Examinations and Boards

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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FACULTY BOARD ELECTIONS: ELECTIONS TO BOARD OF FACULTY OF THEOLOGY

During Hilary Term 1999, a change in the composition of the Theology Board was approved by the University. With effect from the elections due to be held during Trinity Term, the number of ordinary members of the board will be increased from eight to ten members, and the number of official members will be reduced, from eight to six members. In order to facilitate this change in membership, separate arrangements will be necessary with regard to the elections to the board to be held during the current year. The following information regarding nominations therefore replaces that which appeared in the Gazette on 22 April:

Ordinary members: six vacancies (five for two year appointments and one for a single year).

Official members: six vacancies (three for two year appointments and three for single year appointments).

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CHAIRMEN OF EXAMINERS

TRINITY TERM 1999

Preliminary Examinations

Physiological Sciences: DR R.J. WILKINS, MA, D.PHIL., Christ Church (address: Department of Physiology)

Philosophy, Politics, and Economics: DR C.A. GREENHALGH, MA, Fellow of St Peter's


Honour Moderations

Modern History and Economics: DR J.H. HOWARTH, Fellow of St Hilda's

Modern History and English: DR J.C. ROBERTSON, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St Hugh's

Physics and Philosophy: MR B.B. RUNDLE, B.PHIL., MA, Fellow of Trinity


Honour School

Modern History and Economics: DR A.W. BEGGS, MA, M.PHIL., D.PHIL., Fellow of Wadham

Second BM

Year 3: MR N.E. DUDLEY, MA status (address: Department of Surgery, John Radcliffe Hospital)

Master of Philosophy

Celtic Studies: PROFESSOR M.T.O. CHARLES-EDWARDS, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Jesus

Master of Studies

Celtic Studies: PROFESSOR T.M.O. CHARLES-EDWARDS, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Jesus

Women's Studies: DR R.M. BALLASTER, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Mansfield

World Archaeology: DR C.H. GOSDEN, MA, Fellow of St Cross (address: Pitt Rivers Museum)


Master of Theology

THE REVD D.G. MOSS, MA, Tutor at St Stephen's House

Prize

Violet Vaughan Morgan: DR P.E. MCCULLOUGH, MA, Fellow of Lincoln

Foundation Certificates

English Language and Literature: DR P.J. THOMPSON, MA, Regent's Park

Modern History: DR C.A. JACKSON, Department for Continuing Education

Social and Political Science: DR N.J. HORSEWOOD, M.PHIL., Pembroke


Diploma

Postgraduate Diploma in European Studies: PROFESSOR P.G.J. PULZER, MA, Fellow of All Souls

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CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the General Board, the following changes in regulations made by boards of faculties and the Joint Committee for Human Sciences will come into effect on 21 May.

1 Board of the Faculty of English Language and Literature

Honour School of English Language and Literature

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 201, after l. 20 insert:

`() Any one of the following Course II options;

i. Linguistic Theory (one paper; as specified for Course II paper B4)

ii. Medieval and Renaissance Romance (extended essay; as specified for Course II paper 7a)

iii. Scottish Literature pre-1600 (extended essay; as specified for Course II paper 7b)

iv. Old Norse (one paper, as specified in Course II paper B15)

v. Medieval French Literature 1100-1300 or Medieval French Literature 1300–1500 (one paper, as specified for Course II papers B20 and B21)

vi. Medieval Welsh Language and Literature I or Medieval Welsh Language and Literature II (one paper, as specified for Course II papers B21 and B22)

vii. Medieval Latin (one paper, as specified for Course II paper B24)

viii. Classical Literature (extended essay, as specified for Course II paper B26)'.

2 Ibid., delete ll. 21–4 and substitute:

`(i) Any one of the Special Topics from the list for the year concerned, which will be published in the University Gazette by the beginning of the fifth week of the Trinity Term one year before the examination.'

3 Ibid., delete from l. 26 on p. 201 to `examination' on p. 202, l. 1. and substitute:

`Each candidate shall offer the five subjects of List A below, and three subjects chosen from List B, subject to the restrictions set out below. Candidates may not offer more than two papers as extended essays.

Extended essays

(a) The following subjects will be assessed by extended essay only: B5 Old English Special Authors, B6 Medieval and Renaissance Special Authors, B7 Special Topics, B17 Old Norse-Icelandic Literature, and B26 Classical Literature.

(b) The following subjects will be assessed by extended essay or examination: B1 Old English Philology, B2 Middle English Dialectology, B3 Modern English Philology. Candidates will be required to specify their chosen mode of examination for these papers on their registration form and may not revert from this choice.

(c) An extended essay for subjects B5, B6, B7, B17, and B26 shall not exceed 6,000 words and shall be on a theme chosen from a list circulated by the examiners. Subjects B1, B2, and B3 will require two essays, each not exceeding 3,000 words, and shall be on a theme chosen from a list circulated by the examiners.

(d) The list of themes for B1, B3, B5, and B6 shall be circulated on Friday of the Fifth Week of Michaelmas Term next before the examination. The list of themes for B2, B7, B17, and B26 shall be circulated on Friday of the Sixth Week of Hilary Term next before the examination.'

4 Ibid., p. 202, delete ll. 6–10 and substitute:

`(d) Two typed copies of each essay for B1, B3, B5, and B6 must be delivered to the Chairman of Examiners, Honour School of English Language and Literature (Course II), Examination Schools, Oxford, by noon on Friday of the eighth week of Michaelmas Term; and those for B2, B7, B17, and B26 by noon on Friday of the ninth week after the commencement of Hilary Full Term.'

5 Ibid., delete from l. 18 on p. 202 to l. 20 on p. 203 and substitute:

`1. English Literature 600–1100 (one paper)

Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of a wide range of Old English literature and should show an awareness of the historical and cultural contexts of the period.

2. English Literature 1100–1530 (one paper)

Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of a wide range of Middle English literature, and should show an awareness of the historical and cultural contexts of the literature of the period. Candidates should not answer on this paper on works by Chaucer on which they intend to answer on paper A3(a); candidates should not write on this paper on Langland and/or Gower if they are answering on those authors on paper A3(b).

3. Chaucer, Langland, and Gower (two papers)

Candidates will be required to take two papers as follows:

(a) A three-hour paper of questions on Chaucer. Questions will be set that require a wide knowledge of Chaucer's writings. Candidates will be required to answer two questions.

(b) A two-hour paper of questions on Langland and Gower and on comparative studies of the three authors. Candidates will be required to write one essay.

4. Old and Middle English Texts (one paper)

Candidates will be expected to have made a detailed study of Exodus (rev. edn. ed. P. Lucas, 1994), Aelfric, Homilies 14, 20, and 21, ll. 1–291, 494–676 (ed. J.C. Pope, 1968), Ancrene Wisse, and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (ed. J.R.R. Tolkien, E.V. Gordon, rev. N. Davis, 1967). Question 1, which will be compulsory, will consist of passages for translation and commentary from three of the set texts; passages from Ancrene Wisse will be taken from the edition of books 6 and 7, ed. G. Shepherd (1985). Candidates must answer two further essay questions. Essay questions will require answers on issues of genre, sources, textual history, interpretative difficulties, manuscript dissemination.

5. The Development of Standard Literary English to c.1750 (one paper)

Candidates will be expected to show an understanding of the development of the written language from the earliest records to c.1750, with particular attention to the emergence of a standard form. Candidates will be required to answer question 1 and two other questions, and to demonstrate a knowledge of Old, Middle, and early Modern English in their answers. Question 1 will require comment on the language of either (a) passages of biblical translation or (b) other representative texts (four passages of each will be set of which candidates must comment on two). Questions on lexicography will include Johnson's Dictionary.

List B: English Language and Literature and Subsidiary Languages (optional subjects)

Candidates are required to note that the availability of options is subject to the provision of teaching in the year in question.

1. Old English Philology (extended essay or one paper)

Candidates should have made a study of the Old English language in its various dialects up to c.1100, paying particular attention to the evidence available from primary materials; they will be expected to have such awareness of Germanic philology as is necessary for an understanding of the background to Old English. All aspects of the language are included: its orthography, phonology, morphology, syntax, lexis. No texts are prescribed, but those in Sweet's Anglo-Saxon Reader (rev. Whitelock, 1967), nos. ii, vi–viii, xiv, xvi, xxxii–xxxviii, indicate the range of dialects to be covered. In the three-hour paper the first question (which will be compulsory) will require comment on passages set from texts in these dialects. Candidates taking the paper by extended essay will be required to write two extended essays, each a maximum of 3,000 words in length, on topics from a list to be circulated by the examiners in the fifth week of Michaelmas Term next preceding the examination.

2. Middle English Dialectology (extended essay or one paper)

Candidates will be expected to have made a study of a wide range of Middle English and Middle Scots dialects from c.1100 to c.1500, paying particular attention to the evidence available from primary materials. All aspects of the language are included: its orthography, phonology, morphology, syntax, lexis. No texts are prescribed, but those in Burrow and Turville-Petre (eds.), A Book of Middle English, nos. 2–4, 8–9, 11, 14, and Sisam (ed.), Fourteenth- Century Verse and Prose no. 10, indicate the range of dialects to be covered. In the three-hour paper the first question, which will be compulsory, will require comment on passages set from texts in these dialects.

Candidates taking the paper by extended essay will be required to write two extended essays, each a maximum of 3,000 words in length, on topics from a list to be circulated by the examiners in sixth week of Hilary Term preceding the examination.

3. Modern English Philology (extended essay or one paper)

Candidates will be expected to show an understanding of developments in the written and spoken language with reference to the period from c.1500 to the present day, paying particular attention to the evidence available from primary materials. The paper involves the consideration of all aspects of the language, including orthography, phonology, morphology, syntax, and lexis.

There are no prescribed texts, but candidates are expected to read a range of writings in the language in this period. Candidates must answer questions from both Section A, texts for comment and transcription, and Section B, questions on the history and development of the language in the period in question.

Candidates taking the paper by extended essay will be required to write two extended essays, each a maximum of 3,000 words in length, on topics from a list to be circulated by the examiners in the fifth week of Michaelmas Term preceding the examination.'

6 Ibid., p. 203, delete from `Candidates' in l. 22 to `language' in l. 24 and substitute:

`Candidates will be expected to show a general knowledge of theoretical linguistics with special reference to phonology, phonetics, grammar, lexis, semantics, and discourse structure and pragmatics.'

7 Ibid., delete ll. 26–37 and substitute:

`5. Old English Special Authors (extended essay)

Candidates must answer on any one of the Beowulf poet, Alfred, or Aelfric. Candidates answering substantially on any of these writers in paper A1, English Literature 600–1100, may not offer the same writer in this paper. Candidates answering on Aelfric on paper A4 should not discuss the same texts in detail in this paper.

6. Medieval and Renaissance Special Authors (extended essay)

As defined in Course I Subject 7(a) and (b) for the year concerned, except that candidates may not answer on any author made the focus of an answer elsewhere in the examination.

7. Special Topics (extended essay)

In all special topics, candidates will be expected to show such historical and/or contextual knowledge as is necessary for the profitable study of the periods, genres, or authors concerned. Candidates should show knowledge of more than one writer except where otherwise specified. The list of themes for subjects (c) to () will be the same as those set for Course I Subjects 8 (b) to (g) and (i).

(a) Medieval and Renaissance Romance

(b) Scottish Literature pre-1600

(c) The English Drama

(d) English Prose

(e) The History and Theory of Criticism

(f) Women's Writing

(g) The Genres of English Poetry

()h) Any one of the Special Topics for the year concerned, as published in the University Gazette by the beginning of the fifth week of the Trinity Term one year before the examination.'

8 Ibid., l. 38, delete `7' and substitute `8'.

9 Ibid., ll. 40–1, delete `on whom they offer an optional subject.' and substitute `on whom they have answered questions in paper A2, or on whom they offer an optional subject.'

10 Ibid., l. 44, delete `8' and substitute `9'.

11 Ibid., delete from p. 203, l. 49 to p. 204, l. 27.

12 Ibid., p. 204, l. 28 delete `11' and substitute `10'.

13 Ibid., delete from l. 34 on p. 204 to l. 10 on p. 206 and substitute:

`11. Gothic (one paper)

Candidates will be expected to show a knowledge of the elements of Gothic phonology, morphology, syntax, and lexicology, and to show special knowledge of the Gospels in Gothic. Three questions must be answered, including a compulsory translation set from passages from the surviving parts of the translation of St Mark's gospel and of II Timothy, as printed in J. Wright, Grammar of the Gothic Language (2nd edn. rev. O.L. Sayce, 1954); linguistic commentary may be required.

12. Old Saxon (one paper)

Candidates will be expected to show a knowledge of the elements of Old Saxon phonology, morphology, syntax, and lexicology. They will be expected to have made special study of the language of the Heliand, and to show detailed knowledge of its text from l. 3516 to the end (l. 5983) as edited by O. Behagel (9th edn. rev. B. Taeger, 1984), and of the Genesis fragments, as edited by A.N. Doane (1991). Three questions must be answered, including a compulsory translation and comment question.

13. Old High German (one paper)

Candidates will be expected to show a detailed knowledge of the elements of Old High German phonology, morphology, syntax, and lexicology, and to have made a special study of the texts set for Paper V (i): German in the Honour School of Modern Languages.

Passages for translation and linguistic commentary, general linguistic questions, and literary questions on these texts will be set. Three questions must be answered, including a compulsory translation and commentary question.

14. Middle High German (one paper)

Candidates will be expected to study the texts prescribed for Paper IX: German, of the Honour School of Modern Languages, and to show detailed knowledge of three of them.

Passages for translation and literary commentary, and general literary questions on these texts will be set. Three questions must be answered, including a compulsory translation and commentary question.

15. Old Norse (one paper)

Three questions must be answered, including one compulsory translation and commentary question from passages from Islendingabòk; Hrafnkels saga Freysgoda; Skírnismál; Hamdismál; Snorri's Edda (ed. Faulkes, Oxford, 1982); Gylfaginning, ch. 43 to end. Literary questions on these texts will be set and candidates will also be given an opportunity to show a knowledge of the elements of Old Norse phonology, morphology, syntax, and lexicology.

16. Old Norse Texts (one paper)

Candidates will be expected to have made a special study of the following: Audunar páttr; Víga Glúms saga; Vöaut;lundarkvida; Atlakvida. They will be expected to have read but not to have studied in detail, Fóstbroedra saga; Gísla saga Súrssonar; Hervarar saga; Gylfaginning; Vöaut;luspá; Hávamál. Three questions must be answered, including one compulsory translation and commentary question from passages from the texts set for special study. Literary questions will be set on all the set texts.

This subject may be offered only by candidates who also offer Subject B15.

17. Old Norse–Icelandic Literature (extended essay)

Candidates will be expected to have read widely, especially in Old Icelandic prose. This subject may be offered only by candidates who also offer either Subject B15 or Subjects B15 and B16.

18. Old French Language 1150–1250 (one paper)

Candidates will be expected to show a knowledge of the elements of Old French (including Anglo-Norman) orthography, morphology, phonology, syntax, and lexicology, paying particular attention to the evidence available from primary materials. Three questions must be answered, including one compulsory translation and commentary question on passages set from La Vie de S. Alexis, ed. C. Storey; La Chanson de Roland, ll. 1–660, ed. F. Whitehead; Piramus et Tisbé, ed. C. de Boer; La folie Tristan d'Oxford, ed. E. Hoepffner (2nd edn.), Aucassin et Nicolette, ed. M. Roques; La Seinte Resureccion (ANTS 4).

19. Medieval French Literature 1100–1300 (one paper)

Candidates will be expected to have made a special study of at least two of the following: La Chanson de Roland, Chrétien de Troyes, Yvain; La Mort le roi Artu; Le Roman de la Rose, ll. 1–4058. Candidates will also be expected to have read, but not to have studied in detail, either Le Roman de La Rose, ll. 4059–21780 or at least three of the following: Béroul, Tristan; Marie de France; Charroi de Nömes; Aucassin et Nicolette; Jean Renart, Le Lai de l'ombre; Wace, Roman de Brut, 9005–13298; Jean Bodel, Le Jeu de Saint Nicolas, and Villehardouin, La ConquÉte de Constantinople, Le Roman de Renart, ed. M. Roques, ll. 3733–4796. Three questions must be answered, including one requiring literary and linguistic commentary on passages from the set texts, of which candidates must answer one. Translation will not be required.

20. Medieval French Literature 1300–1500 (one paper)

Candidates will be expected to have made a special study of the following: Guillaume de Machaut, Le Jugement du roy de Behaigne; Christine de Pisan, Epistre au dieu d'amours; Franìois Villon, Le Testament. Candidates will also be expected to have read, but not to have studied in detail at least three of the following: Machaut, La Fonteine amoureuse, Machaut, Le Livre du Voir-Dit; Alain Chartier, La Belle Dame sans Mercy; Alain Chartier, La Quadrilogue invectif, Charles d'OrlÄans, Ballades et rondeaux; Les Quinze Joies de mariage. Three questions must be answered, including one requiring literary and linguistic commentary on passages from the set texts, of which candidates must answer one. Translation will not be required.

21. Medieval Welsh Language and Literature I (one paper)

Candidates will be expected to show a knowledge of the elements of Medieval Welsh phonology, morphology, syntax, and lexicology. Opportunities will be provided to discuss the literary qualities of texts. Three questions must be answered, including one compulsory translation and commentary question from passages from Pwyll Pendeuic Dyuet, ed. R.L. Thomson (1957, repr. 1972), Branwen Uerch Lyr, ed. D.S. Thompson (1961, repr. 1968), Poems of the Cywyddwyr, ed. E.I. Rowlands (1976) nos. 1, 2, 4, 7, 13, 19, 21–4, Gwaith Dafydd ap Gwilym, ed. T. Parry (1979), nos. 2, 23, 26, 27, 42, 48, 84, 87, 114, 117, 122, 124. This paper may not be taken by candidates offering B22 Medieval Welsh Language and Literature II.

22. Medieval Welsh Language and Literature II (one paper)

Candidates will be expected to show a knowledge of the elements of Old and Middle Welsh phonology, morphology, syntax, and lexicology. Opportunities will be provided to discuss the literary qualities of the prescribed texts. Three questions must be answered, including one compulsory translation and commentary question from passages from Pedeir Keinc y Mabinogi, ed. I. Williams (1930), Culhwch and Olwen, ed. R. Bromwich and D.S. Evans (1992), `The Juvencus Poems', ed. I. Williams, The Beginnings of Welsh Poetry (1980, 1990), Gwaith Llywelyn Fardd I ac Eraill of Feirdd y Ddeuddegfed Ganrif, ed. M.E. Owen et al (1994), nos. 6–15, 18–21, Poems of the Cywyddwyr, ed. E.I. Rowlands (1976), nos. 1, 2, 4, 7, 13, 19, 21–4, Gwaith Dfydd ap Gwilym, ed. T. Parry (1979), nos 2, 13, 23, 26, 27, 28, 42, 48, 84, 87, 114, 117, 122, 124. They will be expected to have read but not to have studied in detail Breudwyt Ronabwy, ed. M. Richards (1948), Peredur, ed. G. Goetinck (1976), Gwaith Iolo Goch, ed. D.R. Johnston (1988). This paper may not be taken by candidates offering B21 Medieval Welsh Language and Literature I.'

23. Old and Early Middle Irish Language and Literature (one paper)

Candidates will be expected to show a knowledge of the elements of Old Irish phonology, morphology, syntax, and lexicology. They will be given an opportunity to comment on the literary qualities of the prescribed texts. Three questions must be answered, including one compulsory translation and commentary question from passages from Stories from the Táin, ed. J. Strachan and O. Bergin (1944), Sécla Mucce Meic Dathó, ed. R. Thurneysen (1951), Longes mac nUislenn, ed. V. Hull (1949), Early Irish Lyrics, ed. G. Murphy (1956), nos. 1–3, 5.'

14 Ibid., p. 206, l. 11 delete `12' and substitute `24'.

15 Ibid., delete l. 13 and substitute:

`13. The Latin Literature of the British Isles before the Norman Conquest of England'.

16 Ibid., delete ll. 31–2 and substitute:

`26. Classical Literature (extended essay)'.

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2 Boards of the Faculties of English Language and Literature and Literae Humaniores

Honour School of Classics and English

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 138, l. 34, after ()h) insert `(ii) and (iii), (i)'.

2 Ibid., delete from l. 36 on p. 138 to l. 9 on p. 139 and substitute:

`(f) The Development of Standard Literary English to c.1750 (Course II, A.5)

(g) English Literature, 600–1100 (Course II, A1)

()h) Old English Philology (Course II, B1)

(i) Middle English Dialectology (Course II, B2)

(j) Modern English Philology (Course II, B3)

(k) Linguistic Theory (Course II, B4)

(l) The Archaeology of Anglo-Saxon England, seventh to ninth centuries ad (Course II, B10)

(m) Gothic (Course II, B11)

(n) Old Saxon (Course II, B12)

(o) Old High German (Course II, B13)

(p) Middle High German (Course II, B14)

(q) Old Norse (Course II, B15)

(r) Old Norse Texts (Course II, B16)

(s) Old French Language 1150–1250 (Course II, B18)

(t) Medieval French Literature 1100–1300 (Course II, B19) or Medieval French Literature 1300–1500 (Course II, B20)

(u) Medieval Welsh Language and Literature I (Course II, B21) or Medieval Welsh Language and Literature II (Course II, B22)

(v) The Latin Literature of the British Isles before the Norman conquest of England (Course II, B25)

(w) Medieval and Renaissance Romance (Course II, B7(a))

(x) Scottish Literature pre-1600 (Course II, B7(b))'.

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3 Boards of the Faculties of English Language and Literature and Medieval and Modern Languages

Honour School of English and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 192, delete ll. 18–19 and substitute:

`5. English Literature 1100–1530 (one paper) [Honour School of English Language and Literature, Course II, Subject A2]'.

2 Ibid., delete ll. 20–6 and substitute:

`6, 7. Two papers chosen from the Honour School of English Language and Literature Course II, Subjects A: 1, 3–5, B: 1–4, 7, provided that a candidate who has not taken paper 3(c) in part 2 of the Preliminary Examination must offer Subject A1. Subject B7 will be examined by extended essay.'

3 Ibid., delete ll. 31–8 and substitute:

`(b) One subject chosen from English Course II Subjects B6, 8–9, 15, 21 or 2, 23–5, provided that no candidate may offer (i) both B15 and Modern Languages Paper XII Special Subject `Old Norse', or (ii) both B21 or 22 and Modern Languages Paper XII Special Subject `Medieval Welsh Tales and Romances, the Poets of the Welsh Princes and the Poetry of Dafydd ap Gwilym'. Subject B6 will be examined by extended essay (as specified in the regulations for the Honour School of English Language and Literature).'

4 Ibid., delete ll. 45–6 and substitute:

`(ii) English Course II Subject B16, provided that this paper may only be offered by a candidate who also offers English Course II Subject B15.'

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4 Board of the Faculty of Literae Humaniores

Honour Moderations in Classics [Course 1B]

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 35, l. 33, delete `R.G. Ussher (Aris & Phillips 1990)' and substitute `H. Lloyd-Jones (Loeb)'.

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5 Board of the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages

Honour School of Modern Languages

(i) With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 382, delete ll. 32–6.

2 Ibid., p. 395, l. 13, delete `The top copy' and substitute `Two copies'.

3 Ibid., l. 14, delete `second' and substitute `third'.

4 Ibid., l. 16, delete `top copy' and substitute `two copies'.

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(ii) With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 377, l. 47, and p. 378, l. 13, in each case after `XII' insert: `, Special Subject (Paper XII) Modern Catalan (for candidates offering Spanish), Special Subject (Paper XII) Modern Galician (for candidates offering Spanish)'.

2 Ibid., p. 379, l. 17, after `offered' insert `, except that candidates offering Spanish may offer two Special Subjects

(Paper XII) provided one is either Modern Catalan or Modern Galician'.

3 Ibid., p. 389, l. 10, delete `Medny vsadnik' and substitute `Povesti Belkina'.

4 Ibid., p. 391, after l. 42, insert:

`(4) Federico García Lorca, with a special study of Amor de Don Perlimplin con Belisa en su jardín, Así que pasen cinco anos, Bodas de sangre, Canciones, Divan del Tamarit, Llanto por Ignacio Sánchez Mejías, Mariana Pineda, Poeta en Nueva York (ed. Millán), El público, La zapatera prodigiosa.'

5 Ibid., ll. 43 and 50, delete `4' and `5' respectively and substitute `5' and `6'.

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6 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and English Language and Literature

Honour School of English and Modern Languages

(i) With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 5(a) above).

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(ii) With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 5(b) above).

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7 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and Literae Humaniores

(a) Honour School of Classics and Modern Languages

(b) Honour School of Philosophy and Modern Languages

(i) With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 5(a) above).

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(ii) With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 5(b) above).

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8 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and Modern History

Honour School of Modern History and Modern Languages

(i) With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 5(a) above).

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(ii) With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 5(b) above).

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9 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and Oriental Studies

Honour School of European and Middle Eastern Languages

(i) With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 5(a) above).

(ii) With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 5(b) above).

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10 Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies

Honour School of Oriental Studies

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, delete from l. 25 on p. 455 to l. 8 on p. 456 and substitute:

`Biblical texts (lists of texts are available from the Oriental Institute)

3. Prepared texts II: Biblical and Mishnaic texts (lists of texts are available from the Oriental Institute) Papers 2 and 3 may contain general and grammatical questions.

(b) Medieval Hebrew

1. Unprepared translation

2. Prepared texts I (lists of texts are available from the Oriental Institute)

3. Prepared texts II (lists of texts are available from the Oriental Institute) Papers 2 and 3 may contain general and grammatical questions.

(c) Modern Hebrew

1. Prose composition and unprepared translation

2. Prepared texts I (lists of texts are available from the Oriental Institute)

3. Prepared texts II (lists of texts are available from the Oriental Institute) Papers 2 and 3 may contain general and grammatical questions.'

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11 Board of the Faculty of Psychological Studies

Honour School of Psychology, Philosophy, and Physiology

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 498, l. 29, before `Candidates' insert:

`Candidates may take at most five subjects in Psychology.'

2 Ibid., delete `more' and substitute `five'.

3 Ibid., p. 217, delete ll. 27–32 and substitute:

`D5. Any one of the papers set in the written part of the examination for Physiological Sciences in the Honour School of Natural Science, except paper (13) Physiological Sciences. (Candidates may not take the dissertation in Physiology.) Or any one subject from subjects 101, 102, 104, or 105 as prescribed in the Regulations for Honour Schools including Philosophy. D6. As for D5.'

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12 Joint Committee for Human Sciences

(a) Preliminary Examination in Human Sciences

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, delete from l. 32 on p. 82 to l. 6 on p. 83 and substitute:

`Subject 3. Society, Culture, and Environment

Social and Cultural Anthropology: the comparative study of the world's civilisations and peoples, including cross-cultural, power-based, and gender perspectives upon social practice and theories of human life. Specific topics will include production and consumption; transactions and modes of exchange; elementary aspects of kinship and marriage; belief systems and social control; politi- cal and social organisation; classification; technology and social change; the impact of colonialism; space, place and culture; enviroment and cultural landscapes in transition; land and property rights. Candidates will be expected to be familiar with appropriate ethnographic monographs. Human Geography: Physical and human factors affecting the growth and distribution of world population; international migration and its consequences for ethnic diversity; historical and contemporary patterns of urbanisation; urban spatial segregation on social, cultural, and ethnic criteria; the behavioural consequences of urban social segregation.

One three-hour paper will be set. The paper will be divided into two sections: (a) Social and Cultural Anthropology, which will account for two-thirds of the paper, and (b) Human Geography, which will account for one-third of the paper. Candidates will be required to display knowledge of both sections.

Subject 4. Sociology and Demography

Sociology: Current and classic discussions of explanatory strategies and social mechanisms, models of individual action and the consequences of aggregation. Empirical research involving these approaches in areas of substantive sociological interest such as social class, ethnicity, religion, the family, politics.

Demography: Elementary aspects of population analysis. Comparative study of fertility, mortality, and family systems in selected human societies. The long-term development of human population and its relation to habitat and resources. The demographic transition.

One three hour paper will be set. The paper will be divided into two sections: (a) Sociology and (b) Demography. Candidates will be required to display knowledge of both sections.'

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(b) Honour School in Human Sciences

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 230, after l. 33 insert:

`There will be a practical examination for paper 4, Demo-graphy and Population, in which candidates will be required to demonstrate their ability to interpret demographic measures and to apply quantitative skills to demographic problems. The practical examination will count for 25 per cent of the marks available for paper 4, and will be combined with the marks obtained in the Final Honour School examinations for this paper. The Chairman of Examiners will be responsible for notifying the candidates of the arrangements for the examination which will take place in the Michaelmas Term preceding Final Honour School examinations.'

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DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF MEDICINE

The Board of the Faculty of Clinical Medicine has granted leave to P. DAVEY, Magdalen, to supplicate for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine. The evidence submitted by the candidate was entitled: `A clinical and experimental study of myocardial repolarisation in left ventricular hypertrophy and heart failure'.

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EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give notice of oral examination of their candidates as follows:

Biological Sciences

A. MIRA, St Hugh's: `Nutritional and evolutionary studies of the host–endosymbiont relationship in the Blattodea'.
Department of Zoology, Monday, 10 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: A. Kacelnik, A. Douglas.

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Clinical Medicine

B.L. BOOTH, Trinity: `The mechanisms of MHC class I antigen processing'.
Institute for Molecular Medicine, Thursday, 13 May, 9 a.m.
Examiners: T.J. Elliott, J. Trowsdale.

J. HUGHES, Wadham: `Comparative analysis of the PKD1 gene and protein, polycystin-1'.
Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Friday, 11 June, 2 p.m.
Examiners: E.Y. Jones, A.-M. Frischauf.

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Law

J. AUBURN, Magdalen: `Legal professional privilege: derogations and absolutism'.
Mansfield, Friday, 14 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: R.M. Bagshaw, P. Roberts.

J. BLACK-BRANCH, Wolfson: `The constitutional entrenchment and judicial enforcement of minority language rights'.
Examination Schools, Wednesday, 19 May, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: G.S. Goodwin-Gill, S.M.A. Lloyd-Bostock.

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Mathematical Sciences

P. RUDIN, St Hugh's: `A framework for diagrammatic reasoning'.
Wolfson Building, Thursday, 13 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: A. Stevens, A. Pitts.

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Medieval and Modern Languages

E. BOVEE, Keble: `Petrus Borel: background, reception, and interpretation'.
Somerville, Monday, 17 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: A.J. Tooke, C. Crossley.

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Physical Sciences

G. BLAKE, St Catherine's: `The electronic properties of mixed metal iridates'.
Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, Friday, 14 May, 11 a.m.
Examiners: M.J. Rosseinsky, J.P. Attfield.

T. BROWN, Somerville: `Analytical studies of some amino acid secondary metabolism'.
Dyson Perrins Laboratory, Tuesday, 18 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: J.H. Jones, A.J. Kirby.

M.A. MARSHALL, Magdalen: `Pipe-jacked tunnelling: jacking loads and ground movements'.
Department of Engineering Sciences, Monday, 10 May, 10.30 a.m.
Examiners: G.T. Houlsby, R.N. Taylor.

C.E. ROSS, St Cross: `Palynofacies, palaeoenvironmental change, and sequence stratigraphy of the Middle Jurassic, Cleveland Basin, and Brent Group of the UK'.
Department of Earth Sciences, Tuesday, 15 June, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: H.C. Jenkyns, J.H.A. van Konijnenburg.

D.K. WILKINS, Linacre: `Studies of protein denaturation and aggregation'.
New Chemistry Laboratory, Thursday, 13 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: C.V. Robinson, P.A. Evans.

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Social Studies

C.M. JENKINS, New College: `Post-independence economic policies and outcomes in Zimbabwe'.
Queen Elizabeth House, Tuesday, 15 June, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: C. Adam, A. Killick.

C.C. LHO, St Antony's: `The transformation of South Korea's foreign policy 1988–93: Nordpolitik, Moscow, and the road to Pyongyang'.
St Antony's, Friday, 28 May, 10.15 a.m.
Examiners: R.J. Foot, S. Kirby.

J.-W. MÜLLER, All Souls: `German intellectuals, unification, and national identity'.
Examination Schools, Tuesday, 25 May, 10 a.m.
Examiners: M.S. Freeden, R.D. Griffin.

T.G. PALMER, Hertford: `A cosmopolitan theory of justice'.
Balliol, Thursday, 22 July, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: A.R.G. Swift, H. Steiner.

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Theology

R. FOX, St Benet's Hall: `The concept of time in thirteenth-century Western theology'.
Examination Schools, Friday, 21 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: R.A. Cross, J. Marenbon.

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EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF STUDIES IN LEGAL RESEARCH

The examiners appointed by the following faculty board give notice of oral examination of their candidate as follows:

Law

L. BUSCH, Balliol: `Misfeasance in public office'.
St John's, Monday, 10 May, 11.30 a.m.
Examiners: P.P. Craig, M.R. Freedland.

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