Lectures

Contents of this section:

Return to Contents Page of this issue


LITERAE HUMANIORES

The following lectures will be given at the times shown in the Seminar Room, Corpus Christi College.

Both lectures will be followed by discussion, and after that on 21 June a glass of wine will be served.

Convener: E.L. Bowie, MA, Reader in Classical Languages and Literature.

PROFESSOR OLE THOMSEN, Aarhus
Fri. 16 June, 2.15 p.m.: `Greek love—can anything new be said for it?'

PROFESSOR FROMA ZEITLIN, Princeton
Wed. 21 June, 5 p.m.: `The enraptured eye: the dynamics of viewing in Achilles Tatius' Leucippe and Clitophon.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


EUROPEAN HUMANITIES RESEARCH CENTRE

The Politics of Opera

This one-day conference will be held on Monday, 3 July, in the Taylor Institution.

All are welcome. There is no registration fee, but those who attend should make their own arrangements for lunch and any accommodation needed.

Those wishing to attend are asked to contact Dr Rosamund Bartlett, European Humanities Research Centre, 76 Woodstock Road, Oxford OX2 6LE (telephone: Oxford (2)84680, fax: (2)84681, e-mail: rosamund.bartlett@european-humanities.oxford.ac.uk).

PROFESSOR M.M. BOWIE, Director of the Centre
9.45 a.m.: Welcome and introduction.

BERNARD WILLIAMS, All Souls College
10 a.m.: `The politics of opera.'

ROSAMUND BARTLETT, EHRC/Birkbeck College, University of London
10.30 a.m.: `Opera at the Sheremetev Serf Theatre (1775--97).'

MICHAEL BURDEN, New College
11.30 a.m.: `Purcell's King Arthur in the eighteenth century.'

CORMAC NEWARK, Cambridge
12 noon: ` "Letters Home": opera and cultural embassy in (and outside) early nineteenth-century France.'

SUZANNE APSDEN, Cambridge, and KAREN HENSON, Christ Church (leading discussion)
12.30 p.m.: Discussion.

LESLIE KEARNEY, Indiana
2.30 p.m.: `Marriage as a social contract in Mussorgsky's Khovanshchina and Wagner's Die Walküre.'

EMANUELE SENICI, Christ Church
3.30 p.m.: `Verdi's Falstaff and an Italian fin-de-siècle.'

ANYA SUSCHITZKY, Merton College (leads discussion)
3.30 p.m.: Discussion.

PATRICK CARNEGY, Wagner scholar and theatre critic
4.30 p.m.: `De-Nazifying Wagner: West versus East German approaches.'

ROGER ALLEN, Wagner scholar (leads discussion)
5 p.m.: Discussion.

The conference will end with a general discussion, 5.30--6 p.m.

Return to List of Contents of this section


NISSAN INSTITUTE OF JAPANESE STUDIES

Nissan Institute Special Lecture

PROFESSOR KARL HEINZ GRUBER, Chair of Comparative Education, University of Vienna, will deliver the Nissan Institute Special Lecture at 3 p.m. on Friday, 23 June, in the Lecture Theatre, the Nissan Institute.

Convener: R.J. Goodman, MA, D.Phil., University Lecturer in the Social Anthropology of Japan.

Subject: `Images of Japanese education: a photographic essay on the culture of Japanese schools.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


DEPARTMENT OF PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

Litchfield Lecture

PROFESSOR NEAL L. BENOWITZ, Professor of Medicine, Psychiatry, and Biopharmaceutical Science, and Chief, Division of Clinical Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, University of California, San Francisco, will deliver a Litchfield Lecture at 6.15 p.m. on Thursday, 22 June, in Lecture Theatre 2, the John Radcliffe Hospital.

Convener: Dr Michael Murphy, ICRF General Practice Research Group (telephone: Oxford 226759/226929, e-mail: michael.murphy@dplpc.ox.ac.uk).

Subject: `The human pharmacology of nicotine: from addiction to public policy.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


ST JOHN'S COLLEGE

First Robert Penson Lecture

DR MARK LAIRD will deliver the first Robert Penson Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 27 June, in the Garden Quadrangle Auditorium, St John's College. There will be a reception after the lecture, which is open to the general public as well as to members of the University.

Subject: ` "Three yards of serpentine shrubs": St John's and eighteenth-century gardening.'

Robert Penson was the gardener to whose designs St John's gardens were remodelled in the late eighteenth century. The college intends that there will be a Robert Penson Lecture on a theme related to garden history every year at the end of Trinity Term.

Return to List of Contents of this section


CENTRE FOR ECOLOGY AND HYDROLOGY

The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Fridays in the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (formerly the Institute of Virology and Environmental Microbiology).

Convener: Dr A.K. Lilley, CEH Oxford.

DR M. DAY, Cardiff
23 June: `Bacterial viruses and hosts: are their interactions driven by serendipity or by design?'

DR K.J. PURDY, Natural History Museum
30 June: `Anaerobic degradation processes—a molecular perspective.'

DR E. MAHENTHIRALINGAM, Cardiff
7 July: `Risk assessment of bacterial biological control agents: what are we learning from Burkholderia cepacia as a test case?'

DR J. PEDEN, bioinformatics specialist
14 July: to be announced.

Return to List of Contents of this section


THE OXFORD TRUST

Festival of Science and Innovation—Summer Lecture

DR ANNE WHELDON and DR SUE ROAF will lecture at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, 21 June, in the University Museum of Natural History. Admission is free, but booking is essential: telephone Alison Hendry, Oxford 728953.

This lecture is arranged in partnership with Oxford AWISE.

Subject: `What will life be like in 2050?'

Return to List of Contents of this section