Examinations and Boards

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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CHAIRMEN OF EXAMINERS

TRINITY TERM 2000

Preliminary Examinations

Human Sciences: A.J. BOYCE, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St John's (address: Institute of Biological Anthropology)

Physical Sciences: M.J.M. LEASK, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St Catherine's (address: Clarendon Laboratory)

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Moderations

Physics and Philosophy: G. MYATT, MA, Fellow of Green College (address: Nuclear and Astrophysics Laboratory)

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Honour Moderations

Classics and English: D.C. INNES, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St Hilda's

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Honour Schools

Archaeology and Anthropology: R.H. WARD, MA, Fellow of Linacre (address: Department of Biological Anthropology)

Economics and Management: K. GRINT, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Templeton

European and Middle Eastern Languages: A. JONES, MA, Fellow of Pembroke (address: Institute of Oriental Studies)

Human Sciences: R.H. WARD, MA, Fellow of Linacre (address: Department of Biological Anthropology)

Mathematics Part II: K.C. HANNABUSS, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Balliol (address: Mathematical Institute)

Mathematics and Computation: S.A. CAMERON, MA, Fellow of Keble (address: Computing Laboratory)

Mathematics and Philosophy Part II: K. ERDMANN, MA, Fellow of Somerville

Natural Science

Biological Sciences: A. GRAFEN, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St John's

Chemistry Part II: P.W. ATKINS, MA, Fellow of Lincoln (address: Physical and Theoretical Chemistry)

Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry Part I: K.G.H. DYKE, MA, Fellow of Wadham (address: Department of Biochemistry)

Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry Part II: D.A. HARRIS, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St Anne's (address: Department of Biochemistry) Physiological Sciences: P.R. COOK, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Brasenose (address: Sir William School of Pathology)

Psychology, Philosophy, and Physiology: E.T. ROLLS, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Corpus Christi (address: Department of Experimental Psychology)

Theology: S.E. GILLINGHAM, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Worcester

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Master of Philosophy

Classical Archaeology: J.J. COULTON, MA, Fellow of Merton (address: Ashmolean Museum)

European Archaeology: B.W. CUNLIFFE, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Keble (address: Archaeological Institute)

Music: S.L.F. WOLLENBERG, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall (address: Music Faculty)

Qualifying Examination in Classical Archaeology: J.J. COULTON, MA, Fellow of Merton (address: Ashmolean Museum)

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Master of Studies

Celtic Studies: T.M.O. CHARLES-EDWARDS, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Jesus

Classical Archaeology: J.J. COULTON, MA, Fellow of Merton (address: Ashmolean Museum)

English Local History: K. TILLER, MA, Fellow of Kellogg

European Archaeology: B.W. CUNLIFFE, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Keble (address: Archaeological Institute)

Greek and/or Latin Languages and Literature: P.J. PARSONS, MA, Student of Christ Church

Music (Musicology): P.R. FRANKLIN, MA, Fellow of St Catherine's (address: Music Faculty)

Study of Religion: J.S.K. WARD, B.LITT., MA, Canon of Christ Church

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Diplomas

Legal Studies: J.M. EEKELAAR, BCL, MA, Fellow of Pembroke

Postgraduate Diploma in European Studies: D.B. GOLDEY, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Lincoln

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Certificate and Bachelor of Theology

M.D. CHAPMAN, MA, D.PHIL., DIP.TH., Tutor of Ripon College, Cuddesdon

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Prize

Violet Vaughan Morgan: J.L. FULLER, B.LITT., MA, Fellow of Magdalen

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STANDING COMMITTEE FOR ENGINEERING, ECONOMICS, AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED SCHOOLS

Honour School of Engineering, Economics, and Management Part I 2000

Due to an ambiguity in Examination Decrees and Regulations, 1999, relating to the need for candidates taking the paper M1 (Introduction to Management) to submit coursework, it has been decided to remove this need, for candidates taking the paper this year.

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CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the General Board, the following changes in regulations made by boards of faculties and committees will come into effect on 7 April.

1 Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies

Honour School of Oriental Studies

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 461, delete l. 19 and substitute:

`1. Unprepared translation from Ottoman and Modern Turkish.

2. Translation into Turkish and essay in Turkish.'

2 Ibid., l. 20, delete `2' and substitute `3'.

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2 Boards of the Faculties of Oriental Studies and Medieval and Modern Languages

Honour School of European and Middle Eastern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 217, delete ll. 44–7 and substitute:

`7. Unprepared translation from modern Turkish.

8. Translation into Turkish and essay in Turkish.

9. Turkish history and thought in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The following texts are prescribed for study:

Either Mode A:

M. Cavid Baysun, Tarihö Eserlerden Seìilmis> Eski Metinler (Istanbul, 1964), pp. 9–18, 36–60, 118–24.

Selected late Ottoman and modern Turkish political documents.*

Selected late Ottoman writings on political and cultural issues.*

Selected modern Turkish writings on political and cultural issues.*

Or Mode B, in which all the texts are presented in Latin script:

Selected late Ottoman and modern Turkish political documents.*

Selected late Ottoman writings on political and cultural issues.*

Selected modern Turkish writings on political and cultural issues.*

The volume of texts set for Mode B will be about 25 per cent greater than that set for Mode A.

Candidates will be required to translate and/or comment on passages from the prescribed texts, and to write essays on questions relating either to the texts themselves and their background, or to more general historical topics.

10. Modern Turkish literary texts

The following texts are prescribed for study:

Either Mode A:

Selected late Ottoman literary texts (post-1860).*

Selected modern Turkish short stories.*

Selected modern Turkish poetry.*

Or Mode B, in which all the texts are presented in Latin script:

Selected late Ottoman literary texts (post-1860).*

Selected modern Turkish short stories.*

Selected modern Turkish poetry.*

The volume of texts set for Mode B will be about 25 per cent greater than that set for Mode A.

The questions set in the examination will require translation, commentary, and essays.'

2 Ibid., p. 219, delete ll. 7–19 and substitute:

`5. Unprepared translation from Ottoman and modern Turkish.

6. Translation into Turkish and essay in Turkish.

7. Ottoman history and historical texts, 1300–1700.

The following texts are prescribed for study:

Selected Ottoman documents.*

Naima, Tarih (Istanbul, ah 1281–3), vol. ii, pp. 207–64.

M. Cavid Baysun, Tarihö Eserlerden Seìilmis> Eski Metinler (Istanbul, 1964), pp. 29–35, 125–29.

Candidates will be required to translate and/or comment on passages from the prescribed texts, and to write essays on questions relating either to the texts themselves and their background, or to more general historical topics.

8. Turkish history and thought in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

The following texts are prescribed for study:

M. Cavid Baysun, Tarihö Eserlerden Seìilmis> Eski Metinler (Istanbul, 1964), pp. 9–18, 36–60, 118–24.

Selected late Ottoman and modern Turkish political documents.*

Selected late Ottoman writings on political and cultural issues.*

Selected modern Turkish writings on political and cultural issues.*

Candidates will be required to translate and/or comment on passages from the prescribed texts, and to write essays on questions relating either to the texts themselves and their background, or to more general historical topics.

9. Turkish literary texts: translation and commentary.

Selected Turkish/Ottoman poetry, thirteenth to eighteenth centuries.*

Selected late Ottoman literary texts (post-1860).*

Selected modern Turkish short stories.*

Selected modern Turkish poetry.*

10. Either

(a) Turkish literature: essay questions.

Some of the questions set will relate to the texts prescribed for paper 9, but others will be of wider scope. Candidates will be expected to demonstrate knowledge of the general historical development and characteristics of Ottoman and modern Turkish literature.

or

(b) a special subject, to be approved by the Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies.

or

(c) an extended essay, on a topic to be approved by the Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies.'

3 Ibid., p. 462, delete ll. 1–16 and substitute:

`4. Ottoman history and historical texts, 1300–1700.

The following texts are prescribed for study:

Selected Ottoman documents.*

Naima, Tarih (Istanbul, ah 1281–3), vol. ii, pp. 207–64.

M. Cavid Baysun, Tarihö Eserlerden Seìilmis> Eski Metinler (Istanbul, 1964), pp. 29–35, 125–9.

Candidates will be required to translate and/or comment on passages from the prescribed texts, and to write essays on questions relating either to the texts themselves and their background, or to more general historical topics.

5. Turkish history and thought in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

The following texts are prescribed for study:

M. Cavid Baysun, Tarihö Eserlerden Seìilmis> Eski Metinler (Istanbul, 1964), pp. 9–18, 36–60, 118–24.

Selected late Ottoman and modern Turkish political documents.*

Selected late Ottoman writings on political and cultural issues.*

Selected modern Turkish writings on political and cultural issues.*

Candidates will be required to translate and/or comment on passages from the prescribed texts, and to write essays on questions relating either to the texts themselves and their background, or to more general historical topics.

6. Turkish literary texts: translation and commentary.

Selected Turkish/Ottoman poetry, thirteenth to eighteenth centuries.*

Selected late Ottoman literary texts (post-1860).*

Selected modern Turkish short stories.*

Selected modern Turkish poetry.*

7. Either

(a) Turkish literature: essay questions.

Some of the questions set will relate to the texts prescribed for paper 6, but others will be of wider scope. Candidates will be expected to demonstrate knowledge of the general historical development and characteristics of Ottoman and modern Turkish literature.

or

(b) a special subject, to be approved by the Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies.'

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3 Board of the Faculty of Theology

(a) Bachelor of Theology

With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, delete from l. 39 on p. 538 to l. 17 on p. 545 and substitute:

`Candidates must take at least twelve papers. In Part 1 candidates must take all four papers. In Part 2 they must take: two papers from section B; paper C1; and two papers out of D1, D2, and D3. The Supervisory Committee may dispense a candidate from individual compulsory papers on the basis of previous academic work, but not from the total number of papers required. Details of which subjects may be taken by 5,000 or 7,000 word long essays in place of written examination papers are given in the syllabus in section B below.

A.2 Examinations

Candidates will be examined at the end of each academic year of their course of study. Examination will be held in April or May, beginning on the Monday of the second week of Trinity Term, and in September or October, beginning on the second Thursday before Michaelmas Full Term. Every candidate shall send through his or her college an entry form, showing the subject he or she intends to take in that year, to the Head Clerk, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD, by noon on Friday of the fourth week of Hilary Term for the May examination, and by noon on Friday of the seventh week of Trinity Term for the Autumn examination. All entries shall be accompanied by certification of college approval and by the examination fee prescribed in Ch. VIII, Sect. i, § 2 (see Appendix I).

The examiners may examine the candidate viva voce, no candidate who has passed in a subject may sit that examination again.

A candidate who has failed in more than two subjects in an examination shall be deemed to have failed in all the subjects offered at that examination. A candidate may offer at a subsequent examination a subject or subjects in which he or she has failed. Normally only one resit will be allowed in each subject, provided that the B.Th. Supervisory Committee shall have power in exceptional circumstances and on submission of a case by a candidate's college to approve a second resit.

A.3 Long Essays

Approval for the subjects proposed for 5,000 and 7,000 word long essays must be obtained from the B.Th. Supervisory Committee. Applications will be considered by the committee at three times during the year. The deadlines for submitting titles to these meetings are respectively: not later than noon on Friday in week four of Michaelmas Term, in week four of Hilary Term, or in week seven of Trinity Term. Candidates are advised to seek approval for titles as early as practicable in advance of the examination. Dated certification of the committee's approval must be retained for submission with the completed work.

In the case of long essays offered in place of a written examination paper, the application for approval of the essay title must show that the topic is such as will demonstrate knowledge of a theme in the area concerned, and must be submitted with a note from the college indicating the other work in the area concerned which the candidate intends to cover. Certification from the college confirming that this other work has been satisfactorily completed must accompany the long essay when it is submitted.

Long essays must be the candidate's own work and accompanied by a statement from him or her to that effect, and must be typed on one side of the paper. Long essays must include a bibliography and, where appropriate, footnotes (only the latter being included in the word count). Candidates may receive tutorial guidance in the preliminary stages of composition, and tutors may also read or comment on a first draft.

Long essays must be submitted to the Chairman of the Examiners, Bachelor of Theology, c/o the Clerk of the Schools, High Street, Oxford OX1 4BG, not later than noon on the Friday before Trinity Full Term for work submitted as part of the May examination, and not later than the second Monday before Michaelmas Full Term for work submitted as part of the Autumn examination.

The dated certification of the committee's approval of long essay titles, the certification from the college confirming that the other work in a subject area has been satisfactorily completed, and the signed statement from the candidate that the long essays are his/her own work must accompany the long essays when submitted for examination. These certificates and signed statements must be submitted, with the long essays, in a sealed envelope addressed to the Chairman of the Examiners for the Bachelor of Theology, at the above address. Note. All communications for the Supervisory Committee for the Degree of Bachelor of Theology should be addressed to the Secretary of the B.Th. Supervisory Committee, c/o the Theology Faculty Centre, 41 St Giles', Oxford OX1 3LW.

B. THE SYLLABUS

[+] assessed by three-hour written examination

[++] assessed by long essay of 5,000 words in Part 1 or 7,000 words in Part 2, along with four college-assessed pieces of work. Candidates must submit the titles of each long essay and the attendant college-assessed work to the Supervisory Committee for approval. Together these must cover the syllabus of the paper or of the option(s) selected.

[§] Assessed by other means, as noted in the rubric.

Note that most papers may be examined by more than one means. Full-time candidates must attempt all Part 1 papers in their first year. They may attempt Part 2 papers at any examination session following the first Trinity Term. Part-time candidates must attempt all Part 1 papers in their first two years. They may attempt Part 2 papers at any examination session after their first year, provided they have completed Part 1 or are completing it in the same session.

Part 1 papers will be assessed at first year level, and will be given reduced weighting in considering a candidate's degree classification or certificate award.

Texts used in written examinations for biblical papers will be: Revised Standard Version; The Greek New Testament (United Bible Societies, 4th edn. 1993); Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia (Stuttgart, 1977).

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PART 1

This part addresses fundamental issues of Biblical Study, Christian Thought and Christian Ministry, laying a foundation for further study.

SECTION A. Foundation Studies

[+] A.1—Old Testament A

Candidates will study the Historical Books (from 1 Samuel to Nehemiah), the Prophets and the Psalms, including issues raised in their study and interpretation. They will also study in detail at least one of the following texts in English: 2 Samuel 1–12, Isaiah 1–12, Psalms 73–89.

[+] A.2—New Testament A

Candidates will study Matthew and 1 Corinthians, addressing such issues as methodology in New Testament study, the person and ministry of Jesus, the context and theology of the authors, and ecclesiological issues. They will also study in detail either Matthew 5–7, 26–8 and 1 Corinthians 11–15 in English, or Matthew 5–7 in Greek, or 1 Corinthians 11–12 in Greek.

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[+] [++] A.3—Christian Life and Thought

Foundation studies in this discipline can take different routes:

Either [+] [++] A.3.A.—Foundations of Christian Thought

Candidates will study some of the foundational issues involved in the study of Christian theology including faith, revelation, Scripture, authority, tradition, development, religious language, and the relationship of Christian theology to other disciplines.

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Or [+] [++] A.3.B—Development of Christian Life and Thought

Candidates will study the development of Christian life and thought in its cultural and historical context, including issues of authority, spirituality and ministry within Christian communities; and sources and forms of theological reflection and conflict. They should demonstrate some awareness of primary sources (in translation).

Candidates will study the following foundational period:

(a) First to fifth centuries.

They may also study one of the following periods:

(b) Sixth to eleventh centuries;

(c) Eleventh to fourteenth centuries;

(d) Fifteenth and sixteenth centuries.

Candidates must specify the periods studied on their examination entrance forms; they cannot subsequently be assessed on these periods in Paper C.2.

[+] [++] A.4—Christian Witness and the Contemporary World

Candidates will study the relationship between Christian faith and contemporary culture, including religious and secular understandings of society, environment, personhood, and faith. Candidates will be expected to reflect on the practice of mission and pastoral care.

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PART 2

SECTION B. BIBLICAL STUDIES

[+] [++] B.1—Old Testament B

Candidates will study the Pentateuch, Joshua, Judges, and the Writings (other than the Psalms), including issues raised in their study and interpretation. They will also study in detail either two of the following books in English: Genesis; Job; Daniel; or Genesis 1–4 and 12–15 in Hebrew. Candidates who wish to be assessed on texts in Hebrew must take this paper by written exam.

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[+] [++] B.2—New Testament B

Candidates will study at least two of the following books: John, Romans, Hebrews; and broader issues of New Testament theology, ethics, and interpretation. They will study in detail texts from John, Romans, Hebrews in English; and they may study John 1–3, 6, 17, and/or Romans 5–8 in Greek. They may also study Mark, Luke, Acts, the Pastoral Epistles, and Revelation. Candidates who wish to be assessed on texts in Greek must take this paper by written exam.

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[+] [++] B.3—Biblical Interpretation

Candidates will study Part A or Part B or both.

Part A: Candidates will study: central themes in both testaments such as God, creation, the people of God, redemption, messiah, community, worship, hope; and the methodological issues of constructing biblical theology.

Part B: Candidates will study the history and practice of biblical interpretation, including major contemporary trends.

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SECTION C. DOCTRINE AND HISTORY

[+] [++] C.1—Christian Doctrine

Candidates will study the central doctrines of the Christian church, as set out in the historic creeds and formulae, including critical reflection on traditional and recent expositions of these doctrines and engagement with contemporary theological discussion.

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[+] [++] C.2—Church History

Candidates will study the development of Christian life and thought in its cultural and historical context, including issues of authority, spirituality, and ministry within Christian communities; and sources and forms of theological reflection and conflict. They should demonstrate some awareness of primary sources (in translation).

Candidates must specify one period for assessment by written exam or long essay, which must not be one on which they were assessed in Paper A.3.B:

(a) First to fifth centuries;

(b) Sixth to eleventh centuries;

(c) Eleventh to fourteenth centuries;

(d) Fifteenth and sixteenth centuries;

(e) Seventeenth and eighteenth centuries;

(f) Nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

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[+] [++] C.3—Ecclesiology

Candidates will study the theology of the church, including ministry and the sacraments, in its historical development and contemporary practice.

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[+] [++] C.4—Study of Theology

(Candidates who have taken A.3.A may not take this paper.)

Candidates will study some of the major issues involved in the study of Christian theology, including faith, revelation, reason, Scripture, authority, tradition, development, religious language, and the relationship of Christian thought to other disciplines and other religions.

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SECTION D. PRACTICAL THEOLOGY

[++] D.1—Mission and Ministry

Candidates will study and reflect on issues of mission and ministry. College assessed essays should demonstrate knowledge of contributory disciplines. The long essay must be based on a supervised placement of at least twenty-one days in a church or secular setting in which the candidate shares in the experiences of those involved, and should contain theological reflection on the situation.

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[§] D.2—Christian Ethics

This paper will be assessed by two written papers:

(a) Ethics and Faith (three hour examination)

Candidates will study the foundations of Christian moral thought and practice; contemporary moral and social problems; and the relation of Christian moral life to faith, witness, and worship.

(b) Ethics and Ministry (two hour examination)

Candidates should demonstrate ethical and pastoral competence in analysis of, reflection on, and response to a particular situation. This will be a situation relating to sexuality, marriage, and the family, unless the Supervisory Committee gives notice otherwise.

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[+][++] D.3—Christian Worship

Candidates will study the history and theology of Christian initiation, the Eucharist, and daily worship; the place of prayer in worship; non-verbal aspects of liturgy and their cultural factors; relevant insights from the human sciences; word and sacrament, liturgical symbolism, and the place of preaching; worship and the Church's mission; other forms of corporate worship.

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[+] [++] D.4—Christian Spirituality

Candidates will study the history and theology of Christian spirituality including major traditions and figures; and the relationship of spirituality to: scripture, liturgy, hymnody, doctrine, and current trends.

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SECTION E. OTHER SUBJECTS

[+] [++] E.1—Christian Mission

Candidates will study the following: the biblical and theological foundations of mission; the relationship of the Church to the missio Dei; factors in the contemporary world affecting mission, such as industrialisation, urbanisation, secularism, pluralism, and new forms of imperialism. These subjects may be focused through the study of: the history of Christian mission; the distinction between mission and evangelism; the encounter with other faiths; issues of contextualisation; apologetics; liberation movements; and the work of significant missiologists.

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[+][++] E.2—Christian Faith and Other Religions

Candidates will study methodology in the study of religion; Christian approaches to other religions; and one religion other than Christianity, chosen from (and to be specified on the entry form): Hinduism, Buddhism, post-Biblical Judaism, Islam, or a religion proposed by the candidate and approved by the Supervisory Committee.

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[+] [++] E.3—Christian Faith and Philosophy

Candidates will study the relationship between Christianity and the Western philosophical tradition. They will also study relevant issues including: the relation between reason and revelation; the existence of God; the problem of evil; non-objective theism; religious language; religious experience; resurrection and the immortality of the soul.

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[+] [++] E.4—Christian Faith and Science

Candidates will study the relationship between Christian theology and the development of modern science, including: methodology and epistemology in science and theology; the origin of the universe and humanity; the quantum world; the biosphere and ecosystems; and ethical issues of scientific research and development.

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[+] [++] E.5—Christian Faith and Social Sciences

Candidates will study the relationship between Christian theology and the social sciences, including such areas as methodology in both disciplines; sociological and anthropological interpretations of religion; theological and sociological understandings of social phenomena; sociological understandings of religious organisation; and theological critiques of social sciences.

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[+] [++] E.6—Christian Faith and Psychology

Candidates will study the contribution of psychological theory to pastoral theology and pastoral care, in areas such as: developmental theory and the life cycle; human sexuality; love and attachment; and mental health. They will also study: major psychological theories and their critique of religious systems; the counselling movement; the role of the pastor; the nature of pastoral ministry in relation to birth, marriage, and death.

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[+] [++] E.7—Canon Law

Candidates will study the sources, history, and theology of Western canon law or the Eastern canonical tradition or both (to be specified on the entry form); and current systems of canons, e.g. the Roman Catholic Code of Canon Law and the Canons of the Church of England, including an introduction to comparative issues.

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[++] E.8—Confessional Study

Candidates will study the tradition of a Christian denomination as expressed in its formularies, liturgy, spirituality, and ethics.

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[+] [++] [§] E.9—Special Subject

Candidates may propose a Special Study and assessment method for approval by the Supervisory Committee.'

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(b) Regulations of Faculty Boards concerning the status of Probationer Research Student and the Degrees of M.Litt., M.Sc. by Research, and D.Phil.

With effect from 1 April 2000

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 899, l. 12, after `Probationer Research Student', add `(whether studying on a full or part-time basis[1])'.

[1] [It should be noted that admission to study on a part-time basis in Theology is reviewed on an annual basis, and is subject to decisions by the University on the availability of doctoral research by means of part-time study.]

2 Ibid., l. 21, after `the first year' insert `in the case of full-time studies and second year in the case of part-time studies.

3 Ibid., after l. 25 insert:

`A student admitted to study on a full-time basis is not permitted to change the basis of his or her study from full-time to part-time at any stage of his or her registration as a graduate student.

In assessing applications from candidates seeking to undertake a research degree through part-time study, the Graduate Studies Committee of the Board of the Faculty of Theology shall have regard to evidence that:

(i) the candidate is suitable to undertake research at doctoral level;

(ii) the candidate's personal and professional circumstances are such that it is both practicable for him or her to fulfil the requirements of the course, and necessary for him ot her to study on a part-time basis;

(iii) if appropriate, the candidate has the written support of their present employer for their proposed course of study and its obligations;

(iv) the candidate's proposed topic of research is suitable for part-time study;

(v) the candidate can meet the attendance requirements relating to part-time study.

2. Attendance requirements (for part-time students)

Part-time research students are required to attend for a minimum of thirty days of university-based work each year, to be arranged with the agreement of their supervisor, for the period that their names remain on the Register of Graduate Students unless individually dispensed by the Graduate Studies Committee of the Board of the Faculty of Theology.

3. Confirmation of Probationer Research Student status

A student admitted to Probationer Research Student status on a part-time basis shall, before the end of the sixth term from his or her admission, attend an interview with his or her supervisor, the Director of Graduate Studies (or representative) and one other member of staff in order to confirm (i) the satisfactory completion of his or her research training, and (ii) satisfactory progress in making his or her research plans.

Where the interviewers failed to be satisfied on either (i) or (ii) or both, a further interview shall be held before the end of the ninth term from the candidate's admission. Where the interviewers remain unsatisfied on either (i) or (ii) after the second interview, the Board of the Faculty of Theology may remove the student's name from the Register of Graduate Students.'

4 Ibid., renumber existing sections 2–4 as 4–6.

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4 Standing Committee for Engineering and Materials

(a) Honour School of Engineering and Materials

(i) With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first Part I examination in 2002)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 188, delete ll. 46–7 and substitute:

`The examiners will not provide calculators, but will permit the use of one hand-held pocket calculator as specified in the Honour School of Engineering Science.'

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(ii) With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first Part II examination in 2001)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 190, delete ll. 15–16 and substitute:

`The examiners will not provide calculators, but will permit the use of one hand-held pocket calculator as specified in the Honour School of Engineering Science.'

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(b) Pass School of Engineering and Materials

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 191, delete ll. 15–16 and substitute:

`The examiners will not provide calculators, but will permit the use of one hand-held pocket calculator as specified in the Honour School of Engineering Science.'

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5 Joint Standing Committee for Human Sciences (with the concurrence of the Boards of the Faculties of Anthropology and Geography, Biological Sciences, and Social Studies)

(a) Preliminary Examination in Human Sciences

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 85, delete ll. 13–18, and substitute:

`An introduction to the evidence for mammalian, primate, and human evolution. Principles of mammalian physiology: the cell, body fluids, the cardiovascular and respiratory systems, reproduction, hunger and thirst, movement, the senses, and the integrative organisation of the central nervous system. Principles of ecology: ecosystems, plant and animal communities and numbers, biotic interaction, the impact of man on the environment.'

2 Ibid., delete ll. 21–32, and substitute:

`Principles of genetics and evoluation illustrated by examples from human and other organisms.

Mechanisms of evolutionary change: selection and adaptation, evolution of sex, altruism, kin selection and co-operation. Alternative models of evolution. The genetic material—its nature, mode of action, and manipulation: the chromosomal basis of heredity; molecular genetics; mapping the human genome; sex determination; mutation at the level of the gene and the chromosome. Mendelian inheritance; genetic variation in populations and its maintenance; quantitative variation and its genetic basis.'

3 Ibid., l. 47, after `social change;' insert `material culture and ethnographic resources;'

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(b) Honour School of Human Sciences

(i) With immediate effect

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 236, ll. 12–13, delete `appoint the elected members of' and substitute `be'.

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(ii) With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in Trinity Term 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 236, l. 34, delete `Michaelmas' and substitute `Trinity'.

2 Ibid., ll. 37–40, delete `The practical examinationÉfor this paper.' and substitute

`Should a candidate fail the practical examination he or she may resit it in the Michaelmas Full Term preceding the Final Honour School examinations. Should a candidate fail the practical examination, he or she shall be deemed to have failed the whole of paper 4.'

3 Ibid., l. 41, delete `Michaelmas' and substitute `Trinity'.

4 Ibid., l. 42, after `examinations' insert `and the arrangements for resitting the practical examination, should that be necessary in any case'.

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(iii) With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 236, l. 43, delete `Social Anthropology', and substitute `Anthropological Analysis and Interpretation'.

2 Ibid., l. 46, before `subjects', insert `optional'.

3 Ibid., p. 237, delete ll. 17–19, and insert:

`The above optional subjects will normally be available. However, depending on the availability of teaching resources, it may be that not all optional subjects will be available to all candidates in every year. Candidates may obtain details of the choice of optional subjects and any restrictions on numbers for particular subjects for the following year by consulting lists posted in the Human Sciences Centre at the beginning of the first week of Hilary Full Term in the year preceding the final examination. These lists will also be circulated to Course Directors. The date by which students must make their choice will be stated in the course handbook'.

4 Ibid., p. 238, delete ll. 17–24, and substitute:

`(a) Anthropological analysis and interpretation The comparative study of social and cultural forms in the global context: to include economics and exchange, domestic structures and their reproduction, personal and collective identity, language and religion, states and conflict, understanding of biology and environment, historical perspectives on the social world and upon practice in anthropology.'

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(iv) With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 236, delete ll. 47–9, and substitute:

`(7), (8) One or two papers chosen from amongst the advanced options available for the Honour School of Experimental Psychology, subject to any restrictions set out in the lists of available options published in the first week of Hilary Term in the year preceding the final examination.'

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EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give notice of oral examination of their candidates as follows:

Biological Sciences

Y.M.M. DE OLIVEIRA, Green College: `Investigation of remote sensing for assessing and monitoring the Araucaria forest region of Brazil'.
Department of Zoology, Wednesday, 12 April, 2 p.m.
Examiners: G.R.W. Wint, G. Foody.

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English Language and Literature

H.J. TOOKEY, Wadham: `Playing a thousand roles: Anais Nin, fictionality, and femininity'.
St John's, Friday, 28 April, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: R.L. Bush, L. Marcus.

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Law

H. BARMA, Exeter: `Legal aspects of financial reporting in company law'.
Examination Schools, Thursday, 20 April, 11.30 a.m.
Examiners: P.L. Davies, H. Rajak.

E. MICHELER, St Hilda's: `The transfer of ownership rights in shares at common law and under CREST'.
Examination Schools, Tuesday, 18 April, 11 a.m.
Examiners: R. Goode, S. Worthington.

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Mathematical Sciences

M. POURMAHDIAN, Wolfson: `Model theory of simple theories'.
Mathematical Institute, Friday, 7 April, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: B. Zilber, D. Macpherson.

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Modern History

P.E.T. ARBLASTER, St Peter's: `Current affairs publishing in the Habsburg Netherlands, 1620–60, in comparative European perspective'.
Examination Schools, Friday, 24 March, 11.30 a.m.
Examiners: R.G. Lewis, J.I. Israel.

P.K. KIDAMBI, Wadham: `State, society, and the labouring poor: some aspects of the relationship between classes in colonial Bombay, 1890–1920'.
Queen Elizabeth House, Friday, 28 April, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: N. Gooptu, R.S. Chandavarkar.

A. STARA, Worcester: `Lenoir, Quatremere, and the hermeneutic significance of the Musee des Monuments Franìais'.
Department of the History of Art, Thursday, 11 May, 11.30 a.m.
Examiners: M.J. Kemp, R. Hooker.

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Music

S. ALLEN, Somerville: `Benjamin Britten and Christianity'.
St Peter's, Wednesday, 5 April, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: N.J. Marston, D. Mitchell.

D. GOLBY, St Hugh's: `The violin in England c.1750–1850: a case study in music education'.
Faculty of Music, Monday, 17 April, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: H.D. Johnstone, R. Stowell.

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Physical Sciences

SUNGWON KHYM, Hertford: `Magneto transport studies of semimetallic InAs/GaSb structures'.
Clarendon Laboratory, Monday, 27 March, 10.30 a.m.
Examiners: P.C. Klipstein, S.N. Holmes.

C. MORRELL, Trinity: `FTIR emission studies of chemical processes'.
Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, Friday, 19 May, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: M. Brouard, D.E. Heard.

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Social Studies

A. CASARICO, Nuffield: `An economic analysis of pension systems and reforms'.
Nuffield, Monday, 1 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: H.S. Shin, P. Pestieau.

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