Examinations and Boards

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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CHAIRMEN OF EXAMINERS

TRINITY TERM 1999

Honour Moderations

Archaeology and Anthropology: PROFESSOR W.R. JAMES, B.LITT., MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St Cross (address: Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology)

Honour School

Experimental Psychology: DR R.M.A. MARTIN, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St Edmund Hall

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Master of Philosophy

Classical Archaeology: DR D.C. KURTZ, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Wolfson (address: Ashmolean Museum)

Qualifying Examination in Classical Archaeology: DR D.C. KURTZ, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Wolfson (address: Ashmolean Museum)

Qualifying Examination in International Relations: PROFESSOR S.N. MACFARLANE, MA, M.PHIL., D.PHIL., Fellow of St Anne's (address: Department of Social Studies)

Qualifying Examination in Islamic Art and Archaeology: DR J.A.J. RABY, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St Hugh's (address: Oriental Institute)

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Master of Science

Industrial Relations and Human Resource Management: DR O.R. DARBISHIRE, MA, Fellow of Pembroke

Public Policy in Latin America: MRS T.R. THORP, MA, Fellow of St Antony's (address: Latin American Centre)

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Master of Studies

Chinese Studies: DR S.J. VAINKER, MA status, St Hugh's (address: Ashmolean Museum)

Classical Archaeology: DR D.C. KURTZ, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Wolfson (address: Ashmolean Museum)

Islamic Art and Archaeology: DR J.A.J. RABY, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St Hugh's (address: Oriental Institute)

Islamic Art and Archaeology (Research Methods and Techniques): DR J.A.J. RABY, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St Hugh's (address: Oriental Institute)

Theology: PROFESSOR J.S.K. WARD, B.LITT., MA, Canon of Christ Church

Theology (Research): PROFESSOR D.N.J. MACCULLOCH, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St Cross (address: Theology Faculty)

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Qualifying Examination in Medical Sociology for Medical Students

PROFESSOR R.M. FITZPATRICK, MA, Fellow of Nuffield

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BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES: SUB-FACULTY OF BIOLOGY

Honour School of Natural Science: Biological Sciences 2000

Under the terms of the regulations for the above examination (Examination Decrees, 1998, pp. 408–10) the Sub-faculty of Biology has approved the following topics for extended essays in Part A of the Honour School examinations for 2000.

Animal Biology

1. Discuss the influence that Niko Tinbergen, Konrad Lorenz, and Karl von Frisch have had on the study of animal behaviour.

2. How does the reproductive strategy of an animal reflect its phylogeny and ecology?

3. How do the cellular properties of nerve cells influence the behaviour of neural circuits?

4. Discuss how the locomotory systems of animals have been shaped by physical constraints.

5. Many animals are faced with the problem of achieving their requirements for multiple nutrients in a variable and complex nutritional environment. How do they do it?

Plant and Microbial Ecology

1. Discuss why flowering plants have such flexible reproductive strategies.

2. Discuss the potentials and problems of genetically engineered crops.

3. Interpret the microscopic and molecular structure of the fungal hypha in relation to nutrient acquisition.

4. Discuss the central role of sucrose in plant metabolism.

5. Why don't plants get cancer?

Environmental Biology

1. Discuss the contention that invasions by exotic plants or animals present the single greatest threat to biological diversity.

2. Discuss the theory and practice of marine conservation.

3. Describe the causes of habitat fragmentation, its consequences both for plant and animal populations and for ecosystem structure and function.

4. Review the concepts of density dependent, density vague, and density independent growth. What do they imply about the population dynamics one would observe in the field? Describe the observations or experiments that you would make in order to determine which type of growth was being exhibited.

5. To what extent should conservation priorities in the UK be based on ecological criteria?

Cell and Developmental Biology

1. Discuss the use of drugs in cell biology.

2. What determines cell shape and size?

3. Compare the cellular functions of adenine and guanine nucleotides.

4. What mechanisms do cells employ to control the accumulation of proteins in a cell-type and developmentally appropriate manner?

5. Given that all cells experience a high rate of mutation in each cell cycle, evaluate the relative importance of the different mechanisms which reduce the effect of these mutations on the phenotype of the organism.

Biology of Animal and Plant Disease

1. Explain the features of the vertebrate immune system that may be exploited for the development of vaccines.

2. How can a knowledge of host and parasite genetics help in attempts to control disease in plants and animals@

3. What are the problems in applying vector-borne disease models in field situations?

4. What characteristics of parasites make them an especial threat to host populations?

5. What is the molecular basis of resistance and immunity to disease in plants?

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CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the General Board, the following changes in regulations made by boards of faculties will come into effect on 9 April.

1 Board of the Faculty of Biological Sciences

Honour School of Natural Science (Biological Sciences)

With immediate effect

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 409, add after `envelope.' in l. 43 `Extended essays previously submitted for the Honour School of Natural Science (Biological Sciences ) may be resubmitted.'

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2 Board of the Faculty of Law

(a) Honour School of Jurisprudence

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 237, ll. 24, 26, 28, 30, and 32 delete `14' and substitute `13' and delete `22' and substitute `21'.

2 Ibid., p. 238, delete ll. 3–4 and renumber subsequent papers 13–22 as 12–21.

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(b) Magister Juris

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 903, delete ll. 3–4 and renumber subsequent (c)–(e) as (b)–(d).

2 Ibid., p. 906, delete l. 11.

3 Ibid., p. 911, delete l. 21, and renumber subsequent cll. 17–21 as 16–20.

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(c) Diploma in Legal Studies

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 949, l. 11, delete `, and paper 12, Philosophy of Mind'.

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3 Board of the Faculty of Literae Humaniores

(a) Honour Moderations in Classics

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 31, l. 37, delete `The Elements of Deductive Logic', and substitute `Introduction to Logic'.

(b) Honour School of Literae Humaniores

With immediate effect

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 265, l. 32, after `exceeded' insert `, except that, in the case of a commentary on a text and at the discretion of the chairman of examiners, any substantial quoting of that text need not be included in the word limit'.

(c) Regulations for Philosophy in all Honour Schools involving Philosophy

(i) With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 459, l. 26, after `show' insert `adequate'.

2 Ibid., delete ll. 28–36 and substitute:

`102. Knowledge and Reality

Candidates will be expected to show knowledge in some of the following areas: knowledge and justification; perception; memory; induction; other minds; a priori know- ledge; necessity and possibility; reference; truth; facts and propositions; definition; existence; identity, including personal identity; substances, change, events; properties; causation; space; time; essence; natural kinds; realism and idealism; primary and secondary qualities. There will also be a section on Philosophy of Science. Candidates' answers must not be confined to questions from the section on Philosophy of Science.'

3 Ibid., p. 460, delete ll. 10–12 and substitute:

`Part A: The nature of theories; scientific observation and method; scientific explanation; the interpretation of laws and probability; rationality and scientific change; major schools of philosophy of science.'

4 Ibid., p. 461, l. 16 and l. 27, after `show' insert `adequate'.

5 Ibid., p. 462, l. 4, after `show' insert `adequate'.

6 Ibid., p. 463, after l. 28 insert:

`198. Special Subjects

From time to time special subjects may be approved by the Sub-faculty of Philosophy by regulations published in the University Gazette and communicated to college tutors by the end of the fifth week of Trinity Term two years before examination. Candidates may not be permitted to offer certain special subjects in combination with certain other subjects, or may be permitted to do so only on condition that in the papers on the other subjects they will not be permitted to answer certain questions. No candidate may offer more than one special subject. Subject to these qualifications, any candidate may offer any special subject.'

(ii) With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 464, l. 20, after `excess' insert `, except that in Literae Humaniories, in a thesis consisting in commentary on a text, quotation from the text will not be counted towards the the word limit.'

2 Ibid., delete from `Any' in l. 23 to `label.' in l. 25.

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4 Boards of the Faculties of Literae Humaniores and Mathematical Sciences

Honour Moderations in Mathematics and Philosophy

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 50, delete ll. 32–9 and substitute:

`Subjects to be studied include: propositional and predicate languages; truth tables; tableaux; relations; the critical application of formal logic to the analysis of English sentences and inferences (problems of symbolisation; scope, truth-functionality, quantification, identity, descriptions); elementary metatheorems about propositional calculus (including the following topics; expressive adequacy, duality, substitution, interpolation, compactness, consistency, soundness and completeness). Some questions of a mathematical nature will be set.

The logical symbols and tableaux rules to be used are those found in Wilfred Hodges, Logic (Penguin Books). Philosophical questions about logic may be studied by reading Mark Sainsbury, Logical Forms: an Introduction to Philosophical Logic (Blackwell), chapters 1, 2, and 4, omitting the starred sections.'

2 Ibid., ll. 42–3, delete `B. Russell, Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy, Allen and Unwin, 1919' and substitute `Frege, Foundations of Arithmetic, trans. J.L. Austin, Blackwell, 1980'.

3 Ibid., p. 51, l. 4 after `show' insert `adequate'.

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5 Boards of the Faculties of Literae Humaniores and Medieval and Modern Languages

(a) Preliminary Examination in Philosophy and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

As for Preliminary Examination for Philosophy, Politics, and Economics (see 18 below).

(b) Honour School of Philosophy and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 465, l. 49, delete `subject 101' and substitute `either subject 101 or subject 102'.

2 Ibid., p. 471, l. 15, delete `101' and substitute `either 101 or 102'.

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6 Boards of the Faculties of Literae Humaniores and Physical Sciences

Moderations in Physics and Philosophy

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

As for Honour Moderations in Mathematics and Philosophy (see 4 above).

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7 Boards of the Faculties of Literae Humaniores and Social Studies

Honour School of Philosophy, Politics, and Economics

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 466, ll. 19–20 delete `subject 103' and substitute `(i) either subject 101 or subject 102, and (ii) subject 103'.

2 Ibid., ll. 22–3, delete `subject 101 and subject 103' and substitute `(i) either subject 101 or subject 102, and (ii) subject 103'.

3 Ibid., ll. 25–6, delete `subject 101 and subject 103' and substitute `(i) either subject 101 or subject 102, and (ii) subject 103'.

4 Ibid., p. 473, l. 38, delete `subjects 103' and substitute `(i) either subject 101 or 102, and (ii) subjects 103.

5 Ibid., p. 474, l. 1 delete `three' and substitute `two'.

6 Ibid., p. 474, delete from `(i)' on l. 2 to `(ii)' on l. 5.

7 Ibid., l. 8, delete `subjects 101 and 103' and substitute `(i) either subject 101 or subject 102, and (ii) subject 103'.

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8 Boards of the Faculty of Literae Humaniores and Theology

Honour School of Philosophy and Theology

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 466, l. 36 after `107' insert `and either subject 102 or subject 103'.

2 Ibid., l. 37, delete `two' and substitute `three'.

3 Ibid., delete `must' and substitute `may'.

4 Ibid., delete `or three'.

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9 Boards of the Faculties of Literae Humaniores, Physiological Sciences, and Psychological Studies

Honour School of Psychology, Philosophy, and Physiology

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 467, after l. 17 insert:

`Candidates who take one or two subjects in Philosophy must offer either 101, 102, 104, or 105. Those offering three or more Philosophy subjects must choose at least two from the above list.'

2 Ibid., delete ll. 16–17.

3 Ibid., ll 22–4 delete `either (a) take two subjects in Philosophy or (b)'.

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10 Board of the Faculty of Management

Master of Business Administration

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 782, l. 22, add `Entries must be made on the appropriate form, obtainable from the Said Business School, by Friday of the fourth week of Michaelmas Full Term.'

2 Ibid., delete ll. 23–39.

3 Ibid., delete ll. 40–7 and substitute:

`3. Part I: Written assignments

Candidates must complete ten written assignments each of no more than 2,000 words, covering required courses from Michaelmas and Hilary Terms. In addition, there will be one assignment of 8,000 on the New Business Development project which candidates are required to undertake during Hilary Term and to present at the beginning of Trinity Term. These assignments will normally be undertaken in groups. Students must also complete one assignment of 4,000 words for each of three Trinity Term advanced electives and one assignment of 2,000 words for the required International Business Strategy course, all to be taken either individually or in groups. Trinity Term advanced electives are to be chosen from the list of such courses which will be published annually by the Deputy Director (MBA) before the first Friday of Hilary Term. Three copies of each assignment must be submitted to the Chairman of Examiners for the MBA, c/o the Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford: submission dates will be published before the beginning of each lecture course.'

4 Ibid., p. 783, delete ll. 1–13, and substitute:

`3. Part II: Written examinations

There shall be seven written papers of three hours each:

(a) Four papers shall be taken in tenth week of Hilary Term on the required courses of Michaelmas and Hilary Terms.

(b) Two papers shall be taken in ninth week of Trinity Term, and shall be on advanced electives and the required courses, International Business Strategy and Business Law and Ethics.

(c) One paper shall be taken during the final session in September. This will be a case study on which questions may be set relevant to all required courses held throughout the year (details of which are set out in the Schedule below). The case study will be made available to candidates four hours before the start of the examination.

4. Part III: Business project report'.

5 Ibid., l. 25 after `taken' insert `, unless prior permission has been obtained from the Deputy Director (MBA) by a date to be specified by the Chairman of Examiners'.

6 Ibid., delete ll. 33–4 and renumber subsequent paragraphs 7 and 8 as 5 and 6.

7 Ibid., l. 36 delete `final examination' and substitute `written examinations'.

8 Ibid., l. 37, add `any candidate who fails a group assignment may be considered for a pass on the basis of an oral examination'.

9 Ibid., after l. 38 insert:

`8. Any candidate who wishes to take an examination later than the one to which he or she has been admitted may do so on such later date as may be specified by the chairman of examiners, provided that the candidate has obtained the prior consent of the Deputy Director (MBA), who shall consult the chairman of examiners.'

10 Ibid., delete from l. 39 on p. 783 to l. 32 on p. 785 and substitute:

`The following courses are required to be taken during Michaelmas and Hilary Terms:

(a) Financial Accounting

Financial reporting and its regulations; sources of company information; structure and interpretation of financial statements; financial analysis and company valuation. Accounting for management, cost behaviour, and analysis; financial planning and control systems, including performance measurement .

(b) Corporate Finance

Sources of finance and financial systems; capital structure and the cost of capital; taxation; dividend policy; investment appraisal. Portfolio theory and asset pricing models; market efficiency and anomalies; options and derivatives; mergers and takeovers.

(c) People and Organisations

Theories and concepts of organisation behaviour; industrial relations and human resource management; leadership; technology; work design; organisational change; culture; diversity; power; groups; motivation; employee involvement; collective representation; the role of trade unions; the management of human resources and industrial relations; strategies, structures, and styles; methods of job regulation; pay systems; comparative approaches to the management of employees; contemporary developments.

(d) Operations Management

Product management and new product development; distribution and marketing; vertical integration and capacity investment; technological innovation; inventory management; planning and control issues; customer service and the management of product and service quality.

(e) Marketing Management

Concepts of products and services and the role which marketing and operations management may play in manufacturing and service organisations; the product life- cycle, the marketing of services; markets analysis, marketing research and marketing information; market segmentation and positioning; the buying behaviour of individuals and organisations; direct marketing, promotion and marketing communications, pricing.

(f) Strategic Management

Theoretical foundations of strategic management. Structural analysis of industrial and industry dynamics. The resource and capability based view of the firm. Company and competitor analysis. Strategy and organisation. Mergers, acquisitions, and alliances. Competitive strategy in different industry environments. The nature and sources of competitive advantage and patterns of competition. Strategic change and its implementation. Strategy evaluation. Competitive and co-operative strategies. Strategic risk management. Corporate strategy and competitive advantage. Strategic innovation, R&D, and technology management. Current issues in strategic management.

(g) Global and Comparative Business

Globalisation and new regionalism; politics and regulations over international investment and trade; comparative law and environmental issues; government–industry relations; diversity of modern capitalism and comparative business systems.

()h) Business Law and Ethics

The nature of corporate and management responsibility in terms of both legal compliance and wider social and political issues.

(i) Data Analysis and Computing

Business statistics: Data, measurement, and computing, descriptive statistics, probability distribution; sampling, hypothesis testing, interval estimation—problem laboratory, worked examples in practice; testing differences in mean and proportions; test of goodness to fit; analysis of variance; linear regression—problem laboratory; worked examples, in practice; multiple regression; discriminant and cluster analysis; non-parametric methods. Modelling: Quantitative models in business: linear programming, network models; heuristics, stimulation; decision analysis.

(j) Management Accounting and Information

Analysis of cost behaviour. The use of management accounting information for planning, control, and per- formance evaluation. MIS for Business: Introduction to information systems (soft modelling, decision modelling); information system applications (MIS, EIS, DSS); information system technology, development of user applications; future of MIS; business simulation (software).

(k) Management Skills

The practice and where appropriate the theories of business communication and presentations, leadership, and small group skills and negotiations.

(l) Industrial Organisation

The price mechanism, resource allocation, and their welfare aspects. Market structures, cost and scale economies, oligopoly, entry empirical studies of pricing and profit- ability, advertising, product differentiation, innovation, theories of the firm, mergers and vertical integration, public policy towards industry.

(m) Technology, Innovation, and Entrepreneurship

Creating and managing emerging companies with a specific focus on entrepreneurship, particularly in science and technology-related areas. Science and technology are sources of innovation; the role of university commercialisation units and science parks, regionalism, the importance of networks, the role of intellectual property rights in entrepreneurship; identification and evaluation of new business opportunities; valuation, venture capital, the role of the financial markets; starting a new business and the role of finance, human resource management and operations' strategies for the operation of a new enterprise where the focus is on achieving rapid growth.

(n) International Business Strategy

Global strategies of multinational enterprises; organisational structures of multinational enterprises; building dynamic organisational capabilities across borders; parent-subsidiary relationships; managing joint- ventures, strategic alliances and networks.

(o) Economic Environment

Economic growth. Macroeconomic demand. Inflation and unemployment. Monetary policy. Forecasting and policy analysis. Exchange rate and balance of payments. Inter- national macroeconomic policy.'

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11 Board of the Faculty of Modern History

(a) Honour Moderations in Modern History

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 51, after l. 29, insert:

`6. Gunpowder, Compass, and Printing Press: Technology and Society in Renaissance and Early Modern Europe.'

2 Ibid., ll. 30–40, renumber subjects 6 to 15 as 7 to 16 respectively.

3 Ibid., p. 55, after l. 23, insert:

`6. GUNPOWDER, COMPASS, AND PRINTING PRESS: TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY IN RENAISSANCE AND EARLY MODERN EUROPE

1. Francis Bacon, `Mr Bacon in praise of learning', in Benjamin Farrington, Francis Bacon. Philosopher of Industrial Science (London, 1951), pp. 34–5, and the extract from New Atlantis, ibid., pp. 179–91.

2.Vanoccio Biringuccio, Pirotechnia, trans. Cyril Stanley Smith and Martha Teach Gnudi (1942; New York, 1959), pp. 222–7, 234–43, 409–25.

3. William Bourne, The Arte of Shooting in Great Ordnaunce (1587; English Experience, 1969), Preface and pp. 21–41.

4. Georg Braun and Frans Hogenberg, Civitates orbis terrarum (1572–1617), town views of Antwerp, Bologna, Hamburg, Padua, Rome, Vienna, reproduced in John Goss, Braun and Hogenberg's The City Maps of Europe (London, 1991).

5. Thomas Digges, Stratioticos (1579; English Experience, 1968), preface and pp. 69–70, 181–91.

6. Galileo Galilei, Two New Sciences, translated by Stillman Drake (Madison, Wisconsin, 1974), pp. 217–29, 245–6, and 249–56.

7. Francesco Guicciardini, The History of Italy, translated and edited by Sidney Alexander (Princeton, 1969), pp. 49–52.

8. Paul Ive, The Practice of Fortification (1589; English Experience, 1968; facsimile with introduction by Martin Biddle, 1972).

9. Niccolò Tartaglia, La nova scientia (1537) and Quesiti et inventioni diverse (1546), translated passages from Stillman Drake and I.E. Drabkin, Mechanics in Sixteenth-Century Italy. Selections from Tartaglia, Benedetti, Guido Ubaldo & Galileo (Madison, Wisconsin, 1969), pp. 63–9, 81–97, and 98–104.

10. William Bourne, An Almanacke and Prognostication for Three Yeares ... Practised at Grausend for the Meridian of London (1571), in E.G.R. Taylor (ed.), A Regiment for the Sea and Other Writings on Navigation by William Bourne (Cambridge, Hakluyt Society, 1963), pp. 56–95.

11. Martin Cortes, The Art of Navigation, trans. by R. Eden (1561), ff. liii–lxxix.

12. William Gilbert, De Magnete (1600); English translation by P. Fleury Mottelay in Dover paperback edition (1958), pp. xxxvii–li, 121–5, 177–83, 229–42, 275–85, 313–35.

13. Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations (1589); Penguin edition entitled Voyages and Discoveries (1972), pp. 60–6, 71–5, 105–16, 171–88, 197–206, 231–42, 275–97, 298–303, 386–410.

14. Thomas Hood, A Copie of the Speache. Made by the Mathematicall Lecturer (1588), all (13 pages).

15. William Johnson (Blaeu, Willem Janszoon), The Light of Navigation (1612), facsimile, in R.A. Skelton (ed.), Theatrum orbis terrarum, first series, vol. 6 (Amsterdam, 1964), two frontispieces, dedicatory letter, `Briefe and shorte Introduction to the Celestiall Sphere', and figures.

16. Robert Norman, The New Attractive (1581), `The Epistle Dedicatorie' and `To the Reader', pp. 1–26.

17. Hans Sachs and Jost Amman, A True Description of all Trades published in Frankfort in the year 1568 (New York, 1930), pp. 9–19.

18. Thomas Platter, Autobiographie, translated Marie Helmer (Paris, 1964, pp. 97–101, 116–17, 122–5.

19. Jean-Franìois Gilmont, `Printing by the Rules', The Library, vi, part 2 (1980), 129–55.

20. Henri Estienne, The Frankfort Book Fair (1574) (Frankfurt/Main, 1968), pp. 71–104.

21. Léon Voet, The Golden Compasses. A History and Evaluation of the Printing and Publishing Activities of the Official Plantiniana at Antwerp (Antwerp, 1969–72), vol II, Appendices, 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, pp. 467–90, 500–25.

22. W.W. Greg, A Companion to Arber, being a Calendar of Documents in Edward Arber's transcript of the Registers of the Company of Stationers of London 1554–1640 (Oxford, 1967), Supplementary Documents 1, 2, 5, 8, 11, 14, 31.

23. Joseph Moxon, Mechanick Exercises on the whole art of Printing (1683–84), ed. Herbert Davis and Harry Carter (Oxford, 1962), pp. [3]–[80], [191–322].

24. Rodney W. Shirley, The Mapping of the World. Early Printed World Maps 1472–1700 (London: New Holland Press, 1993) Plates 29, 43, 60, 86, 91, 102, 104, 201, 272.

25. Catherine Delano Smith and Elizabeth M. Ingram, Maps in Bibles 1500–1600) (Geneva: Droz, 1991), Figures 1, 3, 5, 18, 29, 32.

26. Mercator-Hondius-Janssonius, Atlas or Geographick description of the World (Amsterdam, 1636), in R.A. Skelton, Theatrum orbis terrarum, fourth series, vol. 2 (Amsterdam, 1968), title-page and dedication (unnumbered); Preface to the Reader, Life of Mercator, life of Hondius, sig.**1r–***2r; world-map, sig. L1v–L2r.

27. Instruments from the Museum of the History of Science: late-sixteenth-century geometrical quadrant by C. Schissler; gunner's compendium and military protractor by Erasmus Habermel; radio latino by Mancinus, c.1600; gunner's rule, 1612; sixteenth-century Italian compass; Gunter sector; planispheric astrolabe Arsenius; late sixteenth-century Spanish mariner's astrolabe; English backstaff by J. Gilbert; portolan charts.

28. `The Measurers', late-sixteenth-century Flemish painting, Museum of the History of Science.'

4 Ibid., from p. 55, l. 124–p. 59, l. 17, renumber subjects `6' to `15' as `7' to `16' respectively.

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12 Boards of the Faculties of Modern History and Literae Humaniores

Honour Moderations in Ancient and Modern History

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

As for Honour Moderations in Modern History (see 11 above).

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13 Boards of the Faculties of Modern History and English Literature

Honour Moderations in Modern History and English

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

As for Honour Moderations in Modern History (see 11 above).

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14 Boards of the Faculties of Modern History and Medieval and Modern Languages

Preliminary Examination in Modern History and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

As for Honour Moderations in Modern History (see 11 above).

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15 Boards of the Faculties of Modern History and Social Studies

Honour Moderations in Modern History and Politics

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

As for Honour Moderations in Modern History (see 11 above).

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16 Board of the Faculty of Music

Master of Studies in Music (Musicology)

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 691, delete ll. 30–2, and substitute:

`3. Candidates may be summoned for a viva voce examination, at which any aspect of the candidate's submissions and course work might be subject to discussion. The list of candidates required to present themselves for a viva voce examination will be published at a time to be announced by the examiners.'

2 Ibid., after l. 34 insert:

`5. A candidate who fails the examination will be permitted to retake it on one further occasion only, not later than one year after the initial attempt. Such a candidate whose work has been of satisfactory standard on the course work related essays will not be required to resubmit the same pieces of work, while a candidate who has reached a satisfactory standard on the written examination paper will not be required to retake that part of the examination.'

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17 Board of the Faculty of Psychological Studies

(a) Preliminary Examination in Psychology, Philosophy, and Physiology

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

As for Preliminary Examination in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics (see 18 below).

(b) Honour School of Experimental Psychology

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 217, delete ll. 30–2 and substitute `D7 Either subjects 101, 102, 104, or 105 as prescribed in the Regulations for Honour Schools including Philosophy'.

2 Ibid., p. 215, in l. 29, after `Group C.*' insert: `All candidates shall offer paper D1 (Research Project).'

3 Ibid., p. 216, delete from `Candidates who do not' in l. 3 to `Experimental Psychology or deputy.' in l. 6 and substitute:

`If an Experimental Project (Mini-Project)) is included in practical work, the subject of this shall be approved in advance by the Head of Department of Experimental Psychology or deputy.'

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18 Board of the Faculty of Social Studies

Preliminary Examination for Philosophy, Politics, and Economics

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 98, l. 41, after `show' insert `knowledge'.

2 Ibid., p. 99, delete ll. 6–14 and substitute:

`Subjects to be studied include: propositional and predicate languages; truth tables; tableaux; relations; the critical application of formal logic to the analysis of English sentences and inferences (problems of symbolisation: scope, truth-functionality, quantification, identity, descriptions). The logical symbols and tableaux rules to be used are those found in Wilfred Hodges, Logic (Penguin Books). Philosophical questions about logic may be studied by reading Mark Sainsbury, Logical Forms: an Introduction to Philosophical Logic (Blackwell), chapters 1, 2, and 4, omitting the starred sections.'

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EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give notice of oral examination of their candidates as follows:

English Language and Literature

C. TAYLOR, Exeter: `Female Cross-Gendered Behaviour in the Fiction of Radclyffe Hall, Anais Nin, H.D., and Djuna Barnes'.
Exeter, Tuesday, 30 March, 2 p.m.
Examiners: J.L. Johnson, L. Marcus.

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Physical Sciences

T. CORBETT-CLARK, St Edmund Hall: `Explanation from neural networks'.
Department of Engineering Science, Monday, 29 March, 10 a.m.
Examiners: A.L. Dexter, J. Austin.

SANGHOON KIM, Trinity: `Some effects of alloying elements on gamma-TiA1 base intermetallics'.
Department of Materials, Monday, 29 March, 10.30 a.m.
Examiners: G. Taylor, I.P. Jones.

T.T. RAUTIAINEN, Linacre: `Modelling microstructural evolution in binary alloys'.
Department of Materials, Wednesday, 21 April, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: A. Cerezo, O. Penrose.

M.P.H. STUMPF, Balliol: `Interplay of magnetism and temperature in the large-dimensional limits of the Hubbard and TJ model'.
Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, Saturday, 10 April, 10 a.m.
Examiners: D.E. Manolopoulos, F. Gebhard.

SHINRO TANIGUCHI, St Catherine's: `Measurement of the through-thickness strength of composites'.
Department of Engineering, Friday, 26 March, 11 a.m.
Examiners: B. Derby, R.E. Lewin.

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Theology

S. TAYLOR, Worcester: `Sacrifice, revelation, and salvation in the thought of René Girard'.
St Peter's, Tuesday, 11 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: C.M. Jones, T.J. Gorringe.

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