Examinations and Boards

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES

M.Sc. in Geometry, Mathematical Physics, and Analysis 2000

Corrigenda

The following list of additional courses in schedule 1 has been approved by the standing committee for examination in 2000.

This list replaces that published in the Gazette of 17 June, p. 1406.

Manifolds and Differential Geometry
Lie Groups

General Relativity
Further Quantum Theory
Algebraic Topology
General Relativity II
Quantum Field Theory

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COMMITTEE FOR THE M.SC. IN NEUROSCIENCE

M.SC. IN NEUROSCIENCE

The approved courses available in 1999--2000 for the specialist component of the M.Sc. in Neuroscience are listed below. Candidates will be required to take five courses, choosing at least one under each of the three series A, B, C.

Series A

Module A1—Strategies for monitoring and analysing neuronal circuits (Hilary Term)

Organiser: Dr A.J. King.

Thirteen lectures and associated practicals/demonstrations.

Recording and monitoring
Manipulation
Neuroanatomical techniques
Cortical microcircuitry
Field potentials in health and disease

Module A2—Mapping and imaging techniques (Trinity Term)

Organiser: Professor R. Passingham.

Eleven lectures and associated practicals/demonstrations.

Techniques for functional localisation
Structural imaging
Functional imaging

Series B

Module B1—Sensory systems (Hilary Term)

Organiser: Dr Moore.

Fourteen lectures and associated practicals/demonstrations.

Sensory systems
Sensory psychophysics
Artificial vision

Module B2—Motor systems (Hilary Term)

Organiser: Professor J.F. Stein.

Ten lectures (to be confirmed) and associated practicals/demonstrations.

Proprioconception and spinal cord circuitry
Basal ganglia, cerebellum and motor cortical systems
Motor psychophysics

Module B3—Neurocomputing and neural networks (Hilary and Trinity Terms)

Organiser: Professor E.T. Rolls.

Eight lectures and four practicals.

Neurocomputing
Connectionist approaches to cognitive function

Module B4—Animal models and clinical aspects of neuroscience (Trinity Term)

Organiser: Professor J.N.P. Rawlins.

Eighteen lectures and associated practicals/demonstrations.

The development and application of animal models
Consciousness and cognition
Non-affective neurological disorders

Series C

Module C1—Cellular signalling (Hilary Term)

Organiser: Professor J. Jack.

Thirteen lectures and associated practicals/demonstrations.

Membranes and channels
Synaptic transmission and modifiability

Module C2—CNS development and neuronal plasticity (Trinity Term)

Organiser: Dr J. Taylor.

Sixteen lectures.

Early development
Formation of a nervous system: vertebrate
Formation of a nervous system: invertebrate
Axonal growth
Establishing connections between neuronal populations
The modifiability of the brain

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SUPPLEMENTARY SUBJECTS IN THE HONOUR SCHOOL OF NATURAL SCIENCE 1999–2000

Until recently approved changes in the Examination Decrees and Regulations the availabilityy of Supplementary Subjects in the Honour School of Natural Science will henceforward by announced on an annual basis in the Trinity Term of the preceding year. Subjects will no longer be listed in the published volume of the Examination Decrees and Regulations; instead a notice about the subjects available in the following year will be published in the Gazette in Trinity Term. The notice of availability will also be sent to colleges and included in the course handbooks for the various Natural Science courses.

Subjects that will be taught and examined during 1999–2000

Anthropology

Those interested in taking this course should arrange to see Professor V. Reynolds, Department of Biological Anthropology (telephone: (2)74693) in noughth week of Michaelmas Term. Examined: end of Trinity Term.

History and Philosophy of Science

Lectures: eight hours in Michaelmas Term, eight hours in Hilary Term. Examined: end of Hilary Term.

Quantum Chemistry

Lectures: sixteen hours in Michaelmas Term, sixteen hours in Hilary Term. Examined: end of Hilary Term.

The Supplementary Subject Chemical Pharmacology will not be available during 1999–2000 but will be available in 2000–1.

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CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the General Board, the following changes in regulations made by boards of faculties and committees come into effect on 30 July.

1 Board of the Faculty of Clinical Medicine

Second Examination for the Degree of Bachelor of Medicine

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 928, l. 21, delete

`Introduction to General Practice' and substitute `Primary Health Care'.

2 Ibid., l. 37, after `his' insert `or her'.

3 Ibid., p. 929, l. 3, after `Public Health' delete `and' and substitute `,'.

4 Ibid., l. 8, after `his' insert `or her'.

5 Ibid., l. 20, after `his' insert `or her'.

6 Ibid., after l. 17, insert:

`(f) Radiology.'.

7 Ibid., p. 930, l. 21, after `his' insert `or her'.

8 Ibid., l. 32, after `his' insert `or her'.

9 Ibid., l. 34, after `himself' insert `or herself'.

10 Ibid., l. 41, after `his' insert `or her'.

11 Ibid., l. 44, after `he' insert `or she'.

12 Ibid., l. 45, after `himself' insert `or herself'.

13 Ibid., p. 931, l. 1, after `year' insert:

`(with the exception of the examiners for the Laboratory Medicine course, who shall be required to attend the first assessment of candidates on no more than one occasion)'.

14 Ibid., delete `In the second assessment of any candidate' and substitute:

`In the reassessment of any candidate who has been deemed to have failed the whole assessment,'.

15 Ibid., l. 2, after `he' insert `or she'.

16 Ibid., l. 10, after `regard to his' insert `or her'.

17 Ibid., l. 10, after `as to his' insert `or her'.

18 Ibid., l. 15, after `he' insert `or she'.

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2 Board of the Faculty of English Language and Literature

Honour School of English Language and Literature

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 201 (as amended by regulation (1) of 21 May 1999, Gazette, p. 1179), in cl. 3(a), after `B7 Special Topics' insert `(except any Course II papers available under B7() for which the Course II regulations specify that these shall be assessed by written examination)'.

2 Ibid., p. 203 (as amended by same regulation, Gazette, p. 1180), in cl. 7.7 after `(extended essay)' insert footnote as follows:

`This is with the exception of Course II papers available under B7() for which the Course II regulations specify that these shall be assessed by written examination'.

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3 Boards of the Faculties of English Language and Literature and Medieval and Modern Languages

Honour School of English and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 192 (as amended by regulation (3) of 21 May 1999, Gazette, p. 1182), in cl. 2, after `Subject B7 will be examined by extended essay', insert:

`This is with the exception of Course II papers available under B7() for which the Course II regulations specify that these shall be assessed by written examination'.

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4 Board of the Faculty of Literae Humaniores

(a) Honour School of Literae Humaniores

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 245, l. 31, after `Archaeology;' insert `up to two subjects in Philology and Linguistics;'.

2 Ibid., l. 36, delete `V' and substitute `VI'.

3 Ibid., p. 246, l. 21, delete `III.11' and substitute `V.1'.

4 Ibid., delete l. 37.

5 Ibid., l. 38, delete `III.14(a)' and substitute `III.11(a).

6 Ibid., l. 39, delete `III.14(b)' and substitute `III.11(b).

7 Ibid., after l. 39, insert `V.2: Latin Historical Linguistics'.

8 Ibid., l. 48, delete `VI' and substitute `VII'.

9 Ibid., p. 255, l. 11, delete `III.15 or IV.5' and substitute `III.12, IV.5 or V.5'.

10 Ibid., p. 256, l. 18, delete `15' and substitute `12'.

11 Ibid., ll. 20–2, delete from `, save' to `Literature'.

12 Ibid., l. 24, delete `V' and substitute `VI'.

13 Ibid., ll. 25–7, delete from `, save' to `Literature'.

14 Ibid., l. 28, delete `15' and substitute `12'.

15 Ibid., p. 262, delete ll. 9–30.

16 Ibid., l. 31, delete `III.14' and substitute `III.11'.

17 Ibid., p. 263, delete ll. 28–33 and substitute:

`III.12 Thesis in Literature

Any candidate may offer a thesis in classical Greek and Latin Literature (excluding the subject in III.11) in accordance with Regulation on Theses below. This subject may not be combined with any of I.15, II.199, IV.5 or V.5'.

18 Ibid., p. 264, l. 19, delete `II.199 or III.15' and substitute

`II.199, III.12 or V.5'.

19 Ibid., after l. 19, insert:

`V. Philology and Linguistics

Course I and Course II: Candidates may offer one or two of the following subjects 1–5. Each of subjects 1–4 will be examined in one paper (3 hours).

V.1 Greek Historical Linguistics

The paper will consist of two sections: (a) the dialects of Greek poetry; Greek dialect inscriptions; Linear B; (b) the history of the Greek language with special reference to the development of the literary languages. Candidates must answer questions from both sections. In (a) compulsory passages will be set for translation and linguistic commentary.

V.2 Latin Historical Linguistics

The paper will consist of two sections: (a) Oscan and Umbrian; Archaic Latin; the language of Plautus; Imperial Latin; Late Latin; (b) the history of the Latin language, with special reference to the development of the literary languages.

Candidates must answer questions from both sections. In (a) compulsory passages will be set for translation and linguistic commentary. All candidates must answer questions from two of the five parts of (a). Lists and/or reproductions of the texts prescribed for section (a) are available from the Classics Office, 37 Wellington Square.

V.3 General Linguistics and Comparative Philology

This paper will be divided into three sections: (a) General Linguistics; (b) synchronic/descriptive analysis of either the Greek language or the Latin language; (c) the reconstruction of Indo-European. Candidates must answer questions from two sections.

V.4 Comparative Philology: Indo-European, Greek and Latin

The paper will consist of two sections: (a) the methods and aims of historical and comparative linguistics, the reconstruction of the Indo-European protolanguage and its development into Latin and Greek (the questions set will require specific competence in one of the two classical languages, but not necessarily both); (b) linguistic commentary on passages of Greek or Latin. Candidates must answer questions from both sections. This subject may not be offered by any candidate who offered the Special Subject Historical Linguistics and Comparative Philology in Honour Moderations in Classics or in the Preliminary Examination in Classics.

V.5 Thesis in Philology and Linguistics

Any candidate may offer a thesis in Philology and Linguistics in accordance with the Regulation on Theses below. This subject may not be combined with any of I.15, II.199, III.12 or IV.5.'

20 Ibid., l. 20, delete `V' and substitute `VI'.

21 Ibid., l. 22, delete `V.1 and V.2' and substitute `VI.1 and VI.2'.

22 Ibid., l.30, delete `V.1' and substitute `VI.1'.

23 Ibid., l.35, delete `V.2' and substitute `VI.2'.

24 Ibid., l.40, delete `VI' and substitute `VII'.

25 Ibid., l. 46, delete `and Special Theses (VI)' and substitute `Philology and Linguistics (V.5) and Special Theses (VII)'.

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(b) Pass School of Literae Humaniores

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 269, l. 15, delete `V' and substitute `VI'.

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5 Boards of the Faculties of Literae Humaniores and English Language and Literature

Honour School of Classics and English

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 140, l. 15, delete `III.11' and substitute `V.1'.

2 Ibid., l. 17, delete `III.12' and substitute `V.2'.

3 Ibid., l. 21, delete `III.13' and substitute `V.3'.

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6 Boards of the Faculties of Literae Humaniores and Medieval and Modern Languages

Honour School of Classics and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 149, l. 18, delete `III.14(a)' and substitute `III.11(a)'.

2 Ibid., l. 20, delete `III.14(b)' and substitute `III.11(b)'.

3 Ibid., l. 34, delete `III.11' and substitute `V.1'.

4 Ibid., l. 37, delete `III.12' and substitute `V.2'.

5 Ibid., l. 45, delete `III.13' and substitute `V.3'.

6 Ibid., p. 150, l. 37, delete `III.14(c)' and substitute `III.11(c)'.

7 Ibid., l. 50, delete `V.1 and V.2' and substitute `VI.1 and VI.2'.

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7 Board of the Faculty of Modern History

Honour School of Modern History

With immediate effect (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 301, ll. 11–12, delete `including footnotes and references but excluding bibliography' and substitute `excluding footnotes, references, and bibliography'.

2 Ibid., l. 28, after `Essays', insert `(two copies)'

3 Ibid., l. 28, delete `5 p.m.' and substitute `12 noon'.

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8 Boards of the Faculties of Modern History and Literae Humaniores

Honour School of Ancient and Modern History

With immediate effect (for first examination in 2000)

As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 7 above).

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9 Board of the Faculty of Theology

(a) Honour School of Theology

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, delete from p. 503, l. 19 to p. 515, l. 48, and substitute:

`1. All candidates will be required to offer eight papers. Candidates must select one from each of the Core Subjects in Section A (A.I–IV), and four from any ONE of the Alternative Tracks in Section B (B.I–III).

2. In Alternative Track B.I two papers, and in Alternative Tracks B.II and B.III one paper, may be chosen from amongst those not already offered in Section A, Section B (subject to any restrictions specified in each Alternative Track), and Section C (the Schedule of Further Optional Papers). With the permission of the Board an essay may be offered, either in place of one of these papers, or in addition to the eight required papers. The regulations governing essays are set out below.

3. Candidates not offering paper (29) The New Testament in Greek, or (25) The Hebrew of the Old Testament as optional papers in Section B may, in addition to their eight papers, also offer the Optional Translation papers in Old Testament Hebrew and/or New Testament Greek.

4. In Section B (the Alternative Tracks B.I–III) and in Section C (the Schedule of Further Optional Subjects) teaching may not be available every year on every subject.

5. Any candidate may be examined viva voce.

6. In the following regulations, the English version of the Bible used will be the Revised Standard Version. The Greek text used will be the text of the United Bible Societies, fourth edn., but in paper (3), The Synoptic Gospels, parallel texts will be taken from K. Aland, Synopsis Quattuor Evangeliorum (fifteenth edn., Stuttgart, Deutsche Bibel Gesellschaft, 1997). The Hebrew text used will be the Biblia Hebraòca Stuttgartensia (Stuttgart, 1977).

SECTION A: CORE SUBJECTS

Candidates must offer ONE paper from EACH of the Core Subjects

A.I to A.IV below.

A.I THE OLD TESTAMENT

All candidates must offer either paper (1) or paper (2).

(1) Israel to the end of the Exile

The paper will include historical, literary, and theological questions, and candidates will be required to comment on passages from the following texts in English, showing knowledge of at least three of the five groups of texts:

(a) Exodus 1–3; 6; 12–15; 19; 20; 24.

(b) Isaiah 1–12; 28–32.

(c) Psalms 2; 18; 45–8; 72; 74; 77; 89; 93; 110; 132; 137.

(d) 2 Kings 18–25.

(e) Ezekiel 1–18.

There will be an opportunity to comment on passages in Hebrew from:

Exodus 20; 24.

Psalms 45–8.

Credit will be given to candidates demonstrating competence in Biblical Hebrew.

(2) Israel from the beginning of the Exile to 4 BC

The paper will include historical, literary, and theological questions, and candidates will be required to comment on passages from the following texts in English, showing knowledge of at least three of the five groups of texts:

(a) Job 1–14; 38–42.

(b) Nehemiah 1; 1–11; 2; 13.

(c) Jonah; Ruth.

(d) Daniel.

(e) Isaiah 40–55.

There will be an opportunity to comment on passages in Hebrew from:

Nehemiah 4–5.

Isaiah 40–1.

Credit will be given to candidates demonstrating competence in Biblical Hebrew.

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A.II THE NEW TESTAMENT

Candidates who choose Track B.I must offer paper (3). Candidates who choose Tracks B.II or B.III must offer paper (4), unless they are offering paper (7) as an optional paper, in which case they must offer paper (3).

(3) The Synoptic Gospels

Candidates will be expected to show a general knowledge of the Synoptic Gospels, their theology and ethics, literary and historical problems, and historical research concerning Jesus, and to comment on a passage in Greek from Matthew, and on a passage in Greek with English supplied from Matthew 3–13 inclusive with parallels in Mark and/or Luke. Candidates may restrict their comment to English texts if their other papers include translation and/or comment on at least two passages of Hebrew.

(4) The Theology and Ethics of the New Testament (with special reference to the gospels of Matthew and John, Romans, and I Corinthians).

Questions will be set on the theology of the individual gospels (not just those specified), Pauline theology, the historical Jesus, the ethics of the New Testament, and the different methods of New Testament interpretation.

There will be a compulsory question containing passages for comment from Matthew, John, Romans and 1 Corinthians, printed in both Greek and English. Candidates will be required to comment on at least three of the set texts. Candidates who have not passed either paper 6 (New Testament Greek) or paper 7 (Biblical Hebrew) in the Preliminary Examination for Theology will have to translate and comment on passages from Matthew 5–7, 26–28 and John 1–6 which will be printed only in Greek, unless their other papers include translation and/or comment on at least two passages of Hebrew.

The passages printed only in Greek will be optional for all other candidates.

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A.III PATRISTICS

All candidates must offer paper (5)

(5) The Development of Doctrine in the Early Church to AD 451

Candidates will be expected to explain how early Christian thinkers undertook to clarify the teachings of the primitive Church and formulate a coherent system of thought in their cultural context. The paper will not only concern itself with formal pronouncements on the doctrines of the Trinity and Incarnation, but also with other controversies and the contributions of particular theologians.

Questions relevant to the Gnostic, Arian, Nestorian and Pelagian controversies will always be set; other questions may relate, wholly or partly, to such topics as anthropology, soteriology, hermeneutics, ecclesiology, political theology, and the doctrine of creation and the fall. Candidates will be required to comment on quotations from the following texts, demonstrating, where appropriate, a knowledge of the history of the following terms: ousia, hypostasis, homoousios, prosopon, persona.

The Creed of the Synod of Nicaea (in W.G. Rusch, The Trinitarian Controversy, Philadelphia: Fortress Press).

The Second Letter of Cyril to Nestorius (in R.A. Norris, The Christological Controversy, Philadelphia: Fortress Press).

The Tome (letter) of Leo the Great (in Norris).

The Definition of the Council of Chalcedon (in Norris).

Credit will be given to candidates who show knowledge (where appropriate) of the other texts contained in Norris.

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A.IV CHRISTIAN DOCTRINE AND INTERPRETATION

All candidates must offer paper (6)

(6) Christian Doctrine and Interpretation

The paper will consist of questions on the major themes of Christian Doctrine and the norms and methods of Christian Theology. Candidates will be expected to show a critical understanding of twentieth-century theological discussion, and its use of the Bible and traditional formulations, and of some of the problems posed for such discussions by modern intellectual developments.

SECTION B: ALTERNATIVE TRACKS

Candidates must offer four papers from ONE of the Alternative Tracks B.I, B.II, and B.III below.

ALTERNATIVE TRACK B.I

Candidates offering this Track must offer FOUR papers:

ONE paper being Paul and John (paper 7);

ONE chosen either from whichever of papers (1) or (2) has not been offered for Section A.I, or from amongst the following papers in Section C, the Schedule of Further Optional Papers: Selected Topics (Old Testament) I; Selected Topics (Old Testament) II; The Hebrew of the Old Testament; Archaeology in relation to the Old Testament; Religions and Mythology of the Ancient Near East; and Varieties of Judaism 100 BC to AD 100;

and TWO papers not already offered chosen from amongst the papers in Sections A and B (except paper 4 and any other papers that are otherwise prohibited by the regulations) and those in C, the Schedule of Further Optional Papers.

(7) Paul and John

Candidates will be expected to show a knowledge of the theological, ethical, literary, and historical issues posed by (a) the Gospel of John, and (b) Romans and/or 1 Corinthians. They will be required to comment on passages from these texts in English, and will have the opportunity to translate and comment on John 1–10; Romans 3–8; and 1 Corinthians 1–7; 15 in Greek.

ALTERNATIVE TRACK B.II

Candidates offering this Track must offer FOUR papers:

ONE from papers (8), (9), and (10) below;

ONE major theologian (an option from paper 11);

ONE chosen from either papers (12) and (13) below or a second major theologian (another option from paper 11);

and any ONE paper not already offered chosen from amongst the papers in Sections A and B (except those that are otherwise prohibited by the regulations) and those in C, the Schedule of Further Optional Papers. Candidates are not permitted to take the following combinations of papers; (3) and (4), and (4) and (7).

(8) The History and Theology of Western Christianity, 1050–1350

The paper will consist of questions on the thought of the leading theologians (especially Anselm, Peter Abelard, Aquinas, Duns Scotus, and William of Ockham), and of questions on the main developments in the western church. It will be so set that any period of 150 years, with its theological writers, will provide sufficient coverage.

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(9) The History and Theology of Western Christianity, 1500–1619

The subject includes the work and thought of the leading reformers, especially Luther, Zwingli, and Calvin, together with the radicals, and the development of the Reformation in European society. Questions will be set both on renewal in the Roman Catholic Church, and on religious change in England from the Henrician reforms to the reign of James I.

(10) Candidates may offer EITHER

A. Christian Life and Thought In Europe, 1789–1914

Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the life and thought of the Christian Church (with special reference to Britain) and the development of Christian theology in its historical context. Candidates will be given opportunity to demonstrate knowledge of the following texts:

F.D.E. Schleiermacher, Speeches on Religion

L. Feuerbach, The Essence of Christianity

S. Kierkegaard, Philosophical Fragments

J.H. Newman, Lectures on the Prophetical Office

A. Ritschl, Justification and Reconciliation, vol. III.

OR

B. Christology from Kant to Troeltsch 1789–1914

Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the impact of modern philosophy and of cultural and historical criticism on Christology, as reflected in some of the following writers: Kant, Schleiermacher, Hegel, Strauss, Baur, Kierkegaard, Thomasius, Ritschl, Kèhler, Nietzsche, Harnack, Wrede, Schweitzer, Kautsky and Troeltsch. Candidates will be required to comment on a selection of the following texts:

I. Kant, Religion within the Limits of Reason Alone (Harper Torchbooks, 1960), pp. 85–138

F.D.E. Schleiermacher, The Christian Faith (T. and T. Clark, 1956), pp. 374– 475

G.W.F. Hegel, Lectures on the Philosophy of Religion, ed. P.C. Hodgson (University of California Press, 1985), vol. III, pp. 310–347

D.F. Strauss, The Life of Jesus Critically Examined, ed. P.C. Hodgson (Fortress, 1972), pp. 40–63 and 757–84; The Christ of Faith and the Jesus of History, ed. L.E. Keck (Fortress, 1977), pp. 19–37 and 159–69.

C. Thomasius, Christ's Person and Work, Part 2: The Person of the Mediator, in God and Incarnation in Mid-Nineteenth Century German Theology, ed. C. Welch (Oxford University Press, 1965), pp. 31–88 A. Ritschl, Justification and Reconciliation (T. and T. Clark, 1900, reprint 1966), vol. III, pp. 385–484

M. Kähler, The So-Called Historical Jesus and the Historic Biblical Christ, ed. C.E. Braaten (Fortress, 1964), pp. 46–97.

E. Troeltsch, `The Significance of the Historical Existence of Jesus for Faith' in Ernst Troeltsch: Writings on Theology and Religion, ed. R. Morgan and M. Pye (Duckworth, 1977), pp. 182–207

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(11) Further Studies in History and Doctrine

Candidates will be expected to study one major theologian in relation to the situation and problems of the time, with special attention to certain texts. In the Trinity Term of each year the Board of the Faculty of Theology will publish a list of theologians (with texts) on which teaching will be provided in the following academic year and on which the examination will be based. In the event of a candidate opting to take a year out after having studied a chosen theologian, the examiners will set questions on that theologian in the year of that candidate's examination, even if that theologian is not available for study that year. Texts will be studied in English. One or two additional questions may be set which will require knowledge of the texts in original languages when these are other than English.

A candidate may offer a second major theologian from amongst those available in the year of his or her examination. In the event that a candidate does choose to offer a second major theologian, that candidate will offer paper 11 as two papers. To facilitate this, separate papers (11(a), 11(b) etc.) will be set for each major theologian (as required by examination entries).

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(12) Philosophy of Religion

Candidates will be expected to analyse theological and religious language and concepts, and to include the historical and critical study of the following: the possibility of natural theology; the nature and grounds of religious belief; the idea and existence of God; religious views of the universe and of humanity's place in it. (`Religion' includes, but is not restricted to, the Christian religion).

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(13) Christian Moral Reasoning

Candidates will be expected to elucidate and assess themes in the Christian tradition of ethical teaching and their contribution to contemporary moral and social debates. The paper will consist of four sections (a) Christian Moral Concepts; (b) Government and its tasks: (c) Medical Ethics: (d) Sexual Ethics. Candidate will be required to answer three or four questions, of which at least one question must be answered from section (a), and at least one from another section.

(a) Christian Moral Concepts

The major moral concepts in Christian thought, such as: love, natural and revealed law, the supreme good, conscience, virtues, sin, justification, and grace; and contribution to contemporary discussions. Candidate may treat questions on these subjects primarily with reference to their sources in the Bible, if they so wish.

(b) Government and its tasks

Theological interpretations of: justice, law, and authority; forms of government, local, national, and international; government, society, and the church; the coercive use of force in punishment and war; responsibilities for education, employment, economy, and environment.

(c) Medical Ethics

Such topics as: the doctor–patient relationship and its social context; planned parenthood, contraception, and abortion in both personal and social contexts; artificial reproduction, genetic manipulation; experimentation on humans; organ transplantation; priorities in treatment and research; the prolongation of life, terminal care, and the ending of life.

(d) Sexual Ethics

Such topics as: celibacy, the goods of marriage, the sacramentality of marriage, divorce, polygamy, homosexuality, the sexual sins, the social differentiation of the sexes, the connection of body and soul in sexual contexts, erotic affection.

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ALTERNATIVE TRACK B.III

Candidates offering this Track must offer FOUR papers:

ONE paper being The Nature of Religion (paper 14);

TWO papers on any one non-Christian religious tradition (i.e. EITHER papers (15) and (16) on Judaism; OR papers (17) and (18) on Islam; OR papers (19) and (20) on Buddhism; OR papers (21) and (22) on Hinduism).

ONE paper not already offered, chosen from amongst the papers in Sections A and B (except those that are otherwise prohibited by the regulations) and those in C, the Schedule of Further Optional Papers. Candidates are not permitted to take the following combinations of papers; (3) and (4), and (4) and (7).

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(14) The Nature of Religion

The paper will consist of questions on the main classical and contemporary approaches to the study of religions; the main attempts to define religion; differing approaches to the study of religion in anthropology, sociology, philosophy, and theology; and the major explanations that have been offered for religious belief. Candidates should be aware of issues involved in claims for religious truth and rationality, and of twentieth-century-discussions of religious conflict and diversity.

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(15) Judaism I: The Formation of Rabbinic Judaism

The paper will include the study of:

(a) Judaism in the first century. Rabbinic Judaism emerges from matrix of movements (Sadducees, Essenes, Samaritans, Christians) laying claim to the authority of the Hebrew Scriptures.

(b) Primary sources of rabbinic Judaism: Mishna/Tosefta; Targum; Midrash; liturgy. Acceptance of the Mishna as authoritative code. The `eclipse' of the Alexandrine Jewish intellectual tradition of Philo.

(c) Development of the primary sources in the Talmudim of Babylonia and the Land of Israel, noting the Zoroastrian and Pagan/Christian environments respectively. Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of such texts (in English translation) as are prescribed by the Board of the Faculty of Theology in the eighth week of the Michaelmas Term of the academic year preceding the examination.

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(16) Judaism II: Judaism in History and Society

Candidates will be expected to answer questions on two out of the following three sections covered by the paper:

(a) The Gaonic period in Islamic Babylonia. Final redaction of the classical texts. Development of the liturgy. Internal Jewish debates on the calendar and between Rabbinates and Karaites. Confrontation with other faiths, with rationalist philosophy, with serious critiques of both scripture and the rabbinic tradition. The following will be set for special study: Saadia Gaon; the impact of Geniza studies.

(b) From Maimonides to the Zohar; tensions between rationalist philosophers and kabbalists in the High Middle Ages. The shift of the `centre of gravity' in Judaism from Babylonia to the West. Effects of the Crusades, the Inquisition, and the Renaissance on Judaism.

(c) The impact of Jewish thought and society of the Enlightenment and the Emancipation. The growth of Hasidism in the eighteenth and Reform in the nineteenth century will be studied as a preliminary to an examination of the range of Jewish sects or denominations today. The contemporary Jewish scene; responses to the Holocaust, to the establishment of the State of Israel, to the women's movement. This paper may only be offered by candidates also offering paper 15.

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(17) Islam I: the Formative Period of Islam

This paper examines the Islamic tradition as it emerged from the seventh to the twelfth centuries, paying particular attention to the issue of religious authority. Topics include: scripture, Islamic law, sectarianism, and political thought. Students will be required to read primary sources in English translation (Qur'an, Hadith; law, political thought) and critical secondary literature. Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of such texts (in English translation) as are prescribed by the Board of the Faculty of Theology in the Michaelmas Term of the academic year preceding the examination.

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(18) Islam II: Islam in the Modern Middle East

This paper examines the development of Islam as a religion in the modern Middle East. Special attention is paid to Islamic religious thought. Topics include: the historical and political contexts; new interpretations of traditional sources; Islamic movements; Islamic modernism. Students will be required to read English translations of primary texts as well as secondary sources. This paper may only be offered by candidates also offering paper 17.

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(19) Buddhism I: Early Buddhist Doctrine and Practice

The earliest Buddhist doctrine is studied against the background of the early Upanishads and other religious movements in north-east India about the fifth century bc. Practice includes both meditation and monastic life. The primary source is the Pali Canon supplemented by the commentarial literature of the Theravadin tradition. Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of such texts (in English translation) as are prescribed by the Board of the Faculty of Theology in the Michaelmas Term of the academic year preceding the examination.

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(20) Buddhism II: Buddhism in History and Society

The paper falls into two main parts. The first part covers the history of Buddhism's diffusion through Asia, beginning with the emperor Asoka (third century bc); what forms of Buddhism have dominated which states and societies (and when), and their main similarities and differences; the development of Buddhist institutions. The second part deals with Buddhism in modern Asia. This paper may only be offered by candidates also offering paper 19.

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(21) Hinduism I: Brahmanism

The paper will include the study of the traditions of practice and belief that are held to rest on the authority of Vedic revelation, namely the Vedas proper (including the Upaniads), the Dharmasastras, the Epics, and the Puranas. They will be expected to understand the difference between the Srauta, Smarta, and Paurnnika domains of observance, the manner of their coexistence, and the relevant aspects of the Brahmanical institutions of the joint family, caste, and the stages or alternative forms of the religious life. In the field of doctrine they will be examined on the soteriologies of the Mimamsaka ritualists and the principal traditions of Upanis.adic exegesis, namely the Advaita of Sakara and his followers, the Visistadvaita of the Srivaisnnavas, and the Dvaita of the Madhvas.

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(22) Hinduism II: Saivism, Vaisnavism, and Modern Hindu Movements

The paper will include the study of the practices and beliefs of those who based their religious life on the authority of scriptures which they held to have been revealed by Siva or Visnu as teachings above the level of the Vedas. In the field of Saivism they will be expected to know the essentials of the observances and theologies of the Pasupatas and Saiddhantika Saivas, the practices of the Bhairava and Sakta (Kaula) systems, the doctrines of the Kashmirian exegetes of the cults of Bhairava and Kali the Tamil tradition of Saiva devotion, and Vira saivism. In the field of Vaisnavism they will be expected to show knowledge of the Pancaratra and the traditions of devotion to Krsna. They will also be expected to be familiar with the major Hindu religious movements of the 19th and 20th centuries. This paper may only be offered by candidates also offering paper 21.

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SECTION C: SCHEDULE OF FURTHER OPTIONAL PAPERS

(23) Selected topics (Old Testament) I

Candidates will be required to show detailed knowledge of one of the following topics. They will be required to comment on passages from the prescribed texts in English (Revised Standard Version), and will be given an opportunity to comment upon the Hebrew text of certain specified chapters and sections.

(i) Prophecy

1 Samuel 9; 10

2 Samuel 7

1 Kings 13; 18; 22

Isaiah 1; 5–8; 10; 40; 42–4; 49; 51–3; 55

Jeremiah 1–5; 7–9; 11; 12; 26–8; 31

Ezekiel 1–4; 8–11; 14; 18; 20; 23; 36; 37

Amos 1–5; 6–9

Zechariah 1–8; 13

Among these the following may be offered in Hebrew:

1 Kings 13; 18; 22

Isaiah 42–4

Amos 1–5

(ii) Apocalyptic

Isaiah 24–7

Daniel

Zechariah

1 Enoch 1–16 (ed. H.F.D. Sparks, The Apocryphal Old Testament, OUP, 1984)

2 Esdras 3–14

Revelation

Among these the following may be offered in Hebrew:

Isaiah 24–7

Zechariah 9–14

(24) Selected topics (Old Testament) II

Candidates will be required to show detailed knowledge of one of the following topics. They will be required to comment on passages from the prescribed texts in English (Revised Standard Version), and will be given an opportunity to comment upon the Hebrew text of certain selected chapters and sections.

(i) Wisdom

Proverbs 1–9; 22:17–31:31

Job 1–19; 38–42

Ecclesiastes

Wisdom of Solomon 1–9

Ecclesiaticus (Sirach) Prologue; 1:1–25:12; 36:18–43:33; 51

Among these the following may be offered in Hebrew:

Proverbs 1–9

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(ii) Worship and Liturgy

Exodus 12–15; 19; 20; 24

Leviticus 1–7; 16

Deuteronomy 12–18

1 Kings 5–8

1 Chronicles 16

Psalms 2; 18; 24; 27; 47–51; 68; 72; 78; 89; 95–100; 110; 113–118; 122; 124; 126; 128; 130–2

A.E. Cowley, Aramaic Papyri of the Fifth Century bc (OUP, 1923), nos. 21; 30–4

Among these the following may be offered in Hebrew:

Exodus 19; 20; 24

Leviticus 16

Psalms 24; 95–100

(25) The Hebrew of the Old Testament

Candidates will be required to show a general knowledge of the language, with a special study of the following prose texts from which passages will be set for translation and comment:

Genesis 6–9

Exodus 20; 24

1 Kings 17–2 Kings 2

Nehemiah 4–6

Candidates will also be given an opportunity to show knowledge of Hebrew verse, and especially of the following texts, from which passages will be set for translation and comment:

Joel

Psalms 1;23; 24; 45–8; 96

Isaiah 40–5

Candidates who do not offer Hebrew verse will not thereby be penalised.

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(26) Archaeology in relation to the Old Testament

The subject includes the geography of Palestine and of the neighbouring lands; the history of the development of Canaanite, Hebrew and Jewish social life and culture; the history of places of worship and their furniture; and the general results of recent archaeological research in the Ancient Near East, insofar as they throw light on these subjects.

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(27) Religions and Mythology of the Ancient Near East

The paper will include a wide range of questions. The following texts are prescribed for special study:

(a) Akkadian Myths and Epics: The Epic of Gilgamesh (standard version) and the Creation Epic, in S. Dalley, Myths from Mesopotamia (OUP, 1989), pp. 50–125, 233–74.

(b) Hittite Myths: The disappearance of Telepinu (version 1), The Song of Kumarbi, in H.A. Hoffner, Hittite Myths (Scholars Press, 1990), pp. 14–17, 40–3.

(c) Egyptian Myths, Hymns and Prayers: in M. Lichtheim, Ancient Egyptian Literature (Berkeley, University of California Press, 1975–80), vol. I, pp. 51–7, 131–3; vol. II, pp. 81–132, 197–9, 203–23.

(d) Ugaritic Myths: Baal and Yam, The Palace of Baal, Baal and Mot, in J.C.L. Gibson, Canaanite Myths and Legends (second edn., T. and T. Clark, 1978)

(e) The Sefire Inscriptions, in J.C.L. Gibson, Textbook of Syrian Semitic Inscriptions, vol. II (OUP, 1975) pp. 18–56.

(f) Philo of Byblos' Phoenician History, in H.W. Attridge and R.A. Oden, Philo of Byblos, The Phoenician History (Catholic Biblical Association of America, 1981).

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(28) Luke–Acts, Epistles and Apocalypse

Candidates will be expected to answer questions on two out of the following three sections, including comment questions on the English passages selected, where the text will be that of the Revised Standard Version. The Greek texts also set for translation and comment (from United Bible Societies, fourth edn.) are optional.

(a) Luke–Acts, with Luke 19–24 and Acts 1–15 set in English for comment, and Luke 19–24 set in Greek for optional translation and comment.

(b) The Pauline corpus (thirteen epistles), with Galatians, Philippians and Ephesians set in English for comment, and Galatians set in Greek for optional comment.

(c) Hebrews to the Apocalypse, with Hebrews and 1 John set in English for comment and Hebrews 1–2 and 1 John set in Greek for optional comment.

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(29) The New Testament in Greek

Candidates will choose passages for translation from amongst a number taken from the Greek New Testament and will be required to show a knowledge of the critical and theological issues involved in some of the passages they translate. The text used will be that of the United Bible Societies, fourth edn. The selection of passages set will allow this detailed knowledge to be limited to the following texts and chapters: Acts 20–6, Colossians, 1 and 2 Thessalonians, Hebrews 7–10, James, 1 and 2 Peter, Revelation 1–12. But there will also be opportunity to show such detailed knowledge outside these specified chapters.

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(30) Varieties of Judaism 100 BC–AD 100

The paper will include a number of general questions and the following texts are prescribed for special study:

Set texts in English:

Qumran Community Rule, Commentary on Habakkuk, in G. Vermes, The Dead Sea Scrolls in English (second edn., Pelican Books 1975).

Josephus, Jewish War II (Loeb, 1956); Antiquities XVIII, 1–119 (Loeb, 1965); Against Apion II, 145–296 (Loeb, 1956).

IV Ezra, ed. B.M. Metzger in J.H. Charlesworth, ed., The Old Testament Pseudepigrapha (Darton, Longman and Todd, 2 vols., 1983, 1985).

Testament of Moses, ed. J. Priest, in Charlesworth, op. cit. Wisdom of Solomon (Revised Standard Version).

Philo, Migration of Abraham, Life of Moses I, 1–84 (Loeb 1958)

Joseph and Aseneth, ed. C. Burchard, in Charlesworth, op. cit.

Psalms of Solomon VIII, IX, XVII, tr. S.P. Brock in H.F.D. Sparks (ed.), The Apocryphal Old Testament (OUP 1984).

1 Enoch 37–71, tr. M.A. Knibb in Sparks, op. cit.

Sibylline Oracles III, ed. J.J. Collins, in Charlesworth, op. cit.

Any or all of the following texts may be offered in the original languages:

Qumran Community Rule 1–4, in E. Lohse (edn.), Die Texte aus

Qumran, Hebräisch und Deutsch (second ed., Darmstadt, Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft, 1971).

Qumran Commentary on Habakkuk, ed. E. Lohse, op. cit.

Josephus, Antiquities XVIII, 1–28, 63–4, 109–19 (Loeb 1965).

Philo, Life of Moses I, 1–44 (Loeb 1958).

Joseph and Aseneth, in M. Philonenko ed., Joseph et AsÄneth (E.J. Brill, 1968).

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(31) The Beginnings of the Church and its Institutions to AD 170

Candidates will be expected to show a knowledge of the history, worship, and institutions of the church in this period, including baptism, eucharist, forms of ministry, models of the church, house-churches, heresy and orthodoxy, apostolic tradition, appeals to scripture, relations with the synagogue, marriage, communications, diet. They will be required to comment on passages from the following texts in English translation:

Set Texts:

Ephesians, 1 and 2 Timothy, Titus, Jude, 1 Clement (Loeb Apostolic Fathers I 1912) Chs. 1–6, 36–65.

Epistles of Ignatius (Loeb Apostolic Fathers I 1912) to The Ephesians, Smyrneans, Philadelphians.

The Didache (Loeb Apostolic Fathers I 1912).

The Epistle of Barnabas (Loeb Apostolic Fathers I 1912).

Ptolemy's Letter to Flora. New Eusebius ed. J. Stevenson (revised ed. 1983).

Shepherd of Hermas, Vision 3 (Loeb Apostolic Fathers II 1913).

Justin First Apology 31–41, 61–7 (1997) L.W. Barnard in

Ancient Christian Writers Vol. 56 (Paulist N.Y. 1997).

Justin Dialogue with Trypho 47, 90–111 (Ante-Nicene Fathers rp. 1989).

The following may also be offered in Greek:

1 Timothy, 2 Timothy, Titus, Ignatius to the Ephesians (Loeb): Didache 7–16 (Loeb); Justin First Apology 61, 65–7 (ed. M.Marcovich 1994).

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(32) Early Liturgy

Candidates will be expected to study the rites of initiation and the eucharist with the development of the Christian liturgical year up to AD 451 and the theology of liturgical worship in the light of anthropological, sociological, artistic and linguistic considerations.

The following texts are set for special study:

E.C. Whitaker, Documents of the Baptismal Liturgy (second edn., SPCK, 1970), pp. 1–19, 30–41, 44–50, 83–5, 127–33.

R.C.D. Jasper and G.J. Cuming, Prayers of the Eucharist: Early and Reformed (third edn., Pueblo, 1987), pp. 7–12, 20–44, 52–81, 88–113, 129–37, 143–67.

E.J. Yarnold, The Awe-Inspiring Rites of Initiation (second edn., T. and T. Clark, 1994) pp. 70–97.

J. Wilkinson, tr. and ed., Egeria's Travels (SPCK, 1971), pp. 123–47 (section 24 to the end).

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(33) Early Syriac Christianity

Candidates will be expected to show a general knowledge of symbolism in the theology of the early Syriac Church.

The following texts are prescribed for special study:

Odes of Solomon 6, 11, 17, 19, 21, 24, 30, 36, 42, tr. J. Emerton in H.F.D. Sparks.

The Apocryphal Old Testament (OUP, 1984)

Acts of Thomas, secs. 1–29, 108–14, tr. A.F.J. Klijn (E.J. Brill, 1962)

Aphrahat, Demonstrations 1, 4, 6, 12 (Dem. 1 and 6 tr. in J. Gwynn, ed. Select Library of Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers II.13 (1898, repr. W.B. Eerdmans, 1956), Dem. 4, tr. S.P. Brock, The Syriac Fathers on Prayer and the Spiritual Life (1987), ch. 1; Dem. 12, tr. in J. Neusner, Aphrahat and Judaism (E.J. Brill, 1971))

Ephrem, Sermon on Our Lord, tr. in E. Mathews and J. Amar, St Ephrem the Syrian.

Selected Prose Works (1994);

Hymns on the Nativity, nos. 1 and 2, tr. K. McVey, St Ephrem the Syrian. Hymns (Classics of Western Spirituality, 1989);

Hymns on Faith, No. 10, Hymns on the Church, No. 36; Hymns on Epiphany, Nos. 1 and 6; tr. S.P. Brock in T. Finn, Early Christian Baptism and the Catechumenate (1992).

The hymns, tr. S.P. Brock, The Harp of the Spirit: Eighteen Poems of St Ephrem (Fellowship of St Alban and St Sergius, second edn. 1983).

Letter to Publius, tr. S.P. Brock, Le MusÄon (1976) Book of Steps, Homily 12, tr. R. Murray, Symbols of Church and Kingdom (CUP, 1975).

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(34) Backgrounds to Early Christianity 30–529 AD

Candidates will be expected to answer questions from two of the following sections, showing detailed knowledge of aspects of life and thought in the Roman Empire which are relevant to the understanding of the New Testament and early Christianity. Passages for comment will be set in English from the prescribed texts in all five sections. Texts will be read in the Loeb Classical Library edition, unless otherwise indicated.

(a) Exegesis. Jewish, Christian and pagan forms of exegesis. The distinction between literal, tropological and psychagogic approaches. Theories of translation. Formation of canons. Philo of Alexandria, Who is the Heir of Divine Things? Augustine, On Christian Doctrine, Book II. ed. and trans. R.P. Green (Clarendon Press 1995)

(b) Philosophy. The doctrines of the major schools. Philosophy and life. Relations between Christians and philosophers. The place of apologetic and polemic in philosophy. Epictetus, The Enchiridion (in vol. 2 of the Loeb edition) Plotinus, Enneads I.8

(c) Religion. Personal, ethnic, civil and mystery religions. The place of religion in life. Rituals and images. Hierarchy and gender. Attitudes of political authorities to religion.

Apuleius, Metamorphoses (Golden Ass), Book 11.

Aristides of Athens, Apology. Ed. and trans. J. Armitage

Robinson, Texts and Studies 26–44, 1891.

(d) Literature. Rhetoric and education. Genre in pagan and Biblical literature. Christian knowledge of Greek and Latin classics. The production, circulation and readership of ancient books.

Quintillian: selections in D.A. Russell and M. Winterbottom, Ancient Literary Criticism (OUP 1972), 372–422.

Basil of Caesarea, On how a young man ought to read Greek literature (Letters, vol. 4 in Loeb edition).

(e) Society. Labour and wealth. Ethnicity and gender. Attitudes to the body and sexuality. Hellenization and Romanitas.

Clement of Alexandria, On the Rich Man's Salvation (in vol. 2 of the Loeb edition).

Tertullian, De Spectaculis.

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(35) History and Theology of the Church in the Byzantine Empire from AD 1000 to AD 1453

Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the constitution and worship of the Church; monasticism; the development of mystical theology; the relations between Church and state and with the Western Church.

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(36) English Church and Mission 597–754

Candidates will be expected to study the main lines of the history of the English Church in this period, and some aspects of its theology. There will also be an opportunity to study works of art. Candidates will be expected to have studied the texts in Group I, on which alone gobbets will be set, and in at least one of sections (a), (b), (c) in Group II.

Group I

(a) Bede Ecclesiastical History of the English People, Preface, Bks I, 23–4; II; III; IV; V, 9–10, 19. (trans. L. Sherley-Price, revised R.E. Latham, with introduction and notes by D.H. Farmer, Penguin Classics, 1990) pp. 41–3, 72–265, 278–82, 300–06.

(b) Bede's Letter to Egbert, trans. D.H. Farmer, ibid., pp. 337– 51.

(c) Bede: On the Temple, trans. S. Connolly, in J. O'Reilly (Liverpool University Press: Translated Texts for Historians 21, 1995), Prologue and Book I to I, 8.4, pp. 1–33; Book II, 18.8 to 20.9, pp. 76–100.

(d) Eddius Stephanus, Life of Wilfrid in The Age of Bede, (ed. D.H. Farmer, trans. J. Webb, Penguin Classics 1988) pp. 105–82.

(e) `The Dream of the Rood', in A Choice of Anglo-Saxon Verse, ed. and trans. R. Hamer (Faber 1970), pp. 161–71.

Group II

(a) Adomnan of Iona, Life of St Columba, ed. and trans. R. Sharpe, (Penguin Classics, 1995)

(b) Bede, Life of Cuthbert, in The Age of Bede (Penguin Classics, 1988), pp. 41–102.

Bede, Lives of the Abbots of Wearmouth and Jarrow, ibid., pp. 185–208 Bede's Homily on the Gospel for the Feast of St Benedict Biscop, in Bede, Homilies on the Gospels, trans. L.T. Martin and D. Hurst, Preface by B. Ward, (Cistercian Studies Series, 110, 1991), pp. 125–32.

Letters of Aldhelm, in Aldhelm, The Prose Works, trans. M. Lapidge and M. Herren (Boydell and Brewer, 1979), pp. 152–70.

(c) Willibald's Life of St Boniface and The Correspondence of St Boniface, in C.H. Talbot, The Anglo-Saxon Missionaries in Germany, (Stead and Ward, 1954), pp. 25–62, 65–149.

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(37) Christian Spirituality

Candidates will be expected to discuss Christian prayer in its theological, psychological and historical aspects, paying particular attention to contemplation and mystical prayer. There will be four groups of texts, and candidates will be expected to have studied two of them.

(a) Patristics

Gregory of Nyssa, The Life of Moses, Book 2, tr. A.J. Malherbe and E. Ferguson, The Classics of Western Spirituality (SPCK/Paulist Press, 1978) pp. 55–137. Ps.-Macarius, Homilies 1, 5, 15, tr. G.A. Maloney, The Classics of Western Spirituality (SPCK/Paulist Press, 1992) Evagrius Ponticus, The Praktikos and Chapters on Prayer. (Translations available in Faculty Library) Ps.-Dionysius the Areopagite, The Mystical Theology. (Translations available in Faculty Library)

(b) English Fourteenth-century Mysticism

The Cloud of Unknowing, tr. J. Walsh, The Classics of Western Spirituality (SPCK/Paulist Press, 1981)

Julian of Norwich: Revelations of Divine Love, tr. E. Colledge and J. Walsh, The Classics of Western Spirituality (SPCK/ Paulist Press 1978)

(c) Spanish Mysticism

Teresa of Avila, The Interior Castle, tr. Allison Peers in Complete Works, vol. II (Sheed and Ward, 1946), pp. 199–351 John of the Cross, Living Flame of Love, second redaction, tr. Allison Peers in Complete Works, vol. III (3 vols in one, Anthony Clarke, 1978) pp. 103–95.

(d) The Wesleys and William Law

Texts in A.C. Outler, ed., John Wesley, Library of Protestant Theology (OUP 1964), pp. 197–231, 251–98 (i.e. Sermons on Justification by Faith and on The Witness of the Spirit; Discourse II on The Law Established by Faith; Sermon on Christian Perfection; The Scripture Way of Salvation; Thoughts on Christian Perfection.)

E.H. Sugden, ed., The Standard Sermons of John Wesley, vol. II (7th edn. Epworth Press, 1968). Sermons 32 (The Nature of Enthusiasm), 34 (Catholic Spirit), 39 (New Birth), 40 (Wilderness State).

H.A. Hodges and A.M. Allchin, A Rapture of Praise: Hymns of John and Charles Wesley (Hodder and Stoughton, 1966). The following hymns: 3, 9, 22, 27, 38, 54, 55, 81, 84, 90, 105, 118, 124, 126, 131.

William Law: The Spirit of Prayer: Part 1, ed. S. Spencer (James Clarke, 1969)

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(38) The Sociology of Religion

The paper will consist of two parts. Candidates will be expected to answer at least one question from each part.

(a) Texts

Candidates will be expected to know at least two of the following in detail:

(i) K. Marx, Theses on Feuerbach and The German Ideology ch. 1, ed. C. Arthur (Lawrence and Wishart, 1985), together with Capital, chapters 1 and 13 (Penguin Books, 1990)

(ii) E. Durkheim, The Elementary Forms of the Religious Life (Allen and Unwin, 1976)

(iii) M. Weber, The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism (Harper Collins, 1991)

(iv) E. Troeltsch, The Social Teaching of the Christian Churches (2 vols., J. Knox, 1992)

(v) Religion and History, ed. Adams (T. and T. Clark, 1991)

(vi) Talcott Parsons, Action Theory and the Human Condition (New York, 1978)

(b) Themes

Candidates will be expected to be able to discuss the following issues in their relation to religious formations: class, gender, race, legitimation, power structures, violence, sects and cults. Questions will be set on sociological readings of other parts of the Theology syllabus, including Biblical studies, doctrine and Church history. Familiarity with contemporary sociological discussion will be assumed.

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(39) Psychology of Religion

The paper will cover theories about aspects of behaviour or experiences relevant to religion and the empirical evidence on these theories. Psychological research methods and their applicability to different aspects of religion such as conversion, prayer, worship. Cognitive and non-cognitive (i.e. psychoanalytic and affective) accounts of religion. Normal and abnormal religious behaviour. Origin and development of religious concepts. Moral development. Constructs of theological psychology (e.g. soul; conscience, sin and guilt; repentance; forgiveness; mercy) and their status in contemporary psychology. Psychology applied to pastoral concerns: religious education; marriage; health; death and bereavement; substance abuse.

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(40) The Bible: Its Use and Influence

Candidates for this paper will be expected to have an understanding of the authority and role of the Bible in theological and ethical discussion and in Christian practice and liturgy. There will also be an opportunity to consider theories of interpretation, the use of the Bible in non-academic as well as academic contexts, and visual, dramatic and musical, as well as literary explorations of the Bible. A wide range of questions will be set, allowing candidates to concentrate on particular periods and issues. The Board (through the Handbook for Students in the Final Honour School of Theology) may prescribe for more detailed study the interpretation of one or more biblical texts. The paper will be examined by three hour written examination and short essay of not more than 3,000 words.

(41) Any other subject that may be approved by the Board of the Faculty of Theology from time to time by regulation published in the Gazette and communicated to college tutors by the end of the first week of the Trinity Full Term in the academic year preceding the examination in which the option will be available. Optional translation papers (2 hours each) The translation components of papers (25), The Hebrew of the Old Testament, and (29), The New Testament in Greek, may be offered individually as optional extra papers by candidates who are not taking one or both of the full papers.


Regulations concerning essays

1. In Alternative Track B.I two papers, and in Alternative Tracks B.II and B.III one paper, may be chosen from amongst those not already offered in Section A, Section B, and Section C, the Schedule of Further Optional Papers, subject to the restrictions specified in each Alternative Track. A candidate may offer an extended essay in place of either one of these papers, as specified in the regulations governing his/her Alternative Track, or in addition to the eight required papers, provided that prior approval of the subject has been obtained from the Board of the Faculty of Theology. Candidates should in general aim at a length of 10,000 words, but must not exceed 15,000 words (both figures inclusive of notes and appendices, but excluding bibliography).

2. The candidate's application should be submitted through and with the support of his or her college tutor or the tutor with overall responsibility for his or her studies, from whom he or she should seek guidance on whether the subject is likely to be acceptable to the Board.

3. The Board's approval must be sought not later than Friday in the fourth week of Trinity Full Term in the year preceding the examination. The request for approval should be addressed to the Secretary of the Board of the Faculty of Theology, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford. The request must be accompanied by a letter from the tutor stating that this subject has his or her approval.

The application should include, in about 100 words, an explanation as to how the topic will be treated, and a brief bibliography.

4. The candidate is advised to have an initial discussion with his or her tutor regarding the proposed field of study, the sources available, and the method of presentation. He or she may also have one further discussion with his or her tutor on his or her approach to the subject. His or her tutor may also read and comment on a first draft.

5. The subject of the essay need not fall within the areas covered by the papers listed in the Honour School of Theology. It may overlap any subject or period on which the candidate offers papers, but the candidate is warned against reproducing the content of his or her essay in any answer to a question in the examination. Subject to the provisions of cl. 4 above, every candidate shall sign a certificate to the effect that the essay is his or her own work and that it has not already been submitted (wholly or substantially) for a final honour school other than one involving Theology, or another degree of this University, or a degree of any other institution. This certificate shall be presented together with the essay. No essay shall, however, be ineligible because it has been or is being submitted for any prize of this University.

6. The candidate must submit one typed copy of the essay (bound or held firmly in a stiff cover), addressed to the Chairman of the Examiners, Honour School of Theology, Examination Schools, Oxford, not later than noon on the Friday of the eighth week of Hilary Term in the academic year in which he or she is presenting himself or herself for examination. The certificate signed by the candidate in accordance with cl. 5 above must be submitted separately in a sealed envelope addressed to the Chairman of the Examiners at the above address at the same time as the essay is submitted.

7. The provisions of these regulations will also apply to candidates submitting an extended essay as part of paper (40).'

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(b) Pass School of Theology

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 516, delete from `1 (Israel to the beginning of the Exile)' on l. 9, to `1789–1914' on l. 15 and substitute: `1 (Israel to the end of the Exile), 2 (Israel from the beginning of the Exile to 4 BC), 3 (The Synoptic Gospels), and 4 (The Theology and Ethics of the New Testament); and at least one from amongst papers 5 (The Development of Doctrine in the Early Church to ad 452), 6 (Christian Doctrine and Interpretation), 8 (The History and Theology of Western Christianity 1050–1350), 9 (The History and Theology of Western Christianity 1500–1619) and 10 EITHER (Christian Life and Thought in Europe 1789–1914) OR (Christology from Kant to Troeltsch 1789–1914).'

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(c) Bachelor of Theology

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 525, l. 14, delete `either' and substitute `seventh'.

2 Ibid., p. 529, ll. 43–4, delete `not later than the Friday of the fifth week of Michaelmas Term in the academic year in which he intends to take the examination'.

Ibid., delete from `Not later than' on l. 47 to `his study' on l. 50, and substitute `The candidate shall submit his study'.

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10 Boards of the Faculties of Theology and Literae Humaniores

Honour School of Philosophy and Theology

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 490, l. 48, delete `artificial insemination; eugenics' and substitute `artificial reproduction; genetic manipulation'.

2 Ibid., ll. 7–8, delete `(except paper 3)'.

3 Ibid., after l. 8, insert `Candidates will be permitted to take paper 7 in place of paper 4 provided that they also offer paper 3'.

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11 Committee for Archaeology

Honour School of Archaeology and Anthropology

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 133, l. 36, after `... Anthropology and Geography.', insert:

`To encourage a wide-ranging understanding of archaeology and anthropology, options shall be chosen in such a way that they constitute two independent, non- overlapping subjects.'

2 Ibid., p. 134, after l. 47 (as amended by Gazette, 24 September 1998 and a subsequent editorial change), insert:

`(r) The Archaeology of Minoan Crete: 7000–700 BC

Because of the potential overlap in subject matter, approval will not be given to candidates who wish to select either two of papers 7(f), 7(g) or 7(j), or both papers 7(k) and 7(l).'

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12 Committee on Continuing Education

Advanced Diplomas in Archaeological Practice and British Studies (Language and Society)

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, delete from p. 979, l. 25 to p. 980, l. 8.

2 Ibid., p. 981, after l. 24 after the decree establishing the course, insert:

`Archaeological Practice

1. Course

(a) The course will consist of lectures, classes, seminars and tutorials in Archaeological Practice. The course, which is available on a part-time basis only, will normally be taken over a period of two, and no more than five, years.

(b) The subjects of the course of study will include: pottery; human bones; animal bones; environmental evidence; metals; aerial photographs; flints; geophysical and surface surveying; landscape and maps; lithics; other sources of data and information; aspects of computing.

2. Every candidate will be required to satisfy the examiners in the following:

(a) Attendance at the taught courses and at one week's prescribed practical fieldwork;

(b) Assignments based on the taught courses and practical fieldwork;

(c) One long assignment of up to 5,000 words (excluding appendices);

(d) A dissertation of up to 10,000 words (excluding appendices) on a topic agreed by the Board of Studies. Assignments under 2 (b)–2 (c) and the dissertation under (d) will be forwarded to the examiners for consideration by such dates as the examiners shall determine and shall notify candidates.

3. Candidates may be required to attend a viva voce examination at the end of the course of studies.

4. The examiners may award a distinction to candidates for the Advanced Diploma.

5. Candidates who fail to satisfy the examiners in the assignments under 2 (b)–2 (c), or the dissertation under

2 (d), or both, may be permitted to re-submit work in respect of the part or parts of the examination which they have failed for examination on not more than one occasion which shall normally be within one year of the initial failure.

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British Studies (Language and Society)

1. Course

(a) The course will consist of lectures, tutorials, and classes in the culture of Britain, with accompanying study in English language. Every candidate must take the course under the supervision of the Committee of Continuing Education for at least one year. Such study shall be pursued at Oxford.

(b) The course will consist of four core subjects as follows:

(i) Pre-sessional course

(ii) English language

(iii) British Studies

(iv) Extended essay option

2. Candidates will normally be expected to pass an examination at the end of the pre-sessional course before being permitted to proceed to the remainder of the course.

3. In addition, every candidate will be required to satisfy the examiners in the following:

(a) A written portfolio of exercises based on the contents of the English language course, which will be of no more than 10,000 words in total;

(b) Six assignments based on the theoretical courses in British Studies, each of a maximum of 2,000 words, which will in total be not more than 10,000 words;

(c) An extended essay normally of between 4,000 and 5,000 words in length (the limit to include notes) on a topic related to one of the core subjects of study.

Assignments under 3(a)–(c) will be forwarded to the examiners for consideration by such dates as the examiners shall determine and shall notify candidates.

3. Candidates may also be called for viva voce examination.

4. The examiners may award a distinction to candidates for the Advanced Diploma.

5. Candidates who fail to satisfy the examiners in the any part of the examination may be permitted to re-submit work in respect of the part or parts of the examination which they have failed for examination on not more than one occasion which shall normally be within one year of the initial failure.'

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13 Joint Committee for Human Sciences

(a) Preliminary Examination in Human Sciences

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 82 (as amended Gazette No. 4510, 6 May 1999, p. 1184), cl. 1, under `Paper 3. Society, Culture, and Environment', delete

`One three-hour paper will be set, on which candidates will be required to answer four questions. The paper will be divided into two sections: (a) Social and Cultural Anthropology, which will account for two-thirds of the paper, and (b) Human Geography, which will account for one-third of the paper. Candidates will be required to display knowledge of both sections.'

and substitute

`One three hour paper will be set. The paper will be divided into two sections: (a) Social and Cultural Anthropology, and (b) Human Geography. Candidates will be required to display knowledge of both sections, and will be required to answer at least two questions from section (a) and at least one question from section (b).'

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(b) Honour School of Human Sciences

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in Michaelmas Term 2001)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 230, after l. 33 (as amended by Gazette No. 4510, 6 May 1999, p. 1184, col. 1), delete

`There will be...Final Honour School Examinations,' and substitute

`There will be a practical examination for paper 4, Demography and Population, in which candidates will be required to demonstrate their ability to interpret demographic measures and to apply quantitative skills to demographic problems. The practical examination will count for 25 per cent of the marks available for paper 4, and will be combined with the marks obtained in the Final Honour School examinations for this paper. The Chairman of Examiners will be responsible for notifying the candidates of the arrangements for the examination which will take place in the Michaelmas Term preceding Final Honour School examinations.'

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DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF MEDICINE

The Board of the Faculty of Clinical Medicine has granted leave to E. MARTIN, Hertford, to supplicate for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.

The evidence submitted by the candidate was entitled: `Endovascular therapy in peripheral vascular disease'.

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DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF SCIENCE

The Board of the Faculty of Physical Sciences has granted leave to T.N. PALMER, Wolfson, to supplicate for the Degree of Doctor of Science.

A list of the evidence submitted by the candidate is available at the University Offices.

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EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards and committee give notice of oral examination of their candidates as follows:

Anthropology and Geography

Z.G. EL-KHOURI KLINK, Exeter: `Beyond the tantur: female attire traditions in nineteenth-century Mount Lebanon'.
Pitt Rivers Museum, Monday, 19 July, 10.30 a.m.
Examiners: R. Barnes, M. Pavaloi.

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Biological Sciences

M. GAL, St Hilda's: `Development of "in vivo expression technology" (IVET) and its use to isolate Pseudomonas fluorescens genes induced in the plant rhizosphere'.
Department of Plant Sciences, Tuesday, 3 August, 2 p.m.
Examiners: I.R. Moore, P.S. Pook.

N.K. KAKKER, Wolfson: `Studies on bovine leukemia virus GAG polyprotein: assembly and compatibility with other retroviruses'.
Institute of Molecular Medicine, Wednesday, 21 July, 2 p.m.
Examiners: A.J. McMichael, A. Burney.

C.H. LAWRIE, Trinity: `The molecular basis of tick–host interactions'.
Department of Biochemistry, Friday, 16 July, 9.30 a.m.
Examiners: R.B. Sim, R. Kaufman.

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Clinical Medicine

P. FIELD, St Cross: `The effects of insulin resistance on chylomicron metabolism'.
Green College, Tuesday, 20 July, 2 p.m.
Examiners: R.D. Evans, B.L. Knight.

K.A. NITHI, Green College: `Mapping the cortical representation of upper limb muscles in man using transcranial magnetic stimulation'.
Department of Clinical Neurology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Wednesday, 28 July, 3 p.m.
Examiners: P.M. Matthews, S. Boniface

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Law

A. ROSLER, St Hugh's: `The authority of the state and the political obligation of the citizen in Aristotle'.
Examination Schools, Thursday, 22 July, 2 p.m.
Examiners: M. Philp, J. Gardner.

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Literae Humaniores

L.S. FOTHERINGHAM, Christ Church: `Repetition and unity in four of Cicero's judicial speeches'.
Examination Schools, Wednesday, 29 July, 11.30 a.m.
Examiners: C.S. Kraus, D.H. Berry.

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Modern History

E. FORD, Trinity: `Italian Renaissance design processes: theory and practice, observations of geometric and numerical design systems'.
Department of the History of Art, Thursday, 22 July, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: M.S. Kwint, F. Ames-Lewis.

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Physical Sciences

P.K. HOPKINS, Wadham: `Novel tripodal ligands designed to complex anions'.
Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, Tuesday, 20 July, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: J.R. Dilworth, P. Pringle.

G. JACOB, St Catherine's: `Quantifying regional left ventricular function using spatio-temporal tracking techniques'.
Department of Engineering Science, Wednesday, 28 July, 2 p.m.
Examiners: J.M. Brady, R.W. Prager.

J.F. LIBBY, Hertford: `The study of E+ E- —>M+M—[delta] and the measurement of trilinear gauge couplings at LEP2 using the Delphi detector'.
Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Monday, 26 July, 2 p.m.
Examiners: A.R. Weidberg, J.C. Thompson.

I.D. ROZDILSKY, Trinity: `3-D atomic-scale characterisation of growing precipitates'.
Department of Materials, Monday, 26 July, 2 p.m.
Examiners: J.M. Titchmarsh, D. Blavette.

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Physiological Sciences

M.J. ROBBINS, Pembroke: `Effects of post-translational modifications of metabotropic glutamate receptors on receptor function'.
Department of Pharmacology, Wednesday, 28 July, 2 p.m.
Examiners: D.R. Wing, R. Clegg.

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Social Studies

S. EVERTS, St Antony's: `Adaptation in foreign policy: French and British reactions to German unification'.
Wolfson, Monday, 27 September, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: A. Deighton, R. Morgan.

C. MADGE, St Hugh's: `The Utopia as ethical thought experiment'.
Nuffield, Friday, 23 July, 2 p.m.
Examiners: D.L. Miller, B. Goodwin.

M. QVORTRUP, Brasenose: `Constitutional implications of the use of the referendum'.
Nuffield, Friday, 23 July, 2 p.m.
Examiners: D.E. Butler, I. Budge.

S. SKAR, Christ Church: `The British Conservative Party and European supranational integration, 1948–55'.
Examination Schools, Thursday, 29 July, 2 p.m.
Examiners: M.E. Ceadel, A. Forster.

C. WALLACE, Nuffield: `Evolutionary game theory in the social sciences'.
Wadham, Monday, 26 July, 2 p.m.
Examiners: A.W. Beggs, M.W. Cripps.

YI LEE WONG, Nuffield: `Family strategies: a study of intergenerational mobility in Hong Kong'.
Institute for Chinese Studies, Monday, 27 September, 2 p.m.
Examiners: F.N. Pieke, F. Devine.

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Committee for Comparative Philology and General Linguistics

NAM-KIL KANG, Somerville: `Reflexives and the linking theory in universal grammar'.
Examination Schools, Thurday, 5 August, 2 p.m.
Examiners: D.F. Cram, H. Hoji.

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