Examinations and Boards

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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ELECTION TO DIVISIONAL BOARD 12 October

Social Sciences Board

Vacancy: One (from among the members of the Faculty of Social Studies)

Retiring member: Dr M.E. Ceadel (resigned)

Period from MT 2000: 4 years

¶ Nominations in writing by two members (other than the candidate) of the Faculty of Social Studies will be received by the Head Clerk at the University Offices, Wellington Square, up to 4 p.m. on Monday, 18 September, and similar nominations by six members of the faculty other than the candidate up to 4 p.m. on Monday, 25 September.

Council has decided that nominations should show for each signatory the name of the faculty in block capitals. Any names which are not so shown may not be published. At least one nomination in respect of each candidate must be made on an official nomination form. Copies of the form are obtainable from the Head Clerk (telephone: (2)70190; e-mail: Philip.Moss@admin.ox.ac.uk).

In the event of a contested election, a brief biographical note on each candidate will be published in the Gazette dated 5 October, and voters may wish to wait until they have read these notes before returning their ballot papers (which will be sent out to members of the faculty as soon as possible after the closing date for nominations, and which, after completion, must be received by the Head Clerk not later than 4 p.m. on 12 October).

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ELECTIONS OF MEMBERS OF BOARDS OF FACULTIES (8 June)

The following have been duly elected to hold office for two years (unless otherwise stated) from the first day of Michaelmas Term 2000:

English Language and Literature

Official members

1. J. CAREY, MA, D.PHIL., Merton Professor of English Literature

2. M.R. GODDEN, MA, Rawlinson and Bosworth Professor of Anglo-Saxon

3. H. O'DONOGHUE, MA, M.PHIL., D.PHIL., Vigfusson Rausing Reader in Ancient Icelandic Literature and Antiquities

4. P. STROHM, MA, J.R.R. Tolkien Professor of English Literature and Language

Ordinary members

1. R.F.S. HAMER, MA, Student of Christ Church

2. J.S. KELLY, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St John's

3. P.E. MCCULLOUGH, MA, Fellow of Lincoln

4. L.A. NEWLYN, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St Edmund Hall

5. J.C.G. PITCHER, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St John's

6. N.G. SHRIMPTON, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall

Law

Official members

1. A.J. ASHWORTH, DCL, Vinerian Professor of English Law

2. J.M. FINNIS, MA, D.PHIL., Professor of Law and Legal Philosophy

3. D.J. GALLIGAN, BCL, MA, Professor of Socio-Legal Studies (for one year)

4. R.G. HOOD, MA, D.PHIL., DCL. Professor of Criminology

5. B.S. MARKESINIS, D.PHIL., DCL, Clifford Chance Professor of Comparative Law

Ordinary members

1. R.M. BAGSHAW, BCL, MA, Fellow of Mansfield

2. J. CARTWRIGHT, BCL, MA, Student of Christ Church

3. G.D. CHILD, MA, Fellow of Lincoln

4. S. GARDNER, BCL, MA, Fellow of Lincoln

5. A.S. KENNEDY, MA, Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall

6. S.J. WHITTAKER, BCL, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St John's

7. K. YEUNG, MA, Fellow of St Anne's

Literae Humaniores

Official members

1. J.R. BROOME, White's Professor of Moral Philosophy-elect (for one year)

2. M. FREDE, MA, Professor of the History of Philosophy

3. F.G.B. MILLAR, MA, D.PHIL., D.LITT., Camden Professor of Ancient History

4. T. WILLIAMSON, MA, D.PHIL., Wykeham Professor of Logic-elect

5. M. WINTERBOTTOM, MA, D.PHIL., Corpus Christi Professor of Latin Language and Literature

Ordinary members

1. A.M. BOWIE, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Queen's (for one year)

2. D.O.M. CHARLES, B.PHIL., MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Oriel

3. E.L. HUSSEY, MA, Fellow of All Souls

4. W.J. MANDER, B.PHIL., MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Harris Manchester

5. R.B. RUTHERFORD, MA, D.PHIL., Student of Christ Church

6. P.F. SNOWDON, B.PHIL., MA, Fellow of Exeter

Modern History

Official members

1. J.M. BROWN, MA, D.PHIL., Beit Professor of the History of the British Commonwealth

2. R.J.W. EVANS, MA, D.PHIL., Regius Professor of Modern History

3. M.J. KEMP, MA. Professor of the History of Art

4. A. OFFER, MA, D.PHIL., Chichele Professor of Economic History-elect

Ordinary members

1. I.W. ARCHER, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Keble

2. J.G. DARWIN, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Nuffield

3. R.N. GILDEA, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Merton

4. D.A. PARROTT, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of New College

5. R.J. SERVICE, MA, Fellow of St Antony's

6. B.J. THOMPSON, MA, Fellow of Somerville

Music

Ordinary members

1. P.R. FRANKLIN, MA, Fellow of St Catherine's

2. H.T. LA RUE, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St Cross

3. N.J. MARSTON, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St Peter's

Oriental Studies

Official members

1. G. DUDBRIDGE, MA, Shaw Professor of Chinese

2. R.F. GOMBRICH, MA, D.PHIL., Boden Professor of Sanskrit

3. R.W. THOMSON, MA, Calouste Gulbenkian Professor of Armenian Studies

4. H.G.M. WILLIAMSON, DD, Regius Professor of Hebrew

Ordinary members

1. J.D. GURNEY, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Wadham

2. J.B. LEWIS, MA, Fellow of Wolfson

3. I.J. MCMULLEN, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Pembroke

4. C.F. ROBINSON, MA, Fellow of Wolfson

5. W.L. TREADWELL, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St Cross

Theology

Official members

1. H.M.R.E. MAYR-HARTING, MA, D.PHIL., Regius Professor of Ecclesiastical History

2. J.S.K. WARD, B.LITT., MA, Regius Professor of Divinity

3. H.G.M. WILLIAMSON, DD, Regius Professor of Hebrew

Ordinary members

1. R.A. CROSS, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Oriel

2. R.C. MORGAN, MA, Fellow of Linacre

3. J.A. SHAW, MA, Fellow of Regent's Park

4. P.J.M. SOUTHWELL, MA, Fellow of Wycliffe Hall

5. C.M. TUCKETT, MA, Fellow of Wolfson

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BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES

M.Sc. in Mathematics and the Foundations of Computer Science 2001

The Supervisory Committee has approved the following courses for examination in 2001.

Section A

Schedule I

Axiomatic Set Theory
Model Theory
Gödel's Incompleteness Theorems
Group Theory
Lie Algebras
Elementary Number Theory
Analytic Topology
Lambda Calculus
Domain Theory

Schedule II

Representation Theory
Algebraic Number Theory
General Topology
Game Semantics
Theory of Concurrency

Section B

Schedule I

Applied Probability
Combinatorial Optimisation
Communication Theory
Complexity and Cryptography
Parallel Algorithms

Schedule II

Computational Algebra
Computational Number Theory
Randomised Algorithms
Applications Oriented Programming Semantics
Theorem Proving

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BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF THEOLOGY

Honour School of Theology and Philosophy and Theology, Paper 12: Further Studies in History and Doctrine

Under the provisions of paper 12 of the Honour School of Theology (`Further Studies in History and Doctrine') (Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 521, the Board of the Faculty of Theology hereby publishes the list of theologians (with texts) on which questions will be set in the examination in 2001.

(a) Origen

Origen on First Principles, Book I, trans. G.W. Butterworth (Peter Smith, 1973).
Prayer, trans. Rowan Greer in An Exhortation to Martyrdom, etc. (Paulist Press: Classics of Western Spirituality series, 1979).
Prologue to the Commentary on the Song of Songs, trans. Rowan Greer, ibid.

(b) Augustine

Confessions, Book 10, trans. H. Chadwick (OUP, 1991).
The City of God against the Pagans, Book 14, trans. R.W. Dyson (CUP, 1998). On the Trinity, Book 10, trans. John Burnaby, in Augustine, Later Works, Library of Christian Classics, vol. VIII (SCM Press, 1955).

(c) Aquinas

Summa Theologiae Ia, qq. 1–3, 13, 44–6; IaIIae, qq. 109–14; IaIIae, qq. 1–2, 23–7; IIIa, qq. 2–6, 46–9 (Blackfriars edn., vols. 1, 2, 3, 8, 30, 31, 34, 48, 54).

(d) Luther 1500–25

E. Gordon Rupp and B. Drewery, Martin Luther: Documents of Modern History (Edward Arnold, series, 1970), pp. 1–10, 15–41, 54–82, 100–2, 107–19, 121–9).
Three Treatises, second revised edition (Fortress Press, Philadelphia, 1970).

(e) Calvin and the City of Geneva

G.R. Potter and M. Greengrass, John Calvin: Documents of Modern History (Edward Arnold, 1983), pp. 1–109.
Calvin, Institutes of the Christian Religion, trans. F.L. Battles: Library of Christian Classics, vols. XX, XXI (SCM Press, 1961), bk. 1, chs. i–v; bk. 3, chs. xxi, xxiii; bk. 4, chs. ii, ix, xii (Sections 1–13), xx.

(f) Schleiermacher

On Religion. Speeches to its Cultured Despisers, Speeches 1, 2, and 5 (CUP, 1988).
The Christian Faith, sectt. 13–19 and 92–105 (T. & T. Clark, 1968).

(g) Newman

Apologia Pro Vita Sua (Penguin, 1994).
Fifteen Sermons Preached before the University of Oxford (University of Notre Dame Press, 1997), x, xi, xiii, xv.
An Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine, 1878 edition (University of Notre Dame Press, 1989), chs. 1–5.
Newman the Thelogian: A Reader, ed. I. Ker (Collins, 1990), pp. 66–122, 199–275.

( h) Barth

`The Strange New World Within the Bible' in The Word of God and the Word of Man (Hodder & Stoughton, London, 1928), pp. 28–50.
Church Dogmatics, I/1, § 1 (T. & T. Clark, Edinburgh, 1976), pp. 3–24; IV/1, § 59 (T. & T. Clark, Edinburgh, 1956), pp. 157–357.

(i) Tillich

Systematic Theology, vol. 1: Introduction, and vol. 2 (SCM Press, 1978), or (J. Nisbet and Co.), vol. 1, 1953, and vol. 2, 1957.

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COMMITTEE ON CONTINUING EDUCATION

Foundation Certificate in Modern History 2001

Under the terms of the regulations for the above examination (Examination Decrees, 1999, pp. 1012–3), the Board of Studies of the Committee on Continuing Education has approved the following arrangements for the selection of an optional paper.

Candidates must choose one paper (source-based) from:

Either: The Nobility and Gentry, c.1560–1640

Or: The Spanish Civil War 1936–9

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SUB-FACULTY OF ENGINEERING SCIENCE

Honour School of Engineering Science Part II 2001

Candidates must offer three papers from those listed below. Two papers must be chosen from one of Lists 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5, in which each paper will assume knowledge of material examined in the corresponding Part I paper B1, B2, B3, B4, or B5. The third paper must be chosen from one of the other five Lists.

List 1: Mechanical Engineering

C1A Thermofluids
C1B Mechanical Properties of Materials
C1C Solid Mechanics

List 2: Civil Engineering

C2A Structure and Fluids
C2B Geotechnics

List 3: Electrical Engineering

C3A Opto-electronics
C3B Analogue and Digital Electronics

List 4: Information Engineering

C4A Control Systems
C4B Information Engineering

List 5: Chemical Engineering

C5A Chemical Processes
C5B Chemical Technology

List 6 (no pre-requisite B paper)

C6A Production Engineering
C6B Engineering Mathematics

Information about content of the various papers is published in the General Scheme of Lectures for Engineering Science.

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STANDING COMMITTEE FOR ENGINEERING, ECONOMICS, AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED SCHOOLS

Honour School of Engineering, Economics, and Management Part II 2001

The Standing Committee for the EEM and Related Schools has approved the following arrangements for the optional Group M and Group C papers.

Candidates selecting the Group M paper(s) must select from the following:

M2 Information Management
M3 Finance and Accounting
M4 Marketing and Business Policy

The syllabi for the three papers listed above can be found in the Library of the Department of Engineering Science.

Candidates selecting the Group C papers are restricted to select one paper or the equivalent of one paper only from the following:

Either

A combination of any two papers from the eleven papers listed below, in which candidates would be expected to answer, in two hours, three questions from each paper:

C1A Thermofluids
C1B Mechanical properties of materials
C1C Solid mechanics

C2A Structures and fluids
C2B Geotechnics

C3A Opto-electronics
C3B Analogue and Digital Electronics

C4A Control systems
C4B Information engineering

C5A Chemical processes
C5B Chemical technology

Or

A complete paper from the two papers listed below:

C6A Production engineering
C6B Engineering mathematics

Each of the papers in the series C1 to C5 will assume knowledge of the material examined in the corresponding Part I paper, B1 Mechanical Engineering, B2 Civil Engineering, B3 Electrical Engineering, B4 Information Engineering, or B5 Chemical Engineering. Information about content of the various papers is published in the General Scheme of Lectures for Engineering Science.

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STANDING COMMITTEE FOR THE HONOUR SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING AND MATERIALS

Honour School of Engineering and Materials Part II 2001

The Standing Committee for the Honour School of Engineering and Materials has approved the following schedule for the written papers in Part II of the Honour School of Engineering and Materials 2001.

(a) Electronic Materials Engineering

EME1. Design and Fabrication: Devices and VLSI

Operation and performance of discrete devices; growth and characterisation of crystals; semiconductor device fabrication and design; VLSI; performance limits and failure analysis of devices.

EME2. Advanced Electronic Materials

Advanced electronic properties of materials; novel electronic materials and devices; superconductivity; materials and devices; structure and electrical properties of defects in crystals; opto-electronic materials.

EME3. Optoelectronics

Fundamentals of optics; opto-electronic components; imaging and display; opto-electronic systems.

(b) Structural Materials Engineering

SME1. Materials Processing

Melt processing; processing of polymers; processing of ceramics; powder processing; metal forming, welding, and joining.

SME2. Advanced Structural Materials

Creep and superplasticity; advanced ceramics; composite materials; polymer molecules; microstructures and mechanical properties; advanced engineering alloys—design and applications.

SME3. Design and Performance

Corrosion and protection; applied elasticity and plasticity; elastic continua; design with ceramics; fracture; fatigue; introduction to production engineering.

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STANDING COMMITTEE FOR THE HONOUR SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING AND COMPUTING SCIENCE

Final Honour School of Engineering and Computing Science Part II 2001

The Standing Committee for the Honour School of Engineering and Computing Science has approved the following subjects for examination in Part II of the Honour School of Engineering and Computing Science 2001. Undergraduates may choose up to two papers from this list.

C3A Opto-electronics
C3B Analogue and Digital Electronics

C4A Control Systems
C4B Information Engineering

C6B Engineering mathematics

Each of the papers in the series C3 and C4 will assume knowledge of the material examined in the corresponding Part I paper, B3 Electrical Engineering, or B4 Information Engineering.

Information about the various papers is published in the General Scheme of Lectures for Engineering Science.

Final Honour School of Engineering and Computing Science Part II 2002

The Standing Committee for the Honour School of Engineering and Computing Science has approved the following subjects for examination in Part II of the Honour School of Engineering and Computing Science 2002. Undergraduates may choose up to two papers from this list, excepting that any paper from ECS3, ECS4, and ECS5 already offered in Part I.

Section I.1. Formal Program Design (as for Section I.1 of the Honour School of Computing Science).

Section II.2. Computer Graphics, Splines, and Computational Geometry (as for Section II.2 of the Honour School of Computer Science 2002).

Section II.3. Parallel Scientific Computation and Parallel Algorithms (as for Section II.3 of the Honour School of Computer Science 2002).

Section II.4. Object Oriented Programming (as for Section II.4 of the Honour School of Computer Science 2002).

and

CS3. Compilers and Programming Languages (Honour School of Computer Science, Paper I.2).

ECS4. Concurrency and Distributed Systems (Honour School of Computer Science, Paper I.3).

ECS5. Computer Architecture and Operating Systems (Honour School of Computer Science, Paper I.4).

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M.SC. IN NEUROSCIENCE

The approved courses available in 2000–1 for the specialist component of the M.Sc. in Neuroscience are listed below. Candidates will be required to take five courses, choosing at least one under each of the three series A, B, C.

Series A

Module A1—Strategies for monitoring and analysing neuronal circuits (Hilary Term)

Organiser: Dr A.J. King

Thirteen lectures and associated practicals/demonstrations.

Recording and monitoring
Manipulation
Neuroanatomical techniques
Cortical microcircuitry
Field potentials in health and disease

Module A2—Mapping and imaging techniques (Hilary Term)

Organiser: Professor R. Passingham

Eleven lectures.

Techniques for functional localisation
Structural imaging
Functional imaging

Module A3—Cellular signalling (Trinity Term)

Organiser: Professor J. Jack and Dr O. Paulsen

Thirteen lectures and associated practicals/demonstrations.

Membranes and channels
Synaptic transmission and modifiability

Series B

Module B1—Sensory systems (Hilary Term)

Organiser: Dr D. Moore

Fourteen lectures and associated practicals/demonstrations.

Sensory systems
Sensory psychophysics
Artificial vision

Module B2—Motor systems (Hilary Term)

Organiser: Professor J.F. Stein

Twelve lectures and associated practicals/demonstrations.

Proprioconception and spinal cord circuitry
Basal ganglia, cerebellum and motor cortical systems
Motor psychophysics

Module B3—Neurocomputing and neural networks (Hilary and Trinity Terms)

Organiser: Professor E.T. Rolls Eight lectures and four practicals.

Neurocomputing
Connectionist approaches to cognitive function

Module B4—Animal models and clinical aspects of neuroscience (Trinity Term)

Organiser: Professor J.N.P. Rawlins

Eighteen lectures and associated practicals/demonstrations.

The development and application of animal models
Consciousness and cognition
Non-affective neurological disorders

Series C

Module C1—CNS Development (Hilary Term)

Organiser: Dr J. Taylor

Twelve lectures.

Early development
Formation of a nervous system: vertebrate
Formation of a nervous system: invertebrate
Axonal growth
Module C2—Neuronal plasticity (Trinity Term)

Organiser: Dr J. Taylor

Eleven lectures.

Establishing connections between neuronal populations
The modifiability of the brain

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SUPPLEMENTARY SUBJECTS IN THE HONOUR SCHOOL OF NATURAL SCIENCE

2000–1 The following subjects will be taught and examined during 2000–1.

Anthropology

Those interested in taking this course should arrange to see Professor V. Reynolds, Department of Biological Anthropology (telephone: (2)74693).

Examined: end of TT.

Aromatic and Heterocyclic Pharmaceutical Chemistry

Lectures: sixteen hours (includes one class) in MT; sixteen hours (includes one class) in HT.

Examined: end of HT.

History and Philosophy of Science

Lectures: eight hours (plus tutorials) in MT; eight hours (plus tutorials/classes) in HT.

Examined: end of HT.

Quantum Chemistry

Lectures: sixteen hours (plus a weekly class) in MT; sixteen hours (plus a weekly class) in HT.

Examined: end of HT.

Chemical Pharmacology may be available as a Supplementary Subject in 2000–1. If so, its availability will be publicised by circulation to colleges and departments and by a notice in the Gazette.

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CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the General Board, the following changes in regulations made by the Board of the Faculty of Psychological Studies will come into effect on 7 July.

Board of the Faculty of Psychological Studies

(a) Honour School of Experimental Psychology

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first Part I examination in 2002, and first Part II examination in 2003)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, delete from p. 221, l. 25 to p. 227, l. 14, and substitute:

`(ii) Regulations

1. Decree (7) of 3 June 1947 permits the number of candidates offering Psychology to be limited, if necessary.

2. The subjects of the examination shall be those prescribed in Parts I and II below.

3. The examination for Part I shall be taken during weeks nought and one of Trinity Term of the candidate's second year. The examination for Part II shall be taken during Trinity Term of the candidate's third year. The dates of submission for the Part I practical work and Part II project work and library dissertation are those prescribed in Parts I and II below.

4. No candidate shall be admitted for Part II examination in this school unless

(a) he or she has passed the Part I examination for Experimental Psychology, and

(b) he or she has satisfied the Moderators for the Preliminary Examination for Psychology, Philosophy, and Physiology in the subject Introduction to Probability Theory and Statistics or he or she has passed the Qualifying Examination in Statistics as prescribed for candidates offering Psychology in the Honour School of Psychology, Philosophy, and Physiology.

The Head of the Department of Experimental Psychology may dispense a candidate from the Qualifying Examination in Statistics in cases where it is clear that the candidate has reached an adequate standard in Statistics by virtue of previous study and qualification.

5. Candidates may also be examined viva voce in Part II; except that the examiners may dispense from the viva voce examination any candidate concerning whom they shall have decided that his or her performance in the viva voce examination could not affect his or her class. The topics of the viva voce examination may include the subject of any of the written papers and the research project or the practical work done during the course.

6. Every candidate shall give notice to the Registrar of all papers being offered not later than Friday in the eighth week of Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examination.

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PART I

1. Four written papers, each of three hours, will be set:

Paper I Biological Bases of Behaviour

Components: (i) Brain and Behaviour, (ii) Biology of Learning and Memory, (iii) Psychological Disorders.

Paper II Human Experimental Psychology

Components: (i) Perception, (ii) Memory, Attention, and Information Processing, (iii) Language and Cognition

Paper III Social Psychology, Developmental Psychology, and Individual Differences

Components: (i) Social Psychology, (ii) Developmental Psychology, (iii) Individual Differences

Paper IV Experimental Design and Statistics

In papers I–III candidates will be required to answer at least one question from each of the components.

2. Candidates will be required to undertake practical work, as specified by the Head of Department of Experimental Psychology, and this will constitute a part of the examination. In exceptional circumstances, the Proctors may dispense a candidate from the specified requirements on the recommendation of the head of department, or deputy.

3. Candidates shall submit to the Head of Department of Experimental Psychology or deputy, not later than tenth week in Hilary Term preceding the term in which the Part I examination is to be held, portfolios containing reports of practical work completed during their course of study for Part I. These portfolios shall be available to the examiners as a part of the examination. Each portfolio shall be accompanied by a certificate signed by the candidate indicating that the portfolio submitted is the candidate's own work.

This certificate must be submitted separately in a sealed envelope addressed to the chairman of examiners. Where the work submitted has been produced in collaboration the candidates shall indicate the extent of their own contributions. Reports of practical work previously submitted for the Honour School of Experimental Psychology may be resubmitted, but reports will not be accepted if they have already been submitted, wholly or substantially, for another Honour School or degree of this University, or for a degree of any other institution. The head of department, or deputy, shall inform the examiners by the end of noughth week of the Trinity Term in which the Part I examination is to be held (a) as to which candidates have failed to satisfy the requirement to undertake practical work, and (b) as to which candidates have failed to satisfy the requirement to submit portfolios. Failure to satisfy either requirement will result in a candidate's being deemed to have withdrawn from the examination under the Regulations of the Proctors concerning Conduct at

Examinations

(See Special Regulations concerning Examinations). The head of department or deputy shall also make available to the examiners records showing the extent to which each candidate has adequately pursued a course of practical work. The examiners shall take this evidence into consideration along with evidence of unsatisfactory or distinguished performance in each portfolio of practical work.

For all papers in Psychology and for the Qualifying Examination in Statistics but not for papers taken from the Honour School of Physiological Sciences, the examiners will permit the use of any hand-held pocket calculators subject to the conditions set out on p. 1074.

4. A candidate who fails the Part I examination may retake the examination once only, in Michaelmas Term of the following academic year.

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PART II

Part II will consist of a research project and either three written papers each of three hours duration, or two written papers, each of three hours duration, and a Library Dissertation.

1. Research Project

The research project will normally be carried out in the Trinity Term and the following Michaelmas Term in the year preceding the Part II examinations. Candidates will be required to do project work under the supervision of one of the following:

(i) any member of the Sub-faculty of Psychological Studies

(ii) any other person approved by the Divisional Board provided that such approval shall be applied for not later than Friday of fourth week of Michaelmas Full Term in the year preceding the Part II examinations.

The research project shall be typed, and held firmly in a stiff cover. It shall consist of not more than 5,000 words of double-spaced text, of A4 size, excluding references, figures, and tables, but including a summary typed on a separate page. No person or body shall have authority to permit any excess in the number of words over the limit of 5,000. If the research project exceeds the word limit the examiners shall take this into consideration and this may affect the class of degree awarded. (See also (3) below.)

2. Written papers and Library Dissertation

Each candidate will be examined in three areas of Psychology by means of either three written papers each of three hours, or two written papers and a Library Dissertation. The written papers will be selected from a list of at least twelve options approved by the Medical Sciences Board and published at the Department of Experimental Psychology. A list of options will be posted in the Department of Experimental Psychology and sent to Senior Tutors of all colleges not later than noon on Monday of the first week of Hilary Term in the year preceding that in which the examination is taken.

The library dissertation shall be typed, and held firmly in a stiff cover. It shall consist of not more than 10,000 words excluding references, tables, and figures, but including any appendices, and a summary typed on a separate page. No person or body shall have authority to permit any excess in the number of words over the limit of 10,000. If the library dissertation exceeds the word limit, the examiners shall take this into consideration and this may affect the class of degree awarded. (See also (3) below.)

3. Further requirements for the Research Project and Library Dissertation

The model for an acceptable research project or library dissertation shall be a paper prepared for and suitable for publication in a psychological journal. The subject of a research project shall be an experimental or observational study performed by the candidate, where experiment may include investigation of the behaviour of a computational, mathematical, or other formal model of a psychological process or a process having psychological application.

The subject of the research project must not overlap with the subject of the library dissertation, if chosen, but either may (but need not) overlap any subject in which the candidate offers Part II examination papers. Candidates are warned that they should avoid repetition in examination papers of material used in the research project or library dissertation and that substantial repetition may be penalised.

All proposed research projects or library dissertations must be approved in advance by the Head of the Department of Experimental Psychology. The procedures for obtaining this approval will be notified to students by the Head of Department of Experimental Psychology.

Two copies of completed projects and library dissertations must be submitted to the Chairman of Examiners, Honour School of Experimental Psychology, Examination Schools, Oxford, not later than noon on Friday of the eighth week of Hilary Term, in the year of the examination. A certificate signed by the candidate indicating that the work submitted is the candidate's own work, and a statement of the number of words in the project or dissertation, must be submitted separately in respect of each research project and library dissertation in a sealed envelope addressed to the chairman of examiners. Research projects and library dissertations previously submitted for the Honour School of Experimental Psychology may be resubmitted. No project or dissertation will be accepted if it has already been submitted, wholly or substantially, for another Honour School or degree of this University, or for a degree of any other institution.'

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(b) Pass School of Experimental Psychology

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first Part I examination in 2002, and first Part II examination in 2003)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 227, delete ll. 20–3, and substitute:

`(ii) Regulations

The candidates shall offer the four papers for Part I as prescribed for the Honour School of Experimental Psychology. They shall be required to pass Part I before sitting the examination for Part II. Candidates shall offer for Part II either two papers, or one paper and a library dissertation, chosen from amongst those prescribed for the Honour School of Experimental Psychology.'

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(c) Honour School of Psychology, Philosophy, and Physiology

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first Part I examination in 2002, and first Part II examination in 2003)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, delete from p. 512, l. 1 to p. 514, l. 51, and substitute

`(ii) Regulations

1. General

Decree (7) of 3 June 1947 permits the number of candidates offering Psychology to be limited, if necessary.

For candidates offering Psychology, the examination shall consist of two parts. Part I will consist of one subject area, Psychology. Part II will consist of two or three subject areas: Psychology, and one or both of Philosophy and Physiology. For other candidates, the examination shall consist only of papers in Philosophy and Physiology.

Candidates taking papers in Psychology must take four papers for Part I and six papers for Part II. The four papers for Psychology Part I shall count as two papers for the Final Honour School. Other candidates must take eight subjects in all, except that where three or more subjects are taken in Physiological Sciences the total number of subjects required is seven. Candidates taking only seven subjects will be required to attend at least one practical class in Physiology. Not more than four subjects in Physiology may be taken.

No candidate who offers Psychology shall be admitted for the Part II examination in this school unless

(a) he or she has passed the Part I examination specified for this school, and

(b) he or she has satisfied the Moderators for the Preliminary Examination for Psychology, Philosophy, and Physiology in the subject Introduction to Probability Theory and Statistics or passed the Qualifying Examination in Statistics for this school. The Head of the Department of Experimental Psychology may dispense a candidate from the Qualifying Examination in Statistics in cases where it is clear that the candidate has reached an adequate standard in Statistics by virtue of previous study and qualification. The examination for Psychology Part I shall be taken during weeks nought and one of Trinity Term of the candidate's second year. The examination for Psychology Part II and for Philosophy and Physiology shall be held during Trinity Term of the candidate's third year. The dates of submission for assessed work are those prescribed in sections 2–4 below.

The subjects in Psychology shall be those specified in 2. Psychology below; in Philosophy those listed in the Regulations for Philosophy in all Honour Schools including Philosophy, and in Physiology the papers and the Dissertation listed under Physiological Sciences in the Honour School of Natural Science.

Candidates may offer either a research project or a library dissertation in Psychology, or a thesis in Philosophy, or a dissertation in Physiology. There are further restrictions on the choice of subjects and requirements to be satisfied within each branch, which are set out below. The highest honours can be obtained by excellence in any of the branches offered, provided that the candidate has taken sufficient subjects in the branch and that adequate knowledge is shown in the other branch(es) of examination.

Any candidate may be examined viva voce, except for Psychology Part I. Every candidate shall give notice to the Registrar of all papers being offered not later than Friday in the eighth week of Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examination.

2. Psychology

PART I

1. The four written papers as specified for Part I of the Honour School of Experimental Psychology will be set:

Paper I Biological Bases of Behaviour

Component parts: (i) Brain and Behaviour, (ii) Biology of Learning and Memory, (iii) Psychological Disorders.

Paper II Human Experimental Psychology

Component parts: (i) Perception, (ii) Memory, Attention, and Information Processing, (iii) Language and Cognition

Paper III Social and Developmental Psychology, and Individual Differences

Component parts: (i) Social Psychology, (ii) Developmental Psychology, (iii) Individual Differences

Paper IV Experimental Design and Statistics

Candidates will be required to show knowledge of five of the nine components of Papers I–III.

They may do so by offering either two papers of two hours and one paper of one hour or one paper of three hours and two papers of one hour. All candidates are required to offer Paper IV (one and a half hours).

In order to be deemed eligible for Graduate Membership of the British Psychological Society (BPS), candidates should ensure that the papers they take provide coverage of at least five of the six areas defined in the BPS Qualifying Examination syllabus. To do this, for paper I they must select at least one of components (i) and (ii); for paper II they must select at least one component, but not both components (ii) and (iii); and for paper III they must select at least two components. The other requirements for BPS Graduate Membership are set out in Part II below.

Candidates will be required to undertake practical work, as specified by the Head of the Department of Experimental Psychology, and this will constitute a part of the examination. In exceptional circumstances the Proctors may dispense a candidate from the specified requirements on the recommendation of the head of department, or deputy. Candidates shall submit to the Head of the Department of Experimental Psychology or deputy, not later than tenth week of Hilary Term preceding the term in which the Part I examination is to be held, portfolios containing reports of their practical work. The provisions of this clause, which follow, apply to the Experimental Project and to the other practical work. These portfolios shall be available to the examiners as a part of the examination. Each portfolio shall be accompanied by a certificate signed by the candidate indicating that the portfolio submitted is the candidate's own work. This certificate must be submitted separately in a sealed envelope addressed to the chairman of examiners. Where the work submitted has been produced in collaboration the candidates shall indicate the extent of their own contributions. Reports of practical work previously submitted for the Honour School of Psychology, Philosophy, and Physiology may be resubmitted, but reports will not be accepted if they have already been submitted, wholly or substantially, for another Honour School or degree of this University, or for a degree of any other institution. The head of department, or deputy, shall inform the examiners by the end of noughth week of the Trinity Term in which the Part I examination is to be held (a) as to which candidates have failed to satisfy the requirement to undertake practical work, and (b) as to which candidates have failed to satisfy the requirement to submit portfolios.

Failure to satisfy either requirement will result in a candidate's being deemed to have withdrawn from the examination under the Regulations of the Proctors concerning Conduct at Examinations (see Special Regulations concerning Examinations). The head of department or deputy shall also make available to the examiners records showing the extent to which each candidate has adequately pursued a course of practical work. The examiners shall take this evidence into consideration along with evidence of unsatisfactory or distinguished performance in each portfolio of practical work. A candidate who fails the Part I examination may retake the examination once only, in Michaelmas Term of the following academic year.

Qualifying Examination in Statistics

Any candidate offering Psychology who has not satisfied the Moderators for the Preliminary Examination for Psychology, Philosophy, and Physiology in the subject Introduction to Probability Theory and Statistics must pass a Qualifying Examination in Statistics before being admitted for examination in the Honour School. The Head of the Department of Experimental Psychology shall have the capacity to dispense a candidate from the examination in cases where it is clear that an individual has reached an adequate standard by virtue of previous study and qualification.

The syllabus and paper set for the examination shall be that for the subject Introduction to Probability Theory and Statistics in the Preliminary Examination for Psychology, Philosophy, and Physiology. For all papers in Psychology and for the Qualifying Examination in Statistics, the examiners will permit the use of any hand-held pocket calculator subject to the conditions set out on p. 1074.

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PART II

Candidates must offer six papers for Part II. At least one and at most three must be in Psychology, the others to be chosen from those available in Philosophy and/or Physiology below. Candidates taking three subjects in Psychology may offer either a research project or a Library Dissertation in place of one of the three Psychology papers.

In order to be deemed eligible for Graduate Membership of the BPS, candidates must take at least two subjects in Psychology.

Written papers, research project, and Library Dissertation

Each candidate will be examined in either one, two, or three areas of Psychology by means of one, two, or three written papers each of three hours, or two written papers, each of three hours, and either a research project or a Library Dissertation. The written papers will be selected from the list of at least twelve options approved by the Medical Sciences Division and published at the Department of Experimental Psychology, as specified for the Honour School of Experimental Psychology. A list of options will be posted in the Department of Experimental Psychology and sent to Senior Tutors of all colleges not later than noon on Monday of the first week of Hilary Term in the year preceding that in which the examination is taken.

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Research Project

As specified for the Honour School of Experimental Psychology.

Library Dissertation

As specified for the Honour School of Experimental Psychology.

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Viva Voce examination

Candidates may also be examined viva voce in Part II; except that the examiners may dispense from the viva voce examination any candidate concerning whom they shall have decided that his or her performance in the viva voce examination could not affect his or her class. The topics of the viva voce examination may include the subject of any of the written papers and the research project or the practical work done during the course.

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3. Philosophy

Candidates must satisfy both the General Regulations, and those relating specifically to Psychology, Philosophy, and Physiology, in the Regulations for Philosophy in all Honour Schools including Philosophy.

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4. Physiology

Candidates may take any of the subjects (1) to (12) and the dissertation specified under Physiological Sciences in the Honour School of Natural Science. A dissertation may only be offered if at least three other papers in Physiology are taken and should be on a topic related to the physio- logical sciences as approved by or on behalf of the Medical Sciences Board. The subject of a dissertation may be experimental work performed by the candidates themselves, or a report based on a temporary association with an established worker or research group (as when the necessary practical skills cannot be mastered in the time available), or a critical review based on individual reading. The dissertation shall be typed but need not be bound provided it is held firmly in a stiff cover. The dissertation shall not exceed 10,000 words

(excluding figures, diagrams, and references), but a dissertation of 4,000–5,000 words will be considered ample when the candidate has performed an appreciable quantity of personal experimental work. Topics for dissertations shall be included on the list circulated by the Medical Sciences Board for candidates in the Honour School of Physiological Sciences and candidates may also propose topics not on that list in accordance with the same regulations.

The timetable for giving notice of an intention to offer a dissertation or for seeking approval for a dissertation not on the approved list shall be the same as those set out in the same regulations for candidates not on the Register of Medical Students. Dissertations (two copies) must be sent to the Chairman of the Examiners of the Honour School of Psychology, Philosophy, and Physiology, Examination Schools, Oxford, not later than noon on Friday of the second week of Trinity Term in which the examination is to be held. A certificate signed by the candidate indicating that the dissertation is the candidate's own work must be submitted separately in respect of each dissertation in a sealed envelope addressed to the chairman of examiners. Where the work submitted has been produced in collaboration the candidates shall indicate the extent of their own contributions.

Dissertations previously submitted for the Honour School of Psychology, Philosophy, and Physiology may be resubmitted. No dissertation will be accepted if it has already been submitted, wholly or substantially, for another Honour School or degree of this University, or for a degree of any other institution.

Candidates offering three or more papers in Physiology shall submit signed notebooks providing evidence of attendance at one practical class during their course of study provided that candidates offering a dissertation involving substantial laboratory work and also offering at least three papers in Psychology may apply to the Medical Sciences Board for exemption from one such practical class. Each notebook shall be accompanied by a certificate signed by the candidate indicating that the notebook submitted is the candidate's own work. This certificate must be submitted separately in a sealed envelope addressed to the chairman of examiners. Where the work submitted has been produced in collaboration the candidates shall indicate the extent of their own contributions. Any practical class which does not constitute a regular departmental practical shall be subject to approval by or on behalf of the Medical Sciences Board.

The signed notebooks shall be available to the examiners at any time prescribed by them before the written examination and shall be taken into consideration by them. The examiners may also require further examination of the candidate on practical work.

Candidates who are examined viva voce may be asked about the practical work done during their course of study.'

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(d) Pass School in Psychology, Philosophy, and Physiology

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first Part I examination in 2002, and first Part II examination in 2003)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 515, delete ll. 6–16, and substitute:

`(ii) Regulations

Candidates may offer either Psychology and Philosophy or Philosophy and Physiology or Physiology and Psychology. Candidates must take six papers in all. These shall consist of three papers from one subject and three papers from the other, as prescribed for the Honour School of Psychology, Philosophy, and Physiology, provided that candidates may offer a thesis in place of one paper in Philosophy or one paper in Physiology. The regulations governing the thesis shall be as prescribed for the Honour School of Psychology, Philosopyy, and Physiology.

Candidates offering Psychology shall take the four papers for Part I as prescribed for the Honour School of Psychology, Philosophy, and Physiology (these four papers count as two for the Final Honour School). They shall be required to pass Part I before sitting the examinations for Part II. They are also required to pass the Qualifying Examination in Statistics s prescribed for the Honour School of Psychology, Philosophy, and Physiology before sitting for the Pass School. Candidates offering Psychology shall offer for Part II one paper chosen from those prescribed for Psychology, and three papers from those prescribed for either Philosophy or Physiology for the Honour School of Psychology, Philosophy, and Phsyiology.'

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EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give notice of oral examination of their candidates as follows:

Clinical Medicine

R. PALMER, Lady Margaret Hall: `Population structure and the PRTI multigene family in rat-derived Pneumocystis carinii'.
Institute of Molecular Medicine, Wednesday, 28 June, 10 a.m.
Examiners: E.J. Louis, E. Dei-Cas.

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English Language and Literature

E. BARRY, Queen's: `Faded sense: the uses of cliché in Samuel Beckett's prose works'.
Wadham, Tuesday, 18 July, 11.30 a.m.
Examiners: J.B. O'Donoghue, S. Connor.

R.M. MILLS, Christ Church: `"Thanks for that elegant defense". Polemical prose and poetry by women in the early eighteenth century'.
Examination Schools, Thursday, 13 July, 2 p.m.
Examiners: R.M. Ballaster, I. Grundy.

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Law

S.G. BERBERI, Wolfson: `The international regime of the sea-bed beyond the limits of national jurisdiction: problems of definition and legal content'.
St Edmund Hall, Friday, 7 July, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: D.A. Wyatt, W. Gilmore.

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Literae Humaniores

M. DHANDA, Balliol: `The negotiation of personal identity'.
Examination Schools, Thursday, 6 July, 3.30 p.m.
Examiners: A.E. Denham, D. Arehard.

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Modern History

J. DORSETT, Oriel: `Sir George Carew: the study and conquest of Ireland'.
Examination Schools, Tuesday, 27 June, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: A.B. Worden, J. Gillespie.

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Physical Sciences

J. LAGO, St Hugh's: `Magnetic ordering and dynamics in two ternary transition metal oxide systems'.
Oriel, Friday, 30 June, 11 a.m.
Examiners: A.T. Boothroyd, S.T. Bramwell.

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Psychological Studies

R. CRAIG, Keble: `Switching attention between visual frames of reference'.
Department of Experimental Psychology, Friday, 30 June, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: S. Millar, M.M. Smyth.

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Social Studies

A.M.D. NUCIFORA, Linacre: `An assessment of the implications of agricultural land use trends in the European Union by 2020'.
Queen Elizabeth House, Wednesday, 12 July, 11 a.m.
Examiners: D. Colman, A.J. Rayner.

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Theology

E.C. BRUGGER, St Hugh's: `Capital punishment, abolition, and Roman Catholic moral tradition'.
Blackfriars, Friday, 14 July, 11 a.m.
Examiners: R. Ombres, N.J. Biggar.

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EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF SCIENCE

The examiners appointed by the following faculty board give notice of oral examination of their candidate as follows:

Physical Sciences

G. URRIOLAGOITIA-SOSA, Wolfson: `A study of fretting fatigue'.
Engineering and Technology Building, Friday, 7 July, 11 a.m.
Examiners: P.D. McFadden, M.R. Lacey.

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