Examinations and Boards

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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LECTURE LISTS: MICHAELMAS TERM 1999

Timetabling arrangements

Faculties and departments are asked to forward their lecture-list files as soon as possible after the finalisation of their arrangements. Details of the dates by which the files are expected to be supplied have been circulated to faculties and departments.

The printed lecture lists will be distributed shortly before the start of term.

Disks, copy, and proofs relating to the Lecture Lists should be forwarded to the Gazette and Lecture Lists Assistant, Oxenford House, Magdalen Street, Oxford OX1 3AB (telephone: (2)78121, fax: (2)78180, e-mail: lecture.lists@admin.ox.ac.uk).

For arrangements concerning the Special Lecture List, see below.

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Entries shared between lists

Any faculty member who wishes to place an entry in the lecture list of another faculty or department is asked to forward the information as soon as possible, and directly to the other faculty.

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Special Lecture List

Michaelmas Term 1999

The Special Lecture List for Trinity Term 1999 will appear shortly before term, at the same time as the ordinary Lecture Lists. It will include all appropriate lectures for Hilary Term published in the Gazette during Michaelmas Term, and also lectures of which details are received by Monday, 15 March (ninth week).

Those wishing to contribute to the Special Lecture List are asked to note that this is a firm deadline, and that items received after it are unlikely to be included.

Items for the Special Lecture List should be forwarded to the Gazette and Lecture Lists Assistant, Oxenford House, Magdalen Street, Oxford OX1 3AB (telephone: (2)78121, fax: (2)78180, e-mail: lecture.lists@admin.ox.ac.uk).

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Enquiries concerning proposed dates for special lectures

Those responsible for arranging lectures intended to be of interest to a wide university audience may wish to consult the editor of the Gazette (fax: 556646, e-mail: gazette@admin.ox.ac.uk), or the Gazette and Lecture Lists Assistant (details above), for information on any other similar lectures, of which details have been received, due to be given on the proposed date or dates.

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Board of the Faculty of Literae Humaniores

The Board of the Faculty recommends that lectures should be given at the following hours:
Monday       9      Greek History/Latin Literature
            10      Philosophy
            11      Roman History/Greek Literature
            12      Archaeology/Philosophy
            5–7    Free

Tuesday      9      Archaeology
            10      Philosophy
            11      Literature
            12      History
            5–7    Free

Wednesday    9      Roman History/Greek Literature
            10      Philosophy
            11      Latin Literature/Greek History
            12      Archaeology/Philosophy
            5–7    Free

Thursday     9      Literature
            10      Philosophy
            11      Greek History/Latin Literature
            12      Archaeology
            5–7    Free

Friday       9      History
            10      Philosophy
            11      Roman History/Greek Literature
            12      Archaeology/Philosophy
            5–7    Free

Sub-faculty of Languages and Literature

It is recommended that lectures for Honour Moderations should be given at the following hours whenever possible:
Homer               11 (Wednesdays, Fridays)
Virgil              11 (Tuesdays, Thursdays)
Greek Authors       12 (Mondays, Wednesdays)
Latin Authors       11 (Tuesdays, Thursdays)
Language Papers     10 (Fridays)
A                   11 (Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, TT;      
                     Mondays, Wednesdays, MT, HT)
C                   10 (Mondays, Wednesdays)
D                   10 (Tuesdays, Thursdays)
E                   12
F                   12 (Tuesdays, Thursdays, HT, TT);
                    11 and 12 (Tuesdays, Thursdays, MT)

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Board of the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages

Timetable of introductory or survey lectures

The Board of the Faculty recommends that lectures should be given at the following hours:
Monday      10      French
            11      German
            12      German
Tuesday      9      Italian
            10      Spanish
            11      Italian 
            12      Spanish
Wednesday    9      Russian
            10      French
            11      Linguistics
            12      Linguistics
Thursday     9      Spanish
            10      Russian
            11      Russian
            12      Italian
Friday      10      French
            11      German
            12      Linguistics

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Board of the Faculty of Social Studies

The Board of the Faculty recommends that:

(a) lectures for the Preliminary Examination for Philosophy, Politics, and Economics should be given at the following times:

Politics    10
Economics   11
Philosophy  12 noon (or a 10 o'clock period not occupied by    
            Politics);

(b) courses of introductory lectures and lectures on compulsory subjects for undergraduates in their first three or four terms of work for the Honour School of Philosophy, Politics, and Economics should normally be given at the following times:

Politics    12 
Economics   11
Philosophy  10

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Board of the Faculty of Theology

To avoid clashes with Philosophy lectures members of the faculty are asked not to offer Theology lectures of interest to those reading for the Joint Honour School of Philosophy and Theology at the following times:

Preliminary Examination

Monday to Saturday 12

Honour School

Monday 10 and 12
Tuesday 10
Wednesday 10 and 12
Thursday 10
Friday 10 and 12
Saturday 10

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CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the General Board, the following changes in regulations made by boards of faculties and committees will come into effect on 14 May.

1 Board of the Faculty of Anthropology and Geography

(a) M.Phil. in Ethnology and Museum Ethnography

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 586, l. 38, delete `Ethnology' and substitute `Material Anthropology'.

2 Ibid., l. 45, delete `Ethnology' and substitute `Material Anthropology'.

3 Ibid., p. 587, l. 11 and l. 13, after `himself' insert `or herself'.

4 Ibid., l. 15, delete `(i)a' and substitute `A. A'.

5 Ibid., delete `general field of ethnology' and substitute `theoretical field of material anthropology'.

6 Ibid., l. 16, delete `(ii)a' and substitute `B. A paper consisting of two Parts: Part I relating to the research methods in material anthropology and museum ethnography and Part II to'.

7 Ibid., l. 16, after `area' insert `and'.

8 Ibid., l. 19 and l. 23, in each case, delete `his' and substitute `the'.

9 Ibid., l. 25, after `his' insert `or her'.

10 Ibid., l. 28, delete `fifth' and substitute `second'.

11 Ibid., l. 31, after `Library' insert `If the thesis is superseded by a D.Phil. thesis by the same student partly using the same material, the Board of the Faculty of Anthropology and Geography may authorise the withdrawal of the M.Phil. thesis from the Balfour Library.'

12 Ibid., l. 35, after `him' insert `or her'.

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(b) Diploma in Material Anthropology and Museum Ethnography

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 945, delete ll. 5■39, and substitute:

`I Social and Cultural Anthropology A: History and Development

(paper and syllabus shared with the Diploma in Social Anthropology)

The scope of this paper includes the following topics: history and development of the subject, and the relation between academic research, museums, and the imperial context of anthropology's past; relations to other subjects, including archaeology and history. Key authors and debates in the development of anthropology, with particular reference to: kinship, marriage, gender, and sexuality; space, place, and culture; environment and cultural landscapes in transition; land and property rights; production and consumption; transactions and modes of exchange; the division of labour and the comparative anthropology of work; technology and social change; the colonial process and its legacy; nationalism, ethnicity, migration, and transnationalism; urbanism.

II Social and Cultural Anthropology B: Theory and Methods

(paper and syllabus shared with the M.Sc. in Material Anthropology and Museum Ethnography)

The scope of this paper includes the following topics: concepts of the individual, society and the person in anthropological perspective; issues of the body, theories of practice, phenomenology; theories of power, order and law; aspects of disorder and violence in society; systems of knowledge and belief; ritual and myth; symbolism and symbolic classification; moral systems and the world religions; oral literature and historical memory; linguistic and artistic modes of communication; aesthetic anthropology; methodological approaches to the study of arts, performance, and material culture; museums, written texts and representation. Fieldwork and data collection methods; quantitative and qualitative techniques; cultural property and indigenous rights; applications of film and sound recording; preparing research proposals; ethical problems.

III and IV Optional Papers

Candidates must choose two optional papers. Titles of available options will be made known at the beginning of each academic year. They will be divided into three lists, as follows:

List A: The Social Anthropology of a Selected Religion.

List B: Topics in Material Anthropology.

List C: Anthropology and Practical Issues.

Candidates for the degree of Diploma in Material Anthropology and Museum Ethnography must select at least one of their options from List B.'

(c) M.Sc. in Material Anthropology and Museum Ethnography

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 746, l. 29, delete `Ethnology and Museum Ethnography' and substitute `Material Anthropology and Museum Ethnography'.

2 Ibid., ll. 30–1, delete `Ethnology and Museum Ethnography' and substitute `Social and Cultural Anthropology'.

3 Ibid., l. 34, delete `two' and substitute `three'.

4 Ibid., l. 40, delete `a person designated for this purpose by the faculty board' and substitute `the Chairman of Examiners. The proposed title of the dissertation, together with a paragraph describing its scope and the supervisor's written endorsement, must be submitted to the Chairman of Examiners by Monday of the first week of Trinity Term'.

5 Ibid., l. 41, delete `Two' and substitute `Three'. 6 Ibid., after `dissertation' delete `,'.

7 Ibid., l. 43, delete `Ethnology' and substitute `Material Culture'.

8 Ibid., p. 747, l. 4, after `Ethnography' insert `,'.

9 Ibid., delete ll. 9–42 and substitute syllabus as for the Diploma in Material Anthropology and Museum Ethnography (see (b) above).

(d) M.Sc. in Social Anthropology

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 768, l. 2, after `Social' insert `and Cultural'.

2 Ibid., l. 6, delete `two' and substitute `three'.

3 Ibid., l. 12, delete `a person designated for this purpose by the faculty board' and substitute `the Chairman of Examiners. The proposed title of the dissertation together with a paragraph describing its scope and the supervisor's written endorsement, must be submitted to the Chairman of Examiners by Monday of the first week of Trinity Term'.

4 Ibid., l. 13, delete `Two' and substitute `Three'.

5 Ibid., ll. 15–16, delete `Ethnology and Museum Ethnography/'.

6 Ibid., l. 16, after `Social Anthropology' insert `/Material Cultural and Museum Ethnography'.

7 Ibid., delete from p. 768, l. 30 to p. 769, l. 17, and substitute:

`I Social and Cultural Anthropology A: History and Development

(paper and syllabus shared with the M.Sc. in Material Anthropology and Museum Ethnography)

The scope of this paper includes the following topics: history and development of the subject, and the relation between academic research, museums, and the imperial context of anthropology's past; relations to other subjects, including archaeology and history. Key authors and debates in the development of anthropology, with particular reference to: kinship, marriage, gender, and sexuality; space, place, and culture; environment and cultural landscapes in transition; land and property rights; production and consumption; transactions and modes of exchange; the division of labour and the comparative anthropology of work; technology and social change; the colonial process and its legacy; nationalism, ethnicity, migration, and transnationalism; urbanism.

II Social and Cultural Anthropology B: Theory and Methods

(paper and syllabus shared with the M.Sc. in Material Anthro- pology and Museum Ethnography)

The scope of this paper includes the following topics: concepts of the individual, society and the person in anthropological perspective; issues of the body, theories of practice, phenomenology; theories of power, order and law; aspects of disorder and violence in society; systems of knowledge and belief; ritual and myth; symbolism and symbolic classification; moral systems and the world religions; oral literature and historical memory; linguistic and artistic modes of communication; aesthetic anthropology; methodological approaches to the study of arts, performance, and material culture; museums, written texts and representation. Fieldwork and data collection methods; quantitative and qualitative techniques; cultural property and indigenous rights; applications of film and sound recording; preparing research proposals; ethical problems.

III and IV Optional Papers

Candidates must choose two optional papers. Titles of available options will be made known at the beginning of each academic year. They will be divided into three lists, as follows:

List A: The Social Anthropology of a Selected Religion.

List B: Topics in Material Anthropology.

List C: Anthropology and Practical Issues.

Candidates for the degree of M.Sc. in Social Anthropology must select one of their options from List A, and the other from List B or List C.'

(e) Diploma in Social Anthropology

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 950, l. 34, before `Candidates' insert `1.'

2 Ibid., p. 951, delete ll. 9–44, and substitute the newSyllabus which is identical to the new Schedule for the M.Sc. in Social Anthropology (see (d) 7 above).

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2 Board of the Faculty of Anthropology and Geography and the Committee for Archaeology

Honour School of Archaeology and Anthropology

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 135, ll. 48–9, delete `First week of Trinity Term' and substitute `Ninth week of Hilary Full Term preceding the examination'.

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3 Board of the Faculty of English Language and Literature

Honour School of English Language and Literature

(a) With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 196, l. 23, `after `he' insert `or she'.

2 Ibid., l. 24 after `if he' insert `or she'.

3 Ibid., l. 24 after `subjects he' insert `or she'.

4 Ibid., l. 27 after `whether he' insert `or she'.

5 Ibid., l. 27 after `subjects he' insert `or she'.

6 Ibid., l. 30 after `he' insert `or she'.

7 Ibid., l. 38 after `his insert `or her'.

8 Ibid., l. 39 after `his insert `or her'.

9 Ibid., p. 197, l. 1, delete `not exceed 6,000 words*' and substitute `contain no fewer than 5,000 nor more than 6,000 words'.

10 Ibid., delete footnote.

11 Ibid., l. 26, after `to be' insert `either too short or'.

12 Ibid., p. 199, l. 11, after `of not' insert `fewer than 5,000 nor'.

13 Ibid., delete ll. 22–4 and substitute:

`Candidates may offer any one of the following, provided that they may not offer in the Final Honour School any author they offered in Paper 3 of Moderations in English Language and Literature.

(a) (i) Chaucer, or (ii) Mergery Kempe, or (iii) The York Cycle.

(b) (i) Donne, or (ii) Milton, or (iii) Marlowe.

(c) (i) Pope, or (ii) Defoe, or (iii) Behn.

(d) (i) Wordsworth, or (ii) Austen, or (iii) Johnson.

(e) (i) R. Browning, or (ii) G. Eliot, or (iii) Wilde.

(fi) Yeats, or (ii) Woolf, or (iii) Beckett.

(g) (i) Plath, or (ii) Rushdie, or (iii) Pinter.

Named authors will be replaced in order, in rotation, in three groups (first: a, d, g; second: b, e, h; third: c, f) in cycles of three years, the first replacement to occur in 2002, for first examination in 2003. Notice of new named authors will be published in the University Gazette by the beginning of the fifth week of Trinity Term two years before first examination.■

14 Ibid., p. 201, l. 7, after `of not' insert `fewer than 5,000 nor'.

15 Ibid., l. 21, after `one of the' insert `syndicated'.

16 Ibid., after l. 24 insert:

` "Syndicated" and Course II Special Topics shall be:

(i) Dissident Writing, c.1381–c.1414.

(ii) The Art of Biography.

(iii) Language and the Media.

(iv) Anglo-American Film.

(v) Linguistic Theory (as specified for Course II, paper B.4).

(vi) Medieval and Renaissance Romance (as specified for Course II, paper B.10.f).

(vii) Scottish Literature pre-1600 (as specified for Course II, paper B.10.g).

(viii) Old Norse (as specified for Course II, paper C.5).

(ix) Old French Literature (as specified for Course II, paper C.10.

(x) Medieval Welsh (as specified for Course II, paper C.11).

(xi) Medieval Latin (as specified for Course II, paper C.12).■

17 Ibid., p. 204, l. 19, delete `Genes' and substitute `Genres'.

(b) With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 199, in ll. 22–4 as amended by cl. 14 in section (a) above, insert new item (a) as follows and renumber existing items (a)–(g) as (b)–(): '(a) (i) The Beowulf Poet, or (ii) Alfred, or (iii) Aelfric'.

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4 Boards of the Faculties of English Language and Literature and Modern History

Honour School of Modern History and English

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 363, delete l. 24 and substitute: '(a) Literature and the Public in England, c.1350–1430'.

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5 Board of the Faculty of Literae Humaniores

Regulations for Philosophy in all Honour Schools including Philosophy

With effect from 1 October 2000(for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 460, delete l. 8, and substitute `105. Philosophy of Science and Philosophy of Psychology and Neuroscience'.

2 Ibid., delete ll. 13–16 and substitute: 'Part B: philosophical issues arising from the history and practice of psychology and neuroscience.'

3 Ibid., p. 464, l. 40, after `111' insert `in the same year'.

4 Ibid., l. 41, after `112' insert `in the same year'.

5 Ibid., l. 44, after `106' insert `in the same year'.

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6 Boards of the Faculties of Literae Humaniores and Physical Sciences

Honour School of Physics and Philosophy

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 494, delete ll. 15–17 and substitute:

`5. For the Physics papers, candidates are restricted to models of calculators included in a list provided by the Chairman of Examiners not later than Wednesday of the fourth week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examination.'

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7 Board of the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages

Honour School of Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1988, p. 383, delete ll. 13–21 and substitute:

`Modern Spanish. Candidates will be required to show knowledge of the descriptive analysis of the structure of the contemporary language, as used in Spain and in the Americas.'

2 Ibid., p. 388, after l. 16, insert:

`(1) Garcilaso de la Vega, Poesías castellanas completas (ed. E.L. Rivers, Clásicos Castalia, 3rd edn, 1996).'

3 Ibid., ll. 17, 19, 30, and 36 renumber `(1)', `(2)', `(3)', `(4)' as `(2)', `(3)', `(4)', `(5)' respectively.

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8 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and English Language and Literature

Honour School of English and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 7 above).

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9 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and Literae Humaniores

(a) Honour School of Classics and Modern Languages

(b) Honour School of Philosophy and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 7 above).

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10 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and Modern History

Honour School of Modern History and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 7 above).

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11 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and Oriental Studies

Honour School of European and Middle Eastern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 7 above).

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12 Board of the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages

Honour School of Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, delete from p. 381, l. 38 to p. 382, l. 7 and substitute:

`The history of the Russian language with the following texts prescribed:

(1) for linguistic comment:

(a) Marginalia to Novgorod service books (V.V. Ivanov et al., Khrestomatiya po istorii russkogo yazyka, Moscow, 1990, pp. 26'7).

Novgorod birchbark texts nos. 247, 644, 605, 424, 724, 717, 731, 531, 705, 142, 370, 363, 361, 125, 43, 49, 154 (A.A. Zaliznyak, Drevnenovgorodskii dialekt, Moscow, 1995, pp. 223–4, 244–5, 246–8, 295–300, 325–9, 344–7, 349–51, 440–1, 494–5, 508–9, 514, 536, 542–3, 562–4). Vkladnaya Varlaama (Zaliznyak, pp. 374–7).

Treaty of Alexander Nevsky and Novgorod with the Germans, 1262–3 (S.P. Obnorsky and S.G. Barkhudarov, Khrestomatiya po istorii russkogo yazyka, part 1, 2nd ed., Moscow, 1952, pp. 51–2).

Novgorod First Chronicle, s.a. 6738–9 (ed. A.N. Nasonov, Novgorodskaya Pervaya letopis' starshego i mladshego izvoda, Moscow-Leningrad, 1950, pp. 69–71).

(b) Afanasy Nikitin, Khozhenie za tri morya (Ivanov et al., pp. 322–5).

Dukhovnaya gramota I. Yu. Gryaznogo (Ivanov et al., pp. 279–80).

Letter of T.I. Golitsyna to V.V. Golitsyn (S.I. Kotkov et al., Moskovskaya delovaya i bytovaya pis'mennost' XVII veka, Moscow, 1968, p. 20).

Letters of D.V. Mikhalkov to M.I. Mikhalkova and P.D. Mikhalkov (Kotkov et al., pp. 39–40 (17b'v), 41 (18b)).

Letters of U.S. Pazukhina to S.I. Pazukhin and E. Klement'ev to F.M. Chelishchev (S.I. Kotkov and N.P. Pankratova, Isochniki po istorii narodno-razgovornogo yazyka XVII-nachala XVIII veka, Moscow, 1964, pp. 169–70, 233).

Letters of Peter I to Tsaritsa Natal'ya Kirillovna, to F.M. Apraksin, to B.P. Sheremetev (S.P. Obnorsky and S.G. Barkhudarov, Khrestomatiya po istorii russkogo yazyka, part 2:1, Moscow, 1949, pp. 83, 96–7, 99–100).

Evidence of A. Turcheninov on fire of 29 May 1737 (A.I. Sumkina and S.I. Kotkov, Pamyatniki moskovskoi delovoi pis'mennosti XVIII veka, Moscow, 1981, pp. 159–60).

Letters of V.B. Golitsyn to Vl.B. Golitsyn, M.D. Kurakina to B.I. Kurakin, M.M. Shcherbatov to D.M. Shcherbatov (Sumkina and Kotkov, pp. 24–6, 49–50 (50), 73–4).

(2) for translation and linguistic comment:

(a) Colophon to Ostromir Codex (Ivanov et al., pp. 15–16). Mstislavova gramota (Ivanov et al., pp. 39–41).

Colophon to Mstislav's Gospel Book (Ivanov et al., pp. 49–50).

Treaty of Novgorod with Grand Prince Yaroslav Yaroslavich, 1264 or 1265 (Obnorsky and Barkhudarov, part 1, pp. 52–4).

Russkaya Pravda(Ivanov, et al., pp. 67–73). Novgorod First Chronicle, s.a. 6633–8, 6675–7, 6700, 6712, 6777–80 (Nasonov, pp. 21–2, 32–3, 40, 46–9, 87–90).

(b) Sudebnik of 1497 (Ivanov et al., pp. 169–72).

Domostroi (Ivanov et al., pp. 255–60).

Ulozhenie Alekseya Mikhailovicha, Chapter 10 (Ivanov et al., pp. 380–1).

G. Kotoshikhin, O. Rossii v tsarstvovanie Alekseya Mikhailovicha, Chapter 4, Section 24, Chapter 13, Sec-tion 1–4 (ed. A.E. Pennington, Oxford, 1980, pp. 65–7, 159–63).

Stateinyi spisok P.A. Tolstogo (Obnorsky and Barkhudarov, part 2:1, 1949, pp. 72–5).

Candidates will be required to show knowledge either of the texts listed under (1) (a)–(b), or those listed under (1) (a) and (2) (a), or of those listed under (i) (b) and (2) (b).'

2 Ibid., p. 383, delete ll. 31–8 and substitute:

`(1) The development of the Church Slavonic language, with the following texts prescribed:

(a) for linguistic comment: Kiev Missal and Euchologium Sinaticum (R. Auty, Handbook of Old Church Slavonic, London, 1968 and subsequent reprints, Pt. ii, Texts andGlossary, passages IV, pp. 52–7, and VI, pp. 64–9).

Luke x:25–37 (Auty, passage XIV, pp. 97–106; ed. L.P. Zhukovskaya et al., Aprakos Mstislava Velikogo, Moscow, 1983, p. 131).

Psalm liv (ed. S. Sever'yanov, Sinaiskaya Psaltyr', Petrograd, 1922, pp. 67–9; ed. E.V. Cheshko et al., Norovskaya psaltyr'. Srednebolgarskaya rukopis' XIV veka, Sofia, 1989, Pt. ii, pp. 387–91; Psaltir s posljedovanjem

`Durd'a Crnojevi´ca 1494, reprinted Cetinje, 1986; the Synodal Bible of 1751 and subsequent editions, e.g. Moscow, 1815, St Petersburg, 1820).

(b) for translation and linguistic comment: Vita Constantini, xiv–xv, xvii–xviii, Vita Methodii, v–xvii, the Treatise on Letters, the Acrostich Prayer (A. Vaillant, Textes vieux-slaves, Paris, 1968, Pt. i, Textes et glossaire, passages I, pp. 30–3, 37–40, II, pp. 46–55, III, pp. 57–61, IV C, pp. 68–70).

Kniga Konstantina filosofa i grammatika o pismenex, sections 4'9 (V. Jagi´c, Codex slovenicus rerum grammaticarum, Berlin, 1896, reprinted Munich, 1968, V, pp. 108–13).

Zhitie sv. Stefana episkopa Permskogo (ed. V. Druzhinin, St Petersburg, 1897, reprinted The Hague, 1959, pp. 69–74).

V.F. Burtsov's Bakvar' (V.V. Ivanov et al., Khrestomatiya po istorii russkogo yazyka, Moscow, 1990, pp. 369–74).

Candidates will be required to show knowledge of the texts listed under (1) (a) and (1) (b).'

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13 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and English Language and Literature

Honour School of English and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 12 above).

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14 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and Literae Humaniores

(a) Honour School of Classics and Modern Languages

(b) Honour School of Philosophy and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 12 above).

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15 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and Modern History

Honour School of Modern History and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 12 above).

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16 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and Oriental Studies

Honour School of European and Middle Eastern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 12 above).

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17 Board of the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages

Honour School of Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 392, delete ll. 44–7 and substitute:

`1. A candidate may offer one of the Special Subjects from the list below. Fuller details, including the method of examination for each Special Subject, will be published in the University Gazette by the beginning of the fifth week of the Trinity Term two years before the examination.

Depending on the availability of teaching resources, not all Special Subjects will be available to all candidates in every year. Modern literary theory.

European cinema.

Syntax.

Semantics.

Phonetics and Pholology.

Sociolinguistics.

Translation Theory.

Romance philology and linguistcs.

Anglo-Norman language and literature.

Old Provençal.

The Old French epic.

The twelfth- and thirteenth-century GrailRomances.

French historical writing to 1515.

French poetry of the mid-sixteenth century.

Dramatic theory and practice in France 1605–60.

Jean-Jacques Rousseau.

French satire from Rabelais to Beaumarchais.

Honoré de Balzac.

French poetry 1870–1918.

French literature and the First World War.

Marcel Proust.

Surrealism.

The `Nouveau Roman'.

Literature and the visual arts from Diderot to Zola.

French women writers.

Advanced French translation: theory and practice.

Old Norse.

Old High German, with either Gothic or Old Saxon or Old English.

The German Minnesang.

Wolfram von Eschenbach.

Mechthild von Magdeburg and women's writing in German 1150–1300.

Martin Luther.

German poetry and drama of the seventeenth century.

Eighteenth-century German aesthetics from Baumgarten to Schiller.

Hölderlin, Hyperion, Empedokles (ed. M.B. Benn, Clarendon German Series) and the poetry written after 1797.

Weimar Classicism 1794–1805.

The Bildungsroman.

German Political Thought 1780–1830.

Expressionism and Dada in literature and the visual arts.

Shorter modernist prose fiction 1901–27.

The poetry of Hugo von Hofmannsthal, Stefan George, and Rainer Maria Rilke.

German poetry from 1945.

The German novel from 1945.

Literature in the GDR.

Advanced German translation.

Italian lyric poetry of the thirteenth century.

Dante's minor works.

`Questione della lingua'.

Women writers of the Italian Renaissance.

The aesthetics and literary criticism of Croce.

The works of Carlo Emilio Gadda.

Sicilian literature 1950–90.

Italian women writers 1950–90.

The civilisation of Muslim Spain.

Spanish drama before Lope de Vega.

The Spanish Erasmians.

The discovery and conquest of Mexico and the Antilles.

Spanish devotional and mystical writing 1577–88.

Federico García Lorce.

Modern Catalan literature.

Modern Galician literature.

Modern Catalan.

Modern Galician.

Bilingualism: Spanish and English.

The work of Alfonso the Wise as author and patron of litera- ture and learning.

Spanish and Portuguese prose romances of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries.

Latin American fiction from 1940.

The Galician-Portuguese Cancioneiros.

The chronicles of the Portuguese expansion in Asia.

The Brazilian novel of the North-East 1880–1960.

Twentieth-century Portuguese and Brazilian women writers.

The literature of Portuguese-speaking Africa.

Old Church Slavonic in relation to Common Slavonic and Russian.

Comparative Slavonic Philology.

The structure and history of one of the following languages: Bulgarian, Czech, Macedonian, Polish, Serbo-Croat, Slovak, Slovene, Sorbian, Ukrainian, White Russian.

Language and style in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Russian literature.

Russian narrative fiction from 1917.

Modern Russian poetry.

Russian religious philosophy in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Russian women's writing.

The School of the Ionian Islands 1797–1912, with special reference to the works of Solomos, Kalvos, Laskaratos, Matesis, Valaoritis, and Mavilis.

The New Athenian School of Poetry 1880–1912, with special reference to the works of Palamas, Drosinis, Gryparis, Krystallis, Malakasis, and Hadzopoulos.

The Greek novel 1918–40, with special reference to the works of K. Theotokis, G. Theotokas, Karagatsis, Myrivilis, Venezis, K. Politis, and G.N. Abbot.

Greek women writers.

Medieval Welsh tales and romances.

The poets of the Welsh princes.

The poetry of Dafydd ap Gwilym.

The Ulster Cycle of tales.

The classical Irish bardic tradition.

The structure and history of the Welsh language.

The structure and history of the Irish language.

Hebrew poetry and prose of medieval Spain and Provence.

Early twentieth-century Hebrew literature.

The literature of the State of Israel.

Yiddish linguistics.

Modern Yiddish literature.

Any other subject approved by the Modern Languages Board.'

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18 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and English Language and Literature

nour School of English and Modern Languages

th effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 17 above).

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9 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and Literae Humaniores

(a) Honour School of Classics and Modern Languages

(b) Honour School of Philosophy and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 17 above).

Return to List of Contents of this section


20 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and Modern History

Honour School of Modern History and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 17 above).

Return to List of Contents of this section


21 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and Oriental Studies

Honour School of European and Middle Eastern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 17 above).

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22 Board of the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages

(a) Honour School of Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 385, delete ll. 15–23 and substitute:

`Das Nibelungenlied, ed. K. Bartsch et al. (Reclam 1997), avent. 1, 14–17, 23–30, 36–9.

Wolfram von Eschenbach, Parzival, books 3, 5, and 9.

Frauenlieder des Mittelalters, ed. I. Kasten (Reclam 1990), nos. 1–47.

Der Stricker, Erzählungen, Fabeln, Raden, ed. O. Ehrismann (Reclam 1992).'

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(b) M.St. in Research Methods in Modern Languages/ M.St. in European Literature

With effect from 1 October 1999

1 In Examination Decrees, 1988, delete from l. 21, p. 696 to l. 22, p. 697.

2 Ibid., p. 864, ll. 50–1, p. 865, delete all references to

`Master of Studies in Research Methods in Modern Languages' and substitute in each case `Master of Studies in European Literature'.

3 Ibid., l. 21, l. 40, delete `piece of written work' and substitute `dissertation'.

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(c) M.Phil. in European Literature

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 589, delete ll. 24–7.

2 Ibid., delete ll. 28–37, including the section as amended by the Gazette, vol. 129, p. 333, column 2, and substitute:

`(a) to offer either one or two literatures:

(i) A candidate who offers one literature shall select it from the following: French, German,Italian, Spanish (including Latin-American), Portuguese (including Brazilian), Russian, Czech, Slovak, Byzantine and Modern Greek, Celtic, and Medieval Latin.

(ii) A candidate who offers two literatures shall select them from the following: French, German,Italian, Spanish (inc- luding Latin-American), Portuguese (including Brazilian), Russian, Czech, Slovak, Byzantine and Modern Greek, Celtic, and English. Candidates may, as one of their literatures, offer classical Latin or Classical Greek, provided that the other literature selected is not English; and they may, as one of their literatures, offer Medieval Latin, provided that the other literature selected is not Classical Latin or Classical Greek or English.

Any candidate may, with the approval of the Modern Languages Boards, offer the literature of any other language falling under the direction of that Board.'

3 Ibid., delete l. 42.

4 Ibid., l. 43, delete `(d)' and substitute `(b)'.

5 Ibid., insert on the following line:

`(c) To offer A, B, and C as defined in 2 below.'

6 Ibid., delete l. 45 and substitute:

`2. The examination shall consist of the following:'.

7 Ibid., on the following line, insert:

`(a) either'.

8 Ibid., l. 46, delete `(a)' and substitute `(i)'.

9 Ibid., p. 590, l. 7, after `The essay' insert `, which shall be written in English'.

10 Ibid., ll. 8–9, delete `ther term'seminar paper' and substitute:

`Hilary Term of the candidate's first year as a student for the examination.'

11 Ibid., on the following line, insert:

`Or'.

12 Ibid., l. 10, delete `(b)' and substitute `(ii)'.

13 Ibid., l. 12, delete `(which must be written in English)'.

14 Ibid., l. 14, after `palaeography' insert `with textual criticism'.

15 Ibid., l. 14, as amended by Gazette, vol. 129, p. 333, delete `the language or'.

16 Ibid., ll. 14–15, delete `in one of the languages'is being offered'.

17 Ibid., ll. 15–16, delete `between the date'examinations' and substitute:

`by the end of the ninth week of the second term as a student for the examination.'

18 Ibid., l. 20, delete `submit the transcription' and substitute `undertake a practical transcription test'.

19 Ibid., l. 21, delete `of' and substitute `on'.

20 Ibid., l. 22, insert: `The test should take place by the end of the fourth week of the Trinity Term in which the examination is to be taken. The mark should be sent by the supervisor to the chairman of Examiners.'

21 Ibid., on the following line, insert:

`The work submitted under (i) must be written in English; the work submitted under (ii) may be written in English or, subject to the approval of the Faculty Board, in a language appropriate to the literature concerned.

Approval must be sought for the choice of options in (a) by the end of the fourth week of the Michaelmas Term of the candidate's first year as a student for the examination.'

22 Ibid., l. 23, delete `(c) A thesis' and substitute:

`(b) A thesis, which may be written in English or, with the approval fo the Faculty Board, in the language appropriate to the literature concerned,'.

23 Ibid., l. 26, delete `2(a) or 2(b)' and substitute `(a) (i) or (ii)'.

24 Ibid., l. 27, delete `2(d)' and substitute `(c)'.

25 Ibid., after l. 30, on the following line, insert:

`Candidates shall seek approval (by application to the Modern Languages Graduate Office, 37 Wellington Square, Oxford) for the proposed subject of their thesis by the end of the fourth week of Trinity Term in their first year.

The thesis must be presented in proper scholarly form. Two copies, typed in double-spacing on one side only of quarto or A4 paper, each copy bound or held firmly in a stiff cover, must be delivered to the Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford by noon on Thursday of the sixth week of the Trinity Term in which the examination is to be taken.

[Add footnote] See the general regulation concerning the preparation and dispatch of theses. Candidates are reminded that work submitted for the Degree of M.Phil. may subsequently be incorporated in a thesis submitted for the Degree of D.Phil.

Successful candidates will be required to deposit one copy of their theses in the Bodleian Library.

[Add footnote] Such candidates will also be required to sign a form stating whether they give permission for their theses to be consulted.'

26 Ibid., l. 31, delete `(d)' and substitute `(c)'.

27 Ibid., delete ll. 32–52 and substitute:

`Candidates shall offer two Special Subjects. These may either be chosen from the Special Subjects proposed by members of the Modern Languages Faculty and listed in the `Graduate Studies in Modern Languages' prospectus, or be Special Subjects of their own devising, provided that each subject has the written support of the candidate's supervisor and is approved by or on behalf of the Modern Languages Board. A proposal for a Special Subject of the candidate's own devising shall be accompanied by a statement (of approximately 100 words) of the character and scope of the Subject proposed. Approval of all Special Subjects must be sought, by application to the Modern Languages Graduate Office, 37 Wellington Square, by the end of the fourth week of the Trinity Term of the candidate's first year as a student for the examination. Approval of Special Subjects proposed will be dependent on the availability of teaching and examining resources at the relevant times.

Candidates will be examined on a portfolio of work (which may be written in English, or, with the approval of the Faculty Board, in the language appropriate to the literature concerned) on topics they have agreed with their supervisor within each Special Subject. The portfolio shall be submitted to the supervisor by Friday of the first week of Hilary Term of the candidate's second year as a student for the examination.

The essay or essays shall be marked, signed, and dated by the supervisor for that Special Subject. It is expected that essays will normally be submitted to the examiners in unrevised form. However, in cases where an essay submitted for examination represents a revised version of an earlier essay, the date and supervisor's mark should refer to the revised version, and the supervisor's comments should indicate the nature and extent of the revisions which have been made and the reasons for submitting a revised version.

The essay or essays contained within the portfolio for each Special Subject should be of approximately 9,000 words in total, though where the subject or approach requires greater length, candidates shall not be penalised for exceeding this guideline.

The essays shall be examined by the examiners who shall, in deciding the marks they award, take account of the stage at which each essay was completed.'

28 Ibid., delete from p. 591, l. 1, to p. 594, l. 14.

29 Ibid., p. 594, l. 24, as amended by Gazette, Vol. 129, p. 333, delete `4'.

30 Ibid., l. 31, as amended by Gazette, Vol. 129, p. 333, delete `sixth.

31 Ibid., delete ll. 24–33.

32 Ibid., l. 34, as amended by Gazette, Vol. 129, p. 333, delete `5'.

33 Ibid., delete p. 594, l. 34 to p. 595, l. 2 and associated footnote.

34 Ibid., p. 595, l. 3, as amended by Gazette, Vol. 129, p. 333, delete `6' and substitute `3'.

35 Ibid., l. 5, as amended by Gazette, Vol. 129, p. 333, delete `7' and substitute `4'.

36 Ibid., after l. 10, on the following line, insert:

`5. In the case of resubmission, candidates shall be required to resubmit all the material by noon on Thursday of the sixth week of the first Trinity Term following their first examination. Candidates may resubmit on one occasion only.'

37 Ibid., l. 11, as amended by Gazette, Vol. 129, p. 333, delete `8' and substitute `6'.

(d) M.St. in European Literature

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 670, delete ll. 34–40, and substitute:

`a) to offer either one or two literatures:

(i) To offers one literature to be selected from the following: French, German,Italian, Spanish (including Latin- American), Portuguese (including Brazilian), Russian, Czech, Slovak, Byzantine and Modern Greek, Celtic, and Medieval Latin.'

2 Ibid., delete l. 46.

34 Ibid., l. 47, delete `(d)' and substitute `(b)'.

4 Ibid., insert on the following line:

`(c) To offer A, B, and C as defined in 3 below.'

5 Ibid., p. 671, delete ll. 1–38 and substitute:

`3. The examination shall consist of the following:

(a) either

(i) Methods of Criticism and the Theory of Literature.

[2(a)(i) for the M.Phil. in European Literature]

or

(ii) Methods of Scholarship.

2(a)(ii) for the M.Phil. in European Literature]

or

(iii) A methodological essay of not more than 6,000 words in length on a topic or issue related to the candidate's Special Subject or dissertation, to be submitted in two typed copies to the Modern Languages Graduate Office (37 Wellington Square) by the fourth week of Trinity Term.

The work submitted under (i) must be written in English; the work submitted under (ii) or (iii) may be written in English or, subject to the approval of the Faculty Board, in a language appropriate to the literature concerned.

Candidates must seek approval for their choice of option in

(a) by the end of the fourth week of the Michaelmas Term.

(b) A dissertation of between 8,000 and 10,000 words and written in English, or, with the approval of the Faculty Board, in the language appropriate to the literature concerned, on a topic connected with that offered in (a)(i) or

(a)(ii) above or (c) below, but distinct from those covered by the essays submitted under (a) or (c), and approved by the Modern Languages Board. Candidates shall seek approval (by application to the Modern Languages Graduate Office, 37 Wellington Square, Oxford) for the proposed topic of their dissertation by the end of the fourth week of Hilary Term.

The dissertation must be presented in proper scholarly form. Two copies, typed in double-spacing on one side only of quarto or A4 paper, each copy bound or held firmly in a stiff cover, must be delivered to the Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, by noon on Thursday of the sixth week of the Trinity Term.

(c) One Special Subject. The regulations will be as in 2(c) for the M.Phil. in Euroepan Literature, except that candidates shall offer one Special Subject instead of two. Candidates must, however, seek approval of their Special Subjects by the end of the fourth week of Michaelmas Term. The portfolio of work shall be submitted to the supervisor by Friday of the first week of Hilary Term.

Unless indicated to the contrary above, other arrangements for the above papers and subjects shall be as specified for the M.Phil. in European Literature.

[Add footnote] [Until 1 October 2000] The regulations governing the M.Phil. in European Literature that will apply to the examination for the M.St. in European Literature in Trinity Term 2000 shall be those that take effect from 1 October 2000.

In the case of resubmission, candidates shall be required to resubmit all the material by noon on Thursday of the sixth week of the first Trinity Term following their first examination. Candidates may resubmit on one occasion only.'

6 Ibid., l. 39, delete `distinction' and substitute `Distinction'.

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23 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and English Language and Literature

Honour School of English and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 22 (a) above).

Return to List of Contents of this section


24 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and Literae Humaniores

(a) Honour School of Classics and Modern Languages

(b) Honour School of Philosophy and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 22 (a) above).

Return to List of Contents of this section


25 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and Modern History

Honour School of Modern History and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 22 (a) above).

Return to List of Contents of this section


26 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and Oriental Studies

Honour School of European and Middle Eastern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 22 (a) above).

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27 Board of the Faculty of Modern History

Honour Moderations in Modern History

With effect from 1 October 1999

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 51, l. 37, delete `Society and Politics in the United States 1870–1921' and substitute `Age of Empire, Age of Reform: American Politics and Society, 1880–1927'.

2 Ibid., p. 59, delete ll. 17–46, and substitute:

`13. AGE OF EMPIRE, AGE OF REFORM: AMERICAN POLITICS AND SOCIETY, 1880–1927

The Politics of Reform

Walter Lippmann, Drift and Mastery (New York, 1914), pp. 172–97 (Drift), 264–76 (Mastery), 277–88 (Modern Communion). Herbert Croly, The Promise of American Life (Boston, 1989), pp. 1–51 (What is the promise of American life?, The Federalists and the Republicans.)

Ida Tarbell, History of the Standard Oil Company (London, 1905), Vol. 1, pp. 38–69 (The Rise of the Standard Oil Company), Vol. 2, pp. 231–5 (The Legitimate Greatness of the Standard Oil Company).

W. Bryan, `Cross of Gold', in G. Tindall, (ed.) A Populist Reader (New York, 1966) pp. 198–91.

W. White, `What's the matter with Kansas?', in Tindall, op. cit., pp. 192–9.

S. Gomper, `Organised Labor', in Tindall, op. cit., pp. 203–11.

David Starr Jordan, The Human Harvest (Boston, 1907), pp.

39–46 (Blood determines history, History determines blood, Men and beasts under the same laws, Selective breeding,Meaning of progress).

Randolph Bourne, War and the Intellectuals (New York, 1964), pp. 107–23 (The Twilight of Idols).

William Hard, `Efficiency and the 'He-man'' in The New Republic 14:175 (9 March 1918), pp. 165–7.

Political Economy

W.G. Sumner, `Sociology', in David Hollinger, ed. The American Intellectual Tradition, (New York, 1997), vol. 2, pp. 30–8.

T. Veblen, `Theory of the Leisure Class', in David Hollinger, op. cit., vol. 2, pp. 128–41.

Jacob Riis, How the Other Half Lives (New York, 1890), pp.

5–9, 46–57, 82–102 (Introduction, The Bend, Chinatown, Jewtown, the Sweaters of Jewtown).

William Dean Howells, A Traveller from Altruria, ed. David W. Levy (Boston, 1894), pp. 29–166.

Black Activism

Booker T. Washington, Up from Slavery (New York, 1901), pp. 71–85, 105–15 (Making Bricks without Straw, Making their Beds, The Atlanta Exposition Address).

W.E.B. DuBois, The Souls of Black Folk (New York, 1903), pp.

1–190.

American Expansion

Colin Calloway, ed., Our Hearts Fell to the Ground (Boston, 1996), pp. 150–204 (The End of Freedom, The White Man's Schools, Sitting Bull, Killing the Dream).

Thomas Paterson, ed., Major Problems in American Foreign Relations (Lexington, 1995), vol. 1, pp. 385–95 (The Spanish- American-Cuban-Filipino War), 454–62 (The Open Door Policy and China), 497–509 (Theodore Roosevelt, the Big Stick, and US Hegemony in the Caribbean).

Mark Twain, A Pen Warmed-up in Hell, ed. Frederick Anderson (New York, 1972), pp. 74–106.

The New Woman

Mary Beth Norton and Ruth Alexander, eds., Major Problems in American Women's History (Lexington, 1996), pp. 254–61, 285–97, 322–33 ('The New Woman', Work Culture, Women and Politics in the 1920s).

Charles Beard and Mary R. Beard, American Citizenship (New York, 1927), pp. 21–33 (The Family).

Wesley Clair Mitchell, The Backward Art of Spending Money (1937), pp. 3–20.

Christopher Lasch, ed., The Social Thought of Jane Addams

(Indianapolis, 1965), pp. 28–43 (The Subjective Necessity of Social Settlements), 151–62 (The Larger Aspects of the Woman's Movement), 231–49 (Peace and Bread in Time of War).

C.P. Gilman, `Women and Economics', in David Hollinger, ed., The American Intellectual Tradition (New York, 1997), vol. 2, pp. 55–60.

Immigration and Assimilation

Jon Gjerde, ed., Major Problems in American Immigration and Ethnic History (Boston, 1998), pp. 171–85, 205–19, 239–52, 274–90 (Emigration and Return, Industiral Immigrants, WomenImmigrants, Racialisation of Immigrants, Responses to Immigration).

Randolph Bourne, War and the Intellectuals (New York, 1964), pp. 107–33 (Trans-National America, The Jew and Trans-National America).

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28 Boards of the Faculties of Modern History and Literae Humaniores

Honour Moderations in Ancient and Modern History

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

As for the Honour Moderations in Modern History (see 27 above).

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29 Boards of the Faculties of Modern History and English

Honour Moderations in Modern History and English

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

As for the Honour Moderations in Modern History (see 27 above).

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30 Boards of the Faculties of Modern History and Social Studies

Honour Moderations in Modern History and Politics

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

As for the Honour Moderations in Modern History (see 27 above).

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31 Boards of the Faculties of Modern History and Modern Languages

Preliminary Examination in Modern History and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

As for the Honour Moderations in Modern History (see 27 above).

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32 Board of the Faculty of Modern History

Honour School of Modern History

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 330, delete l. 4 and substitute:

`The Acts of the Process of Canonisation, and Bull of Canonisation of St Clare, in R.J. Armstrong (ed.), Clare of Assisi: Early Documents, cit., pp. 133–85 and 238–45.'

2 Ibid., after l. 30, insert:

`23. The frescoes of the life of St Francis, attributed to Giotto, in the upper church of the basilica of San Francesco in Assisi, reproduced (in their undamaged state) in E. Lunghi, The Basilica of Saint Francis of Assisi. The frescoes by Giotto, his predecessors and followers (Thames and Hudson, London, 1996) pp. 62–99.'

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33 Boards of the Faculties of Modern History and English Language and Literature

Honour School of Modern History and English

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 32 above).

Return to List of Contents of this section


34 Boards of the Faculties of Modern History and Literae Humaniores

Honour School of Ancient and Modern History

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 32 above).

Return to List of Contents of this section


35 Boards of the Faculties of Modern History and Medieval and Modern Languages

Honour School of Modern History and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 32 above).

Return to List of Contents of this section


36 Boards of the Faculties of Modern History and Social Studies

(a) Honour School of Modern History and Economics

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 32 above).

(b) Honour School of Modern History and Politics

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 32 above).

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37 Board of the Faculty of Modern History

Honour School of Modern History

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 302, l. 10 and p. 309, l. 41, delete `1600' and substitute `1610'.

2 Ibid., delete from p. 309, l. 42 to p. 310, l. 34, and substitute:

`Candidates will be required to study the social, political, economic, and religious developments in France from 1610 to 1715, and will only be required to show such knowledge of external affairs as is necessary for the understanding of the internal history of France during this period.

R. Bonney (ed.), Society and Government in France under Richelieu and Mazarin, 1624–61 (1988).

R. Mettam (ed.), Government and Society in Louis XIV's France (1977).

Charles Loyseau, A Treatise of Orders and Plain Dignities, ed. H.A. Lloyd (1994), p. 48–55 (chapter III, paras 1–27), 90–112 (chapter V, paras 33–110), 161–5 (chapter VII, paras 91–105), 166–8 (chapter VIII, paras 1–10).

Mathieu Molé, Mémoires, ed. A. Champollion-Figeac (Paris, 1855–7), i, pp. 99–102, ii, pp. 1–4, 498–510. Franc et veritable discours sur la revocation du droit annuel (Paris, c.1615).

Testament politique du Cardinal de Richelieu, ed. L. André

(Paris, 1947), pp. 218–23, 230–55, 379–400. Les papiers de Richelieu, ed. P. Grillon (Paris, 1975–85), vol. i, documents 86, 87, 89 of 1625, document 342 of 1626; vol. ii documents 31, 500, 688, 862; vol. iii, document 197, pp. 202–4 only; vol. iv, documents 72, 292, 409, 455; vol. v, documents 224, 375, 592, 603; vol. vi, document 10.

Lettres et mémoires adressés au chancelier Séguier, ed. R. Mousnier (Paris, 1964), vol. i, documents 68, 94, 141, 165, 168, 188, 201, 210, 224; vol. ii, documents 256, 311, 340, 351, 363, 364, 368, 381, 395; appendix 2, i. vi–vii, xii; appendix 3, iv, vii.

Y.-M. Bercé, Histoire des Croquants (Geneva, 1974), vol. ii, documents 29, 31, 42, 68.

Choix de Mazarinades, ed. C. Moreau (Paris, 1853), vol. i, pp. 277–89 (Catéchisme des Partisans), 358–407 (Lettre d'Avis à Messieurs du Parlement de Paris, escrite par un Provincial); vol. ii, pp. 230–4 (Requête de la Noblesse), 406–38 (La Vérité toute nue).

Les articles de la paix, conclus et arrestez à Ruel, le xi mars 1649 (Paris, 1649).

Lettres, Instructions et Mémoires de Colbert, ed. P. Clément

(Paris, 1861–82), vol. i, document 210; vol. ii, document 38; vol. vii, document 15.

Correspondance des Contrôleurs-Généraux des Finances, ed. A. de Boislisle (Paris, 1883), vol. i, documents 207, 209, 211, 256, 333 and appendix 2; vol. ii, appendix 4, pp. 476–86 (line 3).

Locke's Travels in France, ed. J. Lough (1953), pp. 114–65, 228–37.

François de Salignac de la Mothe-Fénelon, A Louis XIV: Remonstrance à ce prince (1694). Plans de gouvernement concertés avec le duc de Chevreuse (1711).

Mémoire sur la situation déplorable de la France en 1710. Louis de Rouvroy, duc de Saint-Simon, Mémoires, ed. G. Truc (Paris, 1948–58), vol. iii, pp. 1238–79 (Lettre anonyme au roi).

Alexandre Dubois, Journal d'un curé de campagne au xviie siècle, ed. H. Platelle (Paris, 1965), pp. 61–149, 160–2, 174.

Documents relatifs aux rapports du clergé avec la royauté de 1682 à 1705, ed. L. Mention (Paris, 1893), pp. 114–34 (Édit du roi sur la juridiction ecclésiastique).'

3 Ibid., p. 325, delete ll. 10–41, and substitute:

`All texts will be studied in translation. Where a published translation is not specified, a specially made translation will be available in the History Faculty Library. Where pagination is given for facing page translations, only those pages giving the text in English need be studied.

Julian, `Letter to the senate and people of Athens', trans. by W.C. Wright, The works of the Emperor Julian, vol. II, Loeb Classical Library (London, 1913), pp. 243–91.

——Fragment of a letter to a priest', ibid., pp. 297–339.

——Misopogon', ibid., pp. 421–511.

——Letters', nos. 8, 15, 19–23, 36–41, 51, 56–8, ibid., vol. III, pp. 21–7, 35–7, 49–75, 117–35, 177–81, 191–209. Augustine, Confessions, trans. H. Chadwick (Oxford, 1991), Books I–IX, pp. 1–178.

—-Letters 16–17, trans. J.H. Baxter, Select Letters, Loeb Classical Library (London, 1930), nos. 5–6, pp. 17–31.

Ammianus Marcellinus, The Later Roman Empire [Res Gestae], trans. W. Hamilton (London, 1986), Book 14,6; 20,4; 21,1–2; 22,1–7, 9–14; 23,1; 25,1–4; 27,9, 11; 28,1, 4; 30,5–6.

The Theodosian Code, trans. C. Pharr (Princeton, 1952), Book IX. Title 16. paras 4–11; IX. 17.5–7; XII. 1.49–56, 63, 77, 87, 94, 98, 104, 110, 112, 116, 120, 122; XIV. 9.1; XVI.

1.2,4; XVI. 2.20; XVI. 5.3, 6–7, 9; XVI. 10.4–13.

Eunapius, The lives of the philosophers and sophists, trans. W.C. Wright, `Philostratus and Eunapius. The lives of the sophists.', Loeb Classical Library (London, 1921), pp. 421–61, 477–513, 519–27, 539–65.

Ausonius, Poems commemorating the professors of Bordeaux, trans. H.G.E. White Ausonius vol. 1, Loeb Classical Library (London, 1919), pp. 97–139.

Symmachus, Letters, Book I; 3, 10, 12, 14, 20, 23, 32, 43, 47–9, 51–3, 58–9, 61.

—-The Relationes of Symmachus, trans. R.H. Barrow (Oxford, 1973) Relationes 3, 10–12, pp. 33–47, 73–81.

Ambrose, Letters, trans. M.M. Beyenka (Washington, 1954) Letters 7(17), 8(18), 60(20), 61(22), pp. 31–51, 365–84.

Jerome, Select letters, trans. F.A. Wright, Loeb Classical Library (London, 1933) Nos. XXII, XLV, LIV, CVII, pp. 53–159, 177–79, 229–65.

—-Letter 70, trans. W.H. Freemantle, Letters and select works (Oxford, 1893)–available with special translations.

Libanius, Autobiography and selected letters, trans. A.F. Norman, Loeb Classical Library (London, 1992) Vol. I, Autobiography, pp. 53–337.

—-Selected works, trans. A.F. Norman, Loeb Classical Library (London, 1969) Vol. I, Oration 18, pp. 279–487.

—-Selected works, trans. A.F. Norman, Loeb Classical Library

(London, 1977) Vol. II, Oration 30, pp. 101–51.

Dessau, Inscriptiones Latinae Selectae, nos. 754, 1258–61, 1265, 2946–7, 2951. Available in special translation.

Diehl, Inscriptiones Latinae Christianae Veteres, no. 63. Available in special translation.'

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38 Boards of the Faculties of Modern History and English Language and Literature

Honour School of Modern History and English

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 37 above).

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39 Boards of the Faculties of Modern History and Literae Humaniores

Honour School of Ancient and Modern History

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 37 above).

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40 Boards of the Faculties of Modern History and Medieval and Modern Languages

Honour School of Modern History and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 37 above).

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41 Boards of the Faculties of Modern History and Social Studies

(a) Honour School of Modern History and Economics

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 37 above).

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(b) Honour School of Modern History and Politics

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 37 above).

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42 Board of the Faculty of Modern History

(a) Honour Moderations in Modern History

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 51, delete ll. 12–13 and substitute:

`1. History of the British Isles: any one of the following periods:

(i) c.300–1087; (II) 1042–1330; (III) 1330–1550; (IV) 1500– 1700; (V) 1685–1830; (VI) since 1830.'

(b) Honour School of Modern History

(i) With immediate effect

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 321, after l. 37 insert:

`The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, trans. T. Parsons (1930, 2nd edn., repr. 1989, ed. A. Giddens (London, 1975)), pp. 13–183'.

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(ii) With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 300, l. 6, delete `Period (i)' and substitute `Periods (i) or (II)'.

2 Ibid., delete ll. 9–11, and substitute

`(i) c.300–1087;

(II) 1042–1330;

(III) 1330–1550;

(IV) 1500–1700;

(V) 1685–1830;

(VI) since 1830.'

3 Ibid., l. 21, after `any paper.' insert:

`Candidates who offer British History papers (i) and (II), or (III) and (IV), or (IV) and (V), for the Final Honour School, must not substantially duplicate material in those two papers.'

4 Ibid., l. 36, delete `British History to 1330,' and substitute `British History c.300–1087; 1042–1330;'

5 Ibid., l. 38, delete `British History to 1330–1685,' and substitute `British History 1330–1550; 1500–1700;'

6 Ibid., l. 40, delete `British History since 1685,' and substitute `British History 1685–1830; since 1830;'

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43 Boards of the Faculties of Modern History and English Language and Literature

(a) Honour School of Modern History and English

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 61, l. 31, delete `School of' and substitute `Moderations in'.

(b) Honour School of Modern History and English

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in

2002) As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 42 (b) (ii) above).

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44 Boards of the Faculties of Modern History and Literae Humaniores

Honour School of Ancient and Modern History

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 126, l. 29, delete `three'.

2 As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 42 (b) (ii) above).

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45 Boards of the Faculties of Modern History and Medieval and Modern Languages

(a) Preliminary Examination in Modern History and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in

2000) In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 86, l. 31, delete `School of' and substitute `Moderations in'.

(b) Honour School of Modern History and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 42 (b) (ii) above).

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46 Boards of the Honour School of Modern History and Social Studies

(a) Honour School of Modern History and Economics

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 42 (b) (ii) above).

(b) Honour Moderations in Modern History and Politics

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 62, ll. 20 and 26, delete `three'.

2 Ibid., l. 28, after `Examination.' insert:

`Candidates who take British History paper VI for Honour Moderations or the Final Honour School may not also take Politics core paper 202 for the Final Honour School.'

(c) Honour School of Modern History and Politics

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 371, l. 32, delete `three'.

2 Ibid., l. 38, after `(xiii)', insert `; candidates who have taken British History VI at Honour Moderations or who are also taking it for the Final Honour School cannot also take Politics paper 202'.

3 Ibid., p. 372, delete ll. 3–5.

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47 Board of the Faculty of Physical Sciences

Honour School of Natural Science (Metallurgy and Science of Materials, and Physics)

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 407, after l. 36, insert new paragraph:

`For the General Subjects Metallurgy and Science of Materials and Physics candidates are restricted to models of calculators included in a list provided by the Chairmen of the Examiners not later than Wednesday of the fourth week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examination.'

2 Ibid., delete l. 44.

3 Ibid., delete ll. 47 and 48.

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48 Board of the Faculty of Social Studies

(a) Preliminary Examination for Philosophy, Politics, and Economics

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 99, delete ll. 15–40 and substitute:

`Introduction to Politics

The paper will contain questions on:

(a) the politics and government of France from 1946, Germany from 1928/German Federal Republic from 1949, Soviet Union from 1917/Russia from 1991, United Kingdom from 1945, the United States from 1932. In particular it will focus on the following comparative topics: constitution, legislature, executive, parties and party system, state and welfare, centre-periphery relations. Questions will also be set on the following historical events and processes: the New Deal, the acquisition of civil rights by Black people in the USA, the rise and decline of political consensus in Britain, political instability inthe French Fourth Republic, political stabilisation in the French Fifth Republic, the collapse of the Weimar Republic, the Nazi Regime, political violence under Stalin, political stability under Brezhnev, Perestroika 1985–91.

(b) Political Theory: democracy, liberty, and ideology.

Questions will be set on the following texts: J.J. Rousseau, The Social Contract; J.S. Mill, On Liberty; Alexis de Toqueville, Democracy in America; Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, The Communist Manifesto; The German Ideology; Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Napoleon; Critique of the Gotha Programme; and on the following topics: theories of democracy; non-democratic politics including the idea of totalitarianism; the concept and theories of ideology; the concept andtheories of liberty.

Candidates must answer four questions. They are required to answer at least two questions from section (a), showing knowledge of at least two countries, and at least one question from section (b).'

(b) Honour School of Philosophy, Politics, and Economics

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 482, delete ll. 48–52 and substitute:

`Welfare-economic foundations; the measurement of well-being; taxation and incentives; taxation, debt and behaviour over time; commodity taxation; taxation of persons; taxation of companies; cost-benefit analysis; health; education; social security; jurisdictional issues; public good, externalities and market failure; policy towards natural resources and the environment.'

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49 Boards of the Faculties of Modern History and Social Studies

Honour Moderations in Modern History and Politics

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 62, ll. 36–7, delete `either section (a) or from sections (a) and

(c)' and substitute `section (a)'.

2 Ibid., delete ll. 39–42 and substitute `Candidates must show knowledge of three countries.'

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50 Board of the Faculty of Theology

(a) Preliminary Examination for Theology

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 116, delete ll. 2–4 and substitute:

`Candidates will be expected to show a general knowledge of the history of the Church, and its relation to the Roman empire, from the late first century to the death of Constantine in 337 AD. Questions will be set on some but not necessarily all of the following topics: the growth of the church and the meaning of conversation; the causes, scope, and effects of persecution; patterns of ministry and the threefold hierarchy; ecclesiastical discipline and the beginnings of monasticism; schisms caused by Judaizers, Gnostics, Montanists, Novatianists and Donatists; the development of orthodoxy and synodical government; the evolution of the Biblical canon; the role of Christianity in the Constantinian Empire.'

(b) Course for the Degree of Bachelor of Theology and Diploma of Higher Education (Theology) at Westminster College

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 1001, l. 18, delete `Personal Research Focus' and substitute `Guided Study'.

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51 Committee for Archaeology

(a) M.St. in Archaeological Science

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 659, after l. 16 insert:

`Archaeological Science

1. Candidates for admission must apply to the Committee for Archaeology.

2. Candidates must follow a course of instruction in Archaeological Science for at least three terms and for a substantial part of the first two subsequent vacations, as determined by the course timetable, and will, when they enter their names for the examination, be required to produce a certificate from their supervisors to this effect.

3. The registration of candidates will lapse at the end of Trinity Term in the academic year of their admission, unless it shall have been extended by the committee.

4. The written examination, which will be taken in the second week of Trinity term, will consist of three papers on the syllabus described in the Schedule.

5. Each candidate will be required to submit a report of approximately 5,000 words, on a practical project selected in consultation with the supervisor and approved by a person designated for this purpose by the Committee for Archaeology.

6. Three typewritten copies of the report on the practical project must be sent, not later than noon on the Friday of ninth week of the Trinity Term in the year in which the examination is taken, to the M.St. Examiners (Archaeological Science), c/o Clerk of the Schools, High Street, Oxford.

7. The examiners may require to see the records of practical work carried out during the first two terms of the course.

8. Candidates must present themselves for an oral examination as required by the examiners. This may be on the candidate's written papers, or practical work, or both.

9. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.

Schedule

(i) Principles and practice of scientific dating

The principles of scientific dating methods including radio- carbon, luminescence, uranium series and dendro-chronology. The practical aspects of these methods and the problems encountered in their application. The statistical analysis of chronological information in the study of archaeological sites and cultures.

(ii) Bio-archaeology

Scientific methods for the study of biological remains from archaeological sites; introduction to the analysis of plant and faunal remains including indicators of disease and artefactual analysis; theoretical and practical aspects of quantitative methods for diet reconstruction by isotopic analysis; introduction to ancient DNA studies; residue analysis.

(iii) Materials analysis and the study of technological change

Introduction to the history of technology; theoretical and practical aspects of materials analysis methods—SEM, microphobe, TIMS, ICP, ICP-MS, XRF, XRD, PIXE, FTIR, and NAA; application of analysis to different material types—stone, ceramics, vitreous materials, and metals; provenance of raw materials; case studies of application to archaeological problems.'

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(b) M.Sc. by coursework in Archaeological Science

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 721, after l. 9, insert:

`Archaeological Science

1. Candidates for admission must apply to the Committee for Archaeology.

2. Candidates must follow a course of instruction in Archaeological Science for at least three terms and for a substantial part of the three subsequent vacations, as determined by the course timetable, and will, when they enter their names for the examination, be required to produce a certificate from their supervisors to this effect.

3. The written examination, which will be taken in the second week of Trinity Term, will consist of three papers on the syllabus described in the Schedule.

4. Each candidate will be required to submit a dissertation of approximately 15,000 to 20,000 words, on a research area selected in consultation with the supervisor and approved by a person designated for this purpose by the Committee for Archaeology.

5. Three typewritten copies of the dissertation must be sent, not later than noon on 30 September of the year in which the examination is taken, to the M.Sc. Examiners (Archaeological Science), c/o Clerk of the Schools, High Street, Oxford.

6. The examiners may require to see the records of practical work carried out during the course.

7. Candidates must present themselves for an oral examination as required by the examiners. This may be on the candidate's written papers, or dissertation, or both.

8. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.

Schedule

(i) Principles and practice of scientific dating

The principles of scientific dating methods including radio- carbon, luminescence, uranium series and dendro-chronology. The practical aspects of these methods and the problems encountered in their application. The statistical analysis of chronological information in the study of archaeological sites and cultures.

(ii) Bio-archaeology

Scientific methods for the study of biological remains from archaeological sites; introduction to the analysis of plant and faunal remains including indicators of disease and artefactual analysis; theoretical and practical aspects of quantitative methods for diet reconstruction by isotopic analysis; introduction to ancient DNA studies; residue analysis.

(iii) Materials analysis and the study of technological change

Introduction to the history of technology; theoretical and practical aspects of materials analysis methods—SEM, microphobe, TIMS, ICP, ICP-MS, XRF, XRD, PIXE, FTIR, and NAA; application of analysis to different material types—stone, ceramics, vitreous materials, and metals; provenance of raw materials; case studies of application to archaeological problems.'

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EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give notice of oral examination of their candidates asfollows:

Biological Sciences

HYUN JI KIM, St Hugh's: `Development and signal transduction in dictyostelium'.
Department of Biochemistry, Monday, 17 May, 1 p.m.
Examiners: J.P. Armitage, J. Williams.

A. WRIGHT, Wolfson: `The molecular basis of perception and transduction of mechanical signals in plants'.
Department of Plant Sciences, Tuesday, 11 May, 11 a.m.
Examiners: M.M. Campbell, A. Trewavas.

English Language and Literature

N.C. VICKERS, Balliol: `Coleridge and medicine, 1795– 1806'.
St Edmund Hall, Saturday, 1 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: L.A. Newlyn, K. Everest.

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Literae Humaniores

N. MATTHEWS, Magdalen: `Settlement change in southern Gaul c.150 bc–ad 100, and the development of Gallia Narbonensis'.
Christ Church, Friday, 14 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: A.K. Bowman, J.J.Wilkes.

G.I.C. ROBERTSON, Corpus Christi: `Evaluative language in Greek lyric and elegiac poetry and inscribed epigram to the end of the fifth century bce'.
Christ Church, Thursday, 13 May, 10.45 a.m.
Examiners: D. Obbink, P.E. Easterling.

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Physical Sciences

J.R. CLARKSON, Keble: `A study of protein damage in foam'.
Department of Engineering Science, Friday, 21 May, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: P.B. Whalley, C.R. Thomas.

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Social Studies

J.I. NUNEZ, St Antony's: `Four essays on reputation and self-regulation'.
Nuffield, Thursday, 20 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: M.A. MEYER, T.J. BESLEY.

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