.15 p.m. on Fridays in the Lindemann Lecture Theatre, the Clarendon Laboratory. For details of the Cherwell–Simon Lecture (9 June), see above.

Conveners: P.G.H. Sandars, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Experimental Physics, and J.I. Silk, MA, D.Phil., Savilian Professor of Astronomy.

PROFESSOR A. SOKAL, New York
12 May: `Science and sociology of science: against war and peace.'

DR E. YABLONOVICH, California, Los Angeles
19 May: `Electromagnetic bandgaps at photonic and radio-frequencies.' (Clifford Patterson Lecture of the Royal Society)

PROFESSOR B. RICHTER, Stanford
2 June: `The future of particle physics.'

PROFESSOR W. KOHN, California, Santa Barbara
16 June: `Electronic structure of matter: wave functions and density functionals.'

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PHYSIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Department of Human Anatomy and Genetics

The following research seminars will be given at 1 p.m. on Fridays in the Lecture Theatre of the department.

Convener: K.E. Davies, MA, D.Phil., Dr Lee's Professor of Anatomy.

PROFESSOR J. PARNAVELAS, University College, London
5 May: `The origin and migration of cortical neurons: new vistas?' (Jenkinson Seminar)

PROFESSOR A. SURANI, Cambridge
12 May: `Germ line, stem cells, and genomic imprinting.' (Jenkinson Seminar)

PROFESSOR G. BATES, King's College, London
19 May: `Insights into the molecular basis of Huntington's disease.'

PROFESSOR J. SECKL, Edinburgh
26 May: `Glucocorticoids and foetal programming of adult disease.' (Jenkinson Seminar)

DR M. VAN DEN HUEVEL
2 June: `How to interpret a morphogen gradient.'

DR S. MOSS, University College, London
9 June: `Assembly and functional modulation of GABAA receptors.'

PROFESSOR J. HEATH, Birmingham
16 June: `Receptor recognition by GP130 cytokines.'

DR P. HANDFORD
23 June: `Molecular pathology of the Marfan syndrome: a tall story.'

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Pharmacology and anatomical pharmacology seminars

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Lecture Theatre, the Department of Pharmacology. Details of the first meeting (2 May) are not available at the time of printing.

PROFESSOR N.B. STANDEN, Leicester
9 May: `Some cardiovascular roles for Katp channels.'

PROFESSOR D.G. GRAHAME-SMITH
16 May: ` "Keep on taking the tablets"—pharmacological adaptation during chronic drug therapy.'

DR A.J. HARWOOD, University College, London
23 May: `Lithium pharmacogenetics and Dictyostelium.'

PROFESSOR J.M. RITTER, St Thomas's Hospital, London
30 May: `Endothelial function in man.'

DR J.P.T. WARD, Guy's, King's, and St Thomas's School of Medicine, London
6 June: `Adrenoceptor-mediated activation of nitric oxide synthase.'

DR D.J. MACEWAN, Aberdeen
13 June: `Controlling life or death by TNF receptor subtype signalling.'

DR B. LISS
20 June: `Molecular mechanisms of selective neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disase: new evidence from single-cell molecular studies of mouse models.'

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PSYCHOLOGICAL STUDIES

Department of Experimental Psychology

The following departmental seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Department of Experimental Psychology, as follows: 2 May, 9 May, 6 June, 13 June, in Weiskrantz Room C.113; otherwise in Lecture Theatre C.

Conveners: S.D. Iversen, MA, Professor of Psychology, and P.E. Bryant, MA, Watts Professor of Psychology.

PROFESSOR I. ROBERTSON, Trinity College, Dublin
2 May: `Pathologies of attention: ramifications and rehabilitation.'

DR S. SCOTT, University College, London
9 May: `PET studies of complexity, rate, and intelligibility in speech perception.'

PROFESSOR R. RAFAL, Bangor
16 May: `Hemispatial neglect and the gates of consciousness: stimulus and task determinants of visual extinction.'

PROFESSOR D. ABRAMS, Kent
23 May: `Group commitment—intergroup and intragroup dynamics of loyalty, conformity, and deviance.'

PROFESSOR D. WOLKE, Hertfordshire
30 May: `Psychological development of very pre-term infants: implications for theory and intervention.'

PROFESSOR A. YOUNG
6 June: `Recognition of emotion after brain injury.'

PROFESSOR N. CHATER, Warwick
13 June: `General principles of cognition: are there any?'

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Cognitive Science Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Mondays in Room C.113, the Department of Experimental Psychology.

PROFESSOR G. HUMPHREYS, Birmingham
8 May: `Consciousness for a cognitive neuropsychological perspective.'

PROFESSOR N. BLOCK, New York
15 May: `What are experiments "about consciousness" really about?'

PROFESSOR C. PEACOCKE
22 May: `The content of perceptual experience.'

PROFESSOR J. HIGGINBOTHAM
29 May: `What is a theory of meaning?'

DR F. HAPPÉ, Institute of Psychiatry
5 June: `How the brain reads the mind: insights from autism, brain imaging, and acquired lesions.'

PROFESSOR G. CURRIE, Nottingham
12 June: `What should a theory-therapist object to in simulation theory?'

PROFESSOR G. MARCUS, New York
19 June: `Evidence from rule learning in infancy.'

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SOCIAL STUDIES

Presidential selection 2000: the participants speak

The following lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Clay Room, Nuffield College.

Convener: B.E. Shafer, MA, Andrew W. Mellon Professor of American Government.

J. BARNES, National Political Reporter, National Journal
2 May: `The invisible primary 2000: selection politics before the first delegate contest.'

J. HARRIS, Foreign Affairs Correspondent, The Washington Post
9 May: `The cloudy shore: US foreign policy and the 2000 presidential election.'

R. SHOGAN, The Los Angeles Times
16 May: `Covering character—the double-edged sword of American politics.'

R. HEALEY, CEO Democratic National Convention
23 May: `Framing the choice: politicallyi programming the National Party Convention.'

A. FROM, Executive Director, Democratic Leadership Council
30 May: `The next politics: Democrats and Republicans, today and tomorrow.'

R. JOHNSTON, Annenberg School of Communication
6 June: `Dynamics of the 2000 presidential primaries: evidence from the Annenberg Study.'

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THEOLOGY

Interdisciplinary seminars in the study of religions

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Blue Boar Seminar Room, Christ Church.

Conveners: J.S.K. Ward, B.Litt., MA, Regius Professor of Divinity, and W.M. Morgan, MA, Lecturer in World Religions, Mansfield and Westminster Colleges.

PROFESSOR N. ROBINSON, Lampeter
2 May: `Islamic studies in symbiosis with theology and religious studies.'

DR D. GELLNER, Brunel
9 May: `Why religious studies needs anthropology.'

DR J. LESLIE, SOAS, London
23 May: `Why religious studies needs gender studies.'

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Robert Whyte Lecture in the Interdisciplinary Study of Religions

PROFESSOR N. SMART, Universities of Lancaster and Santa Barbara, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 16 May, in the Examination Schools.

Conveners: J.S.K. Ward, B.Litt., MA, Regius Professor of Divinity, and W.M. Morgan, MA, Lecturer in World Religions, Mansfield and Westminster Colleges.

Subject: `Religious studies: why Christian theology cannot do without it.'

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Ian Ramsey Centre

Human consciousness

The following seminars will be held at 8.30 p.m. on Thursdays in the Hood Room, St Cross College.

Conveners: Professor J. Hedley Brooke and Dr Margaret Yee.

PROFESSOR B. BARDAKJIAN, Toronto
11 May: `Cues of consciousness in brain cells.'

PROFESSOR S. GREENFIELD
25 May: `How the brain generates consciousness.'

DR YEE
8 June: `Human life and consciousness: a multidisciplinary quest?'

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INTERFACULTY SEMINAR

Restoration to Reform, 1660–1832: British, political, literary, intellectual, and social history

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Wordsworth Room, St Hugh's College.

DR J. RENDALL, York
8 May: ` "Ladies suspected of democratic principles": women's networks and Scottish Whiggism, .1790–.1830.'

PROFESSOR L. JORDANOVA, East Anglia
22 May: `Portraiture in the eighteenth century: possibilities and pitfalls.'

DR S. WISEMAN, Birkbeck College, London
5 June: `Catharine Macaulay and republican history.'

DR C. CAMPBELL ORR, Anglia Polytechnic University
19 June: `Queen Charlotte as patron: some intellectual and social contexts.'

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RESEARCH LABORATORY FOR ARCHAEOLOGY AND THE HISTORY OF ART

The following seminars will be held at 10.30 a.m. on Thursdays in the Library, the Research Laboratory for Archaeology.

Convener: M.S. Tite, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Archaeological Science.

S. WOLF
11 May: `Medieval building bricks: an investigation into firing technology.'

A. SINCLAIR, SACOS, Liverpool
25 May: `Embedded technology in language and mind: some thoughts on prepared core technologies and the notion of planning depth.'

P. SIBELLA
8 June: `Scientific methods working for archaeology: the case of the Late Bronze Age Uluburun Shipwreck, Turkey.'

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CENTRE FOR BRAZILIAN STUDIES

Occasional seminars

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Latin American Centre, 1 Church Walk.

PROFESSOR MARTA DE SENNA, UFRJ
15 May: `Brasil 500 anos: affirmations of nationality in Brazilian literature.'

PROFESSOR R. KAUFMANN, Rutgers
5 June: `Latin America in the glocal economy, with special reference to Brazil and Mexico.' (Jointly with the LAC)

PROFESSOR H. TRINDADE, URFGS and Paris
Date to be announced: `Universidade em ruinas na republica dos professores.'


Conferences and workshops

5 May, Wadham College: `Tradition and modernity in twentieth-century Brazilian literature.' (Co-ordinators: Dr Claudia Pazos-Alonso and Professor Tom Earle)

26 May, St Antony's College: `Brazil's international relations in the twentieth century: history and theory.' (Co-ordinators: Dr Andrew Hurrell and Mr Eugenio Vargas Garcia)

2–3 June, Wadham College: `Brazilian cinema': Part I, `The Brazilian film industry'; Part II, `Brazilian cinema: roots of the present, perspectives for the future.' (Co- ordinator: Dr Lucia Nagib)

12 June, St Antony's College: `Structural reform and institutional change in the Brazilian financial sector.' (Co-ordinator: Dr Edmund Amann and Professor Harry Makler (Stanford))

27 May–10 June, Phoenix Cinema and Magdalen College: `From Cinema Novo to the New Cinema.' (Brazilian Film Festival)

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SAÏD BUSINESS SCHOOL

Interdepartmental Finance Seminars

Unless othewise indicated, the following seminars will be held at 12.30 p.m. on Fridays in the Saïd Business School, 59 George Street.

Enquiries should be addressed to Elaine Durham, Saïd Business School, 59 George Street, Oxford OX1 2BE (telephone: Oxford (2)88683, e-mail: elaine.durham@sbs.ox.ac.uk).

Conveners: Clara Raposo (Saïd Business School), Hyun Shin (Economics), and Sam Howison (Mathematics).

D. LEECH, Warwick Business School
5 May: `Shareholder power and shareholder incentives: towards a theory of ownership control.'

V. NANDA, London Business School
12 May: `Industry structure and the conglomerate discount: theory and evidence.'

B. BIAIS, Toulouse I
Wed. 17 May: `Psychological traits and trading strategies.'

G. HUBERMAN, Columbia Business School
26 May: To be announced.

V. SAPORTA, Bank of England
2 June: `Costs of banking instability: some empirical evidence.'

A. BERNARDO, UCLA
9 June: `Capital budgeting and compensation with asymmetric information and moral hazard.'

P. HENRY, Stanford
16 June: `Do stock market liberalisations cause investment booms?'

B. CHOWDHRY, UCLA
23 June: `Real options and the diversification discount.'

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BYZANTINE STUDIES

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the New Seminar Room, St John's College.

Conveners: E.M. Jeffreys, B.Litt., MA, Bywater and Sotheby Professor of Byzantine and Modern Greek Language and Literature, J.D. Howard-Johnston, MA, D.Phil., University Lecturer in Byzantine Studies, and M.C. Mundell Mango, MA, D.Phil., University Lecturer in Byzantine Archaeology and Art.

PROFESSOR A. CAMERON
2 May: `Constantinople and the Theotokos: the construction of a relationship, fourth to seventh centuries.'

Z. RUBIN, Tel Aviv
9 May: `Byzantium and the Christianisation of Ethiopia.'

E. ARGOV
16 May: `A church historian in search of identity: ethnicity and its use in Sozomen's account of the Byzantine Near East.'

DR S. KINGSLEY
23 May: `Marine archaeology as a text for long-term history in Late Antiquity.'

P. CATLING
30 May: `Landscape archaeology in Lakonia: the medieval period.'

DR M. PARANI
6 June: `Politics and artistic patronage: the foundations of Serbian king Milutin in Thessaloniki.'

DR I. CHRISTOFORAKI
13 June: `Encounter, symbiosis, or acculturation: the case of Lusignan Cyprus.'

PROFESSOR MANGO
20 June: `Welfare at Constantinople.'

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COMPUTING LABORATORY

Departmental seminars

Unless otherwise stated, the following seminars will be held at 4.15 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Lecture Theatre, the Computing Laboratory.

Convener: Dr Oege de Moor.

L. LAMPORT, Compaq
2 May, 4.30 p.m.: `how to write a proof.' (Strachey Lecture)
Wed. 3 May, 2 p.m.: `Distributed state machines and disk paxos.'

J. SANDERS
9 May: `Quantum programming.'

M. MOSCA, Waterloo, Canada
16 May: `Quantum algorithims and finding hidden subgroups.'

R. BORNET, Queen Mary and Westfield College College, London
23 May: `Reasoning with pointers in Hoare logic.'

C. TAPPER
30 May: `From privacy to data protection.'

M. HENSON, Essex
6 June: `Program development and specification refinement in ${\mathcal}_{\lambda}$.'

A. BLAKE, Microsoft, Cambridge
13 June: `Getting computers to learn how to see.'

R. JOZSA, Bristol
20 June: `Counterfactual computation and other possibilities based on quantum effects.'

S. PULMAN, Cambridge
27 June: `Inductive logic programming and computational linguistics.'

SIR A. HOARE, Microsoft Cambridge
Fri. 30 June, room 347, 3 p.m.: `Unifying theories of logic programming.'

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Numerical Analysis Group

Computational Mathematics and Applications Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Thursdays. Unless indicated otherwise they will take place in the OUCL Lecture Theatre.

The co-ordinators are L.N. Trefethen and J. Scott (RAL). Further information may be obtained from Shirley Day (telephone: Oxford (2)73885).

A symposium on `(Pseudo)spectra of nonhermitian random matrices' will be held on Friday, 30 June, 10 a.m.–5 p.m.

PROFESSOR N. HIGHAM, Manchester
4 May, RAL: `Analysis of the Cholesky method with iterative refinement for solving the symmetric definite generalised eigenproblem.'

DR J. PRYCE, Cranfield
11 May: `Exception-free arithmetic on the extended reals.'

DR KE CHEN, Liverpool
18 May: `An efficient Schur preconditioner based on modified discrete wavelet transforms.'

DR R. HAUSER, Cambridge
24 May: `Self-scaled barriers for semidefinite programming.'

DR P. JIMACK, Leeds
1 June: `An adaptive finite element algorithm for the solution of time-dependent free-surface incompressible flow problems.'

PROFESSOR W. GANDER, ETH, Zurich
8 June: `Adaptive quadrature—art or science?'

DR S. BENBOW, Quintessa Ltd.
15 June, RAL: `Augmented linear systems—methods and observations.'

DR M. ASCH, Paris XI
22 June: `Spectral asymptotics of the damped wave operator: theory, simulations, and applications.'

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CENTRE FOR CRIMINOLOGICAL RESEARCH

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Old Library, All Souls College.

Convener: R.G. Hood, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Criminology and Director of the Centre.

PROFESSOR M. KILLIAS, Lausanne
3 May: `Alternatives to imprisonment: the benefits of experimental research.'

PROFESSOR HOOD and DR S. SHUTE, Birmingham
10 May: `Parole decision-making: weighing the risk to the public.'

MRS N. PADFIELD, Cambridge
17 May: `Discretionary lifer panels of the Parole Board: theory and practice.'

DR M. FITZGERALD, LSE
24 May: `Stop and search. Time to stop and think?'

M. NAREY, Director General, HM Prison Service
31 May: `Changing the Prison Service.'

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DEPARTMENT OF THE HISTORY OF ART

Sir Isaiah Berlin Visiting Scholar in Italian Studies

The power of sarcophagi from Rome to Raphael

PROFESSOR SALVATORE SETTIS, Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa, will deliver the following lectures at 5 p.m. on the days indicated in the Headley Lecture Theatre, the Ashmolean Museum.

Tue. 16 May: `Mythology and biography in Roman sarcophagi.'

Thur. 18 May: `The reuse of Roman sarcophagi in medieval Europe.'

Tue. 23 May: `The cradle in a grave: medieval artists and Roman sarcophagi.'

Thur. 25 May: `Ars moriendi, Giotto, and Raphael.'

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MAISON FRANÇAISE

Lectures

Unless otherwise indicated, the following lectures will be given at 5.15 p.m. on the days shown in the Maison Française.

G. DUMENIL, CNRS—Université de Paris
Fri. 5 May, 5 p.m.: `The costs and benefits of neo- liberalism: a class analysis.'

J. GURY, Rennes
Mon. 15 May, 3 p.m., Room 3, Taylor Institution: `Voyageurs français Outre-Manche de Voltaire à Taine: en quête de ces étranges insulaires.'

P. FRANCE, Edinburgh
Mon. 15 May, 5 p.m, Lecture Hall, Taylor Institution: `Lost for words: travel and translation.' (Besterman Lecture)

A. GUNNY, OCIS
Thur. 18 May, 5 p.m., Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies: `The diffusion of Islamic culture by French scholars in the nineteenth century.'

F. CLAUDON, Université de Paris XII
Mon. 22 May: `Portrait d'un libéral réactionnaire: Stendhal en voyageur.'

M. CROSLAND, Kent
Tue. 23 May, 5 p.m.: `Challenge to cultural authority in nineteenth-century France.'

G. DENIS, Paris I
Fri. 26 May, 5 p.m: `L'art de l'agriculture, entre France et Grande-Bretagne, au 18e siècle, à l'origine des sciences agricoles.'

S. MARTINEZ, UNAM, Mexico
Tue. 30 May: `The old problem of determinism and the new philosophy of science.'

D. HOPWOOD
Wed. 31 May: `The lure of the Near East for European travellers.'

A. WILLIAMS, Kent
Mon. 5 June: `France and the new world order, 1940–7.'

A. VIALA, Paris III
Tue. 6 June: `Les débats présents sur la littérature et son enseignement en France, vus de Paris et d'Oxford.'

J.-Y. LE DISEZ, Brétagne Occidentale
Thur. 8 June: ` "Wildly sweet": how Victorian travellers (re)wrote Brittany.'


Seminar in Early Modern French Literature and Culture

The following seminars will be given at 5.15 p.m. on Thursdays in the Maison Française.

N. CRONK, Voltaire Foundation
4 May: `Reading La Fontaine in the eighteenth century: the problem of Voltaire.'

E. NYE
18 May: `Dance and literature: the eighteenth century.'

L. ASFOUR
1 June: `Sterne in France.'

G. DECLERCQ, Paris III
15 June: `La rhétorique galante dans les tragédies de Racine.'


Political societies and culture in late medieval France, the British Isles, and the Netherlands

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be given at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Maison Française.

J.-P. GENET, Paris I
8 May: `Political society and the public space in later medieval France and England.'

J.-P. BOUDET, Paris X
15 May: `La magie dans la société de la fin du Moyen Age.'

P. CONTAMINE, Paris IV
29 May, New Seminar Room, St John's: ` "Bastard feudalism": a tool for the study of the French nobility (and society) at the end of the Middle Ages.'

C. PRIGENT, Paris I
5 June: `Art et société en France au 15e siècle.'

F. COLLARD, Reims
12 June: `Le crime de poison: une autre psychose de la fin du Moyen Age?'

F. LACHAUD, Paris IV
19 June: `Taxation on movable goods in England, thirteenth to fourteenth centuries: why?'


Association for the Study of Modern and Contemporary France

This study-day will be held on Saturday, 6 May, 10 a.m.–4 p.m., in the Maison Française. Those wishing to attend should register in advance: telephone Oxford (2)74220.

T. CUSSON, European Parliament: `Le Royaume-Uni et l'euro: quelle cohabitation entre esprit anglo-saxon et modèle franco-allemand?'

K. NICOLAIDIS, St Antony's: `Euro-vaches, Euro-corps et Euro-monnaie: l'Europe appelle-t-elle à un axe anglo- française?'


Other meetings

Unless otherwise indicated, the following meetings will be held at the Maison Française.

Sat. 20 May, 9.30 a.m.–6.30 p.m.: `La Belle et la Bête: la naissance et les métamorphoses d'un conte' (in conjunction with the Voltaire Foundation).

Sat. 27 May, 10 a.m.–6.30 p.m.: `Interpretation in law, art, and science.'

Sun. 28 May, 9.30 a.m.–1 p.m.: `L'interprétation de l'image: médias, cinéma.'

Thur. 8 June, 9.30 a.m.–7 p.m.: `Études franco-brittaniques—archéologues et voyageurs' (study-day on Brittany).

Fri. 30 June–Sat. 1 July, Maison Française and Nuffield College: `La républicanisme' (in conjunction with Nuffield College).

Fri. 30 June–Sun. 2 July: `Crossing the Channel for Art's sake! Anglo-French attitudes to the pictorial arts in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries' (in conjunction with the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art and the Voltaire Foundation).

Mon. 3 July–Tue. 4 July, Nuffield College and the Maison Française: `Utilities regulation in Europe' (in conjunction with Nuffield College and the Commissariat Général du Plan).

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OXFORD POLICY INSTITUTE

Issues in health sector regulation

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Fridays in Queen Elizabeth House.

L. HAWKINS, World Bank
5 May: `Issues in health sector regulation.'

DR D. COSTAIN, BUPA
12 May: `Regulating quality and price in private UK health markets.'

DR M. GRAHAM, Office of Fair Trading
19 May: `Health insurance regulation.'

D. DAWSON, York
25 May: `Rationing and regulation for a cost- effective NHS.'

A. TOWSE, Office of Health Economics
2 June: `Regulation for cost-effectiveness in pharmaceutical markets.'

L. KUMARANAYAKE, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine
9 June: `Health sector regulation in developing countries.'

A. DURAN, Tecnicas de Salud, Spain
16 June: `Building a health service in transition economies.'

PROFESSOR C. PROPPER, Bristol
25 June: `The impact of financial incentives on the behaviour of GPs.'

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QUEEN ELIZABETH HOUSE

South Asia Day

This meeting will be held on Friday, 2 June, 9 a.m.–6 p.m., in the Blackhall Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House.

Conveners: Dr Nandini Gooptu, Professor Barbara Harriss- White, and Dr Judith Heyer.

S. MANI, United Nations University, Maastricht
9 a.m.: `An examination of India's efforts in integrating its economy with the rest of the world.'

G. MODY, Centre for Workers' Management, Delhi
10 a.m.: `Manufacturing governance: some historical aspects of Indian industry.'

S. BASU, SOAS, London
11.15 a.m.: `The Calcutta jute-mill strike of 1937 and its impact on Bengal politics.'

R. DASGUPTA
12.15 p.m.: ` "Progressive" literature and Marxism in Bengal in the 1930s.'

D. BHATTACHARYA, Jawaharlal Nehru University
2.15 p.m.: `Issues of hegemony, power, and governance: the Indian Left and its politics in West Bengal.'

V.R. MURALEEDHARAN, IIT, Madras
3.15 p.m.: `Malaria and anti-malarial policies in the Madras presidency: 1850s to 1940s.'

FAZAL-UR-RAHIM, Peshawar University
4.30 p.m.: `The role of Pakistan in conflict resolution in Afghanistan (1995–2000).'

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Workshop: themes on labour in South Asia

This meeting will be held on Friday, 26 May, 9 a.m.–6 p.m., in the Blackhall Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House.

Conveners: Dr Nandini Gooptu, Professor Barbara Harriss- White, and Dr Judith Heyer.

Y. SAMAD, Bradford
9 a.m.: `Structural adjustment and the impact on organised labour in Pakistan.'

J. BANAJI
10 a.m.: `India: workers' rights in a corporate governance perspective.'

R. CHANDAVARKAR, Cambridge
11.15 a.m.: To be announced.

J. GAME, SOAS, London
12.15 p.m.: `The proletariat and the tiger: communal politics and trade unionism in Mumbai.'

J. PARRY, LSE
2.15 p.m.: `Sex, marriage, and industry in contemporary Chhattisgarh.'

P. PARTHASARATHI, Boston College
3.15 p.m.: `Colonialism and labour in early nineteenth century South India' (provisional title).

R. HENSMAN, Bombay
4.30 p.m.: `Organising women workers in the unorganised sector.'

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Economic Development Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House.

Conveners: Professor B. Harriss-White and Professor F. Stewart.

J. BANAJI
4 May: `Investor capitalism and the reshaping of business in India.'

R. KAPLINSKY, Sussex
11 May: `Spreading the gains from globalisation: what can we learn from value-chain analysis?'

J. STEPANEK, Boulder
18 May: `Wringing success from failure in late- developing countries.' (Jointly with CSAE)

M. MOORE, Sussex
25 May: `Tax and political development.'

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Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women

Women investigating cross-culturally—Canary Islands, China, Nigeria, South Africa

The following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Thursdays in the Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House. Those wishing to attend are advised to confirm the arrangements by telephoning Oxford (2)73644.

Conveners: Dr Maria Jaschok and Cecillie Swaisland.

V. WILSON, Victoria and Albert Museum
4 May: `Dress, politics, and Chinese women's histories in the twentieth century.'

C. EMEAGWALI, Connecticut State University
18 May: `Nigerian female entrepeneurs in structurally maladjusted societies.'

R. CHAN
25 May: `Chinese women writers: on self, nationhood, and representations.'

C. SWAISLAND
1 June: `The concentration camps of the South African War—the work of E. Hobhouse and M. Fawcett compared.'

N. ROLDAN, Madrid
8 June: `Working women in Gran Canaria banana plantations: the invisibility of female labour.'

A. COLES
15 June: `Gender as an issue in development organisations: critiques and strategies.'

H. EVANS, Westminster
22 June: `Popular narratives on mothers and daughters: expectations of gender in contemporary China.'

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CCRW Commemorative Lecture

S. TOUSSAINT, University of Western Australia, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 10 May, in the Taylor Institution.

Subject: `Interpreting cultural narratives: ethnography, biography, and the paradox of memory.'

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Judy Kimble Memorial Lecture

B. GAWANAS, Parliamentary Commissioner, Namibia, will lecture at 5 p.m. Thursday, 15 June, in St Antony's College. This lecture is co- sponsored by the Judy Kimble Memorial Fund and the Professor of Race Relations.

Subject: `Women in political transformation in southern Africa.'

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Refugee Studies Centre

Seminars on Forced Migration

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House. They are open to the public and are free of charge.

Enquiries should be directed to Dominique Attala, Refugee Studies Centre, Queen Elizabeth House, 21 St Giles', Oxford OX1 3LA (e-mail: rscedu@qeh.ox.ac.uk, Internet site: http://www.qeh.ox.ac.uk/rsc/).

DR G. BOWMAN, Kent
3 May: `The exilic imagination: the construction of homeland from its outside.'

J. HART, London
10 May: `Refugees or citizens? Children in a Palestinian camp in Jordan.'

M. CANDAPPA, London
24 May: `Extraordinary childhoods: the social lives of refugee children.'

DR J. PEARCE, Bradford
31 May: `Post-war reconstruction in Huehuetenango, Guatemala: by whom? For whom? And for what?'

J. GOODHAND, Manchester
7 June: `Researching under fire: the methodological and ethical challenges of conducting community focused research in war zones.'

DR T. BRINGA, Bergen
14 June: `The victim's witness: reflections on "being an anthropologist" in the midst of war in Bosnia.'

DR K. KOSER, University College, London
21 June: `Human trafficking: the asylum seeker's perspective.'

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Elizabeth Colson Lecture

PROFESSOR JUN JING, Beijing, will deliver the Elizabeth Colson Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 17 May, in Rhodes House.

Subject: `Speaking bitterness, seeking justice: a memorial movement on the Yellow River.'

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RUSKIN SCHOOL OF DRAWING AND FINE ART

Joseph Beuys Lectures

New media culture: we are the ghosts in the machine

TERRY BRAUN will lecture at 4.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Lecture Theatre, the Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory. Admission is free, but numbers are limited. For reservations, telephone Oxford (2)76940.

The lectures are presented in collaboration with the Department of Chemistry, the Educational Technology Resources Centre, and the DA2 Digital Arts Development Agency, and with the support of the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation and Southern Arts.

All lectures will be broadcast simultaneously over the World Wide Web from http://www.ruskin-sch.ox.ac.uk/lab/symposia/beuys/beuys00.html. Instructions on the software required are given at this site.

2 May: `Predicting the past—3,000 years of media history.'

9 May: `Interacting in the present—click here and now.'

16 May: `Re-living the future—those who are prepared for their future can choose to re-live it.'

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CENTRE FOR SOCIO-LEGAL STUDIES

Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, Wolfson College.

Conveners: Professor D.J. Galligan, Professor of Socio- Legal Studies and Director of the Centre, and Mavis Maclean, Fellow, Wolfson College, and Research Fellow of the Centre.

PROFESSOR M.J. CHURGIN, Texas
1 May: `Shifts in asylum adjudication in the United States and the United Kingdom.'

PROFESSOR J.E. SMITHBURN, Notre Dame
8 May: `The textbook-problems approach: a proposed family law pedagogy.'

DR J. SCHIRATZKI, Stockholm
15 May: `The best interest of the child in Swedish refugee law.'

C. SAWYER, Bristol
22 May: `Hitting people is wrong?'

I. SAUNDERS
29 May: `Damages for loss of earnings by injured women.'

W. HOLMES, Oklahoma City University
5 June: `E-commerce and the environment.'

T. GALLAGHER
12 June: `Compulsory licensing of intellectual property rights.'

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WELLCOME UNIT FOR THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE

The following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Mondays in the Wellcome Unit.

Convener: M.H. Pelling, M.Litt., Reader in the Social History of Medicine.

DR S. KNOTT, London
1 May: `Sensibility, nervous theory, and American Revolution.'

DR H. KING, Reading
8 May: `Did Roman medicine exist? Nineteenth- century reconstructions of the Roman past.'

DR J. PATRICK
15 May: `The doctor's dossier: medicine, bureaucracy, and novelistic form in Zola, Huysmans, and George Eliot.'

L. VAUGHAN
22 May: `Torpor in the Fens? William Heberden and the Cambridge medical curriculum in the early eighteenth century.'

DR S. CAVALLO, London
29 May: `Constructing trust and reputation: barber- surgeons in seventeenth-century Turin.'

DR G. GENTILCORE, Leicester
5 June: `Counting charlatans in early modern Italy.'

DR U. RUBLACK, Cambridge
12 June: `How hearts move: embodied notions in early modern Europe.'

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STANDING COMMITTEE FOR THE M.ST. IN WOMEN'S STUDIES

Annual Women's Studies Lecture

PROFESSOR T. LAQUEUR, Berkeley, will deliver the annual Women's Studies Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 26 May, in the Auditorium, St John's College.

Subject: `1712 in the history of sexuality and subjectivity.'

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EXETER COLLEGE

Marett Memorial Lecture

DR P. VITEBSKY, Assistant Director of Research, the Scott Polar Research Institute, Cambridge, will deliver the Marett Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 5 May, in the Saskatchewan Lecture Room, Exeter College.

Subject: `Forgetting the ancestors: living without the dead.'

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GREEN COLLEGE

Medicine: past and present

The following seminars will be held at 6 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Committee Room, Green College.

Conveners: Dr Irvine Loudon and Dr Maureen Malowany.

D. COOK, Whitefield Institute, and U. SCHMIDT, Wellcome Unit
2 May: `Medical ethics and euthanasia.'

M. MCAVAUGH, North Carolina, and T. PATTERSON
23 May: `The art of stitching wounds: suturing past and present.'

C. WEBSTER and J. HORDER
20 June: `From general practice to primary care.'

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Alan Emery Lecture

J. NEWSOM-DAVIS, Professor Emeritus, will deliver the Alan Emery Lecture at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, 6 June, in the Witts Lecture Theatre, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

Subject: `The myasthenias: an emerging multiplicity of disorders.'

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KEBLE COLLEGE

Eric Symes Abbott Memorial Lecture

THE REVD CANON DR MARTYN PERCY, Director of the Lincoln Theological Institute, will deliver the Eric Symes Abbott Memorial Lecture at 5.30 p.m. on Friday, 5 May, in the chapel, Keble College.

Subject: `Knowledge of Angles: how spiritual are the English?'

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MANSFIELD COLLEGE AND CHRIST CHURCH

Bonae literae

A one-day colloquium on current research on Renaissance Humanism, sponsored by the Society for Renaissance Studies, will take place on Saturday, 29 April, 10.45–6.30 p.m., in the Council Room, Mansfield College.

Further information may be obtained from Martin McLaughlin (Christ Church) or David Rundle (Mansfield College).

10.45 a.m.–1 p.m.

S. BOWD, Manchester Metropolitan: `A monogamous relationship? Christian Humanism and reform in Italy.'

S. AMOS, St Andrews: `New learning, old theology: Renaissance Biblical Humanism, Scripture, and the question of theological method.'

J. FLOOD, London: `The crisis in Greek teaching at the University of Heidelberg around 1530.'

2.30–4 p.m.

I. BEJCZY, Nijmegen: ` Historia praestat omnibus disciplinis: Juan Luis Vives and his theory of history.'

W. STENHOUSE, University College, London: `Georg Fabricius and inscriptions as a source of law.'

4.30–6 p.m.

D. MARSH, Rutgers: `Aesop and the Humanists: the Quattrocento apologue.'

R. CHAVASSE, Rowlands Castle: `The studia humanitatis and the making of a humanist career: M.A. Sabellico (1436?–1506).'

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ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE

European Studies Centre

The divided past: rewriting post-war German histories

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Fridays in 70 Woodstock Road.

Conveners: Professor C. Klessmann and Mr A.J. Nicholls.

PROFESSOR KLESSMANN, ZZF Potsdam
5 May: `Workers in the Workers' State: German traditions, the Soviet model, and the magnetic attraction of West Germany.'

DR T. LINDENBERGER, ZZF Potsdam
12 May: `Everyday history: new approaches to the history of the post-war Germanies.'

DR M. SABROW, ZZF Potsdam
19 May: `Confrontation and co-operation: relations between two German historiographies.'

DR D. WIERLING, Berlin
26 May: `Generation and generational conflicts in East and West Germany.'

PROFESSOR W. BENZ, Technical University, Berlin
2 June: `Antisemitism and philosemitism in the divided Germany.'

DR I. MERKEL, Humboldt University, Berlin
9 June: `Sex and gender in the divided Germany: approaches to history from a cultural point of view.'

PROFESSOR D. POLLACK, Europa University, Viadrina, Frankfurt/Oder
16 June: `Secularisation in Eastern and Western Germany after 1945.'

PROFESSOR K.H. JARAUSCH, ZZF, Potsdam
23 June: `Living with catastrophe: mending broken memories.'

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Greek history and politics

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in 70 Woodstock Road.

Convener: R. Clogg, MA, Senior Research Fellow, St Antony's College.

DR N. DOUMANIS, Sydney
2 May: `Pluralism and stability in the late Ottoman Empire: Greeks, Turks, and communal co-existence.'

DR S. SEFERIADES, Cambridge
9 May: `The coercive impulse: state apparatus and labour repression in inter-war Greece.'

DR L.B. CHISACOFF, Institute for South-East European Studies, Bucharest
16 May: `Zagora and the Greek Enlightenment in the second half of the eighteenth century.'

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Middle East Centre

Shell Conference on Iranian Foreign Policy

This conference will be held on 12 and 13 May in the Middle East Centre/New Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College.

Friday, 12 May: Domestic sources of Iran's foreign policy

PROFESSOR M. MESBAHI, Florida International
2.30 p.m.: `Introduction: domestic factors and the genesis of the project.'

PROFESSOR F. RAJAEE, Carleton
3 p.m.: `Identity and foreign policy.'

DR H. MOSHIRZADEH, Tehran
3.30 p.m.: `Islam, ideology, and foreign policy.'

DR H. SEMATI, Tehran
4.15 p.m.: `Decision making institutions and foreign policy.'

DR N. HADIAN, Tehran
4.45 p.m.: `Factions, factionalism, and foreign policy.'

Saturday, 13 May: Iran's regional policy: the Caspian Basin and the Persian Gulf

PROFESSOR M. MESBAHI, Florida International
10 a.m.: `Iran's foreign policyi towards the post- Soviet space: a conceptual framework.'

DR N. GHORBAN, Caspian Studies, Tehran
10.30 a.m.: `Iran and the dynamics of the Caspian energy.'

DR E. HERZIG, Manchester
11 a.m.: `Iran and the Transcaucasus: Armenia and Azerbaijan.'

DR S. CHUBIN, Geneva Centre for Security Policy
2.30 p.m.: `Iran and security in the Persian Gulf.'

DR G. SICK, Columbia
3 p.m.: `Iran and the Persian Gulf: the US factor.'

DR F. BIN SALMAN AL-SAUD, King Saud University
3.30 p.m.: `Saudi–Iranian relations.'

DR K. SAJJADPOUR, Director, Institute for Political and International Studies (Iran's Ministry of Foreign Affairs)
5 p.m: `Iran's regional policy.' (Keynote lecture)

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Hamid Enayat Lecture

DR H. KATOUZIAN will deliver the seventeenth Hamid Enayat Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 11 May, in the New Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College. The lecture will be followed by a reception in the Middle East Centre.

Subject: `European liberalisms and modern conceptions of liberty in Iran.'

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ST EDMUND HALL

Philip Geddes Memorial Lecture

JEREMY PAXMAN will deliver the Philip Geddes Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 5 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Surviving spin.'

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ST HUGH'S COLLEGE

Henry Rowlatt Bickley Memorial Lecture

PROFESSOR ROGER PARKER, Cambridge, will deliver the seventeenth Henry Rowlatt Bickley Memorial Lecture at 5.30 p.m. on Tuesday, 16 May, in the Mordan Hall, St Hugh's College.

Subject: `Elisabeth's last act: Verdian history and the close of Don Carlos.'

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Becket Institute

The following lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Becket Institute, St Hugh's College.

DR J. ANDERSON
3 May: `National churches in time of change: the search for recognition in comparative perspective.'

DR A. O'MAHONEY, Heythrop College, University of London
10 May: `The Copts, politics, and Muslim–Christian relations in modern Egypt.'

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TRINITY COLLEGE

Margaret Howard Lecture

THE HON. MICHAEL BELOFF, QC, President, Trinity College, will deliver the Margaret Howard Lecture at 5.45 p.m. on Thursday, 18 May, in the Lecture Theatre 2, the St Cross Building. Admission is free.

Subject: `Advocacy as art.'

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Chatham Lectures

Trinity Term

SEN. GARY HART will deliver the second Chatham Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 1 June, in the Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, the St Cross Building. Admission is free.

Subject: `The future of Anglo-American relations.'

Michaelmas Term

THE RT. HON. CHRISTOPHER PATTEN will deliver the third Chatham Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 26 October, in the Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, the St Cross Building. Admission is free.

Subject: `The future of East–West relations.'

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WOLFSON COLLEGE

Isaiah Berlin Lecture

PROFESSOR ORLANDO FIGES will deliver the annual Isaiah Berlin Lecture at 6 p.m. on Thursday, 25 May, in the Hall, Wolfson College. The lecture is open to the public.

Subject: `The cultural tradition of St Petersburg.'

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FRIENDS OF THE BODLEIAN

The following thirty-minute lectures will be given at 1 p.m. on the days shown in the Cecil Jackson Room, the Sheldonian Theatre.

Wine and sandwiches will be served after the lectures at a cost of £2.50 per person, for which bookings should be made in advance with Mrs P.M. Sturgis, Membership Secretary, Friends of the Bodleian, Bodleian Library, Oxford OX1 3BG (telephone: Oxford (2)77234).

THE REVD PROFESSOR M.A. SCREECH
Wed. 17 May: `Montaigne's own copy of Lucretius.'

R. MCNEIL
Tue. 13 June: `The body in the library.'

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FRIENDS OF THE PITT RIVERS MUSEUM

The following lectures will be given as shown. Visitors are welcome to attend, but are requested to make a contribution of £2 to the Friends' Purchasing Fund.

DR I. FINKEL, Assistant Keeper, Department of Western Asiatic Antiquities, British Museum
Wed. 17 May, Inorganic Chemistry Lecture Theatre, 7 p.m.: `Tales of the unexpected: board games ancient and modern.'

J. GILLOW, author and lecturer
Wed. 14 June, Pitt Rivers Research Centre (64 Banbury Road), 6 p.m.: `Hill tribes of south-western China.'

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TURECK BACH RESEARCH FOUNDATION

Structure and embellishment

The fourth annual symposium of the Tureck Bach Research Foundation will be held on Saturday, 13 May, and Sunday, 14 May, in Worcester College. Admission is free to graduates and senior members of the University.

Details of the afternoon lecture on Sunday will be announced later.

Enquiries should be directed to Windrush House, Davenant Road, Oxford OX2 8BX (telephone: Oxford 515760, fax: 512620).

Saturday, 13 May: Embellishment

DR K. GOEBS
10 a.m.: `Structure and embellishment in Egyptian art.'

DR J. RAWSON
11 a.m.: `Chinese ornament, the Lotus and the Dragon.'

DR R. TURECK
2 p.m.: `Embellishment in Bach and Chinese and Indian music.'

PROFESSOR B. MANDELBROT, Yale
3 p.m.: `Fractal embellishment.'

Sunday, 14 May: Structure

DR A. WOOLFSON, Cambridge
10.30 a.m.: `Are living things computable?'

PROFESSOR R. STEVENSON, UCLA
11.30 a.m.: `Embellishment, the performer's glory in sixteenth-century Spain.'

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