Examinations and Boards

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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ANNUAL ELECTION OF MEMBERS OF BOARDS OF FACULTIES (8 JUNE): VACANCIES

Notice is hereby given under Ch. II, Sect. VI, § 5 (Statutes, 1997, p. 243) of impending vacancies for official and ordinary members of boards of faculties, as set out below. Qualification for official and ordinary membership is as set out in §§ 1 and 2 of that section (pp. 243-6). Those entitled to nominate and vote in these elections are:

(a) for official members, all the members of the faculty concerned, and

(b) for ordinary members, the membership of the faculty concerned, exclusive of those qualified to be official members of the faculty board.

Nominations in writing by two electors will be received by the Head Clerk, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD, up to 4 p.m. on Monday, 15 May, and nominations by six electors up to 4 p.m. on Tuesday, 30 May. There is no special form but, in addition to the signatures of nominators, nominations must state, in block capitals, the name and initials, and college (or, if no college, the department) of (1) each person nominated, and (2) each nominator.

Note:

Under the provisions of Ch. Sect. VI, § 4, cl. 5, the electors of ordinary members of the following boards of faculties have directed by by-law that no ordinary member shall be eligible to serve for more than three successive periods of two years:

English Language and Literature, Law, Oriental Studies.

Faculty Board: Anthropology and Geography

Official members - vacancies: Four

Retiring members: Professor Goudie, Dr O'Hanlon, Professor Parkin, Professor Peach

Period from MT 2000: 2 years

Ordinary members - vacancies: Five

Retiring members: Dr Boyce, Professor Clark, Dr Preston, Mr Stokes, Dr Whittaker

Period from MT 2000: 2 years


Faculty Board: English Language and Literature

Official members - vacancies: Four

Retiring members: Professor Carey, Professor Godden, Dr O'Donoghue, Professor Strohm

Period from MT 2000: 2 years

Ordinary members - vacancies: Six

Retiring members: Dr Black, *Ms Johnson, *Dr Mapstone, Dr Newlyn, Mr Paulin, Dr Pitcher

Period from MT 2000: 2 years


Faculty Board: Law

Official members - vacancies: Four

Retiring members: Professor Ashworth, Professor Galligan, Professor Hood, Professor Markesinis

Period from MT 2000: 2 years

Ordinary members - vacancies: Six

Retiring members: Mr Child, Ms de Moor, Mr Gardner, *Mr Hackney, Dr Ibbetson, Mr Tur

Period from MT 2000: 2 years


Faculty Board: Literae Humaniores

Official members - vacancies: Five

Retiring members: Professor Frede, Professor Millar, Professor Wiggins, Professor Winterbottom, Professor J.P. Griffin

Period from MT 2000: 2 years

Ordinary members - vacancies: Six

Retiring members: Dr Atherton, Dr Avramides, Professor Ayers, Dr Bowie, Dr Lovibond, Dr Rutherford

Period from MT 2000: 2 years


Faculty Board: Management

Members - vacancies: Two

Retiring members: Dr Darbishire, Dr Dopson

Period from MT 2000: 2 years


Faculty Board: Modern History

Official members - vacancies: Four

Retiring members: Professor Brown, Professor Evans, Professor Kemp, Professor O'Neill

Period from MT 2000: 2 years

Ordinary members - vacancies: Six

Retiring members: Mr Davies, Dr Parrott, Dr Rubin, Dr Service, Dr Stevenson, Mr Wormald

Period from MT 2000: 2 years


Faculty Board: Music

Official members - vacancies: Three

Retiring members: Dr Franklin, Dr La Rue, Dr Marston

Period from MT 2000: 2 years


Faculty Board: Oriental Studies

Official members - vacancies: Four

Retiring members: Professor Dudbridge, Professor Thomson, Professor Sanderson, Professor Williamson

Period from MT 2000: 2 years

Ordinary members - vacancies: Six

Retiring members: Professor Gurney, Dr McMullen, *Dr Powell, Mr Richards, Dr Treadwell, one vacancy

Period from MT 2000: 2 years


Faculty Board: Social Studies

Official members - vacancies: Four

Retiring members: Dr Gambetta, Professor Klemperer, Professor Malcomson, Professor Shlaim

Period from MT 2000: 2 years

Ordinary members - vacancies: Six

Retiring members: Dr Bowles, Dr Ceadel, Mr Hay, Professor King, Professor Muellbauer, Dr Rosen

Period from MT 2000: 2 years


Faculty Board: Theology

Official members - vacancies: Three

Retiring members: Professor O'Donovan, Professor Rowland, Professor Swinburne

Period from MT 2000: 2 years

Ordinary members - vacancies: Five

Retiring members: Dr Cross, Professor MacCulloch, Mr Morgan, Mr Southwell, Dr Tuckett

Period from MT 2000: 2 years

*Ineligible for re-election having served three successive periods as an ordinary member.

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GENERAL BOARD OF THE FACULTIES

Appointments by the Board of the Faculty of Clinical Medicine

Corrigendum

In the list of appointments by the Clinical Medicine Board, published in Gazette, p. 960 (16 March), delete `Pat L.N. Yudkin, BA, D.Phil.', and substitute `Patricia L.N. Yudkin, MA, D.Phil.'

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BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF CLINICAL MEDICINE

The Board of the Faculty of Clinical Medicine has conferred the title of University Research Lecturer on the following:

MR TREVOR LAMBERT, Statistician and Study Co-ordinator, Unit of Health-Care Epidemiology;

DR JOHN LOUGHLIN, Arthritis Research Campaign Research Fellow, Institute of Molecular Medicine;

DR CHRISTOPHER NORBURY, ICRF Research Scientist, Institute of Molecular Medicine;

DR STEPHEN SMITH, Head of Image Analysis, FMRIB, Department of Clinical Neurology;

DR IRENE TRACEY, Head, Applications and Pain Group, FMRIB, Department of Clinical Neurology.

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BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF PHYSIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

The Board of the Faculty of Physiological Sciences has conferred the title of University Research Lecturer on the following:

DR DEBORAH CLARKE, Senior Departmental Teaching Assistant, Department of Human Anatomy;

DR PETER KOHL, Royal Society University Research Fellow, University Laboratory of Physiology;

DR ANANT BHIKHU PARESH, Wellcome Trust Career Development Fellow, University Department of Physiology;

DR SUSAN TOTTERDELL, Research Scientist, University Department of Pharmacology;

DR STEPHEN TUCKER, Wellcome Trust Research Career Development Fellow, University Laboratory of Physiology;

DR ROBERT WILKINS, Arthritis Research Campaign Research Fellow, University Laboratory of Physiology.

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BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES: SUB-FACULTY OF BIOLOGY

Honour School of Natural Science—Biological Sciences 2001

Under the terms of the regulations for the above examination (see Examination Decrees, 1999, pp. 421–5), the Sub- faculty of Biology has approved the following topics for extended essays in Part A of the Honour School examinations for 2001.

Animal Biology

1. Discuss how Tinbergen's `four questions' have shaped the study of animal behaviour.

2. Discuss the key organisational principles of the nervous system.

3. Write an essay on the biomechanics of animal flight.

4. Write an essay on adaptive regulatory systems.

Plant and microbial biology

1. Review the advantages and disadvantages of hermaphrodite flowers. How have the disadvantages of such flowers been minimised in the evolution of modern angiosperms?

2. Discuss the ways in which the genetic modification of plants might be used to improve human health.

3. What are the implications of cellular compartmentation for the acquisition of carbon and nitrogen by terrestrial plants?

4. Which features of their cell biology make fungi important in nitrogen and phosphorus acquisition by plants?

5. What has mutant analysis told us about the establishment of the plant body?

Environmental biology

1. Is the Millennium seed bank a waste of £84 million?

2. You are given 250 seeds from the last remaining twenty-four plants of Euphorbia stygiana. What would you do with them and why?

3. Are small populations really under greater threat of extinction than large populations?

4. Is a active habitat management a better use of resources than spending millions trying to save one particular species?

5. It has been proposed that the natural recovery of otter populations in the UK may save the water vole from extinction at the hands of the American mink. What general principles are involved in the interactions among these species, and how do you evaluate this proposal?

Cell and developmental biology

1. Simple organisms like yeast have proved to be useful for studying cellular processes. What areas of cell biology cannot be explained in such systems?

2. Increases in cytosolic free calcium occur in many cell types but with very different consequences. Why is this?

3. How are proteins transported across the nuclear membrane? Why is regulation of this process important?

4. How has determination of the three-dimensional structure of membrane proteins enlightened our understanding of ion transport?

5. How and why do cells manipulate the extracellular environment of themselves and their neighbours?

Biology of animal and plant disease

1. How would YOU design a future control strategy for bovine tuberculosis?

2. What impact do you think global warming will have on infectious disease?

3. Write a review on anti-schictosome immune responses in man. Show how using rodent experimental models complicated the understanding of these responses.

4. Does genetic modification offer an attractive prospect for the design of disease resistance in plants?

5. Discuss the evolution by the birth-and-death process in multigene families of the vertebrate and plant immune systems.

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CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the General Board, the following changes in regulations made by boards of faculties and committees will come into effect on 12 May.

1 Board of the Faculty of English Language and Literature

M.Phil. English Studies

(i) With effect from 1 October 2000

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 585, ll. 36, 40, 45, replace `Friday' in each of the lines in question with `Thursday'.

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(ii) With effect from 1 October 2001

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 584, delete from `He will be required' in l. 18 to the end of l. 21, and substitute:

`Any candidate may be examined viva voce, at the discretion of the examiners.'

2 Ibid., delete from `Candidates' in l. 41 to `compulsory' in l. 1 on p. 585, and substitute:

`Candidates will be required to offer a thesis of about 20,000 words, on some topic[1] approved by the board or by a person or persons to whom it may delegate the function of giving such approval, save that candidates in courses (i) and (ii) may be allowed, in exceptional circumstances, to offer a third paper in Group B instead of the thesis. A thesis involving the edition of a text may, if the candidate so wishes, exceed 20,000 words by not more than the length of the text.

3 Ibid., p. 585, delete from `All candidates' in l. 29 to `Group A' in l. 30 and substitute:

`Any candidate may be examined viva voce on the subjects of Group A.'

4 Ibid., delete from l. 32 to `exam in Eighth week' in l. 46 and substitute:

`5. The method of examination of the subjects of Group B will be by library paper. Candidates must offer two papers (or three if they are not offering an optional thesis), and answer two questions per paper. One list of questions for each B option they have selected will be delivered to candidates' colleges on the Friday of the Fifth Week of Trinity Term. After this date, candidates are prohibited from approaching their supervisors (or any other person) for advice or guidance. Candidates offering two B options must submit a completed library paper for each option to the Schools by noon on Friday of the Seventh Week of Trinity Term. Regulations for candidates offering three B options will be as above, except that in addition they must hand in a library paper for their third B option to the Schools by noon on Friday of Eighth week.'

5 Ibid., p. 586, delete ll. 5–6 and substitute:

`6. Any candidate may be examined viva voce about the extended essays and library papers.'

6 Ibid., after l. 9 insert:

`8. No candidate who has failed any of the above subjects will be awarded the degree in that examination. Candidates failing up to two subjects will be required to resit only those two; candidates failing more than two will be required to resubmit the written work specified for each of the above subjects.'

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2 Boards of the Faculties of English Language and Literature and Literae Humaniores

Honour School of Classics and English

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 143, l. 2, insert `(v) Old and Early Middle Irish Language and Literature (Course II B23)'.

2 Ibid., ll. 5–6, re-letter existing entries (v)–(x) to (w)–(y).

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3 Board of the Faculty of Literae Humaniores

(a) Final Honour School of Literae Humaniores

(i) With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 255, delete l. 41 and l. 44.

2 Ibid., p. 256, delete l. 13.

3 Ibid., l. 14, delete `I'.

4 Ibid., l. 15, delete `Life of Augustus'.

5 Ibid., delete ll. 16–17.

6 Ibid., l. 50, delete `Annals XIII–XVI'.

7 Ibid., delete l. 52.

8 Ibid., p. 259, delete ll. 13–14 and substitute:

`Optional passages for comment will be set from these texts in translation, and from In Catilinam I (Loeb) and De Finibus 1.1–12 (OCT) in Latin only'.

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(ii) With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 271, delete ll. 1–3 and substitute:

`4. Every thesis shall be the candidate's own work. Tutors may, however, assist candidates by discussing with them, for example, the field of study, the sources available, the bibliography, and the method of presentation, and may also read and comment on drafts. The amount of assistance'.

2 Ibid., delete ll. 15–16 and substitute:

`6. No thesis shall exceed 10,000 words, the limit to include all notes and appendices but not including the bibliography.'

3 Ibid., l. 23, insert `firmly' before `bound'.

4 Ibid., l. 24, delete `or held firmly in a stiff cover'.

5 Ibid., delete the sentence beginning `Any candidate' on l. 25.

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(iii) With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 246, delete ll. 27–8.

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(b) Honour Moderations in Classics

(i) With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 34, delete ll. 5–8 and substitute:

`One paper (three hours). The paper will be divided into two main sections:

(a) part (i) exercises designed to test Greek accidence and syntax; part (ii) questions on selected passages from D.A. Russell, An Anthology of Greek Prose (OUP 1991), nos. 17, 18, 23, 24, 33, 40, 44, 66, 78;

(b) a passage for translation into Greek prose. Candidates will be required to offer either both parts of (a) or (b).'

2 Ibid., delete ll. 11–14 and substitute:

`One paper (three hours). The paper will be divided into two main sections:

(a) part (i) exercises designed to test Latin accidence and syntax; part (ii) questions on selected passages from D.A. Russell, An Anthology of Latin Prose (OUP 1991), nos. 7, 12, 22, 23, 34, 52, 63;

(b) a passage for translation into Latin prose. Candidates will be required to offer either both parts of (a) or (b).'

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(ii) With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 36, delete ll. 25–30 and substitute:

`One paper (three hours). The paper will consist of two main sections:

(a) part (i) exercises designed to test Greek accidence and syntax; part (ii) translation into Greek of a short passage of English;

(b) translation into Greek of a longer passage of English. Candidates are required to offer either both parts of (a) or (b). The passages set will be related, in their demands of vocabulary and syntax, to the Greek prose literature used in the elementary Greek instruction provided for the course.'

2 Ibid., p. 40, delete ll. 6–11 and substitute:

`One paper (three hours). The paper will consist of two main sections:

(a) part (i) exercises designed to test Latin accidence and syntax; part (ii) translation into Latin of a short passage of English;

(b) translation into Latin of a longer passage of English. Candidates are required to offer either both parts of (a) or (b). The passages set will be related, in their demands of vocabulary and syntax, to the Latin prose literature used in the elementary Latin instruction provided for the course'.

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(iii) With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 34, l. 15, delete `OR PROSE COMPOSITION'.

2 Ibid., delete ll. 20–1 and also delete the footnote.

3 Ibid., l. 22, replace (c) with (b).

4 Ibid., p. 36, l. 33, delete `OR PROSE COMPOSITION'.

5 Ibid., p. 38, l. 4, delete `OR PROSE COMPOSITION'.

6 Ibid., p. 40, l. 12, delete `OR PROSE COMPOSITION'.

7 Ibid., p. 41, l. 23, delete `OR PROSE COMPOSITION'.

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(c) M.Phil. in Greek and/or Roman History

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 610, delete ll. 35–40 and substitute:

`(b) For options in topics and techniques, Schedules B and C below, candidates will be required to pre-submit two essays of not more than 5,000 words in length, which between them display knowledge of more than a narrow range of the topic covered by the course.'

2 Ibid., l. 42, delete `submitted in lieu of written papers'.

3 Ibid., l. 46, delete the sentence beginning `Candidates who have not'.

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(d) M.St. in Greek and/or Roman History

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 688, delete ll. 5–10 and substitute:

`(b) For options in topics and techniques, Schedules B and C below, candidates will be required to pre-submit two essays of not more than 5,000 words in length, which between them display knowledge of more than a narrow range of the topic covered by the course.'

2 Ibid., l. 12, delete `submitted in lieu of written papers'.

3 Ibid., l. 16, delete the sentence beginning `Candidates who have not'.

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(e) Master of Philosophy in Greek and/or Latin Languages and Literature

With immediate effect

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 607, ll. 38–9, delete `Graduate Studies Committee in Classics' and substitute:

`Administrator, Classics Centre, 67 St Giles', Oxford OX1 3LU'.

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(f) Master of Studies in Greek and/or Latin Languages and Literature

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 684, after l. 2 insert:

`3. The choice of options for the examination will be subject to the approval of the candidate's supervisor and the Graduate Studies Committee in Classics, having regard to the candidate's previous experience, the range covered by the chosen options, and the availability of teaching and examining resources. The options which the candidate wishes to offer must be submitted to the Administrator, Classics Centre, 67 St Giles', Oxford OX1 3LU for approval not later than the Friday of the first week of Michaelmas Full Term. The title of any dissertation, if not already approved, should be submitted not later than the Friday of the fifth week of Michaelmas Full Term. Not all options may be available in any given year.' and renumber subsequent clauses 3–5 as 4–6.

2 Ibid., l. 8, before `The essays' insert `two of'.

3 Ibid., l. 9, delete `Graduate Studies Committee in Classics' and substitute:

`Administrator, Classics Centre, 67 St Giles', Oxford OX1 3LU'.

4 Ibid., l. 10, delete `Friday' and substitute `Monday'.

5 Ibid., after `Term' insert:

`Where a second set of two presubmitted essays are to be offered, candidates should forward titles of these through their supervisor to the Administrator, Classics Centre, 67 St Giles', Oxford OX1 3LU.'

6 Ibid., l. 16, after `below' insert:

`to the Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford OX1 4BG'.

7 Ibid., p. 687, delete ll. 37–45.

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4 Boards of the Faculties of Literae Humaniores and Mathematical Sciences

Honour School of Mathematics and Philosophy

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 480, delete ll. 7–13 and substitute:

`In Part I, candidates are required to take subjects 102 and 122, and in addition are required to take at least one and not more than three subjects chosen from among subjects 101, 103–18, 120. A candidate who takes only three subjects in Philosophy in Part I cannot offer Option (i) Mathematics in Part II. A candidate who takes five subjects in Philosophy in Part I cannot offer Option (iii) Philosophy in Part II. In Part II, candidates who offer Option (ii) Mathematics and Philosophy are required to take two subjects, and candidates who offer Option (iii) Philosophy are required to offer four subjects, from among subjects 101, 103–18, 120, 198, 199, in conformity with the condition that no subject may be offered in both Part I and Part II.'

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5 Boards of the Faculties of Literae Humaniores and Modern Languages

(a) Preliminary Examination in Philosophy and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 100, after l. 29 insert:

`Provided that a candidate who fails one only of the papers in (1) above may offer in a subsequent examination or subsequent examinations, the paper in which he or she has failed.'

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(b) Regulations for Philosophy in all Honour Schools including Philosophy

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 473, after l. 37 insert:

`Candidates who also offer paper 108, The Philosophy of Logic and Language, may not answer certain questions which will be starred'.

2 Ibid., p. 475, after l. 27 insert:

`Candidates may answer no more than one question on Kant's moral philosophy.'

3 Ibid., p. 478, l. 27, delete `a first draft' and substitute `drafts'.

4 Ibid., l. 44, delete `, and must be bound or held firmly in a stiff cover'.

5 Ibid., p. 480, delete ll. 24–9 and substitute:

`Where subject 199 is taken, every candidate shall submit his or her application for approval of the subject to the chairman of the Sub-faculty of Philosophy, c/o The Administrator, Philosophy Centre, 10 Merton Street, Oxford OX1 4JJ, not earlier than the first day of Trinity Full Term two years before the term of the written examination in the case of candidates planning to spend a year abroad.'

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6 Board of the Faculty of Management

M.Sc. in Industrial Relations and Human Resource management

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 770, delete l. 32 and substitute:

`either 7a. European Employment Law or 7b. International Economic Law and Labour Rights'.

2 Ibid., p. 772, delete ll. 3–8 and substitute:

`7a. European Employment Law [as specified for the M.Phil. in Law], 7b. International Economic Law and Labour Rights [as specified for the M.Phil. in Law]'.

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7 Boards of the Faculties of Management and Social Studies

Honour School of Economics and Management

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 164, delete ll. 36–46, and substitute:

`(2) Either

(a) Organisational Behaviour and Analysis The individual in the organisation; motivation and job satisfaction; groups at work; decision making; gender; organisational strategy and structure; the organisational environment; managerial work and behaviour; leadership; culture; power, conflict and change; contemporary and comparative approaches.

Or

(b) Employment Relations The structure and management of the employment relationship, including its environment, and economic and social consequences; human resource strategy and style; systems of collective representation; trade union objectives and organisation; pay systems and performance appraisal; explicit and psychological contracts; the management of co-operation and conflict; employee involvement, participation and team working; technology, work design and work organisation; job regulation; the utilisation of human resources; training and performance; contemporary and comparative approaches to the management of employees.'

2 Ibid., p. 166, l. 37, delete `and' and substitute `but not'.

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8 Board of the Faculty of Mathematical Sciences

(a) Honour School of Computer Science

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 157, ll. 23–4, delete `Section a and Paper b1' and substitute `Papers a1–a6, and b1'.

2 Ibid., p. 160, delete ll. 33–50, and substitute:

`Paper I.6: Numerical Analysis

No practicals. Papers of 3 hours.

Interpolation and approximation of functions: Language and Hermite interpolation, applications to quadrature, error analysis. Global polynominal approximation in the Lµ and L2 norms: inner product spaces; orthogonal polynomials, Gauss quadrature, trapezoidal rule for periodic functions. Piecewise polynominal approximation: linear and Hermite cubic splines, B-splines. Aitken and Richardson extrapolation, Romberg integration. Numerical linear algebra: Gaussian elimination, pivoting, and PA=LU decomposition; Cholesky factorisation. Householder reflectors, QR factorisation, least-squares problems. Eigenvalue decomposition, Gershgorin's theorem. Eigenvalue algorithms for symmetric matrices: tridiagonalisation, QR algorithm. Introduction to nonlinear systems and optimisation: Newton's method for systems of equations; Newton's method for multivariate minimisation; numerical approximation of Jacobian matrices; BFGS quasi-Newton iteration.'

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(b) Honour School of Mathematical Sciences

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 279, l. 17, delete `six' and substitute `seven'.

2 Ibid., delete ll. 24–36, and substitute:

`2 (a) Every candidate shall either take eight papers or take seven papers and submit an extended essay.

(b) Every candidate shall take Paper a1 and Paper a2 and at least two of Papers a3–a7.

(c) Every candidate shall take at least one but not more than three papers from Section b.

(d) Every candidate shall take at least one but not more than two papers from Section o.'

3 Ibid., l. 37, delete `Each paper from Section a' and substitute `Each of papers a1–a6'.

4 Ibid., p. 280, delete l. 1 and substitute `(c) Paper b8 will contain seven questions'.

5 Ibid., delete l. 5, and re-letter (f) as (e).

6 Ibid., l. 6, delete `Paper o1 and'.

7 Ibid., l. 14, delete `EachÉb10' and substitute `Each paper from b1–b8'.

8 Ibid., delete ll. 16–18 and substitute:

`5. Each of papers a1–a6, b1–b7, b10 will be of three hours' duration; Paper b8 will be of two and a half hours' duration.'

9 Ibid., l. 19, delete `Papers b8, b9, and o1' and substitute `Paper b8'.

10 Ibid., l. 21, delete `Concerning Paper b8, the' and substitute `The'.

11 Ibid., delete ll. 24–6 and re-letter (c) and (d) as (b) and (c).

12 Ibid., l. 35, delete `and (b)' and delete `(c)' and substitute `(b)'.

13 Ibid., p. 284, after l. 40, insert:

`Paper a7: Numerical Analysis (as specified for paper I.6 of the FHS of Computer Science).'

14 Ibid., p. 288, l. 12, delete `Numerical Analysis' and substitute `Numerical Solution of Differential Equations'.

15 Ibid., delete ll. 13–34, and substitute `(as specified for paper b9 in FHS of Mathematics and Computer Science)'.

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(c) Honour School of Mathematics

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first Part I examination in 2002 and first Part II examination in 2003)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 291, delete ll. 30–6 and substitute:

`2(a) Every candidate shall take eight papers in Part I.

(b) Every candidate shall take paper a1 and Paper a2 and shall also take three or four papers from Papers a3–a7.

(c) Every candidate shall take two or three papers from Section b.'

2 Ibid., p. 292, l. 3, delete `Papers b8 and b9' and substitute `Paper b8'.

3 Ibid., delete l. 6.

4 Ibid., l. 10, delete `EachÉb10' and substitute `Each paper from b1–b8'.

5 Ibid., l. 12, delete `Papers b8, b9, and o1' and substitute `Paper b8'.

6 Ibid., delete ll. 19–22 and reletter (c) and (d) as (b) and (c).

7 Ibid., l. 30, delete `and (b)' and delete `(c)' and substitute `(b)'.

8 Ibid., p. 294, delete ll. 20–2 and substitute:

`8. The duration of papers in sections a, b, o shall be as prescribed for the FHS of Mathematical Sciences; each of papers c1–c4 will be of three hours' duration; Paper c5 will be of two hours' duration.'

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(d) Pass School of Mathematics

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first Part I examination in 2002 and first Part II examination in 2003)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 294, l. 34, delete `and o'.

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(e) Honour School of Mathematics and Computer Science

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 295, l. 33, delete `Sections a, b, I and II (MC)' and substitute `Sections a(MC), b(MC), I and II(MC)'.

2 Ibid., p. 295, ll. 33–5, delete `The papers of Sections a and bÉMathematics.' and substitute `The papers of Sections a(MC) will be Papers a1–a6 of the Final Honour School of Mathematical Sciences. The papers of Section b(MC) will be Papers b1–b8 and b10 of the Final Honour School of Mathematical Sciences, together with those set out in the Schedule.'

3 Ibid., p. 296, l. 8, delete `Section a' and substitute `Section a(MC)'.

4 Ibid., l. 9, delete `Section b' and substitute `Section b(MC)'.

5 Ibid., p. 297, l. 9, delete `Section a and b' ans substitute `Sections a(MC) and b(MC)'.

6 Ibid., l. 10, delete `Mathematics' and substitute `Mathematical Sciences'.

7 Ibid., after l. 15, insert:

`Schedule

Paper b9: Numrical solution of differential equations No practicals. Paper of 3 hours.

Initial value problems for ordinary differential equations: Euler, multistep and Runge-Kutta methods; stiffness; error control and adaptive algorithms. Boundary value problems for ordinary differential equations: shooting, finite differences.

Boundary value problems for partial differential equations: finite difference discretisations; Poisson equation. Associated methods of sparse numerical linear algebra: sparse Guassian elimination, classical and conjugate gradient iterations, multigrid iterations.

Initial value problems for partial differential equations: parabolic equations, hyperbolic equations; explicit and implicit methods; accuracy, stability and convergence, Fourier analysis, CFL condition.'

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(f) Pass School of Mathematics and Computer Science

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 297, delete `Section a' and substitute `Section a(MC)'.

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(g) Honour School of Mathematics and Philosophy

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first Part I examination in 2002 and first Part II examination in 2003)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 300 delete ll. 3–4 and substitute:

`Seventeen subjects a1–a7 and b1–b10, as prescribed for Papers a1–a7 and b1–b10 in the Honour School of Mathematical Sciences.'

2 Ibid., l. 12, delete `a1–a6' and substitute `a1–a7'.

3 Ibid., l. 39, delete `a1...o1' and substitute `a1–a7 and b2– b10'.

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(h) Pass School of Mathematics and Philosophy

With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 303, l. 11, delete `a1–a6' and substitute `a1–a7'.

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(i) M.Sc. in Computation

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 739, l. 42, delete `complete' and substitute `submit'.

2 Ibid., p. 740, l. 1, delete `listed in the schedule below' and substitute `for which he or she submitted a written assignment'.

3 Ibid., p. 741, ll. 1–2, delete from `has failed' to `as a whole' and substitute `fails the examination'.

4 Ibid., delete from `A revised' on l. 3 to `occasion' on l. 7 and substitute:

`Such a candidate whose dissertation has been of satisfactory standard may resubmit the same piece of work, while a candidate who has reached a satisfactory standard on the written assignments will not be required to retake that part of the examination.'

5 Ibid., l. 8, insert `exactly' before `four'.

6 Ibid., delete ll. 17–21 and substitute:

`(ii) Formal Program Design

(iii) Concurrency

(iv) Functional Programming

(v) Architecture

(vi) Procedural Programming'.

7 Ibid., delete ll. 31, 34, and 40–2, and renumber existing (vi) and (vii) as (v) and (vi), existing (ix) to (xiii) as (vii) to (xi), and existing (xvii) as (xii).

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9 Board of the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages

(a) M.St. in Slavonic Studies

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 708, delete ll. 11–18 and substitute:

`i. Russian Literature before Pushkin.

ii. Pushkin and Romanticism.

iii. Gender and Representation in Russian Culture from 1800.

iv. The Rise of the Russian Novel.

v. Russian Drama in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries.

vi. The Russian Experience of Modernity, 1905–45.

vii. Eurasianism and Russian Cultural Identity.

viii. The Gulag and the Russian Literary Process.

ix. Joseph Brodsky and His Contemporaries.

x. Post-Soviet Russian Literature.'

2 Ibid., delete ll. 24–30 and substitute:

`i. Russian Social and Political Thought, 1825–1917.

ii. The History of Russia, 1861–1917.

iii. The Russian Revolution and the Civil War.'

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(b) M.Phil. in Slavonic Studies

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

As for the M.St. in Slavonic Studies (see (a) above).

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10 Board of the Faculty of Music

(a) Honour Moderations and the Preliminary Examination in Music

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 65, delete ll. 42–5 and substitute:

`Candidates will be required to submit two compositions, totalling between 10–12 minutes in performance, as follows:

(i) a work for either solo voice and piano or for four unaccompanied voices (SATB);

(ii) a work for one of the following: string quartet (two violins, viola, and cello); wind quintet (flute, oboe, clarinet, horn, and bassoon); mixed ensemble, with or without piano but without percussion.'

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(b) Honour School of Music

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 411, delete ll. 15–40 and substitute:

`Each candidate will be required to offer papers (1) and (2) from List A, any two of papers (3), (4), and (5) in that list, and four other papers, always provided that of these four at least one be chosen from each of Lists B and C. Candidates may always offer both List A (3) and B (1); but certain other combinations of papers may from time to time be disallowed, always provided that notice of such disallowance be communicated to candidates not later than the third week of Michaelmas Full Term in the academic year preceding that of examination.

Candidates must inform the Registrar, not later than Friday of the fourth week of Michaelmas Full Term in the academic year of examination, of the eight papers they propose to offer.

Candidates may also be examined viva voce.

List A (core subjects)

(1) History of Western Music I: c.800–c.1630 (one three-hour paper)

(2) History of Western Music II: c.1600 to the present day (one three-hour paper)

The Board of the Faculty of Music shall approve, and publish each year by notice in the Faculty of Music, not later than the eighth week of Trinity Full Term, a list of specified areas in study in (1) and (2) above for the examination six terms thence.

(3) Either Techniques of Composition I (one three-hour paper)

Candidates will be required to complete or continue in the appropriate style a piece of music from which at least one part will be given. One question must be answered from four set as follows:

(a) later sixteenth-century continental vocal polyphony in four parts;

(b) aria in three parts (voice, obbligato instrument, and basso continuo) from the period c.1700–c.60;

(c) four-part texture, of the period c.1760–c.1830;

(d) nineteenth-century song accompaniment for piano, in the Austro-Germanic tradition.

or Techniques of Composition II (portfolio submission): see under List B (1)

(4) Musical Analysis and Criticism (one three-hour paper) Analytical and critical comment on one musical work (or movement of a work), normally from the late eighteenth or nineteenth century. The score will be provided but the music will not be heard in performance.

(5) Musical Thought and Scholarship (one three-hour paper)

A paper on the history, criticism, and philosophy of music. Candidates may choose to answer either one or two questions.'

2 Ibid., delete from 1. 2 on p. 412, to 1. 33 on p. 414 and substitute:

`List B (Portfolio submissions; practical tests)

(1) Techniques of Composition II (portfolio submission) Candidates will be required to write, at their choice and on material set by the examiners in the eighth week of Hilary Full Term in the academic year of examination, one of the following:

(a) a fugue;

(b) a sixteenth-century motet or Mass movement in five parts;

(c) an eighteenth-century (Baroque style) aria or other ritornello-based movement;

(d) a sonata movement (not necessarily the first) from the period from Haydn to Brahms;

(e) a movement in a twentieth-century idiom (questions requiring familiarity with indeterminate or electronic techniques will not be set);

(f) such other form of music as the examiners may offer, provided that the examiners shall always offer material on each of (a)–(e). Papers will be available for collection in the Music Faculty Library from 12 noon on Friday in the eighth week of Hilary Full Term in the academic year of examination. The portfolio, accompanied by a declaration in the form prescribed in the schedule annexed to these regulations, must be submitted by candidates not later than noon on Friday of the first week of Trinity Full Term in the academic year of examination, to the Chairman of the Examiners, Honour School of Music, Examination Schools, Oxford.

This option may not be selected under List B(1) if it has already been selected under list A(3).

(2) Orchestration (portfolio submission)

Candidates will be required to submit one piece of orchestration, the style and technique of the orchestration being appropriate to the material set. A choice of pieces, taken from the period 1750 to the present day, will be set. Papers will be available for collection in the Music Faculty Library from 12 noon on Friday in the eighth week of Hilary Full Term in the academic year of examination. The portfolio, accompanied by a declaration in the form prescribed in the schedule annexed to these regulations, must be submitted by candidates not later than noon on Friday of the fourth week of Trinity Full Term in the academic year of examination, to the Chairman of the Examiners, Honour School of Music, Examination Schools, Oxford.

(3) Solo Performance, instrumental or vocal (practical test)

Candidates shall prepare a programme of works in varying styles and submit it for the approval of the examiners, not later than Friday in the fourth week of Hilary Full Term in the academic year of examination, addressed to the Chairman of the Examiners, Honour School of Music, Examination Schools, Oxford. They may indicate a single work or a complete movement which they would like to play in full. The time each piece takes to play must be stated. The programme shall be timed to last between 35–40 minutes, including breaks and pauses. If the programme significantly exceeds 40 minutes the examiners are entitled to curtail or interrupt the performance. Candidates must provide for accompaniment, where required.

Candidates are required to provide for the examiners one copy of each piece to be performed, in the edition used. The copies shall be presented to the examiners at the beginning of the examination and collected from them at the end.

(4) Composition (portfolio submission)

Candidates will be required to submit a portfolio of four original compositions as follows:

(a) a work of approximately five minutes' duration for solo instrument and piano;

(b) three of the following:

(i) a work of 8–10 minutes' duration for mixed choir (SATB) in up to eight parts;

(ii) a work for mixed ensemble (with or without vocal soloist) of 8–10 minutes' duration and scored for up to fourteen players (including one percussionist playing several instruments);

(iii) a work of 8–10 minutes' duration for one `live' performer and electronic resources, demonstrating both technical skill in the use of studio techniques and compositional imagination in dealing with the transformation of live and computer-generated sound;

(iv) a work (which may be of a partly or wholly electro-acoustic nature) at the candidate's pleasure.

Candidates intending to use the electronic studio in connection with this option are required to have attended the preliminary courses offered to undergraduates in their first year.

(5) Dissertation (portfolio submission)

Candidates must submit a dissertation of between 8,000 and 10,000 words (exclusive of bibliography) which has not been previously submitted for a degree of another university. The subject and title must be approved by the Board of the Faculty of Music. Details relating to approval and submission are given in the general note below.

(6) Edition with commentary (portfolio submission)

Candidates must submit an edition with commentary. Editions previously submitted for the Honour School of Music may be resubmitted. No edition will be accepted if it has already been submitted, wholly or substantially, for another Honour School or degree of this University, or a degree of any other institution. The work or works to be edited must be approved by the Board of the Faculty of Music. Details relating to approval and submission are given in the general note below.

(7) Analysis (portfolio submission)

Candidates must submit an analytical study of not more than 10,000 words which has not been previously submitted for a degree of another university. The subject and title must be approved by the Board of the Faculty of Music.

Details relating to approval and submission are given in the general note below.

List C (written papers; further practical tests)

The Board of the Faculty of Music shall approve, and publish each year by notice in the Faculty of Music, not later than the eighth week of Trinity Full Term, a list of subjects for the examination six terms thence. General Note on approval of subjects for List B (5), (6), and (7); and the submission of written work for List B (4)–(7).

(a) Approval of subjects

Candidates intending to submit any of B(5), (6), or (7) must obtain prior approval of the subject and title from the Board of the Faculty of Music. They are urged to seek early guidance from their college tutor on whether the subject is likely to be acceptable and must submit the proposed subject and title, together with the signed approval of the tutor, to the Chairman of the Board of the Faculty of Music, Faculty of Music, St Aldates, not earlier than the beginning of Trinity Full Term in the academic year preceding that of examination, and not later than noon on Friday of the first week of Michaelmas Full Term in the academic year of examination. The faculty board shall decide whether or not to approve the subject and title and shall advise the candidate as soon as possible.

(b) Submission of written work

Candidates must also submit one copy of the written work related to the examination of subjects B(4)–(7) by noon on Friday of the second week of Trinity Full Term in the academic year of examination. It must be addressed to the Chairman of the Examiners, Honour School of Music, Examination Schools, Oxford. Each submission must be accompanied by a declaration in the form prescribed in the schedule annexed to these regulations. In the case of B(5–7) the text of the work must be presented in typescript.'

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11 Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies

(a) Diploma in Jewish Studies

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 973, after l. 16 insert:

`2. Except where otherwise indicated, all material submitted for examination (dissertation, extended essays, etc.) shall be accompanied by a certificate signed by the candidate indicating that it is the candidate's own work.'

2 Ibid., l. 17, delete `2' and substitute `3'.

3 Ibid., l. 21, delete `All'.

4 Ibid., delete ll. 22–44 and substitute:

`Each module is to be offered for examination in Noughth Week fo the term following that in which the module was taken. Each module may be examined, at the candidate's choice, either by a written examination in Noughth Week of the term following that in which the module is taken or by the submission before 12 noon on the Friday of Noughth Week of the term following that in which the module is taken of a piece of written work of not more than 4,000 words on a subject set by the examiners. Candidates will be notified of the essay topic/s at 12 noon on the Friday of Eighth Week of the term in which the module is taken.

1. Introduction to Hebrew Bibliography

2. Introduction to Jewish Religion and Culture

3. Introduction to Judaism

4. Jewish and Christian Bible Translation and Interpretation, 100–600 ce

5. Jewish History 200 bce to 70 ce

6. Modern Jewish History

7. Sociology of Yiddish

8. Introduction to Maimonides

9. Modern Hebrew Literature

10. Dead Sea Scrolls

11. American Yiddish Culture

12. Modern Jewish Thought

13. Introduction to Talmud

14. Israeli Government and Politics

15. Judaism and Islam: An Encounter of Religions in the Middle East

16. The Holocaust: The Destruction of the Jews in Europe

17. Such other modules as may be approved by the Tutorial Committee, which shall define its scope and inform both the candidate and the teacher of this definition in writing.'

5 Ibid., l. 46, delete `25,000' and substitute `10,000'.

6 Ibid., p. 974, l. 1, delete `fifth' and substitute `sixth'.

7 Ibid., l. 2, delete `The dissertation shall have the weight of three modules.'

8 Ibid., l. 4, delete `3' and substitute `4'.

9 Ibid., l. 5, delete `4' and substitute `5'.

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(b) M.Phil. in Oriental Studies

(i) With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 624, l. 38, before `(a)' insert `(v)'.

2 Ibid., l. 41, after `Institute.' insert:

`Instead of one or two of numbers 1(i), 1(ii), 2(i), 3(iii), 3(iv), and 3(v), candidates may propose their own list(s) of texts. No more than one substitution may be made in any single paper. The choice of texts must be approved by the Board in each case.'

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(ii) With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 628, after l. 43, insert:

`A Qualifying Examination

Candidates must pass a qualifying examination in Sanskrit not later than the end of the second term of the academic year in which the candidate's name is first entered on the register of M.Phil. students unless exempted by the Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies.

B Final Examination'.

2 Ibid., p. 630, after l. 23, insert:

`A Qualifying Examination

Candidates must pass a qualifying examination in Jewish Studies not later than the end of the third term after that in which the candidate's name is first entered on the register of M.Phil. students unless exempted by the Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies.

B Final Examination'.

3 Ibid., l. 47, delete `in the academic year' and substitute `not later than the end of the third term after that'.

4 Ibid., ll. 48–9, delete `or with the approval of the faculty board, in a subsequent year, which' and substitute `unless exempted by the Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies. The examination'.

5 Ibid., p. 631, l. 8, after `language examination' insert `in Arabic or Persian or Turkish'.

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12 Board of the Faculty of Social Studies

(a) Preliminary Examination in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 102, delete ll. 37–48 and substitute:

`The paper will contain two sections.

(a) The Politics and Government of:

France from 1946 (including instability during the Fourth Republic; and stabilisation during the Fifth Republic, with particular reference to the constitution, legislature, executive, parties and party systems, state and welfare, and centre–pheriphery relations);

Germany from 1928 (including the collapse of the Weimar republic; the Nazi regime; and the German Federal Republic, with particular reference to the constitution, legislature, executive, parties and party systems, state and welfare, and centre–periphery relations);

Russia (and the Soviet Union) from 1917 to 1991 (including the leaderships of Lenin, Stalin, Khrushchev, Brezhnev, and Gorbachev, with particular reference to political violence, the party-state system, and attempts at reform); United Kingdom from 1945 (including the ebb and flow of political consensus; the constitution; legislature; executive; parties and party systems, state and welfare, and centre–periphery relations);

United States from 1932 (including the New Deal; the acquisition of civil rights by African-Americans; and the American political system since 1945, with particular reference to the constitution, legislature, executive, parties and party systems, state and welfare, and centre–periphery relations).'

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(b) M.Phil. and M.Sc. in Sociology

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 643, l. 31, after `in' insert `(i)'.

2 Ibid., l. 33, after `data' insert `, and (ii) methods of data collection, including questionnaire design, interviewing, and coding'.

3 Ibid., delete from p. 643, l. 43, to p. 644, l. 3, and sub- stitute:

`(b) Candidates will be required to produce an essay of up to 2,500 words evaluating the research design, methods of data collection and analysis, and any ethical or philosophical issues that arise in a specified research paper. The Director of Graduate Studies shall publish a list of research papers not later than noon on Monday of the first week of the second term; candidates will be required to select one from this list of papers as the subject for their essay.

Candidates shall submit their essay to the Clerk of the Schools by 12 noon on Monday of the first week of the third term of the course, accompanied by a statement that it is the candidate's own work except where otherwise indicated.'

4 Ibid., p. 644, delete ll. 24–30, and substitute:

`Sociology of Politics. Models of political partisanship and voting behaviour. The social bases of political organisation and partisanship including class, religion, ethnicity, and gender. The emergence of new social movements. The social and political processes involved in democratisation. The concept and explanatory role of political culture. Candidates will be expected to be familiar with the main theoretical approaches to the explanation of political behaviour, and must show knowledge of more than one society.'

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(c) M.Phil. in International Relations

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 614, l. 33, delete `international'.

2 Ibid., delete from p. 614, l. 36, to p. 615, l. 30, and substitute:

`(b) The Politics of the United Nations and its Agencies. Examines the evolving role of the United Nations in world politics. After a theoretical and historical introduction, the option examines the role and significance of the United Nations system in five functional areas: development, human rights, security, humanitarian action, and forced migration.

(c) The USSR and Russia in International Relations since 1945. The evolution of Soviet foreign policy under Stalin and Khrushchev; the rise and fall of dÄtente; the USSR and the Third World; ideology and Soviet foreign policy; the role of the military and military factors; the emergence of Russian foreign policy; the making of Russian foreign policy and the role of domestic factors; NATO enlargement and relations with Europe; policy in the `near abroad', including Ukraine, Central Asia, and the Caucasus.

(d) Strategic studies. The development of strategic thought and practice, and the place of strategic factors in international relations, since the early nineteenth century, with main emphasis on the period since the First World War. The course, which is varied from year to year in accordance with the research interests of the graduate students participating, encompasses the following: security concerns as motives of state behaviour; the phenomenon of civil war and international responses to it; the military implications of technological changes, including in weapons, delivery systems, information management and communications; strategic doctrine and practice in specific states, including the major powers, and in different regions of the world; the emergence of doctrines of deterrence, limited war, and peacekeeping; the roles of alliances and international organisations (including the United Nations) in the authorisation and management of force; aspects of international law relating to armed conflict; the attempts to develop alternatives to reliance on national armaments; negotiations about, and measures of, arms limitation and disarmament; the role of guerrilla warfare and non-violent forms of pressure in international relations; political assumptions of strategic thought.

(e) The United States in International Relations since 1945. This course examines the foreign policy of the United States since the end of the Second World War. Special emphasis is placed on the forces and factors that have shaped US foreign policy such as political culture, coalitions, the bureaucracy, and cognitive schemas and on the theories used by political scientists to explain the sources and the making of US foreign policy.

(f) The International Relations of the Middle East. This course covers the international politics of the Middle East and of the Persian Gulf with an emphasis on the period since 1945. There are three main elements: the foreign policies of the Arab states and the relations between them; the Arab–Israeli conflict; and external involvement in the affairs of the region. The course also examines a number of issue areas such as the impact of economic power, the role of Islam, secular ideologies, security, and the causes and consequences of war.

(g) International Political Economy. The interrelationship between the world economy and the international political system, including the principal theories regarding international political economy. The course seeks to integrate readings and discussions on theory and methodology and analysis of contemporary issues in IPE. Topics will include: the reconstruction of the international economy after 1945; the role of the US in the post-war period and theories of hegemonic stability; the politics of international trade and the evolution of the GATT/WTO system; the development of regional economic arrangements and the relationship between regionalism, multilateralism and globalisation in the world economy; the political economy of the European Single Market; the European Monetary Union; current issues in transatlantic economic relations.

(h) The Function of Law in the International Community. This course examines the basic aspects of the international legal system, including the sources of international law, the relationship between national law and international law, jurisdiction, state responsibility, and human rights. A central focus is the role of law in international politics, that is, in the day-to-day relations between states, between states and international organisations, and between states and individuals. The study of the theoretical and analytical aspects of international law, through the literature, is complemented by a practical focus on current issues, including the use of force, international humanitarian law, dispute management, economic conflict, and the role generally of international organisations, particularly the United Nations.

(i) The International Relations of East Asia. The Yalta settlement in 1945 and its contributions to establishing a durable security order in the region; the origins and impact of the cold war in the region, in particular through an examination of the Korean War, the transformation of the American occupation of Japan, and the onset of Sino-American hostility; the fracturing of the cold war system examined via the sub-regional organisation, ASEAN, the onset of the Sino-Soviet and Sino-Vietnamese conflicts, and Sino-American rapprochement; the features of the post-Cold War era, including an examination of newly- established institutions such as the ASEAN regional Forum (ARF) and Asia Pacific Economic Co-operation Forum (APEC). The course also examines a number of issues, such as the international causes and consequences of the economic rise of the regional states, of democratisation, and the impact of nuclear weapons. The course content varies to some degree from year to year in accordance with the research interests of those taking this option.

(j) Classical Theories of International Relations. This option provides an advanced understanding of the history of thought on International Relations in the period of the classical European state system, with particular emphasis on the period 1750–1939. Topics will include: theories of the state and the development of the concept of sovereignty; nationalism and national self-determination; international institutions (including international law, international organisation, the balance of power, and diplomacy); war and the use of force (including the evolution of strategic thought, doctrines of intervention, and ideas arising from the rise of the peace movement); liberal, marxist and mercantilist approaches to international political economy; imperialism and the expansion of international society; revolution and its impact on international relations; theories of progress and of historical change. The works bearing on these subjects by, inter alia: Rousseau, Herder, Mill, Mazzini, Hegel, Vattel, Hume. Kant, Burke, Castlereagh, von Gentz, Oppenheim, Clausewitz, Smith, Cobden, Bentham, List, Marx, Lenin, Angell, Wilson, Nietzsche, Carr, Zimmern. Candidates will also be expected to demonstrate knowledge of the principal methodological approaches to the history of political thought.

(k) The International Relations of the Developing World. The paper analyses the international relations of developing countries from 1945 to the present day. The focus is on the characteristics of developing states and their interaction with the political, economic, and military arrangements in the international system. The paper will address topics including: decolonisation and the emergence of the Third World; the nature of the state and problems of state building in developing countries; the political and economic forces which have shaped international arrangements for trade and finance since 1944; political and economic constraints on growth in the world economy; the international financial institutions and their political impact; the new politics of global investment; intervention, conflict, and their consequences; security and the politics of alliance formation; regionalism and `regimes'.

(l) The International Relations of Latin America. The recent history of US-Latin American relations, including the regional significance of the Cold War, impact of the end of the Cold War, and the making of US policy towards the region. Relations between the major European states and the European Union and the sub-continent. Foreign and security policies of the principal Latin American states, including interstate alliances, rivalries within the region and the international aspects of internal conflicts. Latin American perspectives on non-interventionism, international law, dispute settlements, the international human rights and regional and international organisations. Regional and sub-regional co-operation and integration schemes, including the Andean Community, Mercosur, NAFTA, and the proposed Free Trade Area of the Americas. The political economy of the multinational corporation, and international flows of capital, of labour (including undocumented migrants remittances), and narcotics. Theories of dependency and underdevelopment; liberalism; realism and foreign policy making. Interactions between domestic and international policy, including the international dimensions of democratisation.'

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13 Board of the Faculty of Theology

Honour School of Theology

With effect from l October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, delete from l. 19 on p. 517, to l. 23 on p. 530, and substitute:

`1. All candidates will be required to offer eight papers, as specified below, from the Schedule of Papers. There shall be four compulsory papers, taken by all candidates, covering the Old and New Testaments and the development of Christian Doctrine in its historical context. In addition to these compulsory papers, candidates will be required to offer four further papers chosen according to the schedules in either Track I, Track II, or Track III. Examination regulations applying to all Tracks

2. With the permission of the Board of the Faculty of Theology, any candidate may offer an essay either in place of one of the eight papers, or in addition to the eight required papers. The regulations governing essays are set out below.

3. Candidates not offering either paper (25) or (29) as optional papers may, in addition to their eight papers, also offer the Optional Translation papers in Old Testament Hebrew and/or New Testament Greek.

4. In papers (8) to (40), teaching may not be available every year on every subject.

5. Any candidate may be examined viva voce.

6. In the following regulations, the English version of the Bible used will be the Revised Standard Version. The Greek text used will be the text of the United Bible Societies, fourth edn., but in paper (3), The Synoptic Gospels, parallel texts will be taken from K. Aland, Synopsis Quattuor Evan- geliorum (fifteenth edn., Stuttgart, Deutsche Bibel Gesellschaft, 1997). The Hebrew text used will be the Biblia Hebraòca Stuttgartensia (Stuttgart, 1977). All candidates must offer eight subjects, as specified below, from the Schedule of Papers.

TRACK I

(i) Paper (1) or Paper (2)

(ii) Paper (3)

(iii) Paper (5)

(iv) Paper (6)

(v) Paper (7)

(vi) EITHER Paper (1) or Paper (2) (whichever paper is not offered under (i) above)

OR one paper chosen from Papers (23), (24), (25), (26), < p>(27), or (30).

(vii) One further paper.

(viii) One further paper.

Candidates may not offer Paper (4).

TRACK II

(i) Paper (1) or Paper (2)

(ii) Paper (3) or Paper (4) (candidates choosing Paper (3) must choose Paper (7) under (viii) below)

(iii) Paper (5)

(iv) Paper (6)

(v) One paper chosen from Papers (8), (9), or (10).

(vi) Paper (11).

(vii) EITHER Paper (12) or Paper (13)

OR a further option from Paper (11).

(viii) One further paper.

Candidates may not offer the following combination of options: Paper (3) and Paper (4), Paper (4) and Paper (7).

TRACK III

(i) Paper (1) or Paper (2)

(ii) Paper (3) or Paper (4) (candidates choosing Paper (3) must choose Paper (7) under (viii) below)

(iii) Paper (5)

(iv) Paper (6)

(v) Paper (14)

(vi) and

(vii) EITHER Papers (15) and (16) OR Papers (17) and (18) OR Papers (19) and (20) OR Papers (21) and (22).

(viii) One further paper.

Candidates may not offer the following combination of options: Paper (3) and Paper (4), Paper (4) and Paper (7).

Regulations concerning essays

1. Candidates may offer an extended essay either in place of the paper to be chosen under clause (viii) of Tracks I–III, or in addition to the eight required papers. Candidates should in general aim at a length of 10,000 words, but must not exceed 15,000 words (both figures inclusive of notes and appendices, but excluding bibliography).

2. Prior approval of the subject of the essay must be obtained from the Board of the Faculty of Theology. Such approval must be sought not later than Friday in the fourth week of Trinity Full Term in the year preceding the examination. The request for approval should be addressed to the Secretary of the Board of the Faculty of Theology, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford. The request must be accompanied by a letter from the tutor stating that this subject has his or her approval. The application should include, in about 100 words, an explanation as to how the topic will be treated, and a brief bibliography.

3. The candidate's application for approval of title should be submitted through and with the support of his or her college tutor or the tutor with overall responsibility for his or her studies, from whom he or she should seek guidance on whether the subject is likely to be acceptable to the Board.

4. The candidate is advised to have an initial discussion with his or her supervisor regarding the proposed field of study, the sources available, and the method of presentation. He or she should have further discussions with his or her supervisor during the preparation of the essay. His or her supervisor may read and comment on drafts of the essay.

5. The subject of the essay need not fall within the areas covered by the papers listed in the Honour School of Theology. It may overlap any subject or period on which the candidate offers papers, but the candidate is warned against reproducing the content of his or her essay in any answer to a question in the examination. Subject to the provisions of cl. 4 above, every candidate shall sign a certificate to the effect that the essay is his or her own work and that it has not already been submitted (wholly or substantially) for a final honour school other than one involving Theology, or another degree of this University, or a degree of any other institution. This certificate shall be presented together with the essay. No essay shall, however, be ineligible because it has been or is being submitted for any prize of this University.

6. The candidate must submit one typed copy of the essay (bound or held firmly in a stiff cover), addressed to the Chairman of the Examiners, Honour School of Theology, Examination Schools, Oxford, not later than noon on the Friday of the eighth week of Hilary Term in the academic year in which he or she is presenting himself or herself for examination. The certificate signed by the candidate in accordance with cl. 5 above must be submitted separately in a sealed envelope addressed to the Chairman of the Examiners at the above address at the same time as the essay is submitted.

7. The provisions of clauses 2–4 and clause 6 of these regulations will also apply to candidates submitting an extended essay as part of paper (40).

SCHEDULE OF PAPERS

(1) Israel to the end of the Exile

The paper will include historical, literary, and theological questions, and candidates will be required to comment on passages from the following texts in English, showing knowledge of at least three of the five groups of texts:

(a) Exodus 1–3; 6; 12–15; 19; 20; 24.

(b) Isaiah 1–12; 28–32.

(c) Psalms 2; 18; 45–8; 72; 74; 77; 89; 93; 110; 132; 137.

(d) 2 Kings 18–25.

(e) Ezekiel 1–18.

There will be an opportunity to comment on passages in Hebrew from:

Exodus 20; 24.

Psalms 45–8.

Credit will be given to candidates demonstrating competence in Biblical Hebrew.

(2) Israel from the beginning of the Exile to 4 BC

The paper will include historical, literary, and theological questions, and candidates will be required to comment on passages from the following texts in English, showing knowledge of at least three of the five groups of texts:

(a) Job 1–14; 38–42.

(b) Nehemiah 1:1–11:2; 13.

(c) Jonah; Ruth.

(d) Daniel.

(e) Isaiah 40–55.

There will be an opportunity to comment on passages in Hebrew from:

Nehemiah 4–5.

Isaiah 40–1.

Credit will be given to candidates demonstrating competence in Biblical Hebrew.

(3) The Synoptic Gospels

Candidates will be expected to show a general knowledge of the Synoptic Gospels, their theology and ethics, literary and historical problems, and historical research concerning Jesus, and to comment on a passage in Greek from Matthew, and on a passage in Greek with English supplied from Matthew 3–13 inclusive with parallels in Mark and/ or Luke. Candidates may restrict their comment to English texts if their other papers include translation and/or comment on at least two passages of Hebrew.

(4) The Theology and Ethics of the New Testament (with special reference to the gospels of Matthew and John, Romans, and 1 Corinthians) Questions will be set on the theology of the individual gospels (not just those specified), Pauline theology, the historical Jesus, the ethics of the New Testament, and the different methods of New Testament interpretation.

There will be a compulsory question containing passages for comment from Matthew, John, Romans, and 1 Corinthians, printed in both Greek and English. Candidates will be required to comment on at least three of the set texts. Candidates who have not passed either paper 6 (New Testament Greek) or paper 7 (Biblical Hebrew) in the Preliminary Examination for Theology will have to translate and comment on passages from Matthew 5–7, 26–8 and John 1–6 which will be printed only in Greek, unless their other papers include translation and/or comment on at least two passages of Hebrew. The passages printed only in Greek will be optional for all other candidates.

(5) The Development of Doctrine in the Early Church to AD 451

Candidates will be expected to explain how early Christian thinkers undertook to clarify the teachings of the primitive Church and formulate a coherent system of thought in their cultural context. The paper will not only concern itself with formal pronouncements on the doctrines of the Trinity and Incarnation, but also with other controversies and the contributions of particular theologians.

Questions relevant to the Gnostic, Arian, Nestonian, and Pelagian controversies will always be set; other questions may relate, wholly on partly, to such topics as anthropology, soteriology, hermeneutics, ecclesiology, political theology, and the doctrine of creation and the fall. Candidates will be required to comment on a passage from one of the following texts or group of texts:

The Nicene Definition, Arius' Letter to Eusebius, Arius' Letter to Alexander (from E.R. Hardy, Christology of the Later Fathers, Library of Christian Classics).

Gregory of Nyssa, That there are not Three Gods (in Hardy, op. cit.).

Cyril's Second Letter to Nestorius (in R.A. Norris, The Christological Controversy, Philadelphia: Fortress Press).

The tome of Leo and the Chalcedonian Definition (in Norris op. cit.).

Credit will be given to candidates who show knowledge (where appropriate) of the other texts contained in Norris.

(6) Christian Doctrine and Interpretation

The paper will consist of questions on the major themes of Christian Doctrine and the norms and methods of Christian Theology.

Candidates will be expected to show a critical understanding of twentieth-century theological discussion, and its use of the Bible and traditional formulations, and of some of the problems posed for such discussions by modern intellectual developments.

(7) Paul and John

Candidates will be expected to show a knowledge of the theological, ethical, literary, and historical issues posed by (a) the Gospel of John, and (b) Romans and/or 1 Corinthians. They will be required to comment on passages from these texts in English, and will have the opportunity to translate and comment on John 1–10; Romans 3–8; and 1 Corinthians 1–7; 15 in Greek.

(8) The History and Theology of Western Christianity, 1050–1350 The paper will consist of questions on the thought of the leading theologians (especially Anselm, Peter Abelard, Aquinas, Duns Scotus, and William of Ockham), and of questions on the main developments in the western church. It will be so set that any period of 150 years, with its theological writers, will provide sufficient coverage.

(9) The History and Theology of Western Christianity, 1500–1619

The subject includes the work and thought of the leading reformers, especially Luther, Zwingli, and Calvin, together with the radicals, and the development of the Reformation in European society. Questions will be set both on renewal in the Roman Catholic Church, and on religious change in England from the Henrician reforms to the reign of James I.

(10) EITHER

A. Christian Life and Thought In Europe, 1789–1914

Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the life and thought of the Christian Church (with special reference to Britain) and the development of Christian theology in its historical context. Candidates will be given opportunity to demonstrate knowledge of the following texts:

F.D.E. Schleiermacher, Speeches on Religion.

L. Feuerbach, The Essence of Christianity.

S. Kierkegaard, Philosophical Fragments.

J.H. Newman, Lectures on the Prophetical Office.

A. Ritschl, Justification and Reconciliation, vol. III.

OR

B. Christology from Kant to Troeltsch 1789–1914

Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the impact of modern philosophy and of cultural and historical criticism on Christology, as reflected in some of the following writers: Kant, Schleiermacher, Hegel, Strauss, Baur, Kierkegaard, Thomasius, Ritschl, Kähler, Nietzsche, Harnack, Wrede, Schweitzer, Kautsky, and Troeltsch. Candidates will be required to comment on a selection of the following texts:

I. Kant, Religion within the Limits of Reason Alone (Harper Torchbooks, 1960), pp. 85–138.

F.D.E. Schleiermacher, The Christian Faith (T. and T. Clark, 1956), pp. 374–475.

G.W.F. Hegel, Lectures on the Philosophy of Religion, ed. P.C. Hodgson (University of California Press, 1985), vol. III, pp. 310–47.

D.F. Strauss, The Life of Jesus Critically Examined, ed. P.C. Hodgson (Fortress, 1972), pp. 40–63 and 757–84; The Christ of Faith and the Jesus of History ed. L.E. Keck (Fortress, 1977), pp. 19–37 and 159–69.

C. Thomasius, Christ's Person and Work, Part 2: The Person of the Mediator, in God and Incarnation in Mid-Nineteenth Century German Theology, ed. C. Welch (Oxford University Press, 1965), pp. 31–88.

A. Ritschl, Justification and Reconciliation (T. and T. Clark, 1900, reprint 1966), vol. III, pp. 385–484.

M. Kähler, The So-Called Historical Jesus and the Historic Biblical Christ, ed. C.E. Braaten (Fortress, 1964), pp. 46–97.

E. Troeltsch, `The Significance of the Historical Existence of Jesus for Faith' in Ernst Troeltsch: Writings on Theology and Religion, ed. R. Morgan and M. Pye (Duckworth, 1977), pp. 182–207.

(11) Further Studies in History and Doctrine

Candidates will be expected to study one major theologian in relation to the situation and problems of the time, with special attention to certain texts. In the Trinity Term of each year the Board of the Faculty of Theology will publish a list of theologians (with texts) on which teaching will be provided in the following academic year and on which the examination will be based. In the event of a candidate's opting to take a year out after having studied a chosen theologian, the examiners will set questions on that theologian in the year of that candidate's examination, even if that theologian is not available for study that year. Texts will be studied in English. One or two optional questions may be set which will require knowledge of the texts in original languages when these are other than English.

A candidate may offer a second major theologian from amongst those available in the year of his or her examination. In the event that a candidate does choose to offer a second major theologian, that candidate will offer paper 11 as two papers. To facilitate this, separate papers (11(a), 11(b) etc.) will be set for each major theologian.

(12) Philosophy of Religion

The subject will include an examination of claims about the existence of God, and God's relation to the world: their meaning, the possibility of their truth, and the kind of justification which can or needs to be provided for them, and the philosophical problems raised by the existence of different religions. One or two questions may also be set on central claims peculiar to Christianity, such as the doctrines of the Trinity, Incarnation, and Atonement.

(13) Christian Moral Reasoning

Candidates will be expected to elucidate and assess themes in the Christian tradition of ethical teaching and their contribution to contemporary moral and social debates. The paper will consist of four sections: (a) Christian Moral Concepts; (b) Government and its tasks: (e) Medical Ethics: (d) Sexual Ethics. Candidates will be required to answer three or four questions, of which at least one question must be answered from section (a), and at least one from another section.

(a) Christian Moral Concepts

The major moral concepts in Christian thought, such as: love, natural and revealed law, the supreme good, conscience, virtues, sin, justification, and grace; and contribution to contemporary discussions. Candidates may treat questions on these subjects primarily with reference to their sources in the Bible, if they so wish.

(b) Government and its Tasks

Theological interpretations of: justice, law and authority; forms of government, local, national, and international; government, society, and the church; the coercive use of force in punishment and war, responsibilities for education, employment, economy, and environment.

(c) Medical Ethics

Such topics as: the doctor–patient relationship and its social context; planned parenthood, contraception, and abortion in both personal and social contexts; artificial reproduction, genetic manipulation; experimentation on humans; organ transplantation; priorities in treatment and research; the prolongation of life, terminal care, and the ending of life.

(d) Sexual Ethics

Such topics as celibacy, the goods of marriage, the sacramentality of marriage, divorce, polygamy, homosexuality, the sexual sins, the social differentiation of the sexes, the connection of body and soul in sexual contexts, erotic affection.

(14) The Nature of Religion

The paper will consist of questions on the main classical and contemporary approaches to the study of religions; the main attempts to define religion; differing approaches to the study of religion in anthropology, sociology, philosophy, and theology; and the major explanations that have been offered for religious belief. Candidates should be aware of issues involved in claims for religious truth and rationality, and of twentieth-century discussions of religious conflict and diversity.

(15) Judaism I: The Formation of Rabbinic Judaism

The paper will include the study of:

(a) Judaism in the first century. Rabbinic Judaism's emergence from matrix of movements (Sadducees, Essenes, Samaritans, Christians) laying claim to the authority of the Hebrew Scriptures.

(b) Primary sources of rabbinic Judaism: Mishna/Tosefta; Targum; Midrash; liturgy. Acceptance of the Mishna as authoritative code. The `eclipse' of the Alexandrine Jewish intellectual tradition of Philo.

(c) Development of the primary sources in the Talmudim of Babylonia and the Land of Israel, noting the Zoroastrian and Pagan/Christian environments respectively.

Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of such texts (in English translation) as are prescribed by the Board of the Faculty of Theology in the Michaelmas Term of the academic year preceding the examination.

(16) Judaism II: Judaism in History and Society Candidates will be expected to answer questions on two out of the following three sections covered by the paper:

(a) The Gaonic period in Islamic Babylonia. Final redaction of the classical texts. Development of the liturgy. Internal Jewish debates on the calendar and between Rabbinates and Karaites. Confrontation with other faiths, with rationalist philosophy, with serious critiques of both scripture and the rabbinic tradition. The following will be set for special study: Saadia Gaon; the impact of Geniza studies.

(b) From Maimonides to the Zohar; tensions between rationalist philosophers and kabbalists in the High Middle Ages. The shift of the `centre of gravity' in Judaism from Babylonia to the West. Effects of the Crusades, the Inquisition, and the Renaissance on Judaism.

(c) The impact on Jewish thought and society of the Enlightenment and the Emancipation. The growth of Hasidism in the eighteenth and Reform in the nineteenth century will be studied as a preliminary to an examination of the range of Jewish sects or denominations today. The contemporary Jewish scene; responses to the Holocaust, to the establishment of the State of Israel, to the women's movement. This paper may only be offered by candidates also offering paper 15.

(17) Islam I: the Formative Period of Islam

This paper examines the Islamic tradition as it emerged from the seventh to the twelfth centuries, paying particular attention to the issue of religious authority. Topics include: scripture, Islamic law, sectarianism, and political thought. Students will be required to read primary sources in English translation (Qur'an, Hadith; law, political thought) and critical secondary literature. Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of such texts (in English translation) as are prescribed by the Board of the Faculty of Theology in the Michaelmas Term of the academic year preceding the examination.

(18) Islam II: Islam in the Modern Middle East

This paper examines the development of Islam as a religion in the modern Middle East. Special attention is paid to Islamic religious thought. Topics include: the historical and political contexts; new interpretations of traditional sources; Islamic movements; Islamic modernism. Students will be required to read English translations of primary texts as well as secondary sources. This paper may only be offered by candidates also offering paper 17.

(19) Buddhism I: Early Buddhist Doctrine and Practice

The earliest Buddhist doctrine is studied against the background of the early Upanishads and other religious movements in north-east India about the fifth century BC. Practice includes both meditation and monastic life. The primary source is the Pali Canon supplemented by the commentarial literature of the Theravadin tradition. Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of such texts (in English translation) as are prescribed by the Board of the Faculty of Theology in the Michaelmas Term of the academic year preceding the examination.

(20) Buddhism II: Buddhism in History and Society

The paper falls into two main parts. The first part covers the history of Buddhism's diffusion through Asia, beginning with the emperor Asoka (third century bc); what forms of Buddhism have dominated which states and societies (and when), and their main similarities and differences; the development of Buddhist institutions. The second part deals with Buddhism in modern Asia. This paper may only be offered by candidates also offering paper 19.

(21) Hinduism I: Brahmanism

The paper will include the study of the traditions of practice and belief that are held to rest on the authority of Vedic revelation, namely the Vedas proper (including the Upanishads), the Dharmasastras, the Epics, and the Puranas. Candidates will be expected to understand the difference between the Srauta, Smarta, and Paurnnika domains of observance, the manner of their coexistence, and the relevant aspects of the Brahmanical institutions of the joint family, caste, and the stages or alternative forms of the religious life. In the field of doctrine candidates will be examined on the soteriologies of the Mimamsaka ritualists and the principal traditions of Upanishadic exegesis, namely the Advaita of Sankara and his followers, the Visistadvaita of the Srivaisnavas, and the Dvaita of the Madhvas.

(22) Hinduism II: Saivism, Vaisnavism, and Modern Hindu Movements

The paper will include the study of the practices and beliefs of those who based their religious life on the authority of scriptures which they held to have been revealed by Siva or Visnu as teachings above the level of the Vedas. In the field of Saivism candidates will be expected to know the essentials of the observances and theologies of the Pasupatas and Saiddhantika Saivas, the practices of the Bhairava and Sakta (Kaula) systems, the doctrines of the Kashmirian exegetes of the cults of Bhairava and Kali, the Tamil tradition of Saiva devotion, and Virasaivism. In the field of Vaisnavism candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the Pancaratra and the traditions of devotion to Krsna. They will also be expected to be familiar with the major Hindu religious movements of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. This paper may only be offered by candidates also offering paper 21.

(23) Selected topics (Old Testament) I

Candidates will be required to show detailed knowledge of one of the following topics. They will be required to comment on passages from the prescribed texts in English (Revised Standard Version), and will be given an opportunity to comment upon the Hebrew text of certain specified chapters and sections.

(i) Prophecy

l Samuel 9; 10

2 Samuel 7

l Kings 13; 18; 22

Isaiah 1; 5–8; 10; 40; 42–4; 49; 51–3; 55

Jeremiah 1–5; 7–9; 11; 12; 26–8; 31

Ezekiel 1–4; 8-11; 14; 18; 20; 23; 36; 37

Amos 1–5; 6–9

Zechariah 1–8; 13

Among these the following may be offered in Hebrew:

l Kings 13; 18; 22

Isaiah 42–4

Amos 1–5

(ii) Apocalyptic

Isaiah 24–7

Daniel

Zechariah

l Enoch 1–16 (ed. H.F.D. Sparks, The Apocryphal Old Testament, OUP, 1984)

2 Esdras 3–14

Revelation

Among these the following may be offered in Hebrew:

Isaiah 24–7

Zechariah 9–14

(24) Selected topics (Old Testament) II

Candidates will be required to show detailed knowledge of one of the following topics. They will be required to comment on passages from the prescribed texts in English (Revised Standard Version), and will be given an opportunity to comment upon the Hebrew text of certain selected chapters and sections.

(i) Wisdom

Proverbs 1–9; 22:17–31:31

Job 1–19; 38–42

Ecclesiastes

Wisdom of Solomon 1–9

Ecclesiasticus (Sirach) Prologue; 1:1–25:12; 36:18–43:33; 51

Among these the following may be offered in Hebrew:

Proverbs 1–9

(ii) Worship and Liturgy

Exodus 12–15; 19; 20; 24

Leviticus 1–7; 16

Deuteronomy 12–18

l Kings 5–8

l Chronicles 16

Psalms 2; 18; 24; 27; 47–51; 68; 72; 78; 89; 95–100; 110; 113–18; 122; 124; 126; 128; 130–2

A.E. Cowley, Aramaic Papyri of the fifth Century bc (OUP, 1923), nos. 21; 30–4

Among these the following may be offered in Hebrew:

Exodus 19; 20; 24

Leviticus 16

Psalms 24; 95–100

(25) The Hebrew of the Old Testament

Candidates will be required to show a general knowledge of the language, with a special study of the following prose texts from which passages will be set for translation and comment:

Genesis 6–9

Exodus 20; 24

l Kings 17–2 Kings 2

Nehemiah 4–6

Candidates will also be given an opportunity to show knowledge of Hebrew verse, and especially of the following texts, from which passages will be set for translation and comment:

Joel

Psalms 1; 23; 24; 45–8; 96

Isaiah 40–5

Candidates who do not offer Hebrew verse will not thereby be penalised.

(26) Archaeology in relation to the Old Testament

The subject includes the geography of Palestine and of the neighbouring lands; the history of the development of Canaanite, Hebrew, and Jewish social life and culture; the history of places of worship and their furniture; and the general results of recent archaeological research in the Ancient Near East, insofar as they throw light on these subjects.

(27) Religions and Mythology of the Ancient Near East

The paper will include a wide range of questions. The following texts are prescribed for special study:

(a) Akkadian Myths and Epics: The Epic of Gilgamesh (standard version) and the Creation Epic, in S. Dalley, Myths from Mesopotamia (OUP, 1989), pp. 50–125, 233–74.

(b) Hittite Myths: The disappearance of Telepinu (version 1), The Song of Kumarbi, in H.A. Hoffner, Hittite Myths (Scholars Press, 1990), pp. 14–17, 40–3.

(c) Egyptian Myths, Hymns, and Prayers: in M. Lichtheim, Ancient Egyptian Literature (Berkeley, University of California Press, 1975–80), vol. I, pp. 51–7, 131–3; vol. II, pp. 81– 132, 197–9, 203–23.

(d) Ugaritic Myths: Baal and Yam, The Palace of Baal, Baal and Mot, in J.C.L. Gibson, Canaanite Myths and Legends (2nd edn., T. and T. Clark, 1978)

(e) The Sefire Inscriptions, in J.C.L. Gibson, Textbook of Syrian Semitic Inscriptions, vol. II (OUP, 1975) pp. 18–56.

(f) Philo of Byblos' Phoenician History, in H.W. Attridge and R.A. Oden, Philo of Byblos, The Phoenician History (Catholic Biblical Association of America, 1981).

(28) Luke—Acts, Epistles, and Apocalypse

Candidates will be expected to answer questions on two out of the following three sections, including comment questions on the English passages selected, where the text will be that of the Revised Standard Version. The Greek texts also set for translation and comment (from United Bible Societies, fourth edn.) are optional.

(a) Luke–Acts, with Luke 19–24 and Acts 1–15 set in English for comment, and Luke 19–24 set in Greek for optional translation and comment.

(b) The Pauline corpus (13 epistles), with Galatians, Philippians, and Ephesians set in English for comment, and Galatians set in Greek for optional comment.

(c) Hebrews to the Apocalypse, with Hebrews and l John set in English for comment and Hebrews 1–2 and l John set in Greek for optional comment.

(29) The New Testament in Greek

Candidates will choose passages for translation from amongst a number taken from the Greek New Testament and will be required to show a knowledge of the critical and theological issues involved in some of the passages they translate. The text used will be that of the United Bible Societies, fourth edn. The selection of passages set will allow this detailed knowledge to be limited to the following texts and chapters: Acts 20–6, Colossians, l and 2 Thessalonians, Hebrews 7–10, James, l and 2 Peter, Revelation 1–12. But there will also be opportunity to show such detailed knowledge outside these specified chapters.

(30) Varieties of Judaism 100 bc–ad 100

The paper will include a number of general questions and the following texts are prescribed for special study:

Set texts in English:

Qumran Community Rule, Commentary on Habakkuk, in G. Vermes, The Dead Sea Scrolls in English (second edn., Pelican Books, 1975).

Josephus, Jewish War II (Loeb, 1956); Antiquities XVIII, 1–119 (Loeb, 1965); Against Apion II, 145–296 (Loeb, 1956).

IV Ezra, ed. B.M. Metzger in J.H. Charlesworth, ed., The Old Testament Pseudepigrapha (Darton, Longman, and Todd, 2 vols., 1983, 1985).

Testament of Moses, ed. J. Priest, in Charlesworth, op. cit.

Wisdom of Solomon (Revised Standard Version).

Philo, Migration of Abraham, Life of Moses 1,1–84 (Loeb, 1958)

Joseph and Aseneth, ed. C. Burchard, in Charlesworth, op. cit.

Psalms of Solomon VIII, IX, XVII, tr. S.P. Brock in H.F.D. Sparks (ed.), The

Apocryphal Old Testament (OUP, 1984).

l Enoch 37–71, tr. M.A. Knibb in Sparks, op. cit.

Sibylline Oracles III, ed. J.J. Collins, in Charlesworth, op. cit.

Any or all of the following texts may be offered in the original languages:

Qumran Community Rule 1–4, in E. Lohse (edn.), Die Texte aus Qumran, Hebräisch und Deutsch (second ed., Darmstadt, Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft, 1971).

Qumran Commentary on Habakkuk, ed. E. Lohse, op. cit.

Josephus, Antiquities XVIII, 1–28, 63–4, 109–19 (Loeb, 1965).

Philo, Life of Moses I, 1–44 (Loeb, 1958).

Joseph and Aseneth, in M. Philonenko ed., Joseph et Aséneth (E.J. Brill, 1968).

(31) The Beginnings of the Church and its Institutions to AD 170

Candidates will be expected to show a knowledge of the history, worship, and institutions of the church in this period, including baptism, eucharist, forms of ministry, models of the church, house-churches, heresy and orthodoxy, apostolic tradition, appeals to scripture, relations with the synagogue, marriage, communications, diet. They will be required to comment on passages from the following texts in English translation:

Set Texts:

Ephesians, l and 2 Timothy, Titus, Jude, l Clement (Loeb Apostolic Fathers I, 1912) Chs. 1–6, 36–65.

Epistles of Ignatius (Loeb Apostolic Fathers I, 1912) to The Ephesians, Smyrneans, Philadelphians.

The Didache (Loeb Apostolic Fathers I, 1912).

The Epistle of Barnabas (Loeb Apostolic Fathers I,1912).

Ptolemy's Letter to Flora. New Eusebius ed. J. Stevenson

(revised ed., 1983).

Shepherd of Hermas, Vision 3 (Loeb Apostolic Fathers II, 1913).

Justin first Apology 31–41, 61–7 (1997) L.W. Barnard in Ancient Christian Writers Vol. 56 (Paulist N.Y., 1997)

Justin Dialogue with Trypho 47, 90–111 (Ante-Nicene Fathers, reprinted 1989).

The following may also be offered in Greek:

l Timothy, 2 Timothy, Titus, Ignatius to the Ephesians (Loeb): Didache 7–16 (Loeb); Justin first Apology 61, 65–7 (ed. M.Marcovich 1994).

(32) Early Liturgy

Candidates will be expected to study the rites of initiation and the eucharist with the development of the Christian liturgical year up to ad 451 and the theology of liturgical worship in the light of anthropological, sociological, artistic and linguistic considerations.

The following texts are set for special study:

E.C. Whitaker, Documents of the Baptismal Liturgy (second edn., SPCK, 1970), pp. 1–19, 30–41, 44–50, 83–5, 127–33.

R.C.D. Jasper and G.J. Cuming, Prayers of the Eucharist. Early and Reformed (third edn., Pueblo, 1987), pp. 7–12, 20–44, 52–81, 88–113, 129–37, 143–67.

E.J. Yarnold, The Awe-Inspiring Rites of Initiation (second edn., T. and T. Clark, 1994) pp. 70–97.

J. Wilkinson, tr. and ed., Egeria's Travels (SPCK, 1971), pp. 123–47 (section 24 to the end).

(33) Early Syriac Christianity

Candidates will be expected to show a general knowledge of symbolism in the theology of the early Syriac Church.

The following texts are prescribed for special study:

Odes of Solomon 6, 11, 17, 19, 21, 24, 30, 36, 42, tr. J.A. Emerton in H.F.D. Sparks. The Apocryphal Old Testament (OUP, 1984).

Acts of Thomas, secs. 1–29, 108–14, tr. A.F.J. Klijn (E.J. Brill, 1962).

Aphrahat, Demonstrations 1, 4, 6, 12 (Dem. l and 6 tr. in J. Gwynn, ed. Select Library of Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers II.13 [1898, repr. W.B. Eerdmans, 1956], Dem. 4, tr. S.P. Brock, The Syriac Fathers on Prayer and the Spiritual Life [1987], ch. 1; Dem. 12, tr. in J. Neusner, Aphrahat and Judaism [E.J. Brill, 1971]).

Ephrem, Sermon on Our Lord, tr. in E. Mathews and J. Amar, St Ephrem the Syrian.

Selected Prose Works (1994);

Hymns on the Nativity, nos. l and 2, tr. K. McVey, St Ephrem the Syrian.

Hymns (Classics of Western Spirituality, 1989);

Hymns on Faith, no. 10, Hymns on the Church, no. 36; Hymns on Epiphany, nos. l and 6; tr. S.P. Brock in T. Finn, Early Christian Baptism and the Catechumenate (1992);

The Hymns, tr. S.P. Brock, The Harp of the Spirit: Eighteen Poems of St Ephrem (Fellowship of St Alban and St Sergius, second edn. 1983);

Letter to Publius, tr. S.P. Brock, Le MusÄon (1976);

Book of Steps, Homily 12, tr. R. Murray, Symbols of Church and Kingdom (CUP, 1975).

(34) Backgrounds to Early Christianity 30–529 AD

Candidates will be expected to answer questions from two of the following sections, showing detailed knowledge of aspects of life and thought in the Roman Empire which are relevant to the understanding of the New Testament and early Christianity. Passages for comment will be set in English from the prescribed texts in all five sections. Texts will be read in the Loeb Classical Library edition, unless otherwise indicated.

(a) Exegesis. Jewish, Christian, and pagan forms of exegesis. The distinction between literal, tropological, and psychagogic approaches. Theories of translation. Formation of canons.

Philo of Alexandria, Who is the Heir of Divine Things?

Augustine, On Christian Doctrine, Book II. ed. and trans. R.P. Green (Glarendon Press 1995)

(b) Philosophy. The doctrines of the major schools. Philosophy and life. Relations between Christians and philosophers. The place of apologetic and polemic in philosophy.

Epictetus, The Enchiridion (in vol. 2 of the Loeb edition)

Plotinus, Enneads I.8

(c) Religion. Personal, ethnic, civil and mystery religions. The place of religion in life.

Rituals and images. Hierarchy and gender. Attitudes of political authorities to religion. Apuleius, Metamorphoses (Golden Ass), Book 11.

Aristides of Athens, Apology. Ed. and trans. J. Armitage Robinson, Texts and Studies 26–44, 1891.

(d) Literature. Rhetoric and education. Genre in pagan and Biblical literature. Christian knowledge of Greek and Latin classics. The production, circulation, and readership of ancient books.

Quintillian: selections in D.A. Russell and M. Winterbottom, Ancient Literary Criticism (OUP, 1972), pp. 372–422.

Basil of Caesarea, On how a young man ought to read Greek literature (Letters, vol. 4 in Loeb edition).

(e) Society. Labour and wealth. Ethnicity and gender.

Attitudes to the body and sexuality. Hellenisation and Romanitas.

Clement of Alexandria, On the Rich Man's Salvation (in vol. 2 of the Loeb edition).

Tertullian, De Spectaculis.

(35) History and Theology of the Church in the Byzantine Empire from ad 1000 to AD 1453

Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the constitution and worship of the Church; monasticism; the development of mystical theology; the relations between Church and state and with the Western Church.

(36) English Church and Mission 597–754

Candidates will be expected to study the main lines of the history of the English Church in this period, and some aspects of its theology. There will also be an opportunity to study works of art. Candidates will be expected to have studied the texts in Group I, on which alone gobbets will be set, and in at least one of sections (a), (b), (c) in Group II.

Group I

(a) Bede, Ecclesiastical History of the English People, Preface, Bks I, 23–4; II; III; IV; V, 9–10, 19. (trans. L. Sherley-Price, revised R.E. Latham, with introduction and notes by D.H. Farmer, Penguin Classics, 1990) pp. 41–3, 72–265, 278–82, 300–6.

(b) Bede's Letter to Egbert, trans D.H. Farmer, ibid., pp. 337–51.

(c) Bede, On the Temple, trans. S. Connolly, in J. O'Reilly (Liverpool University Press: Translated Texts for Historians 21, 1995), Prologue and Book I to I, 8.4, pp. 1–33; Book II, 18.8 to 20.9, pp. 76–100.

(d) Eddius Stephanus, Life of Wilfrid in The Age of Bede, (ed. D.H. Farmer , trans. J. Webb, Penguin Classics 1988) pp. 105–82.

(e) `The Dream of the Rood' , in A Choice of Anglo-Saxon Verse, ed. and trans. R. Hamer (Faber, 1970), pp. 161–71.

Group II

(a) Adomnan of lona, Life of St Columba, ed. and trans. R. Sharpe, (Penguin Classics, 1995).

(b) Bede, Life of Cuthbert, in The Age of Bede (Penguin Classics, 1988), pp. 41–102. Bede, Lives of the Abbots of Wearmouth and Jarrow, ibid., pp. 185–208.

Bede's Homily on the Gospel for the Feast of St Benedict Biscop, in Bede, Homilies on the Gospels, trans. L.T. Martin and D. Hurst, Preface by B. Ward, (Cistercian Studies Series, 110, 1991), pp. 125–32.

Letters of Aldhelm, in Aldhelm, The Prose Works, trans. M. Lapidge and M. Herren (Boydell and Brewer, 1979), pp. 152–70.

(c) Willibald's Life of St Boniface and The Correspondence of St Boniface, in C.H. Talbot, The Anglo-Saxon Missionaries in Germany (Stead and Ward, 1954), pp. 25–62, 65–149.

(37) Christian Spirituality

Candidates will be expected to discuss Christian prayer in its theological, psychological, and historical aspects, paying particular attention to contemplation and mystical prayer. There will be four groups of texts, and candidates will be expected to have studied two of them.

(a) Patristics

Gregory of Nyssa, The Life of Moses, Book 2, tr. A.J. Malherbe and E. Ferguson, The Classics of Western Spirituality (SPCK/ Paulist Press, 1978) pp. 55–137.

Ps.-Macanius, Homilies 1, 5, 15, tr. G.A. Maloney, The Classics of Western Spirituality (SPCK/Paulist Press, 1992).

Evagrius Ponticus, The Praktikos and Chapters on Prayer. (Translations available in Faculty Library).

Ps.-Dionysius the Areopagite, The Mystical Theology. (Translations available in Faculty Library).

(b) English Fourteenth-century Mysticism

The Cloud of Unknowing, tr. J. Walsh, The Classics of Western Spirituality (SPCK/Paulist Press, 1981).

Julian of Norwich: Revelations of Divine Love, tr. E. Colledge and J. Walsh, The Classics of Western Spirituality (SPCK/ Paulist Press 1978).

(c) Spanish Mysticism

Teresa of Avila, The Interior Castle, tr. Allison Peers in Complete Works, vol. II (Sheed and Ward, 1946), pp. 199–351.

John of the Cross, Living flame of Love, second redaction, tr. Allison Peers in Complete Works, vol. III (3 vols in one, Anthony Clarke, 1978) pp. 103–95.

(d) The Wesleys and William Law

Texts in A.C. Outler, ed., John Wesley, Library of Protestant Theology (OUP 1964), pp. 197–231, 251–98 (i.e. Sermons on Justification by Faith and on The Witness of the Spirit; Discourse II on The Law Established by Faith; Sermon on Christian Perfection; The Scripture Way of Salvation, Thoughts on Christian Perfection).

E.H. Sugden, ed., The Standard Sermons of John Wesley, vol. 11(seventh edn. Epworth Press, 1968). Sermons 32 (The Nature of Enthusiasm), 34 (Catholic Spirit), 39 (New Birth), 40 (Wilderness State).

H.A. Hodges and A.M. Allehin, A Rapture of Praise. Hymns of John and Charles Wesley (Hodder and Stoughton, 1966). The following hymns: 3, 9, 22, 27, 38, 54, 55, 81, 84, 90, 105, 118, 124, 126, 131.

William Law: The Spirit of Prayer: Part 1, ed. S. Spencer (James Clarke, 1969).

(38) The Sociology of Religion

The paper will consist of two parts. Candidates will be expected to answer at least one question from each part.

(a) Texts

Candidates will be expected to know at least two of the following in detail:

(i) K. Marx, Theses on Feuerbach and The German Ideology ch. 1, ed. C. Arthur (Lawrence and Wishart, 1985), together with Capital, chapters l and 13 (Penguin Books, 1990).

(ii) E. Durkheim, The Elementary Forms of the Religious Life (Allen and Unwin, 1976).

(iii) M. Weber, The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism (Harper Collins, 1991).

(iv) E. Troeltsch, The Social Teaching of the Christian Churches (2 vols., J. Knox, 1992).

(v) Religion and History, ed. Adams (T. and T. Clark, 1991).

(vi) Talcott Parsons, Action Theory and the Human Condition (New York, 1978).

(b) Themes

Candidates will be expected to be able to discuss the following issues in their relation to religious formations: class, gender, race, legitimation, power structures, violence, sects and cults. Questions will be set on sociological readings of other parts of the Theology syllabus, includ- ing Biblical studies, doctrine, and Church history. Familiarity with contemporary sociological discussion will be assumed.

(39) Psychology of Religion

The paper will cover theories about aspects of behaviour or experiences relevant to religion and the empirical evidence on these theories. Psychological research methods and their applicability to different aspects of religion such as conversion, prayer, worship. Cognitive and non-cognitive (i.e. psychoanalytic and affective) accounts of religion. Normal and abnormal religious behaviour. Origin and development of religious concepts. Moral development. Constructs of theological psychology (e.g. soul; conscience, sin, and guilt; repentance; forgiveness; mercy) and their status in contemporary psychology. Psychology applied to pastoral concerns: religious education; marriage; health; death and bereavement; substance abuse.

(40) The Bible: Its Use and Influence

Candidates for this paper will be expected to have an understanding of the authority and role of the Bible in theological and ethical discussion and in Christian practice and liturgy. There will also be an opportunity to consider theories of interpretation, the use of the Bible in non-academic as well as academic contexts, and visual, dramatic and musical, as well as literary explorations of the Bible. A wide range of questions will be set, allowing candidates to concentrate on particular periods and issues. The Board (through the Handbook for Students in the final Honour School of Theology) may prescribe for more detailed study the interpretation of one or more biblical texts. The paper will be examined by three hour written examination and short essay of not more than 3,000 words.

(41) Any other subject that may be approved by the Board of the Faculty of Theology from time to time by regulation published in the Gazette and communicated to college tutors by the end of the first week of the Trinity Full Term in the academic year preceding the examination in which the option will be available.

Optional translation papers (2 hours each)

The translation components of papers (25), The Hebrew of the Old Testament, and (29), The New Testament in Greek, may be offered individually as optional extra papers by candidates who are not taking one or both of the full papers.'

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14 Committee for the History of Art

M.St. in History of Art and Visual Culture

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 692, delete ll. 29–53 and substitute:

`(See also the general notice at the commencement of these regulations.) The regulations of the Committee for the History of Art are as follows:

1. Every candidate must follow for at least three terms a course of instruction in the History of Art, and must, upon entering for the examination, produce from his or her society a certificate to this effect.

2. Syllabus

The course shall comprise: I, one compulsory paper; II, one optional paper chosen by the candidate; and III, a dissertation. I The compulsory paper entitled `History and Visual Forms: an Introduction to Art Historiography and Methods' is taken in Michaelmas Term and will comprise course work and a written examination in Trinity Term. II Optional papers covering topics and issues of art history and visual culture from the later Middle Ages to the present, as approved from time to time by the Committee of the History of Art, are taken in Hilary Term. A definitive list of the optional papers available in any one year will be posted on the notice boards of the Department of the History of Art and of the Faculty of Modern History by Friday of Fourth Week of Michaelmas Term at the latest. Optional papers will be examined by two extended essays of between 3,000 and 4,000 words. III A dissertation of not more than 15,000 words on a topic in the history of art, to be approved by the candidate's supervisor and the Professor of the History of Art prior to the submission of essay and dissertation titles to the Chairman of Examiners for the degree.

3. Candidates shall make written application for the approval of the titles of their extended essays in their optional paper, and also notify the examiners of the title of their dissertation, by Friday of Fourth Week of Hilary Term. Communications with the examiners should be addressed to the Chairman of Examiners for the M.St. in History of Art and Visual Culture, c/o the Departmental Secretary, Department of the History of Art, 59 George Street, Oxford OX1 2BE.

4. Two typewritten or printed copies of the extended essays must be sent to the Chairman of the Examiners at the address above by noon on Friday of Week Nine of Hilary Term. Two typewritten or printed copies of the dissertation must be sent to the Chairman of Examiners at the same address by noon on Friday of Week Seven of Trinity Term. The dissertation must include a short abstract which concisely summarises its scope and principal arguments, in about 300 words. Both the essays and the dissertations must be (individually) securely and firmly bound in either hard or soft covers; and the presentation and footnotes should comply with the requirements specified in the Regulations of the General Board for the degrees of M.Litt. and D.Phil. and follow the Conventions for the presentation of dissertations and theses of the Board of the Faculty of Modern History.

5. Candidates must present themselves for an oral examination if required to do so by the examiners.

6. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.

7. A candidate who fails the examination will be permitted to retake the examination on one further occasion only, not later than one year after the initial attempt. Such a candidate whose dissertation has been of satisfactory standard will not be required to resubmit the dissertation, while a candidate who has reached a satisfactory standard on both the extended essays and the written examination papers will not be required to retake those parts of the examination.'

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14 Committee on Continuing Education

(a) Postgraduate Diploma in Professional Archaeology

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 981, ll. 21–3, delete `together with four periods of practical experience each of three months in approved professional archaeological agencies'.

2 Ibid., l. 24, after `three years.' insert: `Full-time students will be seconded to approved professional archaeological agencies for four periods of three months. Part-time students must normally be employed within approved relevant organisations to register for the Diploma, and their place of work should perform the same function as the placements.'

3 Ibid., delete ll. 28–9 and substitute:

`(a) submission of a portfolio of placement work (or in the case of part-time students, in-house project work);'.

4 Ibid., l. 31, delete `eight' and substitute `five'.

5 Ibid., delete ll. 32–3 and substitute:

`(d) presentation of a project at an induction course;

(e) ten critical reports, not exceeding 2,000 words in length on each of the modules specified in the schedule below (with the exception of the induction course);'

6 Ibid., l. 34, renumber cl. 2(e) as 2(f).

7 Ibid., ll. 36–7, delete `the critical report under (c) and assessments under (e)' and substitute: `the critical reports under (e) and assessments under (f)'.

8 Ibid., l. 45, delete `2(d)' and substitute `2(e)'.

9 Ibid., p. 982, delete ll. 1–10 and substitute:

`Schedule

(i) Candidates are required to attend the following modules:

(i) induction course

(ii) survey

(iii) photography

(iv) conservation

(v) health and safety

(II) Candidates are required to attend six module courses, each of either one or two days chosen from a schedule published annually at the start of the academic year.'

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(b) Master of Studies in Professional Archaeology

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 704, l. 46, delete `over a period of four days'.

2 Ibid., delete ll. 49–50 and substitute: `The dissertation must be delivered not later than noon on the third Friday in September of the year of the course to the Chairman of Examiners for the Degree of M.St. in Professional Archaeology, c/o Registry, 1 Wellington Square, Oxford.'

3 Ibid., p. 705, ll. 10–11, delete `, successful completion of which is a condition of entry to the M.St.'.

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(c) Master of Studies in Psychodynamic Practice

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, l. 13, before `Applicants' insert `1.'.

2 Ibid., p. 705, delete ll. 16–18 and substitute:

`2. Course

The course will consist of research methodology lectures, group research seminars and group clinical seminars, individual tutorials, and continuing personal therapy and supervised practice. The course will be taken on a part-time basis for a period of one year's duration.'

3 Ibid., delete ll. 19–29 and substitute:

`3. Every candidate will be required to satisfy the examiners in the following:

(a) attendance at weekly classes, group seminars, individual tutorials, and personal therapy and placement sessions;

(b) submission of a dissertation of no more than 15,000 words on a topic selected by the student in consultation with the research tutor and course director and agreed by the external examiner. The dissertation must be forwarded to the examiners c/o Registry, Department for Continuing Education, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JA, for receipt not later than noon on the last Friday of September in the year in which the course is studied. Material already submitted for the Postgraduate Diploma in Psychodynamic Practice may not be included;

(c) participation in a minimum of twelve placement supervisions and at least 100 hours of client/patient contact, and submission of an end-of-year report by a candidate's placement supervisor;

(d) participation in a minimum of forty hours of personal therapy;

(e) submission of termly reports from both research and clinical tutors;

(f) a viva voce examination at the end of the course of study.'

4 Ibid., ll. 30–4, renumber cll. 3–5 as 4–6.

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16 Inter-faculty Committee for Chinese Studies

M.Phil. in Modern Chinese Studies

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 623, after l. 44, insert:

`(xi) Modern Chinese Studies.'

2 Ibid., p. 624, l. 7, after `Persian.' insert: `For subject (xi), Modern Chinese Studies, candidates wishing to offer papers from Group A (Economics) shall normally have a first degree in Economics or a closely related discipline; those wishing to offer papers from Group B (Modern History, International Relations and Politics) shall normally have a first degree in a relevant discipline; and those wishing to offer papers from Group C (Social Anthropology) shall normally have a first degree in Social Anthropology or a closely related discipline. In all cases, candidates must satisfy the person appointed to interview them by the Oriental Studies Board on the recommendation of the Inter-faculty Committee for Chinese Studies that they possess the necessary disciplinary knowledge to profit from the M.Phil. in Modern Chinese Studies.'

3 Ibid., p. 633, after l. 12 insert:

`(xi) Modern Chinese Studies

I Qualifying Examination

Every candidate must pass a qualifying examination before the end of the third term from commencement of the course. The qualifying examination shall be set and administered by the examiners appointed in Michaelmas Term by the Oriental Studies Board, on the recommendation of the Inter-faculty Committee for Chinese Studies, to examine for the M.Phil. in Modern Chinese Studies. This examination shall consist of two parts, as follows:

(1) General paper on Modern China

A single, three-hour examination paper on topics on Modern China, which all candidates are required to study in the first and second term from commencement of the course. Details of the chronological two-term course shall be provided in the course handbook available from the Course Co-ordinator.

The qualifying examination shall take place during the Noughth Week of Trinity Term, the exact date and time to be decided by the examiners. Conventions indicating the format of the examination, including the number of questions and range of choice, shall be communicated to candidates by the end of the first week of Hilary Term.

Entries for part 1 of the qualifying examination must be made on the appropriate form, obtainable from the University Offices, by Friday of the first week of the Hilary Full Term following the candidate's admission. Candidates who fail part 1 of the qualifying examination shall be allowed to retake it in the Eighth Week of Trinity Term.

(2) Two Chinese language papers

All candidates must offer one written language paper in Chinese and one oral test. Both parts of the Chinese language qualifying examination shall take place during the final (Eighth) Week of Trinity Term, the exact dates and times to be decided by the examiners. Details of the examination shall be provided in outline in the course handbook and in detail in the examination conventions, the latter to be communicated to candidates by Course Coordinator by the end of the First week of Trinity Term. Entries for part 2 of the qualifying examination must be made on the appropriate form, obtainable from the University Offices, by Friday of the first week of the Trinity Full Term following the candidate's admission. Candidates who fail part 2 of the qualifying examination shall be allowed to retake it in the Noughth Week of the following Michaelmas Term.

II Final Examination

No candidate shall enter the final examination unless he or she has already passed the two parts of the first-year qualifying examination. In the final examination, every candidate must offer:

(a) A dissertation of not more than 30,000 words on a subject in the candidate's chosen discipline approved by the committee, to be delivered to the Clerk of the Schools, High Street, Oxford, by noon on the Monday of the Second Week of Trinity Term. The thesis must be accompanied by a statement that it is the candidate's own work except where otherwise indicated. Successful candidates will be required to deposit one copy of the thesis in the Bodleian Library, and to sign a form stating whether they give permission for it to be consulted.

(b) Two papers in one of the three designated disciplines, that is to say economics (group A), or modern history/ politics/international relations (combined) (group B), or social anthropology (group C), to be taught in the third and fourth terms from the commencement of the course.

Since all disciplines may be not be available every year, candidates must confirm with the course co-ordinator that the discipline they intend to offer will be available before application.

Group A: Economics

(i) Chinese Economics

This paper is designed to provide candidates with the `minimum kit' necessary for gaining competence in understanding and analysing Chinese economic policies, institutions, reform, and development outcomes since the founding of the People's Republic. It is divided into two parts, Chinese Economic Developments in the Pre-Reform Period (1949–78), which will concentrate on topics concerned with Development Strategies and topics relating to the Command System and Economic Institutions, and The Chinese Economy in Transition (1978–present), which will concentrate on topics relating to the following: Models and Strategies of Transition; De-collectivisation of Agriculture; the Non-state sector; Fiscal Decentralisation and Central–local Relations; Enterprise Reform; Corporatisation and Corporate Governance; Financial Sector Reforms; Macroeconomic Stability and Control; China and the International Economy. Details of the topics to be covered, of the form in which the paper will be delivered, and of its detailed objectives are set out in the course handbook.

(ii) The Chinese Economy in Comparative Perspective

This paper is designed to examine aspects of the Chinese economic development and reforms in comparison with other transition economies and less developed countries (LDC)/emerging markets, focusing on issues which are generic to transition economies and developing countries but with special reference to China. Teaching for this paper will involve: (a) attendance at lectures, seminars, classes for the Command and Transitional Economies paper (paper (j) for the M.Phil. in Economics); (b) classes and tutorials, as appropriate, with members of the Sub-faculty of Economics, on Transition and Development Economics dealing specifically with China. Details of the topics to be covered are set out in the course handbook.

Group B: Modern History/Politics/International Relations

Candidates will be introduced to some of the current controversies and debates in the literature on twentieth-century China organised around those themes that best define this period. Full details are provided in the course handbook. Topics may include the following:

Paper 1

The role of the Party, political ideology; the military; regime and state security; the rise of China and its challenge to the global system; human rights and legal culture.

Paper 2

The politics of modern enterprise; peasant society; radicalism and radical social movements; ethnicity; gender.

Group C: Social Anthropology

(1) Theory and Methods of Social and Cultural Anthropology (Paper shared with the M.Sc. in Social Anthropology and the M.Sc. in Material Anthropology and Museum Ethnography).

The scope of this paper includes the following topics: concepts of the individual, society and the person in anthropological perspective; issues of the body; theories of practice, phenomenology; theories of power, order, and law; aspects of disorder and violence in society; systems of knowledge and belief; ritual and myth; sybolism and symbolic classification; moral systems and the world religions; oral literature and historical memory; linguistic and artistic modes of communication; aesthetic anthropology; methodological approaches to the study of arts, performance, and material culture; museums, written texts, and representation. Fieldwork and data collection methods, quantitative and qualitative techniques, cultural property and indigenous rights; applications of film and sound recording; preparing research proposals; ethical problems.

(2) Anthropology of China

The scope of this paper includes the following topics: anthropology and China; family; birth control; kinship; gender; sexuality; religion; ritual; systems of representation and classification; marketing systems and village communities; bureaucracy, nation, and the state; face and social relations; migration and urbanisation; the politics of cultural difference and ethinicity; the overseas Chinese; popular culture and consumerism; China in the world. Details of the topics listed above will be provided in the course handbook. Candidates shall be required to offer two papers, as follows:

(1) Anthropological thoery and methods

The topics to be covered will be as follows:

(i) introduction: anthropology and China

(ii) family and birth control

(iii) kinship

(iv) gender and sexuality

(v) and (vi) folk religion

(2) Anthropology of China

The topics to be covered will be as follows:

(i) principled particularism, connections, nepotism

(ii) marketing systems and village communities

(iii) internal migration and urbanisation

(iv) the nation and nationalism

(v) the overseas Chinese

(vi) popular culture and consumerism

(vii) Greater China?

Full details of the topics listed above will be provided in the course handbook.

(c) two Chinese language papers (one oral, one written)

The Oral examination will consist of two parts: a comprehension group test and an individual test. Full details of the oral examination will be provided in the course handbook. The written language paper will be of a duration of three hours and will comprise a translation into Chinese, comprehension exercise, and translation into English. Full details will be provided in the course handbook and in the examination conventions.

The papers under (b) and (c) above will be taken in the Eighth Week of Trinity Term of the final year. The examiners may examine any candidate viva voce. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.'

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17 Inter-faculty Committee for Queen Elizabeth House

M.Phil. in Development Studies

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 575, after l. 45, insert:

`(k) Gender and Development

Key concepts in Gender and Development relating to: Population; Land-use and the environment; Employment, assess, markets, and credit; social issues; Civil society; violence and conflict; Political organisation and theories of power.'

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18 Standing Committee for Engineering and Computing Science

(a) Honour School of Engineering and Computing Science

(i) With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first Part I examination in 2002)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 176, after l. 37, insert:

`The examiners will not provide calculators, but will permit the use of one hand-held pocket calculator as specified in the Honour School of Engineering Science.'

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(ii) With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first Part II examination in 2001)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 178, delete ll. 49–50 and substitute:

`The examiners will not provide calculators, but will permit the use of one hand-held pocket calculator as specified in the Honour School of Engineering Science.'

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(b) Pass School of Engineering and Computing Science

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 179, delete ll. 28–9 and substitute:

`The examiners will not provide calculators, but will permit the use of one hand-held pocket calculator as specified in the Honour School of Engineering Science.'

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19 Standing Committee for Engineering, Economics, and Management and Related Schools

(a) Honour School of Engineering, Economics, and Management

(i) With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first Part I examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 184, delete ll. 32–40.

2 Ibid., p. 1122, delete ll. 34–42.

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(ii) With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 184, delete ll. 4–5.

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(iii) With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 184, insert after l. 9:

`In the case of written papers in Engineering Science, candidates are restricted to the use of one hand-held pocket calculator as specified in the Honour School of Engineering Science. For all other written papers, the examiners will permit the use of any hand-held calculator subject to the conditions set out on p. 1074.'

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(iv) With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first Part II examination in 2001)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 184, insert after l. 47:

`In the case of written papers in Engineering Science, candidates are restricted to the use of one hand-held pocket calculator as specified in the Honour School of Engineering Science. For all other written papers, the examiners will permit the use of any hand-held calculator subject to the conditions set out on p. 1074.'

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(b) Pass School of Engineering, Economics, and Management

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 186, delete ll. 28–9 and substitute:

`In the case of written papers in Engineering Science, candidates are restricted to the use of one hand-held pocket calculator as specified in the Honour School of Engineering Science. For all other written papers, the examiners will permit the use of any hand-held calculator subject to the conditions set out on p. 1074.'

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20 Standing Committee for Engineering (Materials), Economics, and Management and Related Schools

Honour School of Materials, Economics, and Management

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first Part I examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 276, delete ll. 26–9, and substitute:

`In the case of written papers in Metallurgy and the Science of Materials, candidates are restricted to models of hand-held calculators approved by the Sub-faculty of Materials. For all other written papers, the examiners will permit the use of any hand-held calculator, subject to the conditions set out on p. 1074.'

2 Ibid., p. 276, delete ll. 43–6.

3 Ibid., p. 277, delete ll. 1–5.

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21 Standing Committee for Physics and Philosophy

Moderations in Physics and Philosophy

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 72, l. 42, delete `and B'.

2 Ibid., delete l. 43, and substitute:

`and Frege, Foundations of Arithmetic trans. J.L. Austin, Blackwell, 1980.'

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EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give notice of oral examination of their candidates as follows:

Biological Sciences

L.M.A. BARTLEY, Merton: `The transmission dynamics of Dengue infections'.
Department of Zoology, Friday, 28 April, 10 a.m.
Examiners: T.R.E. Southwood, J. Noakes.

A. DAVISON, Merton: `Phospholipid metabolism in hepatic lymphoma'.
Institute of Molecular Medicine, Wednesday, 31 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: A.L. Harris, S. Ronen.

P.F. DONALD, Wolfson: `The ecology and conservation of skylarks Alauda arvensis on lowland farmland'.
Department of Zoology, Friday, 12 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: J.R. Krebs, G.R. Potts.

A. MACDOUGALL, New College: `Receiver psychology and the design of protective coloration'.
Department of Zoology, Thursday, 22 June, 10 a.m.
Examiners: M. Berdoy, J. Allen.

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Clinical Medicine

R. AUBREY, St Hilda's: `Phase variation of lipopolysaccharide in Haemophilus influenzae'.
Nuffield Department of Pathology, Friday, 28 April, 2 p.m.
Examiners: S. Peacock, D. Maskill.

J.W. FRY, Exeter: `Delivery of a donor MHC class I gene using a recombinant adenovirus to induce immunological unresponsiveness'.
Nuffield Department of Surgery, Thursday, 4 May, 3 p.m.
Examiners: V.E.F. Marshall, A. George.

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English Language and Literature

S. POYNTING, Linacre: `A critical edition of Walter Montagu's The Shepherd's Paradise, Acts 1–3'.
University, Friday, 28 April, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: E.H. Cooper, M. Butler.

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Medieval and Modern Languages

E. PENNEBAKER, St Anne's: `"Ideas instead of bombs": the Austrian Cold War novel'.
Examination Schools, Thursday, 18 May, 11 a.m.
Examiners: K.J. Leeder, A.W. Barker.

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Modern History

E. ALBANIS, St John's: `German-Jewish cultural identity from 1900 to the aftermath of the First World War'.
St Antony's, Monday, 8 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: A.J. Nicholls, A. Gotzmann.

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Physical Sciences

B.R. BALMER, Oriel: `Processing studies on bismuth 2212 superconducting thick films'.
Department of Materials, Wednesday, 10 May, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: R.I. Todd, P. Regnier.

I. BOZTOSUN, Pembroke: `Coupled-channels calculations for the scattering of deformed light heavy-ions: a challenge to the standard approach'.
Nuclear and Astrophysics Laboratory, Tuesday, 2 May, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: A.G. Merchant, M.A. Nagarajan.

J. CADMAN, Merton: `Redox- and proactive receptors for anion recognition in water'.
St Anne's, Tuesday, 2 May, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: J.R. Dilworth, P. Moore.

R.W. EVESON, Wolfson: `Geminate free radical processes and magnetic field effects'.
Corpus Christi, Monday, 8 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: P.J. Hore, B.C. Gilbert.

A.C. NICOL, Oriel: `Aspects of copper precipitation and irradiation hardening in Fe–Cu alloys'.
Department of Materials, Wednesday, 10 May, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: I.P. Jones, J.M. Titchmarsh.

J.V.A. OUZMAN, Wolfson: `The chemistry and structure of diketopiperazines'.
Dyson Perrins Laboratory, Monday, 8 May, 10 a.m.
Examiners: G.W.J. Fleet, L.M. Harwood.

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Psychological Studies

N. CLIFTON, Nuffield: `Women, work, and family in England and France: a question of identity'.
New College, Monday, 15 May, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: E.J. Frazer, E. Apfelbaum.

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Social Studies

V.A.A. KAMSLER, Wolfson: `The art of judgement'.
Nuffield, Thursday, 4 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: P.L. Miller, A.D. Mason.

L.J. LE RENDU, Lady Margaret Hall: `The positive management of dependency: Jersey's survival as a microstate in the modern world'.
Examination Schools, Friday, 28 April, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: G. Marshall, A. Lee.

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Theology

A. MARETT-CROSS, St Benet's Hall: `Seeing the Lord: rapture and the knowledge of God in scholasticism up to Thomas Aquinas'.
Harris Manchester, Wednesday, 17 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: L.J. Smith, D.A. Turner.

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EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF SCIENCE

The examiners appointed by the following faculty board give notice of oral examination of their candidate as follows:

Mathematical Sciences

KWONG-CHEONG WONG, Hertford: `lp-provability based on the lme"-calculus'.
Computing Laboratory, Tuesday, 2 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: C.-H.L. Ong, D.J. Pym.

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