Examinations and Boards

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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GENERAL BOARD OF THE FACULTIES

With the approval of the General Board, the following appointments and reappointments have been made and titles conferred for the periods stated.

1 Appointments

READER

Biological Sciences

sunetra gupta, ma (ab Princeton, ph.d. London), Fellow-elect of
Linacre. In the Epidemiology of Infectious Disease. From 1
December 1999 until the retiring age.

UNIVERSITY LECTURERS

Biological Sciences

adrian l.r. thomas, ma (ph.d. Lund), Fellow of Lady Margaret
Hall.
In Zoology (Ecology). From 1 October 2001 until 30 September
2006.

Managment

alexander gümbel, m.phil. (Diplom. Karlsruhe), Fellow of
Lincoln. In
Management Studies (Finance). From 1 October 1999 until 30
September 2004.

Modern Languages

michelango zaccarello (dottor SNS Pisa), Fellow of Pembroke. In
Italian. From 1 October 1999 until 30 September 2004. 



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Physical Sciences steven d. biller (b.sc. Michigan, m.sc., ph.d. Irvine), Fellow of Mansfield. In Physics. From 1 October 1999 until 30 September 2004. andrew m. steane, ma, d.phil., Fellow of Exeter. In Physics. From 1 October 1999 until 30 September 2004. TEMPORARY UNIVERSITY LECTURER Social Studies valerie lechene (m.sc. Sorbonne, ph.d. EHESS Paris), Fellow of Wadham. In Economics. From 1 October 1999 until 30 September 2003. TEMPORARY STAFF TUTOR IN CONTINUING EDUCATION (part-time) christine a. jackson (ba London, ph.d. Reading). In History and Academic Support. From 1 September 1999 until 31 August 2002. JUNIOR LECTURER Social Studies edmund chattoe, ma, (m.sc. Sussex). In Sociology. From 1 November 1999 until 31 October 2002. SENIOR LECTOR (fixed-term) Literae Humaniores juliane kerkhecker, ma status (Staatsexamen, Tübingen). In Classics. From 1 October 1999 until 30 September 2004.

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2 Reappointment UNIVERSITY LECTURER(CUF) Modern Languages alison m. finch, ma, d.phil. (Ma, ph.d. Cambridge), Fellow of Merton. In French. From 1 October 2000 until the retiring age.

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3 Conferment of title UNIVERSITY LECTURER (CUF) English laurie e. maguire (ba Westfield, ma Birmingham, ph.d. London), Fellow of Magdalen. In English. From 1 October 1999 until 30 September 2004. Dr Maguire has been appointed to the substantive post with effect from 1 October 2000.

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4 Appointments by the Clinical Medicine Board UNIVERSITY LECTURER (NON-MEDICAL) martin farrall (mb, bs, b.sc. London), f.r.c.path., Fellow of Keble. In Cardiovascular Genetics. From 1 November 1999 until 31 October 2004. CLINICAL READER keith m. channon (b.sc. md Manchester), mrcp, Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall. In Cardiovascular Medicine. From 1 August 1999 until 31 July 2004.

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5 Conferment of title by the Clinical Medicine Board HONORARY SENIOR CLINICAL LECTURER

(From 1 November 1999 until 31 October 2004) friedrich p. carls (dmd Berlin, ph.d., md Zurich), Consultant in Oral Maxillofacial Surgery, John Radcliffe Hospital. In Oral Maxillofacial Surgery. janet l. craze (mb, bs London), mrcp, Consultant in Paediatics, John Radcliffe Hospital. In Paediatrics. hugh w. grant (b.sc., mb, b.ch., md Edinburgh), frcs, consultant paediatrician, John Radcliffe Hospital. In Paediatric Surgery. udo kischka (dr.med. Heidelberg), Consultant in Neuro-Rehabilitation, Rivermead Rehabilitation Centre. In Neuro-Rehabilitation. jaideep j. pandit, ba, bm, d.phil., mrcp, frca, consultant anaesthetist, John Radcliffe Hospital. In Anaesthetics. david shlugman (mb, ch.b. Cape Town), frca, Consultant in Anaesthetics, Radcliffe Infirmary. In Anaesthetics. zoë traill, ma (mb, bs London), mrcp, frcr, consultant radiologist, Churchill and Horton Hospitals. In Radiology.

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6 Reconferment of title by the Clinical Medicine Board. HONORARY SENIOR CLINICAL LECTURER

(From 1 January 2000 until the retiring age or resignation from the substantive post) david j. coleman, ma status (bm, ms Southampton), Consultant in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Radcliffe Infirmary. In Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. pauline a. hurley, ma status (b.med.sci., bm, bs Nottingham), Consultant in Obstetrics and Fetal Medicine, John Radcliffe Hospital. In Obstetrics and Gynaecology. c. margaret p. rees, ma status, d.phil. (b.sc., mb, bs London), mrcog, Supernumerary Fellow of St Hilda's, Associate Specialist in Medical Gynaecology, John Radcliffe Hospital. In Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

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CHAIRMEN OF EXAMINERS

TRINITY TERM 2000

Honour Moderations

Modern History: W.E.S. THOMAS, MA, Student of Christ Church

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Law Moderations

P.J. CLARKE, BCL, MA, Fellow of Jesus

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Honour Schools

Engineering and Computing Science Parts I and II: J.M. BRADY, MA, Fellow of Keble (address: Department of Engineering Science)

Engineering, Economics, and Management Parts I and II: R.G. LORD, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall (address: Department of Engineering Science)

Engineering and Materials Parts I and II: S.J. ELSTON, MA, Fellow of St John's (address: Department of Engineering Science)

Literae Humaniores: J.M. DAY, B.PHIL., MA, Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall

Physics and Philosophy: A.R. WEIDBERG, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St John's (address: Nuclear and Astrophysics Laboratory)

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Supplementary Subject

Anthropology: V. REYNOLDS, MA, Fellow of Magdalen (address: Department of Biological Anthropology)

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Master of Philosophy

English Studies Courses III, IV, and V: P.E. MCCULLOCH, MA, Fellow of Lincoln

Corrigendum

Development Studies: F.J. STEWART, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Somerville (address: Queen Elizabeth House)

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BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF MUSIC

Honour School of Music, Trinity Term 2000: changes to List C (Optional Subjects)

The Music Board gives notice that the List C optional topic `Readings in Eighteenth-century Theory' will be replaced by `Schenkerian Analysis in Theory and Practice'. The List C subject previously advertised under two different titles, `Notation Studies' and `Reading Early Music' is correctly titled `Reading Early Music'.

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CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

The following changes in regulations made by the General Board, and, with the approval of the General Board, the following changes in regulations made by boards of faculties and the Committee for the Ruskin School will come into effect on 31 December.

1 General Board of the Faculties

Faculty Boards

With effect from 1 October 2000

In Statutes, 1997, p. 256, as amended by Decree (1) of 28 May 1998 (Gazette, Vol. 128, p. 1284) and by Decree (1) of 16 December 1999 (see `University Acts' above), after Sect. x insert:

`Elected members of the Modern Languages Board: Regulations of the General Board

1. The period of office of elected members of the Modern Languages Board shall be three years, provided that no elected member shall serve for more than two successive periods of three years each.

2. The arrangements for the election of members shall be laid down by standing order of the faculty board.'

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2 Board of the Faculty of English Language and Literature

(a) Preliminary Examination in English Language and Literature

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 82, in l. 37, after `Literature).' insert:

`Four translation passages will be set and candidates will be required to translate two. Two commentary passages from the prescribed Beowulf extracts will be set and candidates will be required to translate one. Essay questions will be set and candidates will be required to answer two.'

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(b) Honour School of English Language and Literature

(i) With immediate effect (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 200, l. 7, delete `One typed copy' and substitute `Two typed copies'.

2 Ibid., p. 204, l. 26, delete `shall not exceed' and substitute:

`for subjects B5, B6, B9, B10, C7, C10, and C14 shall contain no fewer than 5,000 nor more than'.

3 Ibid., l. 30, delete `and C10' and substitute:

`C10, and C14'.

4 Ibid., p. 205, delete ll. 5–10 and substitute:

`[Until 1 October 2000: (d) Two typed copies of each essay for B6 and B9 must be delivered to the Chairman of Examiners, Honour School of English Language and Literature, Examination Schools, Oxford, by noon on the Friday of the eighth week after the commencement of Michaelmas Full Term; and those for B5, B10, C7, C10, and C14 by noon on the Friday of the ninth week after the commencement of Hilary Full Term.]'

5 Ibid., p. 211, l. 50, delete `25' and substitute `24'.

6 Ibid., p. 212, l. 21, delete `27' and substitute `26'.

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(ii) With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 200, delete ll. 26–8 and substitute:

`(iii) if he or she offers Course II, which subjects he or she offers from List B, and, in the case of B1, B2, and B3, whether he or she intends to offer (an) extended essay(s) or sit (the) three-hour paper(s);'.

2 Ibid., p. 204, l. 45, delete `not exceed' and substitute:

`contain no fewer than 5,000 nor more than'.

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(c) Pass School of English Language and Literature

With immediate effect

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 214, delete from `(vii)' in l. 29 to `authors' in l. 30, and substitute:

`any author from paper (vii) whom they have offered in paper 3(a)'.

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3 Boards of the Faculties of English Language and Literature and Medieval and Modern Languages

Honour School of English and Modern Languages

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 194, l. 24, after `candidate' delete `shall'.

2 Ibid., p. 195, l. 45, delete `authors' and substitute

`author'.

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4 Board of the Faculty of Literae Humaniores and Committee for Archaeology

(a) Preliminary Examination in Classical Archaeology and Ancient History

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 74, after the decree establishing the Preliminary Examination, insert:

`Regulations

Every candidate shall offer three of the papers specified in the Regulations for Honour Moderations in Ancient History and Classical Archaeology, namely

1. Aristocracy and democracy in the Greek world, 550–450 BC, and

2. Republic to Empire: Rome 50 BC to AD 50, and

3. A special subject chosen from the topics specified either under III–IV A or under III–IV B of those Regulations.'

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(b) Honour Moderations in Classical Archaeology and Ancient History

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 29, after the decree establishing the Honour Moderations, insert:

`Regulations

Every candidate shall offer four papers [of three hours each] as follows:
I. Aristocracy and democracy in the Greek World, 550–450 BC
The paper studies the history and archaeology of the changing culture of the Greek polis states between the aristocracies in the later sixth century and the emergency of the new demos culture in the first half of the fifth century. Areas of emphasis will include: aristocracy, tyranny, and the history of the interacting archaic states; Achaemenids and the Greek collision with Persia; competing models of social and political culture after the Persian invasion; the archaeology of sanctuaries and cities; the countryside, demes, and cemeteries of Attica; and the visual revolution in art and representation.
II. Republic to Empire: Rome 50 BC to AD 50
The paper studies the impact of the first emperors on the history and archaeology of Rome and its subject states in the period from Late Republic to Early Empire. Areas of emphasis will include: Roman political culture from the Republican war-lords to Augustan princeps; emperor, senate, and the evolving administration; the Julio-Claudian dynasty and court culture: wallpainting, marbles, gardens and suburban parks; municipal culture: houses, amenities, tombs, and freedman art; land and countryside: estates, vici, and centuriated settlement; manufacture, trade, and natural resources; the archaeology of the frontier armies; traditional religion and emperor cult.
III, IV. Two papers from the following groups, provided that not more than one paper may be chosen from any one group:

A. Special subjects in archaeology:

1. Homeric archaeology and early Greece, 1550–700 BC As specified for Honour Moderations in Classics Course IA, paper V–VI.E1

2. Greek vases

As specified for Honour Moderations in Classics Course IA, paper V–VI.E2

3. Greek sculpture, c. 600–300 BC

As specified for Honour Moderations in Classics Course IA, paper V–VI.E3

4. Roman architecture

As specified for Honour Moderations in Classics Course IA, paper V–VI.E4

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B. Special subjects in history:

1. Thucydides and the west

As specified for Honour Moderations in Classics Course IA, paper V–VI.C2

2. Aristophanes' political comedy

As specified for Honour Moderations in Classics Course IA, paper V–VI.C3

3. Cicero and Catiline

As specified for Honour Moderations in Classics Course IA, paper V–VI.D2

4. Tacitus and Tiberius

As specified for Honour Moderations in Classics Course IA, paper V–VI.D3

5. The ancient city

As specified for Honour Moderations in Classics Course IIA, paper IV

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C. Ancient languages:

1. Beginning ancient Greek

(This subject is not available to candidates with A-level, or an equivalent qualification, in ancient Greek.)

Candidates will be required to show knowledge of the main grammatical structures of ancient Greek and of basic vocabulary. The paper will consist of a test involving knowledge of Greek accidence, and passage for comprehension, and two further passages for translation from ancient Greek into English.

2. Beginning Latin

(This subject is not available to candidates with A-level, or an equivalent qualification, in Latin.)

Candidates will be required to show knowledge of the main grammatical structures of Latin and of basic vocabulary. The paper will consist of a test involving knowledge of Latin accidence, a passage for comprehension, and two further passages for translation from Latin into English.'

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(c) Honour School of Classical Archaeology and Ancient History

With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 140, after the decree establishing the Honour School, insert:

`(ii) Regulations

1. Each candidate shall offer the following elements:

I–IV Four period papers chosen from the following group:

A. Early Greece and the Mediterranean, c.800–500 BC: archaeology and history Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the material and written evidence for the Greek world and the areas of contact between Greek and other Mediterranean peoples. Areas of emphasis will include: the development of Athens and Attica; the non-Greek states bordering the Mediterranean; the relationships between them and the Greeks; Greek settlement overseas; trade and coinage; problems of method in history and archaeology; and problems of chronology.

B. Greek history, 478–323 BC

As specified for the Honour School in Ancient and Modern History Paper 1 (a).

C. Greek art and archaeology c.500–300 BC

As specified for the Honour School in Literae Humaniores Paper IV.2.

D. Rome, Italy, and the Hellenistic East, c.300–30 BC: archaeology and history

The course studies the political and cultural interaction and conflict between the Hellenistic East and Roman Italy. Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the material, visual, and written evidence of the period and to show ability in interpreting it in its archaeological and historical contexts. Candidates should be familiar with the relevant archaeology of the following cities and sites: Pella, Alexandria, Pergamon, Ai Khanoum, Athens, Priene, Delos, Praeneste, Pompeii, Rome. In the examination candidates will be required to answer one picture question and three others.

E. Roman history AD 14–284

As specified for the Honour School in Ancient and Modern History Paper 1 (d).

F. Roman art and archaeology, AD 14–284

The course studies the art and archaeological remains of the 250 years of Roman imperial peace, from the death of Augustus to the accession of Diocletian, in a historical perspective. Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of imperial and other images and the various media of representation; of the monuments and building types of the Roman urban environment; and of the broader material record of Roman society and the economy in the imperial period. In the examination candidates will be required to answer one picture question and three others.

V, VI Two papers chosen from the following groups, provided that not more than one paper may be chosen from any one group. One subject chosen from Group A or B may be examined not by a paper, but by a thesis covering a topic within that subject, prepared in accordance with Regulation 3 below. Not all the subjects listed below will necessarily be available in any given year.

A. Special subjects in archaeology:

1. The archaeology of Minoan Crete, 7000–700 bc

As specified for the Honour School in Archaeology and Anthropology Paper 7(r).

2. The Late Bronze Age in the Aegean

(This option is not available to those who offered Paper III–IV.A.1 in Honour Moderations in Ancient History and Classical Archaeology.) As specified for the Honour School in Archaeology and Anthropology Paper 7(f).

3. The archaeology of Greek cities

Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the material evidence relating to Greek cities from c.750 to 50 BC. Areas of emphasis will include physical provision for political institutions, the development of sanctuaries, the choice and use of imagery for public display, domestic architecture and domestic life, and the defense of city and territory.

4. Greek and Roman wallpainting

Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of surviving Greek and Roman wallpainting from the archaic period to the imperial period, of its various archaeological and architectural settings, and of the literary and other relevant visual evidence (painted pottery and mosaics) that bears on the study of the evolution and iconography of ancient pictorial representation. In the examination candidates will be required to answer one picture question and three others.

5. Epigraphy of the Greek and Roman world, c.700 BC–AD 300

The course focuses on the inscribed text, mainly on stone and bronze, as monument, physical object and medium of information in the classical community, and it explores the evidence of particular inscriptions, or groups of inscriptions, for the political, social and economic history of communities in classical Greece, the Hellenistic world, and the Roman Republic and Empire. Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of epigraphic texts, either in the original languages or in translation, available in standard collections. Provisional source-books: R. Meiggs, D.M. Lewis, Greek Historical Inscriptions; M.M. Austin, The Hellenistic World; M.H. Crawford, Roman Statutes; R.K. Sherk, Roman Documents from the Greek East, Translated Documents of Greece and Rome (Series edited by E. Badian and R.K. Sherk).

6. Greek and Roman coins

Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the principal developments in coinage from its beginnings c.600 BC until the reign of Diocletian (AD 284–305). Emphasis will be placed on the ways in which numismatic evidence may be used to address questions of historical and archaeological interest.

7. Cities and settlement in the Roman Empire

(This option may not be combined with either Paper I–IV.F. or Paper V–VI.B.5.) As specified for the Honour School of Literae Humaniores Paper IV.4.

8. The transformation of the Celtic world, 500 BC–AD 100

As specified for the Honour School in Archaeology and Anthropology Paper 7(i).

9. The emergence of Medieval Europe, AD 400–900

As specified for the Honour School in Archaeology and Anthropology Paper 7(m). (There is an error in the title of Paper 7(m) which is to be amended.)

10. The Late Roman Empire, AD 284-565

The paper studies the archaeology and art of the Roman Empire from Diocletian through the death of Justinian. Subjects include: urban change; development of the countryside in the east; industry; patterns of trade; persistence of pagan art; and the impact of Christianity (church building, pilgrimage, monasticism) on architecture and art. The main sites to be studied are: Rome, Constantinople, Trier, Verulamium, Ravenna, Justiniana Prima, Caesarea Maritima, Scythopolis, Jerusalem, and sites in the Roman provinces of Syria and Palestine.

11. Byzantium: the transition from Antiquity to the Middle Ages, AD 500–1000

As specified for the Honour School in Archaeology and Anthropology Paper 7(n).

12. The formation of the Islamic world, AD 550–950

As specified for the Honour School in Archaeology and Anthropology Paper 7(o).

13. Archaeological science: approaches to material evidence

As specified for the Honour School in Archaeology and Anthropology Paper 3.

B. Special subjects in history:

1. Comparative ancient history and historiography

As specified for the Honour School in Literae Humaniores Paper I.8.

2. Athenian democracy in the Classical age

As specified for the Honour School in Literae Humaniores Paper I.9.

3. Alexander the Great and his early successors, 336–302 BC

As specified for the Honour School in Literae Humaniores Paper I.10.

4. Cicero: politics and thought in the Late Republic

As specified for the Honour School in Literae Humaniores Paper I.11.

5. Civic life of the Roman Empire from the Flavian to the Severan period

(This option may not be combined with either Paper I–IV.F. or Paper V–VI.A.7. As specified for the Honour School in Literae Humaniores Paper I.12.

6. Religions in the Greek and Roman world, c.30 BC–AD 312

As specified for the Honour School in Literae Humaniores Paper I.13.

7. Sexuality and gender in Greece and Rome

As specified for the Honour School in Literae Humaniores Paper I.14.

8. From Julian the Apostate to St Augustine, AD 350–95

As specified for the Honour School in Modern History Paper IV.1.

9. Francia in the age of Clovis and Gregory of Tours

As specified for the Honour School in Modern History Paper IV.2.

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C. Ancient languages:

1. Further ancient Greek

(This option is available to those who offered Paper III–IV.C.1 in Honour Moderations in Classical Archaeology and Ancient History and to any other candidate whose knowledge of ancient Greek is deemed by the Standing Committee to be appropriate to the course.)

Candidates will be required to show more advanced knowledge of ancient Greek grammar and vocabulary. The set texts for the course are Xenophon, Hellenica, 1–2.3.10 and Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.1–24.7. The paper will consist of a passage of unseen translation, and two further passages for translation, one from each set text.

2. Further Latin

(This option is available to those who offered Paper III–IV.C.2 in Honour Moderations in Classical Archaeology and Ancient History, and to any other candidate who knowledge of Latin is deemed by the Standing Committee to be appropriate to the course.)

Candidates will be required to show more advanced knowledge of Latin grammar and vocabulary. The set texts for the course are Livy, Book 21 and Pliny the Elder, Natural History 35.1–40 (148). The paper will consist of a passage of unseen translation, and two further passages for translation, one from each set text.

3. Beginning ancient Greek

(This option is not available to those who offered Paper III–IV.C.1 in Honour Moderations in Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.)

As specified for Honour Moderations in Classical Archaeology and Ancient History Paper III-IV.C.1.

4. Beginning Latin

(This option is not available to those who offered Paper III–IV.C.2 in Honour Moderations in Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.) As specified for Honour Moderations in Classical Archaeology and Ancient History Paper III–IV.C.2.

VII A Site or Museum report, prepared in accordance with Regulation 3 below.

The report must be on Either (i) an excavation or archaeological site, based on participation or autopsy and on a consideration of all relevant historical and archaeological sources; Or (ii) a coherent body of finds from one site or of one category, based as far as possible on autopsy and on a consideration of all relevant historical and archaeological sources.

VIII An optional Additional Thesis, prepared in accordance with Regulation 3 below. This Additional Thesis is not to be confused with the thesis which may be offered in place of Paper V or VI.

2. Candidates may also be examined viva voce.

3. Theses.

(a) This regulation governs theses submitted under Regulation 1.V–VI and VIII, and the Site or Museum report submitted under VII.

(b) The subjects for all theses and for the Site or Museum report must, to the satisfaction of the Standing Committee, fall within the scope of the Honour School of Classical Archaeology and Ancient History. The subject may, but need not, overlap any subject on which the candidate offers papers. Candidates are warned that they should avoid repetition in papers of materials used in their theses, and that substantial repetition may be penalised. Candidates who offer an optional Additional Thesis under Regulation 1.VIII and another thesis must avoid all overlap between them.

(c) Candidates proposing to offer a thesis must submit, through their college, to the Chairman of the Standing Committee not later than the Wednesday of the first week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examination the following: (i) the title of the proposed thesis or report, together with (ii) a synopsis of the subject in about 100 words, (iii) a statement whether the thesis is to be submitted under Regulation 1.VI–VI.A or B, or under Regulation 1.VIII, and (iv) a letter of approval from their tutor. The Standing Committee shall decide as soon as possible whether or not to approve the title and shall advise the candidate immediately. No decision shall be deferred beyond the end of the third week of Michaelmas Full Term.

(d) Every thesis or report shall be the candidate's own work. Tutors may, however, discuss with candidates the field of study, the sources available, and the method of presentation, and may also read and comment on a first draft. The amount of assistance a candidate may receive shall not exceed an amount equivalent to the teaching of a normal paper. Candidates shall make a declaration that the thesis or report is their own work, and their tutors shall countersign the declaration confirming that, to the best of their knowledge and belief, this is so. This declaration must be placed in a sealed envelope bearing the candidate's examination number and presented together with the thesis or report.

(e) Theses and reports previously submitted for the Honour School of Classical Archaeology and Ancient History may be resubmitted. No thesis or report shall be accepted which has already been submitted, wholly or substantially, for another Honour School or degree of this or any other institution, and the certificate shall also state that the thesis or report has not been so submitted. No thesis or report shall, however, be ineligible because it has been or is being submitted for any prize of this university.

(f) Candidates should aim at a length of 10,000 words but must not exceed 15,000 words (both figures inclusive of notes and appendices but excluding bibliography). No person or body shall have authority to permit the limit of 15,000 words to be exceeded. Where appropriate, there shall be a select bibliography and a list of sources.

(g) All theses and reports must be typed in double spacing on one side only of quarto or A4 paper with any notes and references at the foot of each page, and must be bound or held firmly in a stiff cover and identified by the candidate's examination number only. Two copies of each thesis or report shall be submitted to the examiners. Any candidate wishing to have one copy of his or her thesis or report returned must enclose with it, in an envelope bearing only his or her candidate number, a self-addressed sticky label.

(h) Candidates wishing to change the title of a thesis or report after it has been approved may apply for permission for the change to be granted by the Chairman of the Standing Committee (if the application is made before the first day of Hilary Full Term preceding the examination) or (if later) the Chairman of the Examiners, Honour School of Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.

(i) Candidates shall submit any thesis or report, identified by the candidates' examination number only, not later than noon on Friday of the week before the Trinity Full Term of the examination to the Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, addressed to the Chairman of the Examiners, Honour School of Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.'

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(d) Pass School of Classical Archaeology and Ancient History

With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 140 after the regulations for the Honour School, insert:

`(ii) Regulations

1. Candidates must satisfy the examiners in the following four papers: I–II. Two papers selected from the options specified under I–IV.A–F of the Regulations for the Honour School of Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.

III. A paper selected from the options specified under V–VI.A of the Regulations for the Honour School of Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.

IV. A paper selected from the options specified under V–VI.B of the Regulations for the Honour School of Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.

2. A thesis on a subject approved by the Standing Committee may be offered in place of either Paper III or Paper IV, prepared in accordance with Regulation 3 of the Honour School of Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.'

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5 Board of the Faculty of Literae Humaniores

Philosophy in all Honour Schools including Philosophy

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 474, delete ll. 27–31 and substitute:

`Part A: the nature of theories; scientific observation and method; scientific explanation; the interpretation of laws and probability; rationality and scientific change; major schools of philosophy of science. Part B: social meaning; individualism; rationality; rational choice theory; prediction and explanation in economics; the explanation of social action; historical explanation; ideology.'

2 Ibid., delete ll. 35–8 and substitute:

`The subject will include an examination of claims about the existence of God, and God's relation to the world: their meaning, the possibility of their truth, and the kind of justification which can or needs to be provided for them; and the philosophical problems raised by the existence of different religions. One or two questions may also be set on central claims peculiar to Christianity, such as the doctrines of Trinity, Incarnation, and Atonement.'

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6 Board of the Faculty of Physical Sciences

Preliminary Examination in Physical Sciences

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 103, as amended in Gazette, Vol. 130, p. 24, delete existing cl. 2 and substitute:

`2. The Moderators will not provide calculators but unless otherwise specified will permit the use of any hand-held pocket calculator subject to the conditions set out on p. 1074. Candidates taking subjects 5, 6, 7, or 9 are restricted to models of calculators included in a list provided by the Chairman of the Moderators not later than the Wednesday of the fourth week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examination. The use of calculators will not be permitted in the papers set for subjects 16, 17, 18, 19, and 24.'

2 Ibid., p. 104, l. 28, delete `General Mathematics' and substitute `Mathematics for Chemistry'.

3 Ibid., after l. 33 insert: `(24) Mathematics for Materials and Earth Sciences'.

4 Ibid., delete ll. 37–9 and substitute: `Candidates offer any one or more of Mathematics 1, 2, or Mathematical Physics may not offer Mathematics for Chemistry, or Mathematics for Materials and Earth Sciences, or Elementary Mathematics, Physics and Statistics. Candidates may not offer both Mathematics for Chemistry and Mathematics for Materials and Earth Sciences.'

5 Ibid., p. 111, l. 16, delete `General Mathematics' and substitute `Mathematics for Chemistry'.

6 Ibid., p. 113, after l. 39 insert:

`Subject 24. Mathematics for Materials and Earth Sciences

Vector Geometry. Applications to crystallography and mechanics. Matrices and determinants. Applications to crystal transformations and physical properties of crystals.

Ordinary and partial differentiation. Indefinite and definite integrals. Taylor and Maclaurin series.

Complex numbers.

First order ordinary differential equations. Second order ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients. Applications in Materials and Earth Sciences.

Partial differential equations and Fourier series. Separation of variables. Applications to heat and mass flow, quantum mechanics, elasticity and waves.'

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7 Committee for the Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art

Final Examination in Fine Art

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 535, l. 18, delete

`twentieth-century visual culture' and substitute `visual culture since 1900'.

2 Ibid., ll. 20–1, delete `requiring comments on a set of photographs of works of art from the twentieth century' and substitute `on the history and theory of visual culture since 1900'.

3 Ibid., ll. 34–5, delete `his own unaided work save for advice on the choice and scope of the subject, the scope of the subject, the provision of a reading list, and guidance on matter of presentation.' and substitute `his or her own unaided work. Tutors may provide advice on the choice and scope of the subject, the sources available, and the method of presentation. They may also read and comment on a first draft of the essay.'

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EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give notice of oral examination of their candidates as follows:

Anthropology and Geography

K.M. AARRE, St Antony's: `Changing attitudes towards children in care in Portugal in the 1990s: a case study of a children's home'.
Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Thursday, 13 January, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: W.R. James, A. James.

J. RAE, Christ Church: `Tribe and state: management of the Syrian Steppe'.
St Cross, Friday, 17 December, 11.30 a.m.
Examiners: D. Chatty, D.S. Thomas.

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Clinical Medicine

L. KAKLAMANIS, Wolfson: `Epigenetic alterations in the colorectal adenoma–carcinoma sequence'.
Nuffield Department of Pathology and Bacteriology, Tuesday, 25 January, 3.30 p.m.
Examiners: B.F. Warren, N.A. Shepherd.

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English Language and Literature

H.J. UMMEL, St Peter's: `Telling differences: an examination of some external and internal factors involved in the dating and distinguishing of English handwriting, 1550– 1850'.
Bodleian Library, Thursday, 6 January, 10 a.m.
Examiners: M. Clapinson, R. Zim.

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Law

B. RUTINWA, Lincoln: `Legal responsibilities of countries of origin and third states in refugee situations under public international law'.
All Souls, Tuesday, 21 December, 2 p.m.
Examiners: A.V. Lowe, C. Beyani.

S.J. SCHONBERG, St Edmund Hall: `Legitimate expectations in administrative decision-making: a comparative study of English, French, and EC law'.
University, Tuesday, 21 December, 11 a.m.
Examiners: M.H. Matthews, J.S. Bell.

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Literae Humaniores

B.M. BREITENBERGER, St Hugh's: `Aphrodite and Eros: the development of erotic mythology in early Greek poetry and cult'.
Examination Schools, Friday, 14 January, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: S.R. West, I.C. Rurtherford.

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Mathematical Sciences

D. LOGHIN, St Hugh's: `Green's functions for preconditioning'.
Computing Laboratory, Friday, 14 January, 2 p.m.
Examiners: E. Suli, I.G. Graham.

M. POURMAHDIAN, Wolfson: `Model theory of simple theories'.
Mathematical Institute, Thursday, 13 January, 2 p.m.
Examiners: B. Zilber, H.D. MacPherson.

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Medieval and Modern Languages

H.R. BRIDGE, Wolfson: `Transforming history: women's prose writing and historiography in the GDR'.
Wadham, Friday, 14 January, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: R.C. Ockenden, E. Boa.

M. RIGAUD-DRAYTON, St Hugh's: `Henri Michaux's quest for a universal sign'.
St Anne's, Monday, 20 December, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: P.R.A. McGuinness, C. Scott.

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Modern History

M. CHAIT, Wolfson: `Healing Hawaii: the recovery of an island's identity; a socio-historical study of cultural resistance from the 1840s to the 1990s'.
St Antony's, Tuesday, 25 January, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: W.J. Beinart, J. Eade.

I. CHRISTOFORAKI, Merton: `Patronage, art, and society in Lusignan Cyprus c.1192–c.1489'.
Examination Schools, Thursday, 13 January, 2 p.m.
Examiners: M.J. Vickers, C. Jolivet-LÄvy.

V.M. QUIRKE, Queen's: `Experiments in collaboration: the changing relationship between scientist and pharmaceutical companies in Britain and in France, 1935–65'.
Nuffield, Friday, 14 January, 2 p.m.
Examiners: A. Offer, D. Pestre.

S.S. YARROW, St Cross: `Saints' shrines and miracle narratives in twelfth-century southern England: negotiating communities'.
Somerville, Friday, 7 January, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: B.J. Thompson, R.I. Moore.

M.C. KELLAR, Jesus: `"To Enrich with Gospel Truth the Neighbour Realm": religious reform in England and Scotland, 1534–61'.
Jesus, Tuesday, 11 January, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: F.M. Heal, R.A. Mason.

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Music

K. HENSON, Christ Church: `Of men, women, and others: exotic opera in late nineteenth-century France'.
St Catherine's, Tuesday, 11 January, 2 p.m.
Examiners: P.R. Franklin, D. Charlton.

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Physical Sciences

N.J. ADAMS, Wadham: `Studies in homogeneous catalysis'.
Dyson Perrins Laboratory, Friday, 17 December, 2 p.m.
Examiners: M. Moloney, J. Williams.

S.S. CHOI, Merton: `A theoretical study on manipulation of trapped atomic Bose–Einstein condensates'.
Clarendon Laboratory, Friday, 7 January, 2 p.m.
Examiners: C. Foot, P. Knight.

R.J.D. HATLEY, Magdalen: `Studies on the synthesis of roseophilin and its analogues'.
Dyson Perrins Laboratory, Thursday, 23 December, 10.30 a.m.
Examiners: V.E. Gouverneur, D.W. Knight.

R.S.J. SARTHOUR, Keble: `Magnetism in rare-earth superlattices and alloys'.
Clarendon Laboratory, Monday, 10 January, 11 a.m.
Examiners: M.J.M. Leask, E.M. Forgan.

W. STEEL, Wolfson: `On the properties of plasma crystals'.
Department of Engineering Science, Thursday, 13 January, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: G.E. Morfill, R.N. Franklin.

D. STEVENS, Balliol: `The quantum manipulation of ions'.
Clarendon Laboratory,Tuesday, 21 December, 2 p.m.
Examiners: C.J. Foot, D.M. Segal.

M. TURNBULL, Jesus: `The numerical modelling of steep waves interacting with structures'.
Department of Engineering Science, Wednesday, 12 January, 2 p.m.
Examiners: P.H. Taylor, M.J. Downie.

K. WARBURTON, St Anne's: `Control jets in low density flow'.
Department of Engineering Science, Friday, 7 January, 2 p.m.
Examiners: M.L.G. Oldfield, G.T. Roberts.

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Physiological Sciences

R.C. BIELBY, Christ Church: `Regulation of extracellular matrix turnover by mechanical stimuli in annulus fibrosus cells'.
Department of Biochemistry, Friday, 7 January, 1.30 p.m.
Examiners: A.J. Day, A. Pitsillides.

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Social Studies

M.B. DUFFY, Nuffield: `Northern Ireland during the troubles—social attitudes and political preferences, 1968–96'.
Nuffield, Wednesday, 12 January, 5 p.m.
Examiners: G. Marshal, B. O'Leary.

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Theology

G.P. FLYNN, Campion Hall: `The Church and unbelief: Yves Congar's total ecclesiology'.
Christ Church, Tuesday, 11 January, 10 a.m.
Examiners: J.B. Webster, J. Saward.

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EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF SCIENCE

The examiners appointed by the following faculty board give notice of oral examination of their candidate as follows:

Physical Sciences

p. crompton, Trinity: `Assessment of design procedures for structural glass beams'.
Department of Engineering Science, Tuesday, 21 December, 11 a.m.
Examiners: Z. You, S. Ledbetter.

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