Examinations and Boards

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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BY-ELECTIONS FOR MEMBERS OF BOARDS OF FACULTIES (12 NOVEMBER): RESULTS

UNCONTESTED ELECTIONS

Clinical Medicine

One ordinary member: M.J. GOLDACRE, BM, B.CH., MA, Fellow of Magdalen

Music

One ordinary member: B. BUJIC, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Magdalen

Physiological Sciences

One ordinary member: C.A.R. BOYD, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Brasenose

Social Studies

One official member: J.J. RICHARDSON, Nuffield Professor of Comparative European Politics

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PHYSICAL SCIENCES BOARD: ELECTION OF OFFICIAL MEMBER

The following nomination has been duly received:

R.A. COWLEY, Dr Lee's Professor of Experimental Philosophy

Nominated by:

K. Burnett, St John's
J. Wark, Trinity

Note: this election is for an official member, not for an ordinary member, as stated in earlier notices.

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BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF THEOLOGY

M.Phil. in Judaism and Christianity in the Graeco-Roman World

The Board of the Faculty of Theology has approved the following texts for paper B(2), `The Gospels and the historical Jesus', for examination in 2000:

1. Mark.

2. Luke 9:51–end.

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CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the General Board, the following changes in regulations made by the Board of the Faculty of Modern History and the Committee for Educational Studies will come into effect on 18 December.

1 Board of the Faculty of Modern History

(a) M.Phil. in Economic and Social History

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 566, delete l. 5 and substitute:

`2.1 Path dependence in the economic history of technology'.

2 Ibid., delete l. 26 and substitute:

`5.4 Management, control, and eradication of tropical disease since c.1850'.

3 Ibid., after l. 27 insert:

`5.6 The birth of the clinic, 1750–1850

5.7 International health and welfare organisations in the twentieth century'.

4 Ibid., p. 568, delete from l. 39 to p. 569, l.2 and substitute:

`2.1. Path dependence in the economic history of technology

Starting from a review of the basic economics of technology and technological change, these lectures aim to provide an introduction to the fundamentals of path dependence in resource allocation, with special reference to innovation and diffusion activities and their interaction. Among the main topics to be treted are the properties of stochastic dynamical systems with positive feedbacks; micro-economic sources of self-reinforcing behaviour; formal representation of non-ergodic behaviour in variety of models (Poyla urn processes and reversible spin systems); the relationship between path dependence and market failure, and the concept of `lock-in'. Specific cases from US and British technological history in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries (including manufacture by interchangeable parts, QWERTY, electrical supply system standards, nuclear power, chemical-intensive agriculture) will be examined. The relationship of this analytical framework to recent `evolutionary' approaches in the literature of the history of technology (e.g. the work of Basalla, Mokyr, and others) will be discussed.'

5 Ibid., p. 573, delete `5.4' and substitute `5.7'.

6 Ibid., move ll. 4–17 (as amended) to after l. 29 and substitute:

`5.4. Management, control, and eradication of tropical diseases since c.1850

Using case studies from within the tropical world, this course examines the relationship between shifts in the understanding of disease aetiology and attempts made to manage, control, or eradicate disease. The impact of Western medical knowledge will be explored within the context of colonial settings. Through archival sources, oral histories, and films held at the Wellcome Unit, there will be an opportunity to examine the work of colonial medical services as well as medical missionaries in Africa in order to discuss the ways in which their methods of disease control interacted with indigenous practices. In the second part of the course, the work and role of national and international organisations, such as the Rockefeller Foundation, the League of Nations, and the World Health Organisation, in disease-specific campaigns against tropical diseases will be examined. A comparison of the WHO global campaigns against smallpox and malaria from the 1950s to 1970s will illustrate the successes and failures of international attempts to eradicate disease.'

7 Ibid., after l. 29, before the text inserted by cl. 6 above, insert:

`5.6. The birth of the clinic, 1750–1850

The course explores one of the defining moments in the history of modern medicine, immortalised by Foucault. In particular it looks at the following themes: (1) the original role of the hospital as a shelter for the indigent; (2) the development of the hospital as a site for the study of disease around 1800; (3) the similarities and differences between hospital and private medical practice; and (4) the growing tension after 1820 between the hospital and the laboratory as centres of medical science. For the most part, the course concentrates on the history of the clinic in France, but reference is continually made to contemporary developments in Great Britain, the Austrian Empire, and the Italian peninsula.

The most important comparative question addressed concerns the chronology of the development of clinical medicine: was Paris really first? Students, however, also have the chance to examine other comparative themes such as the different attitudes towards the hospital patient in Britain and France and reflect on the emergence in this period of specific national medical cultures.'

(b) M.Sc. in Economic and Social History

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

As for the M.Phil. in Economic and Social History (see (a) above).

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2 Committee for Educational Studies

Regulations of Faculty Boards concerning the Status of Probationer Research Student and the Degrees of M.Litt., M.Sc. by Research, and D.Phil.

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 862, delete ll. 9–15 and substitute:

`Research Students, those wishing to transfer to M.Sc. status must submit a paper on their research to a specially constituted panel of two assessors appointed by the committee. The panel will interview candidates and make a recommendation to the committee in an agreed written report. For the interview candidates must submit:

(a) an outline description of the research (one side of A4 paper);

(b) a detailed research proposal of no more than 6,000 words.

This should:

(i) draw upon relevant literature in order to discuss the background to the research, theoretical perspectives, and possible outcomes to the research;

(ii) state key research questions;

(iii) discuss the overall methodological approach, and specific strategies, to be employed in answering these research questions, paying particular attention to practical and ethical issues relevant to the research;

(c) a tentative timetable for the research;

(d) a list of references'.

2 Ibid., delete ll. 19–30 and substitute:

`panel of two assessors appointed by the committee. The panel will interview candidates and make a recommendation to the committee in an agreed written report. For the interview candidates must submit:

(a) an outline description of the research (one side of A4 paper);

(b) a detailed research proposal of no more than 6,000 words.

This should:

(i) draw upon relevant literature in order to discuss the background to the research, theoretical perspectives, and possible outcomes to the research;

(ii) state key research questions;

(iii) discuss the overall methodological approach, and specific strategies, to be employed in answering these research questions, paying particular attention to practical and ethical issues relevant to the research;

(c) a tentative timetable for the research;

(d) a list of references'.

3 Ibid., delete ll. 40–50 and substitute:

`to a specially constituted panel of two assessors appointed by the committee. The panel will interview candidates and make a recommendation to the committee in an agreed written report. For the interview candidates must submit:

(e) an outline description of the research (one side of A4 paper);

(f) a detailed research proposal of no more than 6,000 words. This should:

(i) draw upon relevant literature in order to discuss the background to the research, theoretical perspectives, and possible outcomes to the research;

(ii) state key research questions;

(iii) discuss the overall methodological approach, and specific strategies, to be employed in answering these research questions, paying particular attention to practical and ethical issues relevant to the research;

(g) a tentative timetable for the research;

() a list of references'.

4 Ibid., p. 383, delete l. 1 and after l. 5 insert `5. Theses'.

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DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF MEDICINE

The Board of the Faculty of Clinical Medicine has granted leave to J.B.P. BARBER, Lincoln, to supplicate for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.

The evidence submitted by the candidate was entitled: `Evaluation of rapid assays for the detection of radio- sensitive breast-cancer patients'.

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EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give notice of oral examination of their candidates as follows:

Biological Sciences

KAM-HO NICKY WONG, Keble: `Characterisation of complement activation via mannose binding lectin (MBL) and MBL-associated serine proteases (MASP)'.
Department of Biochemistry, Thursday, 17 December, 10 a.m.
Examiners: D. Staunton, S. Thiel.

XUEMEI YUAN, St Cross: `NMR studies of a TB module from human fibrillin-1'.
New Chemistry Laboratory, Monday, 7 December, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: C.M. Dobson, J. Feeney.

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Clinical Medicine

G. SACKS, Magdalen: `The inflammatory nature of human pregnancy and its role in the pathogenesis of pre- eclampsia'.
St John's, Wednesday, 9 December, 2 p.m.
Examiners: K.C. Gatter, G. Vince.

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English Language and Literature

M. MCFALL, Corpus Christi: `John Collier (1901–80): life and works'.
Merton, Tuesday, 5 January, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: J. Briggs, J. Carey.

P.A. PALMER, Keble: `The grafted tongue: linguistic colonisation and the native response in sixteenth-century Ireland'.
Magdalen, Monday, 14 December, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: D.G.E. Norbrook, C. Carroll.

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Law

J.A. DIECKMANN, Brasenose: `Subrogation and cessio legis: a comparative study'.
St Hugh's, Monday, 7 December, 2 p.m.
Examiners: L. Smith, S. Enchelmaier.

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Mathematical Sciences

J.K. HAUGLAND, Brasenose: `Application of sieve methods to prime numbers'.
Mathematical Institute, Wednesday, 9 December, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: B.J. Birch, G. Harman.

W. DE SILVA, Merton: `Products in the symplectic floer homology of lagrangian intersections'.
Mathematical Institute, Friday, 15 January, 2 p.m.
Examiners: S.M. Salamon, D.A. Salamon.

C. LEWIS, St Hugh's: `Spin (7) instantons'.
Mathematical Institute, Saturday, 19 December, 11 a.m.
Examiners: V. Pidstrigatch, S.M. Salamon.

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Modern History

M.J. CARDWELL, Linacre: `Arts and arms: political literature, military defeat, and the fall of the Newcastle ministry, 1754–6'.
Examination Schools, Thursday, 17 December, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: C.H. Gerrard, H.T. Dickinson.

R. COLISTETE, St Antony's: `Labour relations and industrial performance in Brazil: Greater Sïo Paulo, 1945–60'.
Latin American Centre, Monday, 14 December, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: E. Amann, C. Lewis.

M. LAZARIDES, Brasenose: `The writings of Walter Sickert and the new art criticism'.
Examination Schools, Friday, 8 January, 10 a.m.
Examiners: S.F.G. Farthing, K. McConkey.

S. MORRIS, Nuffield: `Private profit and public interest: model dwelling companies and the housing of the working classes in London, 1840–1914'.
All Souls, Monday, 11 January, 2 p.m.
Examiners: C.H. Feinstein, M.J. Daunton.

R. RAZA, Somerville: `British women writers on India between the mid-eighteenth century and 1857'.
Department for Continuing Education, Friday, 11 December, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: A.B. Hawkins, P.J. Marshall.

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Physical Sciences

T.V. BACK, New College: `Laser spectroscopy of highly charged ions using an electron beam ion trap'.
Clarendon Laboratory, Friday, 11 December, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: P.E.G. Baird, J.P. Connerade.

G. PRINGPUANGKEO, St Hugh's: `Novel membrane techniques for process intensification in biotransformation'.
Department of Engineering Science, Tuesday, 22 December, 11.30 a.m.
Examiners: A.W. Bunch, Z.F. Cui.

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Physiological Sciences

M.J. POULIN, New College: `Aspects of cerebral blood flow in humans'.
Merton, Monday, 11 January, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: D.J. Paterson, J.H. Coote.

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Social Studies

C.C. LORGEN, Nuffield: `Non-governmental organisations in transition in Uganda: a study of the health sector'.
St Peter's, Tuesday, 15 December, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: G.P. Williams, J. Beall.

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